A PROJECT REPORT ON

ANALYSING THE WORKING OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION DISTRIBUTION LIST:
CORPORATE GUIDE: FACULTY GUIDE: MR. GAURAV CHAUHAN, PROF. RACHIT HALDIYA TERRITORY MANAGER, TAFE LTD. FACULTY FMS-IRM, JAIPUR. JAIPUR.

SUBMITTED BY: RAJVEER SHARMA ENROL. NO. BM/JULY/09/2050, 3rd SEMESTER, PGDM-BM (MARKETING) SUBMITTED FOR PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Faculty of Management Studies – Institute of Rural Management

ACKNOWLEGEMENT
It is almost inevitable to incur indebtedness to all who generously helped me, by devoting their valuable time and sharing their experiences with me without which this project would never have been accomplished. I extend my heartiest thanks to Brig. S.K Gaur (Director FMS-IRM), FMS-IRM faculty members for their regular assistance all throughout the project. I would like to give special thanks to Prof. Rachit Haldiya, academic guide for teaching me silver lining in every dark cloud. I would like to convey my sincere thanks to Mr. Alok Singh (Deputy General Manager, TAFE .Ltd) and Mr. Manoj Chandalia (Senior Area Manager, TAFE Ltd.) for giving us support, guidance & opportunity to do our summer internship with TAFE Pvt.Ltd. I would also like to express gratitude towards Mr. Gaurav Chauhan, my project guide for his guidance, constructive criticism and motivation and for his tremendous patience and understanding while training and thereby helping me in bring
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out my task in the present shape. Unfortunately now he has left the organization. It’s a great pleasure to acknowledge the gratitude I feel towards other employees of TAFE, who have shared their ideas and experience, which was of great help to me for the accomplishment of the project. Last but not the least, I acknowledge all the respondents who have responded in the survey and have made data collection.

CERTIFICATE
Certified that this project report entitled “ ANALYSING THE WORKING OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH Mr. RECOMMENDATIONS SHARMA , under FOR my EFFECTIVE guidance and IMPLEMENTATION” is a record of project work done by RAJVEER supervision and that it has not previously formed the basis for the award of any degree , fellowship or associate ship to him .

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Date: Haldiya Prof. of any other institute/society. for any degree/diploma associate ship. Rachit Faculty Guide DECLARATION I hereby declare that this project entitled “ANALYSING THE WORKING OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION” is a bonafide record of work done by us during the course of summer project work and that it has not previously formed the basis for the award to us. fellowship or other similar title. 4 .

2MAJOR TRACTOR PLAYERS IN INDIA 19-25 4.1 TRACTOR INDUSTRY: AN OVERVIEW 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5-6 2.3 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROCESS 31-34 5 .4TAFE AWARDS 26-30 5. INTRODUCTION 7-18 2.2TAFE QUALITY 4. MAJOR TRACOR PRODUCERS IN INDIA 3.2 INDIAN TRACTOR INDUSTRY 3.1 INTRODUCTION 5.2 WORKING PROCESS OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 5. PROFILE OF THE ORGANISATION 4. ROLL NO-1608 FMS-IRM TABLE OF CONTENTS S.1INTRODUCTION 4.Date: BM/JULY/09/22/2050 RAJVEER SHARMA Enroll No. LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 5.NO CONTENTS PAGE NO 1.1HISTORY OF TRACTORS 3.3TAFE CORE VALUES 4.

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION SWOT ANALYSIS LITRETURE REVIEW BIBLIOGRAPHY 66-69 70-72 73-77 78 CHAPTER-1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 6 . 8. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 6.2DEALERSHIPS ANALYSIS (MARKET SHARE) 6. FINDINGS.6.3DEALERSHIPS ANALYSIS (LMS) 35-65 7. 9. 10.1OBJECTIVES OF RESEARCH 6.

These processes are designed for business to business and direct to consumer strategies. generally operated through a variety of marketing techniques. systems and practices designed to generate new potential business clientele. The researchers were required to bring out the effectiveness of the present customer acquisition management system of the company by conducting a survey at various dealerships. which they have found during the course of the study and recommended various corrective measures for it. The researchers have mentioned the problems and the loop holes in the TAFE’s lead management system. The researchers visited the urban and rural areas of Jaipur and outside the Jaipur to understand the working of current customer acquisition system in these areas through the study. 7 . Cluster heads and Sales persons regarding that are all inquiries are maintained properly in the TPMS (TAFE prospect management system) which is one of the core operation of the Lead management system of the TAFE Ltd. exclusive showrooms and sales outlets of the company.1. During the course of the study the researchers visited various rural and urban areas in Jaipur and outside the Jaipur. The title of the study is “ ANALYSING THE WORKING OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION “ The study also include the assessment of the company’s DSP’s. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The report is an earnest endeavor made to understand the present general business practices to describe methodologies.

CHAPTER-2 INTRODUCTION 1. sawaimadhopur and gangapur city. karoli. branch offices. TRACTOR INDUSTRY: AN OVERVIEW 2. kotputli. hindaun. The main aim of this study was to understand a system which comprises of mainly three questions: they are (a) what you want to know. exclusive showrooms and sales points of the company at various places in rajasthan which includes. (b) how to store the information in your database and (c) how that information can use to generate the new sales which is the ultimate goal of Lead management system. Jaipur city. chomu. INDIAN TRACTOR INDUSTRY 8 . sanganer.This study was carried out by conducting a survey at various dealerships. dausa.

greater ability of farmers to make cash purchases (including the usage of Kisan Credit Card which are increasingly being used to part-finance tractor purchases). persuading even farmers with medium-sized land holdings to either rent or purchase tractors. availability of labour for agricultural activities continued to decline. These factors apart. On a regional basis. The key factor enabling the demand growth of 2009-10 was strong rural liquidity. the performance of the eastern. thereby ending the phase of cyclical correction that had pulled down tractor sales during the preceding two years (2007-09). while that of the southern region was moderate. Also. the revival of 2009-10 happened despite the drought-like conditions in many States during the kharif1 season dampening sentiments. an improved credit environment. nonagricultural use of tractors (for haulage in construction and infrastructure projects) continued to increase.1 Tractor Industry: An Overview The tractor industry reported a strong 28. albeit on a low base.3% growth in sales volumes during 2009-10. benefiting tractor demand. enhanced employment opportunities (with rural employment schemes being implemented by the Government of India). Significantly. which in turn was sustained by several factors. including: higher minimum support price (MSP) for crops. A strong growth in tractor volumes. northern and western parts of the country was robust during 2009-10 in terms of tractor demand. INTRODUCTION 2. and continuance of replacement demand. was witnessed in the 9 . with infrastructure projects and rural employment schemes increasing employment opportunities.2.

