You are on page 1of 21

1

Dissemination of Nursing Knowledge:
 
  Tips and Resources 
 
 
 
 
 
Dissemination 
 
To spread wisdom and beliefs  
  (Roy, 1999) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kirsten Hanrahan, MA, ARNP


Kathy L. Marlow, MSN, ARNP, NP-C
Carla Aldrich, MSN, CRNA
Audrey M. Hiatt, MSN, ARNP-BC

DNP: Advanced Role Development II


Spring 2010
 
1

 
 
 
 
 
 
Table of Contents 
 
Instructions                    ..2 
 
Barriers to Dissemination                  3 
 
Common Pitfalls                    3 
 
Strategies for Getting Started                  3 
 
How to Disseminate 
Posters                     4 
Presentations                    6 
Publications                    8 
 
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Dissemination  
Case Studies                   12 
Glossary of Dissemination Legal and Ethical Terms        13 
 
Resources 
Templates                  15 
Web Resources                 16 
References                  17 
 
2

Instructions 
 
To complete this seminar, participants will:  
1) View the power point presentation 
 
2) Skim or read the resource material in this book resource material intended for students to incorporate
dissemination into their course work.  
 
3) Read the articles posted 
 Kerner, J. F. (2008). Integrating research, practice, and policy: What we see depends on where 
we stand. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 14(2), 193‐198. doi: 
10.1097/01.PHH.0000311899.11197.db 00124784‐200803000‐00018 [pii] 
 Montgomery, K. S., Eddy, N. L., Jackson, E., Nelson, E., Reed, K., Stark, T. L., & Thompson, C. 
(2001). Global Research Dissemination and Utilization: Recommendations for Nurses and Nurse 
Educators. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, 22(3), 124‐129.  
 Roy C. (1999). State of the art: Dissemination and utilization of nursing literature in practice. 
Biological Research for Nursing, 1(2), 147‐155. 
 Siedlecki, S. L., Montague, M., & Schultz, J. (2008). Writing for publication: Avoiding common 
ethical pitfalls. Journal of Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing, 35(2), 147‐150. 
 
4) Explore the AHRQ dissemination planning website: http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/advances/planningtool.htm  
 
5) Participate in case studies and discussion questions posted on ICON 
• What incentives can be put in place to overcome turf issues, competition for recognition, and 
administrative and organizational barriers to research, practice, and policy partnerships?  
• Describe your plan for disseminating your capstone project (be as specific as possible, where, 
when, to who?). Use the AHRQ dissemination planning website to assist you.  
• Using the leadership and teamwork competencies (knowledge, skills, attitudes) you identified 
on the QSEN assessment, how will you participate on interprofessional or intraprofessional 
teams to disseminate your capstone project? 
• Discuss potential ethical and legal issues that may surface in the dissemination of your project. 
What strategies will you use to avoid the ethical and legal pitfalls? 
 
Purpose/rationale:  
Dissemination of nursing knowledge is essential for advanced practice nurses. Being able to contribute, 
effectively use, and communicate knowledge to nurses, interdisciplinary colleagues, policy makers and 
the public via publications, journal clubs, presentations, panel memberships, posters, and media 
interviews is crucial for the nursing profession. 
 
Learning Objectives:  
Upon completing this seminar module, participants will be able to:  
1. Discuss policy, economic, population, fiscal and organizational components of dissemination from a 
broad systems perspective.  
 
2. Discuss how to use leadership and teamwork competencies (knowledge, skills, attitudes) on 
interprofessional or intraprofessional teams in disseminating the capstone project. 
 
3. Demonstrate understanding of authorship, conflicts of interest, plagiarism, and other legal and ethical 
issues in dissemination.  
 
3

 
Barriers to Dissemination 
 Oral traditions of knowledge and skill transfer 
 History of “voiceless” and oppressed: poor self esteem, powerlessness, lack of solidarity, poor 
communication skills 
 Interpersonal characteristics‐ dislike writing, inexperience, lack confidence, anxiety, and behaviors 
such as perfectionism and procrastination, lack of motivation and perseverance, inefficient work habits, 
poor writing skills, and difficulties taking constructive criticism.  
 Writers block‐ what to write about, can’t get started, don’t know what to say, role complexity, 
conflicting expectations, grandiose expectations, and other priorities.  
 Lack of time‐ blocks of time and uninterrupted time are needed to facilitate though processes 
 
 
Common Pitfalls  
 Uncertainty of contribution to nursing, the “so what?” 
 Lack of detail 
 Failing to convince 
 Inexperience 
 Lack of workplace value  
 Lack of a clear topic 
 Lack of a clear audience 
 Unsure where to publish 
 Fatal flaws: lack of significance, inappropriate design 
 
 
Strategies for Getting Started 
 Start with a small manageable publication: book review, opinion letters, clinical procedures, and case 
studies are considered entry way opportunities for publishing. 
 Start with a poster presentation: build toward presentations and manuscripts. 
 Write about something you are passionate about. 
 Write with a group. 
 Write with an experienced writer or mentor. 
 Student‐Faculty collaborations 
 Start with a title, work from there.  
 Start with your methods, work from there. 
 Schedule time for writing. 
 Review the literature, set up a table to sort, organize and synthesize.  
 
