You are on page 1of 40

1

RESTORATION OF
ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND
HERITAGE BUILDINGS

GUIDED BY PRESENTED BY
MR. PRAVEEN P L HAMSUI HAROLD
Asst. Professor Roll No 20
Dept of Civil Engg S7 Civil
2

INTRODUCTION
• India has
Very rich historic background.
Heritage of the past work of man.
Culture , traditions
Many archeological buildings, Tajmahal one
among the seven wonders of world.
3

IMPORTANCE OF
HERITAGE BUILDINGS
4

NATIONAL IMPORTANCE OF
HERITAGE BUILDINGS
Ancient Monument
Existence for not less than 100 years

Mute testaments of the glorious past.

Represent the remains of ancient habitation.


5

Contd...
Sense of identity and continuity for future
generations.

Represents the nations culture and beauty.

Form an impressive historic features.


6

TERMINOLOGIES
Conservation
Process of retaining structure’s historical,
architectural, aesthetic, cultural significance.
Preservation
Maintaining the fabric of a place in its existing
state and retarding deterioration .
Reconstruction
Returning a place as nearly as possible to a
known earlier.
7

Contd…
Rehabilitation
Making possible a contemporary use of a
historic building through repair and alterations
while protecting its heritage value.

Restoration
Process of accurately depicting the form,
features, and character of a property as it
appeared at a particular period of time.
8

WHY RESTORATION
9

RESTORATION
Process of correctly revealing the state of a
historic building, as it looked in the past.

Returning the existing fabric of a place to a


known earlier state.

Reassembling existing components without


introducing new materials.
10

Contd…

Restoration takes the structure to a new


minimum strength level.

Follows a precise methodology.

Purpose is to safeguard the important


archaeological monuments.
11

Contd…

Task is to point out the major structural defects


which occurs in these structures and their
remedial measures.

Increases the total expected life of the structure


12

CHALLENGES FACED
Physical condition:
Behavior of materials and structural systems

Management context:
Availability and use of resources.

Cultural significance and social


values:
The impact of interventions.
13

GUIDELINES TO BE FOLLOWED
Special attention has to be paid to the plans,
intention, materials and tools used.

Traditional building materials were mud, earth


and clay and lime.

Confirm the longevity of most of these


monuments.
14

Contd…
The proposed approach leads to efficient
restoration practice.

Identification of various problems.

Choosing the most appropriate treatment.

Date of restoration and proposed use.


15

LEGISLATIONS INVOLVED
 Need for restoration decided by:

The Indian Treasure Trove Act, 1878.

The Ancient Monuments Preservation Act, 1904.

The Antiquities and Art Treasure Act, 1947.

The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites


and Remains Act, 1958.
16

REASONS FOR RESTORATION


Human negligence- unintentional.

Human vandalism- intentional.

Overloading of roof.

Structural problems.

Climatic problems.
17

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL


PROBLEMS

DAMAGE THROUGH SALT SALT DAMAGE OF WEAK


CRYSTALLISATION POINTING MATERIAL
18

Contd…
Chemical problems include swelling
compounds, leaching and encrustation.

Physical problems include salt crystallization


and frost action.

Mechanical problems include cracks from


earthquake settlements.
19

Contd…

FROAST DAMAGE SUBFLORESCENCE


20

CASE STUDIES
1. HUMAYUN’S TOMB

2. MAIN BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF PUNE.
21

HUMAYUN’S TOMB
22

HUMAYUN’S TOMB
First privately funded restoration

Completed in March 2013 through the joint


efforts of AKTC and ASI under the National
Culture Fund.

Objective was to revitalize the gardens,


pathways, fountains and water channels.
23

Contd…
The project’s implementation phase began
when the trust began their work on the garden
site in 2000.

The tomb stands on a platform 120 metres


square and reaches a height of 47 metres.

Earliest example of using red sandstone and


white marble.
24

RESTORED PROJECT FEATURES


Removal of 3000 truckloads of earth
Planting of 12 hectares of lawn.
Repair of fountains, wells and rainwater-
harvesting systems.
Resetting and alignment of over 3500 kilometres
of path kerbstones.
Planning and installation of a new water-
circulation system for the walkway channels.
Creation of 128 groundwater recharge pits and de-
silting of other wells.
25

UNIVERSITY OF PUNE
26

CASE STUDY 2
Study of rehabilitation of main building, University of
Pune.
The building was constructed in 1871 by the British.
Designed by the then architect James Trubshawe.
The building is within 60,000 sqft area having
shallow foundation resting on black cotton soil.
Useful life of a structure being considered as 100
years.
Assessment of structure involved rapid visual
screening, data collection, condition assessment.
27

Major Problems and remedial


measures
• 1.
Structural cracks in masonry walls &
damaged masonry with loose bonding
Poor load distribution
Poor water proofing.
Penetration of roots.
Growth of creepers.
28

Remedial measures

Epoxy grouting
Jacketing
Metal straps
lime mortar.

INCREASED GAP IN JOINTS


29

Major Problems and remedial measures


contd..
2. Collapse of portion of
column
The column bulging due to
water seepage collapsed
partially.

Loose bonding of the


mortar as well as cracks in the
core.
30

Remedial measures
The collapsed portion was removed and
reconstructed.

Steel rods were inserted into the old masonry.

The cracks in the core of the column were


taken care by the epoxy grouting.
31

Major Problems and remedial measures


contd..
• 3. Bulging wall & Major longitudinal crack in
beam
The internal wall was showing signs of bulging.

The rainwater gutter was sagged due to water seepage.

The wall was bulged and some cracks had appeared in


the plaster of the wall.
32

Remedial Measures

Remedial Measures
The gutter needed to
be replaced and laid
with proper slopes.

The bulge in the wall


also needed to be
LONGITUDINALLY CRACKED checked.
BEAM WITH VISIBLE SAG
33

ECONOMIC BENEFITS
Businesses benefit

Growth in employment

Enhanced municipal tax base

Increased tourism.
34

RESTORATION V/S NEW


CONSTRUCTION
Cheaper

less energy required

Creates less waste.

Can be done even during winter.


35

FORTHCOMING RESTORATION
NCF, ASI and the Taj Group have signed a
Memorandum for the preservation and
upgradation of Taj Mahal.
The cleaning of the Taj will be carried out in
five phases.
scientific treatment and cleaning of interiors of
the main mausoleum up to human height will be
completed by January.
will be completed by March 2018.
36

RESTORATION WORK AT
TAJ MAHAL
37

DISADVANTAGES
Building materials and hardware are not easy to find.

Skilled labour is essential.

Strictly followed in accordance with the Archaeological


Act.

Affects the neighbourhood.


38

CONCLUSION
The best therapy to reduce decay is preventive
maintenance.
Adequate maintenance can limit or postpone the need for
subsequent intervention.
The repair process requires the existing condition of the
structure to be identified and its causes of its deterioration.
An understanding of the significance of the structure
should be the basis for conservation and reinforcement
measures.
39

REFERENCES
Model Building Bye-laws Chapter-8,
Conservation of heritage sites including
heritage buildings, Retrieved 2012, pp 55-100.
Sayali Sandbhor and Rohan Botre (2013):
A Systematic Approach Towards Restoration Of
Heritage Buildings, International journal of
engineering research and Technology, Volume:
02 Issue: 03, pp 33.
40

Thank you..!!!