the situation improved during 2009-10 as credit availability improved on the strength of greater liquidity in the banking system. and the growing emphasis on tractor exports augur well for the industry. Historically. Tractor volumes in the northern and western regions also reported strong growth during 2009-10. largely reflecting cyclical corrections. Overall. strong Governmental focus on availability of finance for agriculture mechanization tools and on rural development. in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. 200809. benefiting from a low base (H2. increase in the use of tractors for non-agricultural purposes. the industry also had to cope with theliquidity crunch. especially in the second half (H2) of the year. of late. the fiscal years 2007-08 and 2008-09 both reported a marginal decline in tractor sales volumes. After four years of strong growth during 2003-07. the long-term demand drivers for the industry remain robust. The currently low levels of tractor penetration in India. The southern region reported moderate performance in terms of tractor demand (growth of 11. 2008-09) and a satisfactory kharif crop in some States. being impacted largely by the de-growth in Andhra Pradesh (AP)—a key southern market—where rainfall was irregular in 2009-10. However. which pushed up interest rates. Orissa and Jharkhand. In addition to the cyclical dips. While tractor financing has traditionally been done by PSBs. and crop patterns (monsoon).9% in 2009-10). growth in farm mechanisation and farmers’ remuneration. higher MSPs for rice along with some revival of interest of public sector banks (PSBs) in tractor financing led to strong tractor sales volumes. Background Chart-1 Annual Trends in Tractor Sales Volumes 10 . with tractor demand being closely linked to agricultural output. despite their higher interest rates vis-à-vis the PSBs. have been able to increase their penetration of this market on the strength of faster loan processing and use of more liberal credit norms. during H2. even as financiers resorted to more stringent lending norms in the face of rising non-performing assets (NPAs). being influenced by cyclical trends. However. including Bihar. availability of finance.eastern States. which had a good paddy crop. private banks and non-banking finance companies (NBFCs). tractor demand has been fairly volatile.

Chart 2: Monthly Trends in Tractor Sales Volumes 11 .

that is.The tractor industry reported a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of over 20% in volume terms during the period 2003-07. However. 2008-09 also impacted the profitability of the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). the one that happened during 2007-09 was less severe. given that once prices are lowered it is difficult to raise them subsequently. because of the high price inventory they were carrying. However. This is an accepted practice in the industry. The pickup in volumes also lowered the overhead expenses for the tractor manufacturers. during H2 2009-10. the tractor manufacturers. the situation improved on the cost structure front in H1 2009-10 with the softening of commodity prices preparing the ground for the industry to earn higher profitability margins. with volumes declining by around 3%. The long up-cycle in demand was supported by several factors. including excise duty exemptions on tractors (2004-05). boosting their profitability. with the preceding three fiscal years (2000-03) having witnessed a prolonged phase of volume correction. While the OEMs did not lower the listed sales price of tractors. In contrast to this phase of cyclical slowdown. the tractor majors increased the prices with the reversal of commodity prices and the discounts have also come down. thrust on rural development. The growth also came on a low base. The demand slowdown during H2. despite the intermittent tightening of the liquidity situation during H2. 2008-09. Chart 3: Trends in Profitability Margins of Select Players 12 . the benefit of lower steel prices was passed on to the end customers via discounts. and low interest rates. The cyclical correction during 2000-03 had been aggravated by the build-up of channel inventory with the major players having pushed aggressively for larger sales. improved availability of finances for tractor purchase.

but remained moderate at around 50% during 2008-09. After that. however. the tractor volume growth has helped the OEMs improve their capacity utilizations. In 2009-10. capacity utilisation improved steadily. there is still excess capacity in 13 . following large capacity additions and a volume slump.Capacity utilisation in the tractor industry had hit a low during 2002-03.

including generator engines and cranes. The tractor industry witnessed a strong y-o-y growth of 28. Many of the industry players have thus diversified into related products. Madhya Pradesh (MP). Asia and Africa for future exports. As discussed. and Maharashtra. besides focusing more on exports. Industry Trends by Region The biggest markets for the tractor industry include States like Uttar Pradesh (UP). Thus. with most of the States reporting positive growth during the year. Chart 4: Trend in Tractor Sales across regions Chart 5: Trend in Tractor sales across States 14 . As for tractor exports. Rajasthan. most tractor manufacturers would not need to make any significant capital investments in building capacities. the domestic tractor industry has to cope with demand volatility on account of cyclical trends and the strong linkages it has with agricultural production and monsoon rains. over the medium term. while a major part of that currently goes to USA. to gain some insulation against the volatility in domestic tractor demand. the OEMs are now exploring various other markets across Europe. which together accounted for around 50% of the total tractor sales in India during 2009-10.3% during 2009-10. Andhra Pradesh (AP).the industry.

farmers also received compensation for the Government’s acquisition of select land patches (adjoining highways).7% in volume sales in 2009-10 over the previous fiscal. Tractor sales in Rajasthan were especially low in H2.67. being driven mainly by the higher MSPs announced for paddy. The northern region benefited from higher MSPs (for crops). growth in tractor volumes was relatively subdued in 2009-10 (around 24% y-o-y) as compared with the figure for the northern region as a whole. 2009-10 reporting particularly strong growth (around 51% y-o-y) mainly on the back of high sugarcane prices for the kharif crop and improved irrigation facilities. Tractor volumes in UP grew by 42. with H2.8% over 2008-09. albeit on a small base. where tractor penetration had been low 15 . which increased the availability of cash with them.000 units in 2009-10. tractor volumes continued to report strong growth in 2009-10. This region reported a growth rate of 35. Haryana and Rajasthan.The northern region remains the largest tractor market in India with sales of around 1. increased infrastructure development activities (especially highways) led to appreciation in land values and use of tractors for non-agricultural purposes. and went up by 53. In Rajasthan however. and increasing non-agricultural use of tractors. many financiers remained reluctant to finance tractor purchases in some States like Bihar. 2009-10 versus H1. with the key contributors including UP. due to lower kharif output on account of deficient rains and inadequate financing availability. tractor volumes remained strong for the fifth straight year in 2009-10 (y-o-y growth of 42%). The Bihar market. tractor volumes grew 66% over 2008-09 to around 29. thereby accounting for over 50% of the total sales in the eastern region.7% during 2009-10.000 units as of 2009-10. In the case of Punjab. In some cases. Within the region however. in Bihar. Nevertheless. In the eastern region. Additionally. limited availability of labour (forcing higher mechanisation). Punjab. 2009-10. Feedback from industry players suggests cash purchases (including purchases using Kisan Credit Card) in some northern States increased to 35-40% of the total tractor volumes in 2009-10 from 10-15% in the past.