4

 
How to Disseminate 
 
Poster Presentations 
 
Poster options 
 Individually printed power point slides (see directions for power presentations). Cost: $ 
 One piece power point (ppt) slide (see directions below). Cost: $$ 
 Outsource poster to graphics designer ‐ some institutions have a graphics design team or you may 
choose to hire a free‐lance graphics designer. Cost: $$$ 
 Laminate: Advantage‐protection, Disadvantage‐glare. Cost: $ 
 Also consider: how will you transport the poster? Will it fit in an overhead storage bin? Protective 
tubes are available. Cost: $$ 
 
Content suitable for poster presentations 
Smaller projects, clinical work, evidence based guidelines, research subprojects, preliminary findings, 
exploratory studies, program evaluation, or phenomenological studies.  
 
Submit an abstract 
 Find the right venue to present your work. Generally this will be at a nursing or specialty organization 
conference. 
 Read the call for poster abstracts. Note deadlines, establish timeline. 
 Write abstract according to the call for posters.  
 If specified: 
 Use the right format. 
 Title should not be longer than 10 words and accurately reflect the poster content. 
 Use the headings suggested and include something under each heading. 
 If you don’t have complete results, describe what you plan to present. 
 Include implications for nursing practice and research as appropriate, tie back to 
purpose or objectives, make it real. 
 Check word count.  
 Check spelling and grammar. 
 Have at least two people review it: one content expert and one good editor.  
 Make changes, continue to edit and review as needed. 
 Check word count again, edit as needed. 
 Follow directions for blinding. 
 Follow directions for submitting. 
 
Designing your poster presentation 
 Read the specifications for the poster session.  
 A common format is the 3 panel poster where:  
Panel 1: Background, problem, purpose 
Panel 2: Methods or what you did 
Panel 3: Findings and implications. 
 Keep the focus on 2‐3 key findings. 
5

 Will poster boards be provided? What are the dimensions for the poster supposed to be? If not 
specified, a 3 x 4 or 3 x 5 foot poster will fit most standard poster boards.  
 Plan poster layout incorporating elements from the abstract. Content should flow easily from panel to 
panel, like a story. 
 Avoid using large amounts of text, be brief and to the point. Present key elements in an easy‐to‐read 
format. Use bullets in some but not all sections.   
 Translate complex findings to graphs and figures.  
 Select design. Use contrasting colors, no more than three contrasting colors. Use color graphs.  
 
Instructions for creating poster in power point using a PC 
 Open a new power point presentation, select a template or design style. One slide will be your poster. 
Generally you will want to use the second slide and not the title slide.  
 Set proportions* for poster: 
File‐page set up‐ width: set at 6 inches for every foot of poster 
  length: set at 6 inches for every foot of poster 
For example: for 3 foot high by 4 foot long poster set width: 18 inches and length: 24 inches. 
 Use Zoom function on tool bar‐ increase to 50‐75% to format and decrease to 25‐30% to get full 
poster view. 
 Set up title bar: 32 to 50 font*. Choose an easy to read font. Avoid anything too “FANCY, chunky 
or scripted” to read. Use “Upper and Lower Case Lettering and NOT ALL CAPS”.  
 Add byline in smaller font, (size may vary with number of authors) include credentials, affiliations if 
needed. 
 Add text boxes for content‐ To keep margins and text boxes aligned it works best to use one text box 
for each column, rather than for each section of text.  
Caution: Depending on the size of your text box and poster space, ppt will auto format changing your 
font size‐ either disable the auto format or check font size closely.  
 Follow specifications for subtitles or add your own to organize‐ 24 to 28 font*, slightly larger than text, 
may also use bold or underlining to set apart. 
 Insert text‐ keep font size > 18*. 
 Insert objects‐ by importing or creating in ppt. 
Caution: When resizing, to avoid distortion, use crossed double arrows to resize objects and keep them 
proportional. If problems with distorted objects, it may work best to re‐create them in ppt.  
 Add small institutional logos, sponsorship (such as grants or other paid endorsements) and 
acknowledgments as appropriate.  
 References are generally not necessary unless specified, but do keep a list.  
 Check for consistency throughout‐ fonts, margins, spacing, bolding etc. 
Tip: If you have spacing errors, there is probably a blank space in a larger font creating it. Change font 
size to include blank and open spaces.  
 Proof read. Check spelling, edit.  
 SAVE it! Back it up. 
 Make a print copy: File‐page set up‐change back to letter size. Make a copy of this to print on regular 
size paper. (may need to use legal paper for 3 x 5 posters)  
Caution: Proportions may be off from poster. ALWAYS ask for a proof before enlargement and final 
print.   
 From original file, enlarge x 200 to PRINT. Most copy centers will do printing and laminating, if you 
don’t want to use a graphics department.  
* Caution font size will vary with proportions you set.  
6

 
Presenting your poster: 
 Presenting a poster is a great opportunity for networking, sharing knowledge and discussing 
collaborations.  
 Have handout copies of poster. 
 Have a list of references. 
 Don’t forget pins! Laminated posters get particularly heavy so have plenty. Some venues may use 
Velcro but that should be specified.  
 A lint brush may be needed for the poster board. 
 Have business cards with your e‐mail to hand out. 
 Be professional and approachable. 
 Walk them through it, tell the story, stimulate conversation. 
 Find their interest in your poster, and streamline them to that information and discussion. 
 Stand by your poster the entire time. 
 
