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post-show resources: drama pack

contents
What this pack includes 3
Introduction: reflecting and reviewing 4
Student sheet 8: Glossary of roles in theatre 5
Lesson 1: Shared reflection and review 6
Lesson 2: Characterisation 7
Lesson 3: Costume 8
Student sheet 9: Interview 10
Student sheet 10: Costume sketches 12
Set Lesson 4: Set Design 14
Lesson 5: Lighting Design 15
Student sheet 11: Lighting effects 1 16
Student sheet 12: Lighting effects 2 17
Student sheet 13: Script extract 1 18
Lesson 5: Sound design 19
Student sheet 14: Script extract 2 20

2 contents
What this pack includes
Lesson Plans:
Pre-lesson:
Individual Reflection and Recall: Evaluation of Live Theatre Worksheet.
Reviewing live performance is an important element of all Drama and Theatre Studies specifications at Key
Stage 4 and Key Stage 5. Most exam boards allow students to take notes into their written examination.
The purpose of this section is to provide some approaches to reflecting on the performance that will inform
the students’ note taking.

Lesson Plan 1: Shared R & R - Reflection and review of performance elements


Learning objective:
• To recall and gather information quickly and efficiently.
• To inform the students’ note-taking.

Lesson 2: Characterisation
Learning objective:
• To use movement, gesture and facial expression to portray different characteristics.

Lesson Plan 3: Costume design


Learning objective:
• To examine and analyse existing costume in a production.

Lesson Plan 4: Set design and staging


Learning objective:
• To analyse how the set and staging was used to reflect different themes in the musical.

Lesson Plan 5: Lighting design


Learning objective:
• To evaluate the lighting design in Kinky Boots in detail.

Lesson Plan 6: Sound design


Learning objective:
• To explore and express yourself through sound design and peer collaboration.

STUDENT SHEETS
All lesson plans are followed by the relevant student resource sheets.
This pack include printable resources: STUDENT SHEETS 8-15

3 What this pack includes


REFLECTING AND REVIEWING
Introduction for teachers
This pack is designed to help students reflect on their visit to the theatre.

These lessons focus on the creative decision making behind the production process. Teachers should
encourage students to think about the nature of the decisions that have been made by the different theatre
makers.

These lessons can be taught discreetly for those students specialising in specific theatre craft, or they can be
used as a basis of post-trip analysis and discussion for the whole class.

Reminders for students: their personal response is the most important aspect of any review.

Curriculum link:
Reviewing live performance is an important element of all Drama and Theatre Studies specifications at Key Stage
4 and 5.

Students can use these notes to:


• Evaluate the show in class group discussion
• Potentially take the notes into their written examination.
• Write fuller revision notes on their analysis of different production elements of a production

Objectives:
• To know how to write about a production, either for coursework or in an examination
• To know how to identify things to write about, and know how to write about them
• To be ready to answer a question or complete coursework about their experience of a theatre production

4 REFLECTING AND REVIEWING


STUDENT SHEET 8: GLOSSARY OF ROLES IN THEATRE
CREATIVE TEAM
Writer / Composer The writer creates the play. If the play is also a musical, then it may also have a composer
and lyricist.

Director The director is responsible for realising the production on stage and leads the creative vision of the
whole production. The director leads the rehearsals, collaborates with the designer, the musical director and the
production team to make sure the production is the best it can be. They hand over responsibility for the production
to an associate or assistant director once the production is open.

Set Designer The designer is responsible for all aspects of the look and feel of the production. Working closely
with the director to complement or realise the vision of the production, the Designer creates set designs and works
with the production team to make sure the physical sets which are created are exactly as they should be. In smaller
productions, the designer may also act as the costume designer.

Scenic Artist The scenic artist is usually briefed by the Set Designer to produce one or several scenic works for
theatre. These could be anything from cloud backdrops or the backdrop of a city such as New York or London,
which is to be viewed out of a set window. They also paint any murals or paintings required and touch-up or finish
work carried out by the painting team. They may also paint complex prop pieces.

Musical Director The musical director leads the singing rehearsals and often also conducts the orchestra in
a musical.

Choreographer The choreographer works with the actors or dancers to create and rehearse any dance or
movement sequences in the production.

Lighting Designer Lighting plays a crucial role in the look of a production. The lighting designer works closely
with the designer and the production team to design and set up the lighting and lighting effects of the show.

Sound Designer Depending on the production, some may use a sound designer who creates the sound effects
for the production, works to create soundscapes, or mixes the music to ensure it sounds as good as it can.

