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R^ARTEN
Composed b y~
HERBERT E. HYDE
with a Preface b
J. Janet Hoffman

CHICAGO
CLAYTON f SUMMY CO 64 E. VAN BUREN STIC.
WEEKES C CO. LONDON

VANBUREN STR_^ WEEKES £> LONDON CO.HYDE Cfy/ith a Preface oy^> J. SUMMY CO. Janet Hoffman^ ^X'© ^/-© y® Price $iop CHICAGO CLAYTON F. CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL COPYRiC-HT . 64 E. COPYRIGHT 1916 BY CLAYTON F SUMMY CO. FOK THE KINDERGARTEN Composed bjXO HERBERT E.

org/details/rhythmsforkinderOOhyde . Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2017 with funding from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Alternates https://archive.

In the act of re-telling.” & f J. 1736 . are simple. skip. Feeling and thought find channels of expression through the free use of these rhythms. and pantomine.actions to rhythmic stimulus thereby enhanced. exult. Roll on. shout. will truly stimulate and enrich our daily activities with children. ! ! Preface In the presentation of this book. their very simplicity offering wide range of interpretation. In the act of creative expression do we make our contributions to history through the highest embodi- ment of feelings. thoughts and actions. Co. Because of this intelligent use of rhythmic activity we recognize it as an unusual collection. needs and moods. S. clap hands. rhythms which impel listeners to creative expression and interpretative action. Rhythmic expression be- longs to every individual. love or anger eventually took form in rhythmic expression. Associate Director of the Chicago Kindergarten Institute C. Fundamental movements of limbs and body are utilized and developed. In “ Oh to have henceforth a poem of new life joys • $ To dance. and truly do we find strong rhythmic motor re-actions in childhood. By means of them the individual of to-day spontaneously expresses his interests. Experiences of importance to him as joy or sorrow. float on Oh. leap. man communicated with his fellows by ges- tures. In it we find rhythms which are fundamental. imitative actions. To have so sincere and able a contribution for use. to make the most jubilant song full of music. living real experiences from the point of departure for these musical compositions. It was his avenue of conveying his interests. rhythms which. historic records were begun. Before the evolution of language. and motor re. needs or moods to others.F. Janet Hoffman. the public has a gift of real worth. as most surely we have found it in the childhood of civilization. because they are fundamental.

Author Introduction Music may be applied to the needs of Kindergarten either in a subjective or in an objective way. To that end an effort has been made to make each composition convey a definite stimulus to the child’s imagination. Hyde . for it may be used in connection with the Dalcroze system of Eurhythmies and also for the earlier stages of piano instruction. The titles which are placed above the compositions are intended only to sug- gest to the teacher the chief use of each little piece. S. Janet Hoffman. need not be con- fined to the Kindergarten alone. in the hope that he will respond to its influence with an equally definite expression. For exam- ple. where the child expresses himself and the music reflects his mood. Its service. and also for her generosity in permitting him the freedom of her Kin- dergarten at the Butler Memorial House during the working out of these compo- sitions. will find that some of them have uses other than those which the title suggests. His gratitude is also extended to Miss J. Associate Director of the Chicago Kindergarten Institute. and after careful observation these little pieces were written with the intention of their being used in an objec- tive way. The author acknowledges his indebtedness to his sister for the inspiration of this work. F. This may appear to contra- dict the statement that it is the author s intention that each composition convey a de- finite idea. and also for her help in explaining to him the various needs of the Kindergarten. 1736 . whereby the music produces the mood which is to be reflected by the child. The former method. however. the“See-Saw” or the “ Waltz” may also serve as a “Swing.” Again the “ Waltz” may be used for “Birds” while “Walking Horses” might serve as a “March” and “Galloping Horses” could meet the requirements of a “Skip. Herbert E. for her kindly assistance.” So it is hoped that this book will be of use to Kindergarten teachers for whose needs it was primarily designed. Co. necessitates a skilled performer. o C. interest and advice. capable of effective impro- visation and one who is at the same time sensitive to every change in the child’s actions.* but the kindergartner who examines these pieces carefully. The handicaps of this (procedure are obvious.

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