 
Presentations 
 
Presentation options:  There is a wide range of presentation venues everything from media events, to 
policy hearings, special interest groups, professional or lay conferences. The size, scope and knowledge 
of the audience will vary. Although multimedia presentations are becoming common, power point 
presentations are the standard media for professional presentations.  
 
Content suitable for presentations: The content of presentations depends on the audience. Either 
select the content and message to fit the audience, or select an audience to fit what you want to 
present.  
 
Submit an abstract: 
 Find the right venue to present your work.  
 Read the call for abstracts. Note deadlines. 
 Write abstract according to the call for presentations.  
 If specified: 
 Use the right format. 
 Use the headings suggested and include something under each heading. 
 If you don’t have complete results, describe what you plan to present. 
 Include implications for nursing practice and research as appropriate. 
 Check word count, if there are limits. 
 Check spelling and grammar. 
 Have at least two people review it: one content expert and one good editor.  
 Make changes, continue to edit and review as needed. 
 Check word count again, edit as needed. 
 Follow directions for blinding. 
 Follow directions for submitting. 
7

Preparing your presentation: 
(Instructions for creating presentations in power point using a PC)  
 Read the specifications for the presentation session. Know your time limit.  
 Tip: A general rule of thumb is to plan for 1 slide per minute. Allow time for questions. 
 What equipment will be provided? Most venues will have… but you need to verify this with someone 
if information is not provided. Notify them of any special needs such as an internet connection.  
 Open a new power point presentation, select a template or design style. Use one design style 
throughout.  
 Create a title slide with byline, institutional logos and sponsorship (such as grants or other paid 
endorsements) as appropriate. 
 Identify objectives or outline for presentation. 
 Develop content. 
Tips:  
 There is a tendency for inexperienced presenters to try to overdo content in their 
presentations. Identify the key pieces of information, don’t bombard the audience with 
everything. 
 Vary slide setup and graphics to add interest, but not to the point where it becomes 
distracting from the presentation.  
 Use titles to inform participant of how the slide content pertains. 
 Use graphs when possible. Graphs are easier to read than tables.  
 When adding tables, figure, or images use crossed double arrows to resize objects and 
keep them proportional and avoid distortion. If problems with distorted objects, it may work 
best to re‐create them in ppt.  
 Author names and a date should be included for direct citations or specific research 
studies. Cite directly on the slide; a smaller font may be used. Complete references for cited 
materials should be listed at the end and available to participants.  
 Keep slide font > 24 font, titles slightly larger, references may be 16 font. 
 Check for consistency in content and general format. 
 Consider using slide notes to develop oral presentation. 
 Conclude with implications for practice and research and future directions. 
 Practice presenting content for completeness, timing, and flow. Add slides to transition content if 
needed. 
 Proof read. Check spelling, edit. Repeat. 
 SAVE it! Back it up. 
 Submit according to specifications, but always take a back up copy on a flash drive. 
 Consider if you want to have handouts or copies of presentation available, submit them if applicable.  
 
Presenting:  
 Be prepared:  
 Practice, practice out loud, practice with an audience, know your content.  
 Take a back up copy of your presentation on a flash drive. 
 Arrive early, check equipment and that your presentation is loaded. 
 Have a list of references. 
 Have business cards with your e‐mail to hand out.  
 Be professional. 
 Plan for questions. 
8

Other Presentation Opportunities 
 
Discussion panel: Your clinical expertise or opinions may be needed on a discussion panel. Identify your 
unique contribution to the discussion. Find out how the panel will be moderated and by whom. Will you 
need to make a statement and/or answer questions? Are you expected to argue and counter argue a 
point? Know who else will be on the panel and what their contribution will be. Anticipate what you will 
present and what you might be asked. 
 
Journal Clubs and Seminars: This may be interdisciplinary and informal, but preparation should be 
serious. Select articles of interest to the group. Prepare a brief overview including: what was previously 
known, the purpose, the methods in detail, results, and implications. Then discuss strengths and 
weakness of the methods, significance and interpretation of results, and what you take away from this 
that can be applied to practice.  
 
Media interviews:  This is an important way to let the public know about scholarly work in nursing. 
Writing a media release statement may conjure up interest in what you are doing or opinions that you 
want to discuss. Ask what questions you might expect and anticipate how you will answer. You don’t 
have to answer all the questions, just re‐direct the interview to the information you want to provide to 
the public.  
 
 
Publications 
 
Publication options: There is a wide range of publication venues everything from general sciences to 
nursing specialty journals and text, medical and other health care journals and text, lay publications, 
websites, electronic journals and other web publications, political briefs, letters, opinions, lay 
publications and much more. The size, scope, and knowledge of the audience will vary.  
 