higher crop prices (of sugarcane and cotton in Maharashtra. the 31-40 HP category had reported sales of 157. 2008-09). the de-growth of 2009-10 was also aided by irregular monsoons. in the eastern region. The performance of the southern region in terms of tractor sales was relatively modest during 2009-10. thereby underperforming the growth in overall tractor volumes (around 19%) that year. Karnataka. with the preceding four to five years having witnessed a large and sustained volume growth. AP. 2009-10 included a benign base effect. Karnataka and Madhya Pradesh. Some Long-Term Demand Drivers for the Industry 1. The main reason for this underperformance was the low growth that the southern region. In 2008-09. While this does indicate the relative backwardness of Indian 16 . the biggest market for this segment. volume growth is expected to moderate in 2010-11 because of the base effect. which is the largest tractor market in the south. The >51 HP segment of the Indian tractor market also underperformed the industry growth rate in 2009-10 mainly because of the de-growth in the exports which is a key demand area for these high HP tractors. 2009-10 mainly because of improved retail financing by the PSBs. with 31-40 HP tractors accounting for around 47% of the total industry volumes. 2009-10 (55% y-o-y growth over H2. Overall. however. In 2009-10 however. Industry Trends by Tractor Horse Power (HP) The Indian tractor market has traditionally been a medium HP market.9% over the previous fiscal. tractor sales were flat during H1. the revival was led by UP. Gujarat and MP posted during H2. with the volume growing by 22%2 over 2008-09. but the performance improved in H2. While most States in the region reported healthy growth. Low penetration of tractors in Indian agriculture: Indian agriculture is characterised by low farm mechanisation.historically. which accounts for around 23% of the total industry volumes.602 tractor units. The other major segment in the Indian tractor market is the 41-50 HP range. and of cereals and soyabean in MP). as the benefit of a low base get diluted gradually. which was about the same as the previous year’s figure but lower than the 2006-07 statistic by 7%. The AP market has been undergoing a volume correction since 2007-08. The western region reported sales of around 92. Tractor penetration in India is low at around 13 tractors per 1. The other big market in the southern region.000 tractor units during 2009-10—a growth rate of 35. reported in 2009-10. fragmented land holdings. 2009-10. and greater availability of retail finance.4% in 2009-10. and high dependence on monsoon rains (in the absence of adequate irrigation facilities).7% over the previous fiscal—benefiting particularly from the strong performance that Maharashtra. has shown sustained growth over the last few years and become one of the important markets for the tractor industry. with the growth rate being around 11. In Tamil Nadu. reported growth of 74% in tractor volumes in 2009-10 mainly on the strength of higher MSPs for rice. this factor apart.000 hectares as against the global average of 19 and the US average of 29. The factors contributing to the strong growth in the region during H2. This segment grew by around 10% during 200910. this category reported a strong revival. going forward. growth in tractor volumes is expected to moderate. de-grew by 10.

and fiscal stimulus for rural development. although larger players could benefit from scale economics. with measures such as nil excise duty on tractors (even the excise duty on tractor parts has been lowered from 16% to 8%) and inclusion of tractor financing under priority sector lending (by PSBs) serving as long-term demand drivers. In the developed markets. the continuing firmness in the prices of agricultural products. and the healthy monsoons anticipated during the coming kharif season. given the good rabi crop this time around. which is why the sector remains a strong focus area for the Government. with the USA. it being a key demand facilitator. tax exemptions.900 tractors during 2009-10. Export of tractors: Indian tractor manufacturers have been increasingly targeting the international markets over the last few years. Overall. 3. Indian tractors have a relatively marginal presence. The industry’s profitability is however expected to remain moderate in the medium term. supported by increasing tractor penetration. considering the high competitive intensity and low capacity utilisation levels. The industry exported a total of around 37. Outlook Tractor sales are expected to remain healthy in fiscal 2010-11. 17 . higher credit disbursements for agriculture. Moreover. The tractor industry benefits significantly from the Governmental focus on agriculture. has acquired Yancheng Tractors. the penetration remains low. they would remain vulnerable to adverse changes in commodity prices. to improve its presence in the country. on an all-India basis. South America. which bodes well for tractor demand over the long term. which along with the current shortage of farm labour and consequently rising labour costs. Africa. While some States in the northern region have achieved high levels of tractor penetration and farm mechanisation. while they have seen an improvement in 2009-10. The industry leader. and some Asian countries being the top destinations. Financing of tractor purchase is of great significance for the industry. 2. the fourth largest tractor manufacturer in China (in terms of FY2008 volumes). Mahindra and Mahindra (M&M). and sharper Governmental focus on the farm sector (larger budgetary allocations) are also expected to encourage tractor sales.agriculture. ICRA expects the long-term growth rate for the Indian tractor industry to trend around the historical average of 68%. increasing nonagricultural use of tractors. As for margins. may be expected to lead to greater mechanisation and use of tractors. it provides employment to a large rural population. improving farm mechanisation levels (with labour availability in rural areas declining). with sales being largely restricted to the hobby farming segment. Government support for the agricultural sector: Although agriculture contributes just around 20% to India’s GDP. The long-term prospects for the Indian tractor industry hinge on agricultural growth and Government support in areas such as financing availability. it also points to the significant scope that exists for raising tractor penetration.

with the 31-40 HP category alone accounting for around 50% of this.8%). accounting for one third of global production. U. western and eastern Europe towards india and china. Market share of major tractor players in india 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 M&M T E AF L&-JOH N DEE ER OT E S HR ES COR TS INTER NATIONAL TR ACTOR S The long-term prospects of the Indian tractor industry are highly dependent on Government policies for the agriculture sector.1%). followed by Tractors and Farm Equipments TAFE. and International Tractors Limited (8. The global spotlight on tractor manufacturing in terms of unit volume seems to be swinging away from the U. Historically.K. The industry is dominated by Mahindra and Mahindra (M&M) with a market share of around 41. During the last few years.9%). The Indian tractor industry has around 13 national players and a few regional players. the industry has seen some consolidation with M&M acquiring Punjab Tractors (PTL) and TAFE acquiring Eicher Tractors.S. L&T-John Deere (7. which holds around 22% of the market. The other major players include Escorts (12.2 Indian tractor Industry The indian tractor industry is the largest tractor industry in the world.2. . most tractor sales are done on credit even as over the last few years financial institutions. Most of the tractors sold in India are in the 21-50 HP range. .1%. facing an increase in their non-performing assets 18 .

Gujarat. Maharashtra. Better irrigated States like Punjab and Haryana have a high tractor density (over 100 per 1. is expected to grow in future and remain one of the biggest tractor markets in the world. besides China and the USA. tractor penetration remains low at around 13 per 1. which remain a key factor in determining agricultural production. Chart 6: Trend in state wise market share 19 . Besides being used in farming. a directed-lending mechanism of the Government of India. have resorted to some tightening of credit norms. tractors find application in activities such as harvesting and irrigation. Himachal.000 hectares). reflecting the rise in disposable incomes in the rural markets. there has been a sharp increase in cash purchases. The prospects of the domestic industry are highly linked to monsoon rains. MP and West Bengal have low levels of tractor penetration—a pointer to the substantial growth potential that the latter set offers. the tractors are also being used for non-agricultural purposes including haulage in construction and infrastructure projects which has expanded the tractor market. Tamil Nadu. India is one of the largest tractor markets in the world.000 hectares. In terms of volume. lately. during 2009-10. drawing water and powering agricultural implements. In addition. while States like Rajasthan. The Indian tractor market. On an all-India basis. Most of the tractor financing done by banks comes under priority sector lending. thus. land reclamation. Also. Andhra.(NPAs).

4% market share during 200910). mainly at the expense of M&M (market share down by 140 bps) and Escorts (down by 140 bps). In the eastern region. In the western region too. M&M remained the market leader with around 41. increasing its market share by 190 bps. M&M was able to raise its market share by around 140 bps in 2009-10 at the expense of Escorts and TAFE.1% market share. 20 . there. and International Tractors (ITL) with around 8. However. 2008-09 (bps) M&M remains particularly strong in the southern region (50. Chart 7: Movement in Regional Market Shares of Select Players 2009-10 vs.Region-wise Market Shares of Various Players The market shares of the top four players in the Indian tractor industry did not change much during 2009-10 in comparison with 2008-09.1%. where M&M has been traditionally weak. LT-JD performed well in 2009-10. the company increased its market share by 140 bps during 2009-10.9. followed by TAFE with a market share of around 22%. L&T John Deere (LT-JD) was able to increase its market share in the region by around 250 bps in 2009-10. Escorts with around 12. In the northern region. even as ITL and Escorts lost market shares by around 90 bps and 60 bps respectively. even as TAFE lost market share by around 90 bps there.