Costume Designer The costume designer designs all the costumes for the production. They work with a costume
team to source, make and fit costumes which are perfect for each character.

Producer The producer is the champion of the project, who raises money to stage the production and brings on
board key members of the creative team to bring the production to life.

Company
Performers A company is auditioned for each production. Actors and dancers work closely with the director
and choreographer to create the characters in the show and perform the show every night.

5 STUDENT SHEET 8: GLOSSARY OF ROLES IN THEATRE


Lesson 1: Shared R & R - Reflection and Review
Duration: 50 minutes

Learning objectives:
• To recall and gather information quickly and efficiently.
• To inform the students’ note-taking.

Equipment:
• Large sheets of paper and pens

Activity:
• Work in pairs or small groups.

• Divide up performance elements as different areas of focus, for example: acting, set design, lighting and sound,
costume, directorial interpretation. You need a different area of focus for each group.

• Students work together to brainstorm their area of focus and record ideas. After two minutes pass sheet onto
another group.

• They then have two minutes to read your notes and add their own ideas.

• Repeat this process until everyone has contributed something to each sheet.

• The last group brainstorming on each production element, presents their recollections back to the class.

• Photocopy each of the sheets so everyone has a copy to take away with them.

What next?
If they haven’t already, ask students to complete the EVALUATION OF LIVE THEATRE WORKSHEET

• Encourage students to be analytical.

• Encourage the students to be critical. What were the strengths, what were the weaknesses?

• Have a general discussion and give examples of WHAT happened, HOW it happened, and WHY it happened
in that way (what was the creative choice behind it?)

Example:
What: The moment the prototype ‘Kinky Boot’ is made.
How: Lola insisted the boot was red, and changed the boot colour from burgundy to bright red using clever staging.
Why: This draws on the symbolism of colour and the contrast this vibrant red has from the rest of the set.
Red = danger, sexiness and adventure.

6 Lesson 1: Shared R & R - Reflection and Review


Lesson 2: Characterisation
Duration: 50 minutes - 1 hour

Learning objective:
• To use movement, gesture and facial expression to portray different characteristics.

Activity detail:
• Get students to move around the space as themselves. Instruct them to move forwards, backwards, sideways and
diagonally – clapping each time you change the direction. Say FREEZE.

• Tell them you are now going to give them a Kinky Boots character and when you clap your hands they must be
that character and walk around the room in that role until you say FREEZE again and offer them a new character.

• Do this for all characters listed, encouraging facial expressions, usage of levels, physical theatre, mime, pause, etc.

• After each character “walk” stop the class and ask certain students to share their “walk” by performing it around
the room.
• Then ask members of the audience to ask the actor to comment on their use of gestures, movements, mime,
levels, facial expressions, etc, linking it to their live viewing experience watching Kinky Boots the musical.

Characters:
• Charlie

• Nicola (Charlie’s fiancé)

• Lola

• Don (tough, burly factory worker)

7 Characterisation
Lesson 3: costume
Duration: 50 minutes - 1 hour

Learning objectives:
• To consider the costume design choices in Kinky Boots.
• To make choices and design a costume according to what best suits the physical representation of the character
and the performance.

Printable resources:
STUDENT SHEET 9: INTERVIEW ‘DESIGN x 3’
STUDENT SHEET 10: COSTUME SKETCHES

Equipment:
A variety of art supplies such as coloured pencils, markers, or crayons. For a 3-D effect, you may also wish to
provide glue and a variety of sample fabrics, such as pieces of coloured leather, lace, faux fur, satin, Velcro,
ribbon, etc...

Starter:
Ask students to read through the Design x 3 interview citing Greg Barnes’ creative decisions.

Activity 1: Design a new show


Announce to the group that they are going to become shoe designers and ask them to each take out several
pieces of blank paper and select writing utensils from the provided art supplies.

Explain that the participants are being tasked with the challenge to design shoes that they feel REPRESENTS
them, both inside and out. Give participants the following instructions:

• Choose your “base” shoe type (i.e., boot, sneaker, sandal, high-heel, etc.) and draw or trace an outline on your
paper.

• Choose material(s) and colour(s) for your shoe that you feel represent you and colour in your outline.

• Add at least four special features to your shoe (i.e., logo, laces, scuff marks, zippers, wings, pictures or
designs, etc.).