Content suitable for publications: Most any subject matter and content relevant to nursing is suitable to 
some form of publication. Research studies and methodologies are most suited for scholarly research 
journals. Clinical and evidence based guidelines, quality improvement, program evaluation, and 
literature reviews are most often published in specialty publications. The content of publications 
depends on the audience. Either select content and message to fit the audience, or select an audience 
to fit what you want to disseminate. 
 
Choose a publication: Scientific and social science journals report an “IF” or impact factor, which is a 
proxy for the importance of a journal within its field, based on objective measures such as citations. The 
publication you choose will depend on the message you want to convey and the audience you want to 
reach. Read the journal’s scope and aims to assure a good fit.  
 
Submit a query: See journal instructions for sending a query letter to the editors. A query should briefly 
describe your subject, purpose, methods, results, and implications. Most journals do not require this, 
but it may be useful in order to determine their level of interest in your topic. If there are no instructions 
for queries, it is appropriate to contact the section editor by letter or e‐mail. 
9

Preparing your publication: (This section is specific to preparing professional publications for journals)  
 Locate and read Guidelines for Authors. Most professional publications will have guidelines to instruct 
authors about appropriate content, types of articles accepted, formatting, the review process, 
submission process and ethical standards of the journal. Most are available either on line or in the 
journal. Locate the journal and find an article on a different topic, but like yours. Use this to get a feel for 
the journal and guide formatting as well.   
 Set up your basic formatting and headings accordingly. Sections and headings will vary by journal. This 
will provide you with an outline and save you time by not having to reformat later for submission.  
 Get organized.  A clear coherent structure is important for any publication. Structure will help the 
reader to follow and understand the content. The structure depends on the type of articles and journal 
format. Most articles will have the following elements although headings may vary. Keep your page 
limits in mind and plan out sections.  
 Title: The contents of the article should be conveyed in the title. The title page will also include 
author’s names and affiliations. Follow directions for blinded review. 
 Abstracts: Consult the guidelines for authors for abstracts, particularly regarding headings and word 
limits. An abstract will concisely summarize your article. This is your chance to catch the reader’s 
attention and make them want to continue on to read the whole article.  
Top: Although your audience will read this first, it is often easiest to write the abstract when the paper is 
done. Conversely, some authors prefer to use the abstract to guide their writing and so they do this first.   
 Introduction: This section is a natural progression of the background and significance of the topic. A 
brief problem or purpose statement should be clearly evident early in the paper. A literature review may 
synthesize ideas and indicate gaps in knowledge or previous publications. Conceptual or theoretical 
theories may be included in this section. Any specific hypotheses, questions or aims should come at the 
end of this section.  
 Methods: This section is a clear description of what you did so that others could replicate it. Contents 
of this section and the title may vary according to what you are reporting. For research reports, this 
section would include: design, setting, sample, population, sampling, protection of human subjects, data 
collection instrument and procedures, and data analysis techniques. Other clinical reports will include 
some of these elements.  
Tip: Sometimes it is easiest to start writing in this section.  
 Findings: This section will include your research findings, objective measures, or evaluation of what 
you did. Often tables and figures are used to present data here. Any data that will be discussed in the 
narrative should be presented here.  
 Discussion: The discussion section is narrative, but also varies by journal. This is where you want to 
point out the “so what” of what you did and what new knowledge you discovered. Link findings back to 
the literature, conceptual or theoretical framework. Results should be further interpreted as 
implications for practice and research. Limitations should be discussed but not the focus. Avoid over 
generalizations. Finally, make recommendations for future study and development.  
 Acknowledgements: Include others who have made contributions to the article, but do not meet the 
criteria for authorship.  
 Tables, figures, appendices, and pictures: Follow formatting guidelines. Some appendices may be 
more suitable as online links to additional information.  
 References: Follow directions for blinded review.  
Tip: Reference managers may help to organize and format.  
 Proof read. Check spelling, edit. Repeat. 
 SAVE it! Back it up. 
 Submit according to the publication process.  
10

Review, Revision, Rejection and Re‐submission Processes 
 Review: Peer reviewed journals will consider articles for review, send them to reviewers and then the 
editor will make a decision about accepting with revisions, revisions with a second review, or rejection. 
This process can take a long time. Online submission and review processes have decreased review time 
and made tracking a manuscript through this process possible. Most journals will give an indication of 
review time when they receive a manuscript.  
 Revisions: Rarely (8%) articles are accepted without at least minor revisions. Editors report accepting 
66% (range 10‐100%) and rejecting 6% (range 1‐40%) after revisions. Revisions may be substantial and 
turn around time may be limited. This can be overwhelming. Process the reviewer’s comments and then 
address them point by point. Include a letter with resubmission of how all but minor edits were handled. 
If you choose not to accept some of the edits, you must have a clear rationale described in the letter. 
Follow directions and timeline for resubmission.  
 Rejection: Editors report rejecting 23% (range 1‐85%) of manuscripts. Having a manuscript turned 
down by a publisher can be defeating. Most editors will provide the author with some feedback as to 
why the article was rejected and reviewer’s comments. This constructive criticism can be difficult to 
accept. Once the initial emotional response has passed, authors need to take an objective look at the 
comments. Is the material worth while and salvageable? Can the comments be used to re‐craft the 
article for submission to another journal? Although you can only submit an article to one journal at a 
time, once it has been rejected, you can resubmit it elsewhere, but not back to the original journal.  
Reference: Freda & Kearney (2005).  
 