CHAPTER-3 MAJOR TRACTOR PRODUCERS IN INDIA 1. MAJOR TRACTOR PLAYERS IN INDIA 21 . HISTORY OF TRACTORS 2.

000 per year.1 HISTORY OF TRACTORS: As commercialization of agriculture grew in intensity in the mid to late 1800s the British Raj and the local legislatures and provinces began investing in agricultural development through support and establishment agricultural research farms and colleges and large scale irrigation schemes yet the level of mechanization was low at the time of independence in 1947.500 tractors in use in 1951. By 1970 annual production had exceeded 20.000 by 1980. Credit facilities for farmers continued to improve and the tractor market expanded rapidly with the total in use passing the half million mark by 1980.000 units working in the country. There were 8. Despite this aggressiveness the first three decades after independence local production of 4-wheel tractors grew slowly. 22 .000 in 1955 and 37. indicating large opportunities still exist for agricultural mechanization. less than 50% is under mechanized land preparation. 20. Harsha Tractors and Pittie Tractors) did not survive.000 units per year and by the late 1990s with production approaching 270. Despite these impressive numbers FAO statistics estimate that of total agricultural area in India. the demand was met entirely through imports. 1961 to 1970 Local production began in 1961 with five manufacturers producing a total of 880 units per year. Yet. The socialist oriented five year plans of the 1950s and 60s aggressively promoted rural mechanization via joint ventures and tie-ups between local industrialists and international tractor manufacturers. began local manufacture of Ford tractors in 1971 in collaboration with Ford. by the late 1980s tractor production was nearly 140. Escorts Ltd. 1945 to 1960 War surplus tractors and bulldozers were imported for land reclamation and cultivation in mid 1940's. By 1965 this had increased to over 5000 units per year and the total in use had risen to over 52.3.000 units with over 146. India over-took the United States as the world's largest producer of four-wheel tractors with over 16 national and 4 multi-national corporations producing tractors today. In 1947 central and state tractor organizations were set up to develop and promote the supply and use of tractors in agriculture and up to 1960.000.000 in 1975 reaching 71. UK and total production climbed steadily to 33.000 by 1960. 1971 to 1980 Six new manufacturers were established during this period although three companies (Kirloskar Tractors.

Larsen and Toubro have established a joint venture with John Deere. where farmers who were not financially able took tractors in moves to increase their families prestige. Annual production exceeded 75. it has not been necessary to obtain an industrial license for tractor manufacture in India. 1997 to 1999 Five new manufacturers have started production since 1997. 23 .000. Looking to South American export markets Mahindra and Mahindra are also developing a joint venture with Case for tractors in the 60-200 hp range.2 million. By 1997 annual production exceeded 255. eastern Uttar Pradesh) tractors sales began a slow and slight decline.became an exporter in the 1980s mainly to countries in Africa.000 units by 1985 and reached 140. Total annual production was forecast to reach 300. USA for the manufacture of 35-65 hp tractors at a plant in Pune. Maharashtra and Greeves Ltd will produce Same tractors under similar arrangements with Same Deutz-Fahr of Italy. By 2004 a slight up tick in sales once again due to stronger and national and to some extent international markets.000 during the following year. or for social functions.000. But by 2006 sales once again were down to 216. Manufacturers scrambled to push into eastern and southern India markets in an attempt to reverse the decline. already well established in the motor industry.000 in 1990 when the total in use was about 1.000 units and the national tractor population had passed the two million mark.a net importer up to the mid-seventies . Haryana. began tractor production in Pune. 1999 to Present Facing market saturation in the traditional markets of the north west (Punjab. In April of the same year New Holland Tractor (India) Ltd launched production of 70 hp tractors with matching equipment.1981 to 1990 A further five manufacturers began production during this period but only one of these survived in the increasingly competitive market place.000 and now in 2007-08 have slid further to just over 200. and began exploring the potential for overseas markets. 1991 to 1997 Since 1992. There are also reported increased misuse of these loans for buying either lifestyle goods. By 2002 sales went below 200. The company is making a $US 75 million initial investment in a state of the art plant at Greater Noida in Uttar Pradesh state with an initial capacity of 35000 units per year. Then India . and added to the market saturation problems also came increased problems of "prestige" loan defaults. In 1998 Bajaj Tempo. India now emerged as one of the world leaders in wheeled tractor production. Government and private banks have both tightened their lending for this sector adding to the industry and farmers woes. Sales remained in a slump.

.2 MAJOR TRACTOR PLAYERS IN INDIA: Major tractor players in india 1) MAHINDRA & MAHINDRA (M&M) 2) TAFE ( TRACTOR & FARM EQUIPMENTS LTD. After M&M's organizational restructuring in 1994. this division was 24 . International Harvester Inc. and was named International Tractor Company of India (ITCI).3. 1.JOHN DEERE 5) INTERNATIONAL TRACTORS LTD. ITCI merged with M&M and became its Tractor Division. MAHINDRA & MAHINDRA TRACTORS M&M's Farm Equipment Sector origins lie in a joint venture in 1963 between the Company. and Voltas Limited. In 1977.) 3) ESCORTS 4) L & T.

Apart from these two main manufacturing units. etc. M&M has two main tractor manufacturing plants located at Mumbai and Nagpur in Maharashtra. In March 2007. the Farm Equipment Sector has satellite plants located at Rudrapur in Uttarachal and Jaipur in Rajasthan. and renamed it Mahindra Jiangling Motor Co Group (JMCG).1% market share & it is market leader.6%. situated in all the major cities and covering all the principal states and M&M tractors has sold more than 13. marine. The plant in China reportedly has a production capacity of 12. This dealer network is managed by 28 area offices. industrial. And in a reversal to earlier trends of Indian tractor manufactures with joint ventures with western tractor companies. construction. in 2004 announced that they had bought majority stake (80%) in Jiangling Tractor Company. compressors.000 tractors since its inception. This is the first instance of Indian tractor industries participating in India's reverse FDI. Currently it has nearly 41.called the Farm Equipment Sector. M&M Industrial engines are used for various applications like generator sets. The Farm Equipment Sector has also ventured into manufacturing of Industrial Engines.00. M&M. In July 2007. These engines are manufactured at the Company's engine assembly plants at Kandivli and Nagpur.2% by the Delhi-based Burman family. Mahindra upped its stake to 64. TAFE 25 .000 tractors annually. The 43% stake includes 29% owned by private equity firm Actis Capital and 14. The Farm Equipment Sector as reported by the Company has a dealer network of over 450 dealers. 2. M&M bought a controlling 43% stake in the Mohali-based tractor firm Punjab Tractors (Swaraj) that will reportedly increase M&M's share in the domestic farm equipment market from just over 30% to 40%. M&M's Farm Equipment Sector is perhaps the largest exporter of Indian tractors to the USA and the west.