• Select one “SUPER POWER” that you feel you already posses (i.e. shoes allow the wearer to be good at soccer,
speak Spanish fluently, tap dance, etc.) and draw symbols representing that super power on your shoe design.

• Give your shoe a name and write it on the top of your paper.

8 costume
Lesson 3: costume continued
Activity 2: Design a new costume for The Angels
• Use the sketches from Student Sheet 10 to help with style.

• Look at what all The Angels’ costumes have in common in terms of style, fabrics, colours.

• Analyse as a class which ‘British’ features and iconic elements have been stylised in these costumes.

• Students can trace the outline of one Angel from Student Sheet 10 and design their own costume.

• What else, quintessentially British, might you use to inspire a design for an Angel. The inspiration might be a
British job (farmer, tea-shop owner) or it might be something more abstract (Paddington Bear, Stonehenge).

9 costume continued
STUDENT SHEET 9: INTERVIEW

D
DR: It is a crucial part of the story that the thousands of rivets in the design of the
Price & Son factory has been overseen by factory on stage. Of course, none of them
generations of the Price family. Our basic are real; most are tiny domes made of
environment became the interior of the wood and painted to appear like iron rivets.
factory, yet not in any naturalistic way, but But more than 1,200 are actually small
only suggesting what it might feel like to work dome-shaped LED lights that when not lit
in such a place. It is not until the final scene look just like all the other rivets, but when
of the show that there is any large transfor- illuminated can dance and flash and chase
mation. The show moves away from the small and change to whatever colour is called

ESIGN x3
world of Northampton to the larger more for. Therefore, when it’s time for Lola’s early
exotic world of the Milan Shoe Fair – a world scenes in London or the later dance numbers
that is as alien as the factory was familiar – with Lola and her Angels in the factory, the
and towards which the story has been use of the LED lights in conjunction with the
moving all along. costumes and the shifts in the stage lighting
GregG Barnes Costume Designer (GB)
allows an almost instantaneous shift from
Josh Marquette Hair Designer (JM) Q: The juxtaposition between the two lead Charlie’s world to Lola’s and back again.
David Rockwell Scenic Designer (DR) characters (Lola and Charlie) is extreme. How do JM: Contrary to the world of the factory, the
the elements of your design support both of the drag queens are beauty and style – in one
Join us as we jump into conversation with three characters’ worlds? way or another – and some have a trashy
members of the KINKY BOOTS design team! GB: Colour is always your most important style! Again, I worked closely with Gregg to
tool. Next, we shape the little details that aid come up with individual looks for these girls.
Q: Can you describe your design concept for
the actor in telling the story. The factory Lola has to be the opposite of Charlie.
KINKY BOOTS the musical? Charlie is handsome with hair that is perhaps
workers wear a lot of layers and colours that
DR: The goal was to create sets that are cool like clothes that are worn and have due for a cut whereas Lola is all glamour
reference the locations depicted in the film, little “stories” that are built in because of how inspired by many of today’s current divas.
but in no way attempt to physically recreate they are used at the factory. A little trick that The ‘ladies’ around Lola complement his
them. At the start of the design process, from we have built in with the Factory ladies is that style with individual characteristics of their
the first conversation with the director and their clothes become a bit brighter and tidier own. I used the world around me to design
choreographer, Jerry Mitchell, the idea was as they spend time with Lola. She inspires these looks. I saw what women are wearing
to design a single physical environment that them to take a bit more care with their on television and in fashion magazines and
could somehow serve the entire play up on the street.
until the final transformation to the climactic
scene at the International Milan Shoe Fair.
The result was what could be described as “...there is a kind of honesty in the design
a three-dimensional collage of an aging
British shoe factory. that pulls people instantly into a story of
GB: The concept? It is a big word isn’t it?
I’d say that the design celebrates family in a
funny way; the extended family that we all
real people and the lessons that are learned
create once we leave home and go out into
the word to find our way. The family of the
about the universality of feelings and the
Factory Workers and the family that Lola has
created with her “Angels” are different in so common traits that we all share...”
many details but, at heart, they have more in
common than it first appears. appearance. The men resist Lola and we
GB: In contrast to the world of the factory
try to help that along as well.
JM: The design behind KINKY BOOTS and the workers, the Angels and Lola wear
shows the flat, regular working life in a factory DR: To contrast Charles’ and Lola’s lives, we clothes that are brighter, more fashion
verses the theatrical beauty of drag queens designed the factory to be able to transform conscious, more theatrical. They are
on stage. The time period is contemporary itself from the staid, solid, iron and brick performers and create the illusion of being
but for the hair design, I tried as much as world of Charlie’s Northampton, and of women. There is a lot of thought and care
possible to keep the factory workers a little Charlie himself, to the flash and dazzle of that have gone into getting them “right.”
bit dated; like they have been hanging onto a Lola’s drag club in London, and of Lola
style from their youth. They got stuck at their herself. Our primary method to create this
favorite period of life about 20 years ago like transformation was based on rivets – a major
so many people do. part of 19 th century factory design. There are Continued on next page