Other Publication Opportunities 
 
Book reviews: Reviewing a book for a high quality journal furthers development of the nursing 
profession. Book reviews may serve as an entry to publishing and provide a framework for developing 
the skills needed for writing.  
 
Electronic journals: There has been an explosion of Ejournals in response to technological advances and 
demands for knowledge dissemination. Ejournals can be confused with wiki’s and other internet 
resources. A peer‐reviewed electronic journal is a good entry into publishing. They are considered not as 
scholarly, but are gaining respect.  
 
Evidence‐based guidelines: There is increasing demand and funding for evidence based guidelines to be 
written and disseminated. Publishing guidelines through the peer reviewed National Guideline 
Clearinghouse is a one mechanism of getting evidence‐based guidelines to users.  
 
Expert witness: Writing for publication may open other opportunities for sharing knowledge. In 
litigation cases, lawyers will search for experts based on publications in the area of interest. This 
opportunity can be financially rewarding.  
 
Letters: Letters stating opinions or responding to publications may be solicited by the journal or 
submitted unsolicited. Opinion should be concise but well argued. Views should be substantiated by 
research and other literature.  
 
Policy briefs: Public health administrators need to be appraised of healthcare issues and services. 
Systematic reviews and executive summaries are a preferred way to concisely communicate the 
evidence.  
 
11

Quality improvement articles: May be suitable for quality improvement of subspecialty journals. The 
structure should include: the problem, literature review, design, background and setting, key measures 
for improvement, strategies for change, effects of change, and next steps. 
 
12

Legal and Ethical Aspects of Dissemination 

Case Studies  
 
Case 1: During a meta‐analysis assignment for the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, you 
notice two articles from two different journals addressing your topic that are confusing. The 
articles appear to refer to the same research study, yet some of the data differs. The authors 
are the same, but the two articles list their names in a different order. 
Questions: 
What action do you take in your assignment? Do you ignore it and not use the information? Do 
you use the information in the meta‐analysis and cite your opinion in text? 
What are some acceptable explanations for this? 
What type of ethical issue may this be? Is it a duplicate publication, self plagiarism, falsification, 
authorship issue, or copyright issue? 
Do you take any action to confirm your suspicions? Do you contact the editor of the journal? 
Why or why not? What additional information is needed to make a decision? 
 
 
Case 2: Martha decides to write an article about her Doctor of Nursing Practice capstone 
project and submit it to a journal for publication. Martha has never written a published article 
before and asks a former instructor, Mary, to be a coauthor for assistance with the process. 
Mary did not participate in the capstone project but would be a great help in completing and 
reviewing the manuscript.  
Questions: 
Should Mary be included as an author of the manuscript? Why or why not?  
If Mary is not listed as an author, what strategies can Martha use to make the publishing 
process a success? 
 
13

Glossary of Dissemination Legal and Ethical Terms 
 
Anti‐plagiarism software: Detects plagiarism of words and phrases, but not ideas (Benos et al., 2005; 
Handa, 2008; Rohrich & Sullivan, 2009). 
 
Authorship: A person who has met three criteria. The three criteria include those who make significant 
contributions to either the design of the study or data interpretation and analysis, those who contribute 
to writing or revising of the article, and those who take responsibility for the published version (Benos et 
al., 2005; Graf et al., 2007). 
 
Citation and reference errors: Includes misspellings of author or journal names; missing or incorrect 
title of the article, volume number, page numbers, or year; omissions of citations; omissions of text 
citations from the reference list; listing inaccurate quotes; and citing the wrong author (Siedlecki, 
Montague, & Schultz, 2008). 
 
Coercion authorship: Occurs when a person who is inappropriate to list as an author applies pressure to 
be listed as one (Feeser & Simon, 2008). 
 
Conflict of interest: Occurs when an author fails to inform readers of the potential for bias or altered 
objectivity based on individual or institutional influences (Benos et al., 2005; Roberts, 2009). 
 
Copyright infringement: Involves the reproduction of an original work without permission of the person 
who has the copyright (Library of Congress, 2010). 
 
Duplicate publication/submission: Submitting the same article to more than one journal at the same 
time or revising a previously published article and sending it to a different journal for publication 
(Roberts, 2009; Wood, 2009). 
 
Fabrication: The presentation of information that is imaginary or made up (Benos et al., 2005).  
 
Falsification: The presentation of data that has been changed or modified to obtain an outcome that is 
more desirable (Benos et al., 2005). 
 
Ghost writing: An individual who made a significant contribution to the publication but is omitted as an 
author (Feeser & Simon, 2008). 
 