3.000 in 1975 reaching 71. Powertrac and Farmtrac. ESCORT TRACTORS Escorts Ltd began local manufacture of Ford tractors in 1971 in collaboration with Ford. Ford (Ford . now owns 24% of TAFE. Tractors are built and sold in India under both the TAFE and Massey Ferguson brands. but the name was allowed to continue as per agreement until 2000. 4. L&T-JOHN DEERE 26 .Tractors and Farm Equipment Limited (TAFE) was established in 1961 to manufacture and market Massey Ferguson tractors and related farm equipment in India. and exported under both brands as well. the owner of Massey Ferguson. when Escorts relabeled its Ford models under the Escort brand. UK and total production climbed steadily to 33. In 2005. Ford Motor Company proper quit the tractors business. TAFE bought the Eicher Motors tractor and engine division. Escort. Escort manufactures produces tractors in the 27-75 HP range and has already sold over 6 lac tractors. Its tractors are marketed under three brand names.000 by 1980. AGCO.New Holland) was sold in 1992.

is known as John Deere Equipment Private Limited. and under the John Deere name for worldwide sales. Mexico. 1995 and began manufacturing tractors designed by Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI).John Deere name for sale in India. Pune factory started to produce new 55 to 75 Hp 5003 series tractors for European market in 2008. Turkey.In 2000. 47. It was known as L&T John Deere Private Ltd. The factory currently produces tractors in of 35. and 27 . in a rural area near Pune. North and South Africa. 50. In 2005. and South East Asia. 40. Deere & Company acquired nearly all the remaining shares in this joint venture. Maharashtra. ITL currently is manufacturing Sonalika tractors between 30 HP to 90 HP. 5. and manufactured tractors under the L&T . 42. 55 and 70 HP capacities for domestic markets and for export to the USA. The new enterprise. INTERNATIONAL TRACTORS International Tractors Limited was incorporated on October 17. John Deere set up production in a joint venture with Larsen & Toubro Ltd in Sanaswadi.

These five major tractor players consistitutes more than 90% of the total tractor market of india.the CERES brand between 60HP to 90HP. CHAPTER-4 COMPANY PROFILE & ITS PRODUCTS 28 . (d) Punjab Tractors Ltd. ( swaraj tractors) etc. Renault Agriculture is a subsidiary of the Renault Group. (c) New Holland Tractors. But together the market presence of these tractors are is not more than 10% and there sale is limited to very few regions in india. Incidentally CLAAS already has a strong presence in India market producing its Crop Tiger range of Combine Harvesters in a plant in Faridabad (near New Delhi) since 1992. Force motors Ltd. CLASS has opened a new plant in Punjab at Morinda in 2006. ITL went into collaboration with Renault Agricultural of France in July 2000. There are few other players such as: (a) Balwan Tractors. Ltd. (b) Captain Tractors Pvt. Renault Agriculture was bought by CLAAS of Germany in 2003.

COMPANY PROFILE AND PRODUCTS 4. USA). this company has four plants involved in tractor manufacturing at Mandidheep (Bhopal). A member of the Amalgamations Group of Chennai.4 INTRODUCTION TAFE QUALITY TAFE CORE VALUES TAFE AWARDS 4.2 4.3 4. Kallidaipatti (Madurai). TAFE acquired the Eicher tractors business. its engine plant at Alwar and transmissions plant at Parwanoo through a wholly owned subsidiary “TAFE Motors and Tractors Limited.4.1 4. in collaboration with Massey Ferguson (now owned by AGCO corporation. Doddabalbur (Bangalore) 29 .1 Introduction TAFE is a US$750 million tractor major incorporated in 1960 at Chennai in India.

gears. a Diesel Engine plant at Alwar. panel instruments. TAFE Access Limited is a wholly owned subsidiary of TAFE involved in the manufacture and marketing of farm implements. IT. trailers and accessories. TAFE is certified by both ISO 9001 and ISO 14001.and in Chennai. apart from the tractor manufacturing plant at Mandideep mentioned above. TAFE Motors and Tractors Limited has.2 TAFE Quality The quality movement in TAFE has evolved over the years into a way of life. Apart from being among the top five tractor manufacturers in the world. This movement is not restricted to traditional areas such as manufacturing but is company wide and is aimed at ensuring we as a corporate entity set the industry benchmarks for the quality of both products and services. 30 . 4. Rajasthan producing a range of air cooled and water cooled diesel engines up to 80 HP with plans are on to increase the product range up to 125 KVA. white goods and automotive sector and have the distinction of being awarded Toyota Quality Award. TAFE pioneered quality circle movement in the tractor industry and has over fifty quality circles in place. engineering plastics. Kaizen and Six Sigma find wide application in the company. TAFE’s Engineering Plastics Division produces a range of components for the consumer electronics. The Transmissions Division located at Parwanoo in Himachal Pradesh produces a range of transmission components both for captive use as well as for sale to OE manufacturers. hydraulic pumps. As well as for sale directly through a dedicated distribution channel under the brand name of “Speed”. distribution of passenger cars. manufacture of hydraulic pumps and panel instruments to discerning customers both in India and overseas. TAFE is also involved in making diesel engines. TAFE’s Power Source Division produces a range of automotive batteries for both 2-wheeler and 4-wheeler applications for sale through AMCO Batteries Ltd. plantations and passenger car distribution through other divisions and wholly owned subsidiaries. Japanese quality management services such as 5S. Kanban.

3 TAFE Core Values Through setting leadership standards in performance and customer care. CORE VALUES Customer satisfaction : We may not be able to wipe the sweat from the customer's brow but we can certainely put a smile on their face. Through an in-house process. 4. this effort is unique in itself and this flow of inputs from the field to the product development group has resulted in new products launched by the tractor group gaining immediate and wide acceptance in the market. 31 . In the tractor industry. we make it possible to crystallize the customer’s stated and unstated needs into products on the basis of continuous interaction with customers at the plant as well as in the field by our Multi Disciplinary Teams. Extensive testing with direct customer involvement both at plant as well as in the field make us refine our products before they are finally launched. TAFE has achieved the distinction of being the first choice of the farmer and a growing presence in the international market.The focus on Total Quality Management. Customer Focus The product development effort at TAFE is strictly customer driven. upgrading Vendor Quality and productivity and strategic tie-ups with quality management specialists from Japan and change management exercise spearheaded by the Warwick Management Group has paid rich dividends in terms of more cost effective operations as well as being acknowleded by customers as manufacturers of quality products.

Human resources : We are not just indivisuals doing our respective jobs. Our people matter. preparing and facing changes in a world where the only thing that is permanent. 4. The commendation to Tractors and Farm Equipment Limited (TAFE). We are partners in progress. for “Strong commitment to excel on the journey towards excellence”. 32 .Quality in products and services : An uncompromising focus on quality not just in products but in all that we do. we don't forget our commitment to serve our society for everything that it has given us. first tractor company to be recognized for strong commitment to excel at CII -EXIM Bank Award for Excellence. with our business associates. Trust & long term relationships with stake holders : We value relationships and we live it. Business ethics : Our strong foundation has been ethical practices and open and transparent operations. Environment and society : While serving our company. Proactive response to change : We create value by anticipating.4 TAFE Awards TAFE. is change itself. was announced at the 15th Quality Summit conducted by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) based on an independent assessment of the organization.

J. It also supports schools near its plants with infrastructural inputs. In fact its Chennai plant is a bird sanctuary that attracts many varieties of migrant birds. support and care to people suffering from terminal illnesses such as cancer. which would have otherwise considered them as liabilities. Its plants are lush bases of greenery that are nurtured with sensitivity and care.4. Projects TAFE partners institutions offering treatment.TAFE is certified under ISO 14001 for its environment management systems. It provides these women a conducive surrounding to work in and all the special facilities they need.5 TAFE Social Concern Eco friendly products & plants TAFE’s products are engineered to more than meet emission standards. 33 . All our products satisfy current emission norms and work is afoot to enhance products to conform to US tier 3 norms. All its plants practice rain water harvesting to ensure water table rejuvenation. to be financially independent and respected members of society. It has been and will continue to be at the forefront of support at times of natural calamities. Rehab Centre TAFE empowers orthopaedically challenged women living in and around Madurai through its JRehab centre.