10 interview
Q: What other factors have influenced your design? JM: I worked very closely with Gregg to craft each other and that is a credit to the singular
a look for each character. Gregg is a master vision of Jerry Mitchell, our director. The story
DR: The need to create a distinct
and very inspirational to watch as he carefully is based on real events and there is a kind
transformation at the end of the show
considers every aspect of a character and of honesty in the design that pulls people
moving from Northampton to Milan was a
commonly gives actors ways to enhance their instantly into a story of real people and the
considerable influence. So while our research
performances. For the character of Lauren, we lessons that are learned about the universality
for the factory concentrated on the look
went the opposite of dated. She is trying to be of feelings and the common traits that we all
and feel of an old and worn out 19 th century
very hip and perhaps bleached her hair and share even though we come together from
factory building, in contrast, our research
styled it like someone she saw in a music many diverse paths.
for the shoe fair focused distinctly on the
magazine. She tries to settle into factory life DR: Three things in particular were very
21st century – on the new, the fashionable,
but is maybe a little too feisty for it. This idea satisfying in the final design of KINKY
and the cutting edge. The result was sleek,
of a ‘dated’ world is also reflected in David’s BOOTS. First, the factory space success-
tubular black steelwork walls and randomly
beautifully rugged set and I think all design fully captured the sense of that gritty, old
attached mirror panels. The steelwork walls
aspects complement each other very well. industrial work space, yet at the same time in
were an echo of the older factory ironwork,
but their cool black finish and the crisp mirror GB: I also called friends of mine in London a curiously romantic way was in keeping with
panels were distinctly contemporary. Behind and they turned me on to Coronation Street, the fairytale rhythms of a musical comedy.
it all is a “Bubble Light Wall,” composed of which is a long running television series. Second, the original concept of playing all
more than 1,500 light bulbs attached to I looked at many episodes of that for of the scenes – not just the literal factory
another mirrored surface and controlled by combinations of colour, how things are scenes – within
16 circuits, which allow the lights to appear layered and the sort of work clothes that the environment of the factory worked as
to chase each round and about as well as are featured in that working class setting. well as it did. And lastly, the final scene at
create innumerable flashing patterns. The For the Angels and Lola that is more of a the Milan Shoe Fair was such a complete
desire was to create a high fashion funhouse flight of fancy but I tried to make each one transformation, but with a relatively
that would stand in stark contrast to a far unique and to take advantage of the cast minimum amount of scenery. The stark
more serious Price & Son factory. that has been assembled by studying their contrast between the rusting, grimy treadmills
personas. I watched the first three seasons of Northampton and the black lacquered
GB: I always look to many sources for
of RuPaul’s Drag Race to inspire me as well! chrome runways of Milan is very satisfying in
inspiration. [Director/Choreographer,] Jerry
the event.
Mitchell and the cast all went and visited the Q: In terms of design, what do you find most
actual factory where the story is set. Photos JM: This is a beautiful production. Every
striking about this production? stage picture not only tells a story but looks
from those visits were extremely helpful. I also
GB: I think we have created a beautiful, richly textured and interesting as well!
studied the film which is something that I
simple, cohesive design for the actor’s to
usually avoid, but the extras in the background
work through this touching and amusing
are actual factory workers (not actors) and it
story. I love how all of the elements support
gives the film a texture that is honest.

11 interview continued
STUDENT
APPENDIX
APPENDIX
APPENDIX SHEET 10:SKETCHES
S:S:S:COSTUME
COSTUME
COSTUME COSTUME SKETCHES
SKETCHES
SKETCHES

12 STUDENT SHEET 10: COSTUME SKETCHES


82APPENDIX
8282 APPENDIXSS–S––COSTUME
APPENDIX COSTUMESKETCHES
COSTUME SKETCHES
SKETCHES
STUDENT
APPENDIX
APPENDIX
APPENDIX SHEET 10:SKETCHES
S:S:S:COSTUME
COSTUME
COSTUME COSTUME SKETCHES continued
SKETCHES
SKETCHES

13 STUDENT SHEET 10: COSTUME SKETCHES continued


83APPENDIX
8383 APPENDIXSS–S––COSTUME
APPENDIX COSTUMESKETCHES
COSTUME SKETCHES
SKETCHES
Lesson 4: set design
Duration: 50 minutes - 1 hour

Learning objective:
• To analyse how the set and staging was used to reflect different themes in the musical.