Gift or honorary authorship: The designation of authorship based on social position, professional 
position, or authority rather than contribution (Feeser & Simon, 2008; Siedlecki, Montague, & Schultz, 
2008). 
 
Image manipulation: The alteration of an image after the image was taken (Roberts, 2009). 
 
Plagiarism: Use of another person’s ideas or statements without giving the true author credit (Siedlecki, 
Montague, & Schultz, 2008). 
 
14

Salami publishing: The publication of several articles involving one study when actually it could have 
been published as a single article (Roberts, 2009). 
 
Scientific misconduct: The use of fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in reporting the results of one’s 
research (Benos et al., 2005). 
 
Self‐plagiarism: The use of one’s own previously published information without telling the reader that it 
appeared in a previous publication (Roig, 2006). 
 
U.S. Copyright Law: Includes the protection of published or unpublished original literary works (Library 
of Congress, 2010). 
15

Templates
 
Template for Titler, M. & Adams, S. (2005). Guidelines for writing evidence‐based practice guidelines. 
Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa College of Nursing GNIRC Research Translation and Dissemination 
Core. Request from: http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/excellence/nursing_interventions/rtdc.htm
 
 
Templates for the College of Nursing power point presentations are at the links below: 

TITLE SLIDE

http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/MNRS/2007NewIdentitybeigegreen.ppt

TITLE SLIDE

http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/MNRS/2007NewIdentityPowerpointbluegreenblacklogo.ppt

TITLE SLIDE

http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/MNRS/2007NewIdentityPowerpointbluegreenred.ppt

TITLE SLIDE

http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/MNRS/2007NewIdentityPowerpointbluegreenreversedlogo.ppt
TITLE SLIDE

http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/MNRS/2007NewIdentityPowerpointgreenblue.ppt

TITLE SLIDE

http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/MNRS/2007NewIdentityPowerpointpurpleblue.ppt
16

Websites 
Source  Subject  Link
Agency for Healthcare  Dissemination planning tool RE:  http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/advances/planningtool.
htm
Research and Quality  Patient Safety 
(AHRQ) 
AHRQ  Dissemination planning  http://chrp.creighton.edu/Documents/Disseminati
on%20Planning%20Tool.doc
worksheet 
AHRQ  National Guideline  http://www.guideline.gov/
Clearinghouse‐ peer reviewed 
evidence‐based guidelines 
Canadian Nurses  Tips for working with news  http://www.cna-
aiic.ca/CNA/issues/matters/newsmedia/default_e.
Association (CAN)  media   aspx
Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T.  Portal that provides access to  http://cancercontrolplanet.cancer.gov
(Plan, Link, Act, Network  data and resources that can help 
with Evidence‐based Tools)  planners, program staff, and 
researchers to design, 
implement and evaluate 
evidence‐based cancer control 
programs 
Center for Health  Health Dissemination Tools &  http://www.research-
practice.org/tools/guidelines.html
Dissemination and  Resou
Implementation Research 
Launch Internet Explorer Browser.ln
rces ‐ Guidelines and 
Troubleshooting 
International Committee of  Uniform requirements for  http://www.icmje.org/
Medical Journal Editors  manuscripts. 
Roig, Miguel  Avoiding plagiarism, self‐ http://facpub.stjohns.edu/~roigm/plagiarism/
plagiarism, and other 
questionable writing practices: A 
guide to ethical writing. 
Thomas Reuters  Index Factor  http://thomsonreuters.com/products_services/scie
nce/academic/impact_factor/?view=Standard
Thomas Reuters  Intellectual property solutions http://ip.thomsonreuters.com/
Thomas Reuters  Products to assist with scholarly  http://thomsonreuters.com/products_services/scie
nce/science_products/a-z/journal_citation_reports
research, publishing and 
analysis 
University of Iowa College  Scholarship dissemination  http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/research/ONR/FA
Q_sd.htm
of Nursing  resources and tips for students 
University of Iowa College  Resources for research projects  http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/research/ONR/FA
Q_dma.htm
of Nursing  and data analysis 
University of Iowa College  Research Translation and  http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/excellence/nursing
_interventions/rtdc.htm
of Nursing  Dissemination Core tools and 
resources for accessing and 
developing evidence‐based 
guidelines 
17