2 WORKING PROCESS OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN TAFE 5.CHAPTER-5 LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 5.3 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROCESS LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 34 .1 INTRODUCTION 5.

critical opportunities to mishandle an inquiry that reduces or destroys its potential value. Lead management facilitates a business's connection between its outgoing consumer advertising and the responses to that advertising. 4. This process has also accurately been referred to as customer acquisition management. lead (or inquiry) flow process can become complex as clients. Contacted and uncontacted leads are entered into personal and automated follow-up processes (Lead nurturing). End result is a new business sale (Sales result). both productive and counter-productive to business development.Lead Management is a term used in general business practice to describe methodologies. Respondent's information is captured (Inquiry Capture). Business engages in a range of advertising media (Lead generation). 5. distributed across the various stages of a sales process.2 WORKING PROCESS OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN TAFE: 35 . and improve the general attitudes of potential clients and the public at large for future business development. this process has rapidly become technology-centric. as businesses practicing lead management techniques have shifted much of the prior manual workload to automation systems. This critical connectivity facilitates business profitability through the acquisition of new customers. This ever-increasing number of scenarios creates functional disconnects. increase visibility. The process creates an architecture for organization of data. creating a Customer inquiry. generally operated through a variety of marketing techniques. 3. Recipients of advertising respond. With the advent of the Internet and other information systems technologies. While simple in scope. and across a distributed sales force. prospective clients. These processes are designed for business-to-business and direct-to-consumer strategies. and practices designed to generate new potential business clientele. Captured information is then filtered to determine validity (Inquiry filtering) The filtered leads are then graded and prioritized for potential (Lead grading) Leads are then distributed to marketing and/or sales personnel (Lead distribution). Interactions and subsequent actions create a variety of potential outcomes. 8. and sales professionals interact. 2. Appropriate management of these scenarios is the function of lead management. and creating a market brand. systems. Leads are contacted for prospecting (Sales contact). 9. brand development. The general principles of lead management create an ordered structure for managing volumes of business inquiries. in other words. or lead. 5. 6. though personal interaction with lead inquiries is still vital to success. Along with its other related business practices--marketing. frequently termed leads. selling to existing customers. Lead management is in many cases a precursor to sales management and customer relationship management. advertising. 7. and sales--the goal of an effective lead management initiative is to generate new business revenue. A typical outline of a lead management process might follow the following steps: 1.

sales points. All the Inquiries which are related with the company’s product are finally registered at regional office following a particular schedule.The Lead Management system in TAFE LTD. This system is launched at all india level which is primary involved the dealerships. sub-dealerships etc. exclusive showrooms. We can understand the process of Lead Management system by a flowchart which is given under as: HOT-PROSPECT ( FROM VILLAGE) ↓ DEALER SALES PERSON ( DSP ) ↓ POCKET DIARY ↓ → INQUIRY REGISTER AT SHOWROOMS/ BRANCH ↓ ↓ → ↓ ↓ LMR ( LEAD MANAGEMENT REGISTER) AT DEALERSHIP HP LIST FOR HOT PROSPECT ON EXCEL SHEET ↓ AO (AREA OFFICE) ↓ DAILY BASIS 36 . of the company where the customer’s Inquiry is maintained. Is very important operation for the new sales generation. branch offices.

The inquiries can also be registered at any showroom in a inquiry register whenever any customer visit the respective showroom. we can also say that this Lead Management System is an important expect of Modern marketing activities which are also useful in the CRM ( customer relationship activities ) of the company to maintain the good relations with the customers. Hot-Prospect are those consumers having the probability to buy a tractor within the same month. The ultimate goal of this Lead Management System is to produce new sales & also to keep that customer data for the future benefits. This updation takes place every day at the dealerships.Prospect Management System ) which is a online software meant to maintain the data regarding customers. The same process is followed at branch offices & sub-dealerships. Step-2 These inquiries are then transferred in the LMR ( Lead Management Register ) present at every dealership. Step-3 This excel-sheet is than updated in the TPMS ( TAFE. So. 5. 37 . Also on every Friday this excel sheet is transferred to the Area Office for further actions. various tractor fairs organized by the companies at various times in an year.ON EVERY FRIDAY TPMS ( TAFE PROSPECT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM) UPDATE FLOW CHART OF WORKING PROCESS LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN TAFE LTD. This Hot-Prospect list is made in an excel-sheet format. through the DSP’s of that particular area. All the inquiries are then examine by a specialized person to generate Hot-Prospect list.3 DISCRIPTION OF THE PROCESS: Step-1 The inquiries are captured as Hot Prospect in villages which are registered in a pocket diary by the dealer sales person ( DSP ). These inquiries are generated through the field activities.

1 OBJECTIVES OF THE RESEARCH 6.2 DEALERSHIP ANALYSIS ( MARKET SHARE) 38 .CHAPTER-6 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIO N 6.

6. 39 . which also acts as a precursor to sales management and customer relationship management.3 DEALERSHIP ANALYSIS (IN TERMS OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM) TITLE OF THE STUDY “ANALYSING THE WORKING OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION” 6.1 OBJECTIVE OF THE RESEARCH The project has mainly been given with the following objectives: • Understanding of a system which are useful in the customer acquisition management.

REFERENCE PERIOD The study is conducted for the period of 45 days starting from 15 May 2009 to 30 June 2009. Such a huge tractor market cannot ignore the rapid changes provided by the tractor companies not only in their rapid advances in design & technology in case of product but also the rapid changes in the marketing & other practices which are essential to survive in such a competitive market. every tractor company come up with new marketing practices to generate more & more customers. Given this scenario one cannot ignore such a huge Indian tractor market. Now a days. this may hence not be a total reflection of the coverage. exclusive sales outlets (showrooms). SCOPE OF THE STUDY India is an agricultural economy. Because of these reasons the tractor industry is emerging as the most competitive industry in the automobile sector. As a matter of fact. of which Indian market constitutes about one third of the total market. & sales points and assess its effectiveness by finding its strong & weak points.• Understanding the working process of the lead management system at various dealerships. so it is considered to be the largest in the world. Obviously. The scope of the study is limited solely to the markets and places visited by the researcher for the purpose of research. having continuous growth with the induction of new methods and equipments and mechanized farming. SOURCES OF DATA The Research is based upon the following: 40 . the world tractor market is estimated at about 10 lakhs tractor per annum. How can present day marketing practices makes the difference in the customer generation & what role can research and prevalent techniques and methodologies play in improving those practices this is beneficial to the company as well as to the researchers. The study has limited exposure to the market due to time. India has a vast market for tractors. mobility and budget constraints.