Activity:
Ask the class to discuss the set design in groups. You may want to print a selection of the images from the
Images Pack.

Share back their observations with the class. Use the following questions to prompt analytical responses.

• How did the set help tell the story?

• Did it look realistic, or has the designer used some abstract features to tell the story?

• What colour palette has the designer used?

• How does the set move and change during the production? What elements are available to a set designer
when working in the theatre? (Set moving in from the wings, or from above or below the stage.) How does this
help to portray the story?

• What features did you like, what stood out?

• Ask students to think about how the themes and different characters of Kinky Boots are portrayed through the set.

Extension and Key Stage 5:


Props:
Design a prop for one of the Kinky Boots characters. How does this prop represent the character?

14 lesson 4: set design


Lesson 5: Lighting Design
Duration: 50 minutes - 1 hour

Learning objective:
• To evaluate the lighting design in Kinky Boots in detail.

Printable resources:
Use this link to print this fantastic ‘Lighting Drama Terms Poster’:
https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/lighting-drama-terms-poster-6402198
STUDENT SHEET 11: LIGHTING EFFECTS 1
STUDENT SHEET 12: LIGHTING EFFECTS 2
STUDENT SHEET 13: SCRIPT EXTRACT 1

Starter:
• Discuss the lighting design questions from the Evaluation of Live Theatre Worksheet focusing on students initial
responses to lighting design and how this worked with the overall set and costume design of the show.

• Ask students to complete Student Sheet 11: Lighting Effects 1.

• Remind students of different lighting effects on the sheet: gobos, gels, fading, projection etc.

Main activity:
Read through script extract on Student Sheet 13 with students. Explain this is from Act 2 where Lola sings in
her father’s nursing home.

Look at the photograph on Student Sheet 13 - Lighting effect 2. This shows the lighting state for this scene.
Ask students to annotate the picture and add any other comments about the effect of this lighting state.

• Can students analyse why the lighting designer, Kenneth Posner, has chosen this lighting state?

• What consideration has he had to make? Ask students to list some questions that Kenneth would have to
ask himself and the creative team.

• What effect does it have on the audience?

• How does it emphasis the message in Lola’s song and the effect on the audience?

15 Lesson 5: Lighting Design


STUDENT SHEET 11: LIGHTING EFFECTS 1
Fill in the following table.

• Did you notice any of the below being used in the performance of Kinky Boots?
• If so, which scene?
• What effect did this have on the atmosphere of the scene?

Lighting effect Scene or moment in storyline Effect on mood or atmosphere.


How did it make the audience feel?
How did it enhance the storytelling?

Colour

Gobbos

Gels

Spotlights

Filters

Gauzes

Projections

Blackout

Fading and
cross faders

16 STUDENT SHEET 11: LIGHTING EFFECTS 1


STUDENT SHEET 12: LIGHTING EFFECTS 2
Look at the light state below, which is taken from Lola’s song ‘Hold me in your Heart’ in Act 2.

• What specific lights have been used here to light the space?

• What effect does the lighting have on the overall performance of the song?

• Did they help to build atmosphere, and if so, in what way?

17 STUDENT SHEET 12: LIGHTING EFFECTS 2


KY - B'way Final 3/29/13
© 2013 by H.Fierstein. KIN 93.

CHARLIE (cont'd)

STUDENT SHEET 13: SCRIPT EXTRACT 1


ays a
Whenever you leave a room, there’s alw h you
ing gap . Just how life wit
great big gap
is. w that I don’t blame
Anyway, I want you to knoway I shot off my yap,
you for being angry. The
I could. Leave it to
I’d walk out on myself ifsion and use it to
me to finally fin d my pas
hurt someone I love.
flowing
LOLA is slowly revealed in
gown, ups tage.