References 
 
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication Manual of the American Psychological 
Association. Washington, D. C.: American Psychological Association. 
Baggs, J. G. (2008). Issues and rules for authors concerning authorship versus 
acknowledgements, dual publication, self plagiarism, and salami publishing. Research in 
Nursing & Health, 31, 295‐297. doi:10.1002/nur.20280 
Benos, D. J., Fabres, J., Farmer, J., Gutierrez, J. P., Hennessy, K., Kosek, D.,…Wang, K. (2005). 
Ethics and scientific publication. Advances in Physiology Education, 29, 59‐74. 
doi:10.1152/advan.00056.2004 
Butcher, H. K. (2004). Nursing’s distinctive knowledge. In L. Haynes, H. K. Butcher & T. Boese 
(Eds.) Nursing in contemporary society: Issues, trends and transition into practice (pp. 71‐
103). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall. 
Cassey, M. (2007). Incorporating the National Guideline Clearinghouse into evidence‐based 
practice. Nursing Economics, 25(5), 302‐303. 
Committee on Publication Ethics. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2010, from http:// 
publicationethics.org/ 
Committee on Publication Ethics. (2009). Maturitas, 62, 208‐224. 
doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2008.12.015 
Crenshaw, A. H. (2009). Plagiarism and copyright law. Current Orthopaedic Practice, 20(4), 343. 
Decullier, E., & Chapuis, F. (2007). Oral presentation bias: A retrospective cohort study. Journal 
of Epidemiology and Community Health, 61, 190‐193. doi:10.1136/jech.2006.048603 
Dobbins, M., Jack, S., Thomas, H., & Kothari, A. (2007). Public health decision‐makers’ 
informational needs and preferences for receiving research evidence. Worldviews on 
Evidence‐Based Nursing, 4(3), 156‐163. 
Evensen, A. E., Sanson‐Fisher, R., E‐Este, C., & Fitzgerald, M. (2010). Trends in publications 
regarding evidence practice gaps: A literature review. Implementation Science, 5, 11. 
doi:10.1186/1748‐5908‐5‐11. 
Feeser, V. R., & Simon, J. R. (2008). The ethical assignment of authorship in scientific 
publications: Issues and guidelines. Academic Emergency Medicine, 15, 963‐969. 
doi:10.1111/j.1553‐2712.2008.00239.x 
Freda, M. C., & Kearney, M. (2005). An international survey of nurse editors' roles and practices. 
Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 37(1), 87‐94. 
Graf, C., Wager, E., Bowman, A., Fiack, S., Scott‐Lichter, D., & Robinson, A. (2007). Best practice 
guidelines on publication ethics: A publisher’s perspective. International Journal of Clinical 
Practice, 61(Suppl. 152), 1‐26. doi:10.1111/j.1742‐1241.2006.01230.x 
Green, L. W., Ottoson, J. M., Garcia, C., & Hiatt, R. A. (2009). Diffusion theory and knowledge 
dissemination, utilization, and integration in public health. Annual Review of Public Health, 
30, 151‐174. 
Habermann, B., Broome, M., Pryor, E. R., & Ziner, K. W. (2010). Research coordinators’ 
experiences with scientific misconduct and research integrity. Nursing Research, 59(1), 51‐
57. 
Handa, S. (2008). Plagiarism and publication ethics: Dos and don’ts. Indian Journal of 
Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprology, 74(4), 301‐303. 
18

Happell, B. (2007). Conference presentations: Developing nursing knowledge by dissemination 
research findings. Nurse Researcher, 15(1), 70‐77. 
Happell, B. (2009). Presenting with precision: Preparing and delivering a polished conference 
presentation. Nurse Researcher, 16(3), 45‐55. 
Happell, B. (2008). Writing for publication: A practical guide. Nursing Standard, 22(28), 35‐40. 
Hicks, C. (1995). The shortfall in published research: A study of nurses’ research and publication 
activities. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 21, 594‐604. 
Houfek, J. F., Kaiser, K. L., Visovsky, C., Barry, T. L., Nelson, A. E., Kaiser, M. M., Miller, C. L. 
(2010). Using a writing group to promote faculty scholarship. Nurse Educator, 35(1), 41‐
45. 
Hagedorn, H., Hogan, M., Smith, J. L., Bowman, C., Curran, G. M., Espadas, D.,  ... Sales, A.E. 
(2006). Lessons learned about implementing research evidence into clinical practice: 
Experiences from VA QUERI. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 21(S2), S21‐S24.  doi: 
10.1111/j.1525‐1497.2006.00358.x. 
International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. (n.d.). Ethical considerations. Retrieved 
February 22, 2010, from http://www.icmje.org/ 
Jones, S. L., & Cook, C. B. (2000). Electronic journals: Are they a paradigm shift? Online Journal 
of Issues in Nursing, 5(1), 1. 
Keen, A. (2007). Writing for publication: Pressures, barriers, and support strategies. Nurse 
Education Today, 27, 382‐388. doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2006.05.019 
Kerner, J., Rimer, B., & Emmons, K. (2005). Introduction to the special section on dissemination: 
Dissemination research and research dissemination: How can we close the gap? Health 
Psychology, 24(5), 443‐446.  
Library of Congress: United States Copyright Office. (2010). Retrieved February 21, 2010, from 
http://www.copyright.gov/ 
Miller, J. E. (2006). Preparing and presenting effective research posters. HSR: Health Services 
Research, 42(1), 311‐328.  
Montgomery, K. S., Eddy, N. L., Jackson, E., Nelson, E., Reed, K., Stark, T. L., & Thompson, C. 
(2001). Global Research Dissemination and Utilization: Recommendations for Nurses and 
Nurse Educators. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, 22(3), 124‐129.  
Morton, N. S. (2009). Publication ethics. Pediatric Anesthesia, 19, 1011‐1013. 
doi:10.1111/j.1460‐9592.2009.03086.x 
Oddi, L. F., Whitley, G. G., & Pool, B. J. (1994). Contributions of graduate students to the 
creation and dissemination of nursing knowledge. IMAGE: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 
26(1), 7‐11.  
Patterson, K., Grenny, J. McMillan, R., & Switzler, A. (2002). Crucial conversations. Tools for 
talking when stakes are high. New York: McGraw‐Hill. 
Pressler, J.L., & Kenner, C.A. (2010). Speaking with the press. Nurse Educator, 35, 1, 4‐5. 
doi: 10.1097/NNE.0b013e3181c41fe1 
Rabbin, B. A., Brownson, R. C., Haire‐Joshu, D., Kreuter, M. W., & Weaver, N. L. (2008). A 
glossary for dissemination and implementation research in health. Journal of Public Health 
Management Practice, 14(2), 117‐123. 
Rassool, G. H. (2005). Moving in the right direction: First step in writing for publication in 
nursing. Rev Latino‐American Enfermagem, 13(6):1035‐1038. 
19