2. PRIMARY DATA: The researcher collected primary data during the course of the research period with the help of Observing & interviewing the current working status of those who are engaged in the maintenance of Lead Management System. RESEARCH DESIGN A Research design specifies the methods and procedures for conducting a particular study. The convenience factors were the availability and approachability of the respondents. It is a map (or) blue print to which the research is to be conducted. EXPLORATORY research design has been considered as a suitable methodology for present study and for data analysis. SAMPLING DESIGN A sample design is a definite plan for obtaining a sample for a given population. In the study the Company allotted us clusters in the form of various towns. The research design will give a clear cut idea of the procedure to be followed for the completion of the project. relevant literature. internet and previous research papers that have been conducted by the company Representatives & the officials.1. articles. DATA: SECONDARY Secondary data were drawn from the Brochures. The problem at hand is to Analyse the current Lead Management system & find out the existing problems facing by the company which are acting as the barriers in the proper implementation of this System with rectifying solutions. The design that has been adopted for the study of the given topic is CONVENIENCE SAMPLING & JUDGEMENTAL SAMPLING which is a non-probability sampling method. 41 . The research has been carried out with certain focused objectives which need to be fulfilled after the completion of the study. books. ad campaigns. The completion of these objectives will throw some light on the problem. It refers to a technique or procedure adopted in selecting items for the sample.

EXPERT’S SURVEY: All the persons those are engaged in maintaining & performing on the Lead Management System at visited places in Urban & Rural areas. The study was conducted at the outlets in the following areas. The Researchers went to the places and surveyed all the considered points that could possibly be approached. KOTPUTLI. 42 . KAROLI. JAIPUR URBAN. GANGAPUR CITY. HINDAUN. PLACES OF STUDY The Researchers had to select the outlets of their convenience. The outlets have been classified into various categories as follows:     Dealerships of the company Sub-dealerships of the company Exclusive showrooms-cum-branch outlets Sales points.         CHOMU. DAUSA.POPULATION POPULATION UNDER SURVEY: All types of outlets which are directly related with the companies Lead Management System in urban and rural market. JAIPUR RURAL.

The findings are to be reported with the help of suitable graphs and diagrams where ever required.The data analysis is to be done using statistical tools and techniques. Various statistical tests are used to check hypothesis. of sales points = 10 (d) Total no. of exclusive showrooms cum sub-dealerships = 5 (c) Total no. The result is to be critically analyzed and every aspect of the objectives to be dealt with great detail. TOOLS OF ANALYSIS Statistical tools and techniques used are as follows:  Column Graphs. SANGANER. which could be further divided as: (a) Total no. of sales persons= 18 ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES Quantitative analysis is performed using the data collected at each outlet. SAMPLE SIZE A total of 10 places were visited as given above.  SAWAIMADHOPUR. The comparative analytical findings are to be reported for most aspects of the objective. of dealerships = 2 (b) Total no. LIMITATIONS OF THE RESEARCH 43 .

Few experts don’t express their original perception and views because of biasness. Sales persons were not willing to respond. 6. some are contacted through phones. Some of the experts were not comfortable in giving fair feedback for the company. 5. As the nature of research was exploratory so it was difficult to cover each and every outlet. 3.The limitations of the research were as follows: 1. Lack of proper experience on the part of the researcher in conducting such studies in the past. 44 .Every study has some or the other limitation associated with it . 2. 4. Time was the major constraint as 45 days were not enough to cover all the outlets.

2 DEALERSHIP ANALYSIS (MARKET SHARE) (A) GANGAPUR CITY DEALERSHIP INDUSRTY OF APRIL MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 178 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 107  Gangapur city dealership constitutes sawaimadhopur and karoli.  Total industry of sawaimadhopur in April = 85  Total tractors of TAFE sold in April = 45  Total industry of karoli in April = 93  Total tractors of TAFE sold in April = 62 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR APRIL MONTH 45 .6.

INFERENCES:
1. The market share of TAFE in the gangapur city is around 60.11%. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. 2. In Gangapur city, sawaimadhopur district holds around 25.28% of market share. 3. On the other hand karoli district holds around 34.83% of market share.

GANGAPUR CITY DEALERSHIP INDUSRTY OF MAY MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 171 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 107

 Gangapur city dealership constitutes sawaimadhopur and karoli.
46

 Total industry of sawaimadhopur in May = 94  Total tractors of TAFE sold in May = 56  Total industry of karoli in May = 77  Total tractors of TAFE sold in May = 51
MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR MAY MONTH

INFERENCES:
1. The market share of TAFE in the gangapur city is around 62.57%. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. 2. In Gangapur city, sawaimadhopur district holds around 32.74% of market share. 3. On the other hand karoli district holds around 29.82% of market share.

47

GANGAPUR CITY DEALERSHIP INDUSRTY OF JUNE MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 195 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 140

 Gangapur city dealership constitutes sawaimadhopur and karoli.  Total industry of Sawaimadhopur in June = 89  Total tractors of TAFE sold in June = 66  Total industry of karoli in June = 106  Total tractors of TAFE sold in June = 74
MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR JUNE MONTH

48

3. In Gangapur city. (B) JAIPUR DEALERSHIP INDUSRTY OF APRIL MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 197 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 117 49 . sawaimadhopur district holds around 33. 2. On the other hand karoli district holds around 37.94% of market share. The market share of TAFE in the gangapur city is around 71. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations.84% of market share.79%.INFERENCES: 1.

50 . In Jaipur region. Sanganer. Chaksu. Jaipur dealership constitutes 11 clusters in this region for example: Chomu. Chomu.39%. etc. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. The market share of TAFE in the Jaipur region is around 59. Bagru.  Market share of other Tractor Brands = 80 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR april MONTH INFERENCES: 1. Tonk. Phagi. 2. Sanganer & bagru are the strong market for TAFE in comparison to other remaining clusters of TAFE & holds major share. Dudu.

Sanganer. Tonk. Chaksu.  Market share of other Tractor Brands = 78 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR MAY MONTH 51 . etc.JAIPUR DEALERSHIP INDUSRTY OF MAY MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 189 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 111  Jaipur dealership constitutes 11 clusters in this region for example: Chomu. Phagi. Bagru. Dudu.

Bagru. 2. etc. In may month the percentage share of TAFE has decline along with the total industry of that month. Phagi.73%. Dudu.  Market share of other Tractor Brands = 84 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR june MONTH 52 . The market share of TAFE in the Jaipur region is around 58. Tonk.INFERENCES: 1. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. JAIPUR DEALERSHIP INDUSRTY OF JUNE MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 207 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 123  Jaipur dealership constitutes 11 clusters in this region for example: Chomu. Chaksu. Sanganer.

The market share of TAFE in the Jaipur region is around 59. (C) KOTPUTLI BRANCH OFFICE INDUSRTY OF APRIL MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 40 53 . In may month the percentage share of TAFE has increased along with the total industry of that month in the expectation of good mansoon. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. 2.INFERENCES: 1.42%.

which is the second highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations.  Total industry of Kotputli in April = 40  Total tractors of TAFE sold in April = 10 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR APRIL MONTH INFERENCES: 1. 2. The market share of TAFE in the Kotputli is around 25%. In kotputli region the other dominant players are M & M and escorts. 54 .TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 10  Kotputli branch office constitutes Pawta and Kotputli local.

KOTPUTLI BRANCH OFFICE INDUSRTY OF MAY MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 38 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 12  Kotputli branch office constitutes Pawta and Kotputli local.  Total industry of Kotputli in May = 38  Total tractors of TAFE sold in May = 12 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR may MONTH 55 .

In kotputli region the other dominant players are M & M and escorts both has increased the discount amount to reduce the TAFE’s Market share. KOTPUTLI BRANCH OFFICE INDUSRTY OF JUNE MONTH 56 . The market share of TAFE in the Kotputli is around 31. which is the second highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations.57%. 2.INFERENCES: 1.