CHARLIE (cont'd)
an. Forget the boots
But forget me. Forget Mil to say was; if
and business. What I wanted you you’re something
anyone ever tries to tell
e the m see me. If being
less than a man, you hav ugh to take on the
a man means being brave eno the ONLY man I’ve ever
entire world then you’re You challenged Don
known. Certainly the best. the one who really
to change his mind, but I’m
needed that lesson.
RT
MUSIC: HOLD ME IN YOUR HEA
(vamp)

CHARLIE (cont'd) ling


So, this is Charlie from Northampton tel
terribly sorry.
Simon from Clacton he’s soyou.
Goodbye, Lola. And thank
HE hangs up the phone.

M
INT. SMALL RECREATION ROO
ins to
LOLA steps forward and beg
sing.

LOLA
ANYMORE
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE ME GH OUT LOUD
YOU CAN'T LISTEN TO ME LAU
DANCE
YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE ME NCE
YOU CAN'T EVEN TAKE THE CHA YOU
THAT IT MIGHT REFLEC T ON
T PART OF ME
YOU MISSED OUT ON THE BES I AM TODAY.
THE PART THAT MAD E ME WHO
ME
OH, BUT THE BEST PART OF
IS STANDING IN FRO NT OF YOU
AND LOVES YOU ANYWAY.
HOLD ME IN YOUR HEART
TILL YOU UNDERSTAND
HOLD ME IN YOUR HEART
JUST THE WAY THAT I AM

18 STUDENT SHEET 13: SCRIPT EXTRACT 1


Lesson 5: Sound Design
Learning objective:
• To explore and express yourself through sound design and peer collaboration.

Printable resources: STUDENT SHEET 14: SCRIPT EXTRACT 2

Equipment:
A range of percussion instruments, or plastic bottles, cutlery, cardboard boxes etc.

Activity:
• Divide students into groups of 4 or 5.

• Read over the script extract together. Explain this is where Charlie is talking to factory worker Lauren. She is
trying to convince him to change the types of shoes the factory makes. There is factory noise in the background
and during the scene a telephone rings and the shoe alarms goes off. This signifies that a batch of shoes is ready
on the production line.
• Show students pictures of factory interiors to help them visualise the heavy machinery and materials used.

• Give students ten minutes to play-build and develop a sixty second soundscape that demonstrates
REINVENTION/CHANGE.

• All groups must have the same scene location (a shoe factory) but each student contributes a sound that
represents something happening within the factory.

• Encourage the students to be creative, expressive and original with their sounds – no dialogue at this stage.
Tell students to think about repetition and layering.

• The lead sound designer could act as a conductor controlling the dynamics using hand gesture for volume,
starting and stopping.

• Roam the room listening, suggesting and assisting where necessary. After 10 minutes stop the workshop
and get groups to share their soundscape.

• Explain that the groups should now add lines of Kinky Boots dialogue from the script extract over the soundscape.

• Ask students to aim to create dramatic tension through the pauses, sounds and dynamics in their soundscape.

• Discuss how sound added to the effect of the dialogue.

• Groups share their newly REINVENTED factory soundscape.

19 Lesson 5: Sound Design


KY - B'way Final 3/29/13
© 2013 by H.Fierstein. KIN 28.

STUDENT SHEET 14: SCRIPT EXTRACT 2


BACK TO THE STAGE:
LOLA (CONT’D)
AND LIKE JE SUIS
JE SUIS
ANGELS

OOH-WEE
THAT’S ME
EBONY LOLA
I’M LOLA

REN.
CHARLIE is faced with LAU

CHARLIE
can’t keep making
But what else can I do? We
..
things that no one wants.

LAUREN
do.
Then make something they
HING
The MUSIC COMES TO A SCREEC
HALT.

CHARLIE
what?
“Make something they do”
LAUREN
t. Change the
Make something they do wan
product.
CHARLIE
make shoes.
This is a shoe factory. We
a vamp.
MUSIC - starts up again as

LAUREN
r at the Whitcomb
Not ones anyone wants. Ove k of all-weather
factory: They not ed a lac
rted making all-
hiking shoes. So they stasaved the factory.
weathe r hiking sho es and
sandals. All the sods
Toby’s has started makingking for an under-
who surviv ed went out loo
ed to fill the void.
served niche market and aim ir offices whining,
They didn’t sit up in the
“What else can I do? ”
ng with
THE SHOE ALARM sounds alo OFFICE.
the telephone in CHARLIE’S

:
SHOE STORE FRONT IN LONDON
the SHOE
NICOLA stands in front of cel
STORE from the opening, her
phone in hand.

20 STUDENT SHEET 14: SCRIPT EXTRACT 2