Roberts, J. (2009). An author’s guide to publication ethics: A review of emerging standards in 
biomedical journals. Headache, 49, 578‐589. doi:10.1111/j.1526‐4610.2009.01379.x 
Rogers, E. (2003). Diffusion of innovations. New York: Free Press.  
Rohrich, R. J., & Sullivan, D. (2009). Plagiarism and dual publication: Review of the issues and 
policy statement. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 124, 1333‐1339. 
doi:10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181b59d42 
Roig, M. (2006). Avoiding plagiarism, self‐plagiarism, and other questionable writing practices: 
A guide to ethical writing. Retrieved February 21, 2010, from http://facpub.stjohns.edu/ 
~roigm/plagiarism/Index.html 
Roy C. (1999). State of the art: Dissemination and utilization of nursing literature in practice. 
Biological Research for Nursing, 1(2), 147‐155. 
Siedlecki, S. L., Montague, M., & Schultz, J. (2008). Writing for publication: Avoiding common 
ethical pitfalls. Journal of Wound, Ostomy, & Continence Nursing, 35(2), 147‐150. 
Smith, M.W., & Barnett, P.G. (2008). The role of economic in the QUERI program:  QUERI series, 
Implementation Science, 3, 20‐28. doi:10.1186/1748‐5908‐3‐20 
Stetler, C. B., Mittman, B. S, & Francis, J. (2008). Overview of the VA Quality Enhancement 
Research Initiative (QUERI) and QUERI theme articles: QUERI Series. Implementation 
Science, 3:8.   
Taggart, H. M., & Arslanian, C. (2000). Creating an effective poster presentation. Orthopedic 
Nursing, 19(3), 47‐49, 52.  
Titler, M. G., & Everett, L. Q. (2001). Translating research into practice: Considerations for  
critical care investigators.  Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 13, 587‐604. 
Titler, M. G., Kleiber, C., Steelman, V., Rakel, B., Budreau, G., Everett, L. Q. (2001). The Iowa  
Model of evidence based practices to promote quality care. Critical Care Nursing Clinics 
of North American, 13, 497‐509. 
Titler, M. G. (2004). Methods in translation science. Worldviews of Evidence‐Based Nursing,  
1(1), 38‐48. 
Titler, M. & Adams, S. (2005). Guidelines for writing evidence‐based practice guidelines. Iowa 
City, IA: University of Iowa College of Nursing GNIRC Research Translation and 
Dissemination Core. 
Wager, E., Barbour, V., Yentis, S., Kleinert, S. (2009). Retractions: Guidance from the committee 
on publication ethics. Journal of Critical Care, 24, 620‐622. doi:10.1016/j.jcrc.2009.10.009 
Wager, E., Fiack, S., Graf, C., Robinson, A., & Rowlands, I. (2009). Science journal editors’views 
on publication ethics: Results of an international survey. Journal of Medical Ethics, 35, 
348‐353. doi:10.1136/jme.2008.028324 
What is plagiarism? (n.d.) Retrieved February 21, 2010, from http://www.plagiarism.org 
/index.html 
Whitley, G.G., & Oddi, L. F. (1998). Graduate student‐faculty collaboration in research and 
publication. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 20(5), 572‐583. 
Whitley, G. G., Oddi, L. F., & Terrell, D. (1998). Factors influencing the publishing efforts of 
graduate students in nursing. Journal of Nursing Education, 37(4), 182‐185. 
Willett, L. L., Paranjape, A., & Estrada, C. (2008). Identifying key components for an effective 
case report poster: An observational study. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 24(3), 
393‐397. doi: 10.1007/s11606‐008‐0860‐1 
20

Wollin, J. A., & Fairweather, C. T. (2007). Finding your voice: Key elements to consider when 
writing for publication. British Journal of Nursing, 16(22), 1418‐1421. 
Wood, M. J. (2009). The ethics of writing for publication. Clinical Nursing Research, 18, 3‐5. 
doi:10.1177/1054773808330494 
Zotti, M.E., Selby‐Harrington, M. L., & Riportella‐Muller, R. (1994) Communicating research 
findings to readers of clinical nursing journals: Guidance for prospective authors. Journal 
of Pediatric Health Care. 8(3), 106‐110.