You are on page 1of 13

An Introduction to Simulink®

Michael Balchanos
Bassem Nairouz
Modeling & Simulation
• Modeling in engineering is the process of creating 
a mathematical formulation that can describe the 
behavior of a physical system
• Simulation is the application of computational 
models to the study and prediction of physical 
events or the behavior of engineered systems
– Allows engineers to better predict and optimize 
systems
– Determining factor in product or system design
– Basis for further scientific discovery
Simulation‐based Engineering
• Modeling and Simulation capability will allow
– Replace physical tests to ensure product performance, 
reliability and quality
– Shorter design cycle due to the reduced need for 
physical prototyping
– Innovative and radical departures from traditional 
designs
– The creation of a library of validated and verified 
simulation components on which to build future 
systems

• This enhanced M&S capability can also be used to 
provide realistic training and optimize operations
What is Simulink
• Simulink® is a graphical extension to MATLAB for the modeling and 
simulation of dynamic systems
– linear and nonlinear systems
– continuous , discrete, or hybrid time domains
– multirate, namely subsystems with different simulation time steps
– Implementation as interconnected block diagrams
• Simulink is also useful for modeling control systems
• Simulink is integrated with MATLAB and data can be easily transferred 
between the programs
• Capability of solving real problems in a variety of scientific and engineering 
fields, including:
– Aerospace and Defense
– Automotive
– Mechanical 
– Communications
– Electronics and Signal Processing
– Biomedical
– Finance
– Industrial
Simulink and MATLAB
• Simulink is tightly integrated with the MATLAB 
environment
• It requires MATLAB to run, depending on it to 
define and evaluate model and block parameters
• Simulink can also utilize many MATLAB scripting 
features
– Define model inputs
– Store model outputs for analysis and visualization
– Perform functions within a model, through integrated 
calls to MATLAB operators and functions
Why Simulink over MATLAB?
• MATLAB (with file extension “*.m”)
– Only text code
– Not easy for  modeling complicated systems
– Runs usually faster
– Requires numerical solver implementation
• Simulink (with file extension “*.mdl”)
– Visual with model schematic
– Easy to model complicated systems
– Not easy to change parameters
– Usually requires more CPU time than MATLAB (large vector dimensions)
– Includes numerical solvers that can be selected according to the nature of the problem considered
– Issues with algebraic loops and numerical singularities
• Combining MATLAB and Simulink can lead to a more efficient simulation
– Visual model
– Easy to change parameters and good for parametric studies
– Create many instances of a subsystem
– Hierarchical model
How Simulink works
• A Simulink model is composed of
– Blocks
– Connections
• Each block has these general characteristics
– A vector of inputs u
– A vector of outputs y
– A vector of states x
• The state vector may consist of
– Continuous states
– Discrete states
– A combination of both
Modeling options in Simulink
• Given a physical system, there are two main alternatives for 
developing a modeling and simulation(M&S) environment in 
Simulink
1) Block diagram of system of governing Differential Equations (D.E.)
– System is defined and a mathematical formulation that describes the 
system is developed
– System of DEs implemented and solved by using Simulink basic blocks 
and connections 
2) Simulation using subsystem component models from library
– System is physically and functionally defined
– Components are dragged and dropped from the library and are 
connected based on physical architecture
• Electric circuit example: First option would lead to an M&S that 
explicitly solves the system of equations that describes the circuit, 
but second option would be the implementation of the circuit itself
Simulink libraries
• Simulink includes several built‐in toolboxes for easier 
implementation of a dynamic system model
Basic Elements
• There are two major classes of elements in Simulink:
– Blocks are used to generate, modify, combine, output, and display signals
• Continuous: Linear, continuous‐time system elements
• Discrete: Linear, discrete‐time system elements 
• Functions & Tables: User‐defined functions and tables for interpolating function 
values
• Math: Mathematical operators 
• Nonlinear: Nonlinear operators 
• Signals & Systems: Blocks for controlling/monitoring signal(s) and for creating 
subsystems
• Sinks: Used to output or display signals 
• Sources: Used to generate various signals 
– Lines are used to transfer signals from one block to another
• Lines transmit signals in the direction indicated by the arrow
• Lines must always transmit signals from the output terminal of one block to the 
input terminal of another block
• Lines can never inject a signal into another line; lines must be combined through 
the use of a block such as a summing junction.
• A signal can be either a scalar signal or a vector signal
Creating a Simulink Model
The modeling process can be completed in the 
following six steps:
1. Define the system
2. Identify system components
3. Model the System with equations
4. Build the Simulink® block diagram
5. Run the simulation
6. Validate the simulation results
Starting Simulink
• At the command prompt for matlab type 
“simulink”. This will open up the window for 
Simulink
References
• Simulink tutorial links by Mathworks.com
– http://www.mathworks.com/academia/student_cent
er/tutorials/simulink‐launchpad.html
• Simulink Basics Tutorial by University of Michigan
– http://www.engin.umich.edu/group/ctm/working/ma
c/simulink_basics/index.htm
• “Simulink,” Beate Oswald‐Tranta, Institute for 
Automation, University of Leoben, Austria 2005
• “How to use Simulink,” Jin‐Woo Jung, 
Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2005