 Total industry of Kotputli in June = 45  Total tractors of TAFE sold in June = 17 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR JUNE MONTH INFERENCES: 57 .TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 45 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 17  Kotputli branch office constitutes Pawta and Kotputli local.

77%. the other dominant players are M & M and escorts both has increased the discount amount to reduce the TAFE’s Market share. In kotputli region in June TAFE has also increased the discount amount to counteract the competitors policy. 2.  Total industry of dausa in April = 29  Total tractors of TAFE sold in April = 20 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR APRIL MONTH 58 .1. The market share of TAFE in the Kotputli is around 37. which is the second highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. DAUSA BRANCH OFFICE INDUSRTY OF APRIL MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 29 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 20  Dausa branch constitutes of Senthal and Lalsot.

96%. The market share of TAFE in the Dausa is around 68.INFERENCES: 1. 2. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. The sale of tractors in this region is significantly hampered in april due to lack of rain and other natural factors DAUSA BRANCH OFFICE INDUSRTY OF MAY MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 84 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN 59 .

The sale of tractors in this region is significantly increased in comparison to April month. The market share of TAFE in the Dausa is around 77.THE SAME TIME = 65  Dausa branch constitutes of Senthal and Lalsot. 60 .38%. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations.  Total industry of dausa in May = 84  Total tractors of TAFE sold in May = 65 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR MAY MONTH INFERENCES: 1. 2.

 Total industry of dausa in June = 89  Total tractors of TAFE sold in June = 73 MARKET SHARE OF TAFE FOR june MONTH 61 .DAUSA BRANCH OFFICE INDUSRTY OF JUNE MONTH TOTAL TRACTORS SOLD IN THE REGION = 89 TOTAL TRACTORS OF TAFE SOLD IN THE SAME REGION IN THE SAME TIME = 73  Dausa branch constitutes of Senthal and Lalsot.

2. which is highest in comparison to other competitive tractor organizations. 6. The market share of TAFE in the Dausa is around 82.INFERENCES: 1.3 DEALERSHIP ANALYSIS( IN TERMS OF LEAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM) 62 . The sale of tractors in this region is slihgtly increased in comparison to may month because in the expectation of better rain.02%.

of Hot Prospect in April = 131  No. & Gangapur city itself.  No.39%  Conversion Ratio 63 . karoli.GANGAPUR CITY DEALERSHIP: Inquiries generated in April = 152 Inquiries registered at dealership = 145 Gangapur City Dealership constitutes of Sawaimadhopur.67% Registration efficacy in April month = 145/152 = 0. of TAFE tractors sold in April = 107  Industry for the month = 178  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 131/178 = 0.9539= 95. hindaun.8167 = 81.7359 = 73.59% = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 107/131 = 0.

& Gangapur city itself.8011 = 80. of Hot Prospect in May = 137  No.11%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % 64 . of TAFE tractors sold in May = 107  Industry for the month = 171  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 137/171 = 0. hindaun.GANGAPUR CITY DEALERSHIP: Inquiries generated in May = 159 Inquiries registered at dealership = 152 Gangapur City Dealership constitutes of Sawaimadhopur.  No. karoli.

hindaun. of TAFE tractors sold in June = 140 65 .9681= 95.  No.Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 107/137 = 0. karoli. & Gangapur city itself.59% GANGAPUR CITY DEALERSHIP: Inquiries generated in June = 172 Inquiries registered at dealership = 163 Gangapur City Dealership constitutes of Sawaimadhopur.10% Registration efficacy in May month = 152/159 = 0.7810 = 78. of Hot Prospect in June = 158  No.

 Industry for the month = 195  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 158/195 = 0.9476= 94.81 = 81%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 140/158 = 0.76% JAIPUR CITY DEALERSHIP: Inquiries generated in April = 178 Inquiries registered at dealership = 166 66 .60% Registration efficacy in June month = 163/172 = 0.8860 = 88.

 No.9325= 93.48% Registration efficacy in April month = 166/178 = 0. of TAFE tractors sold in April = 117  Industry for the month = 197  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 155/197 = 0.7548 = 75.Jaipur City Dealership constitutes of Sanganer.7868 = 78.25% 67 . chomu.68%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 117/155 = 0. of Hot Prospect in April = 155  No. & Jaipur city itself.

& Jaipur city itself.  No. chomu.JAIPUR CITY DEALERSHIP Inquiries generated in May = 165 Inquiries registered at dealership = 158 Jaipur City Dealership constitutes of Sanganer. of TAFE tractors sold in May = 111  Industry for the month = 189  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 148/189 = 0. of Hot Prospect in May = 148  No.7830 = 78.30% 68 .

 No. Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 111/148 = 0.9575= 95.00% Registration efficacy in May month = 158/165 = 0. chomu. of Hot Prospect in June = 152 69 . & Jaipur city itself.75% JAIPUR CITY DEALERSHIP Inquiries generated in June = 173 Inquiries registered at dealership = 168 Jaipur City Dealership constitutes of Sanganer.75 = 75.

10% DAUSA DEALERSHIP 70 .9710= 97.92% Registration efficacy in June month = 168/173 = 0.7342 = 73.8092 = 80. of TAFE tractors sold in June = 123  Industry for the month = 207  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 152/207 = 0.42%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 123/152 = 0. No.

Inquiries generated in April = 35 Inquiries registered at dealership = 30

Dausa Dealership constitutes of Senthal, Lalsot, & Dausa itself.

 No. of Hot Prospect in April = 28  No. of TAFE tractors sold in April = 20  Industry for the month = 29  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I )
= 28/29 = 0.9655 = 96.55%
 Conversion Ratio

= Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) =20/28 = 0.7142 =

71.42% Registration efficacy in April month = 30/35 = 0.8571= 85.71%

71

DAUSA DEALERSHIP Inquiries generated in May = 75 Inquiries registered at dealership = 72

Dausa Dealership constitutes of Senthal, Lalsot, & Dausa itself.

 No. of Hot Prospect in May = 69  No. of TAFE tractors sold in May = 65  Industry for the month = 84  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I )
72

= 69/84 = 0.8214 = 82.14%
 Conversion Ratio

= Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 65/69 = 0.9420 = 94.2%

Registration efficacy in May month = 72/75 = 0.96= 96%

DAUSA DEALERSHIP Inquiries generated in June = 82 Inquiries registered at dealership = 78

Dausa Dealership constitutes of Senthal, Lalsot, & Dausa itself.

 No. of Hot Prospect in June = 75
73

33% Registration efficacy in June month =78/82 = 0. of TAFE tractors sold in June = 73  Industry for the month = 89  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 75/89 = 0.12% KOTPUTLI BRANCH OFFICE Inquiries generated in April = 23 74 .8426 = 84. No.9512= 95.9733 = 97.26%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 73/75 = 0.

 No.40 = 40%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 10/16= 0.5% Registration efficacy in April month = 19/23 = 0.625 = 62. of Hot Prospect in April = 16  No.8260= 82. of TAFE tractors sold in April = 10  Industry for the month = 40  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 16/40 = 0.Inquiries registered at dealership = 19 Kotputli Branch Office constitutes of Pawta & Kotputli local.60% 75 .

8947= 89.KOTPUTLI BRANCH OFFICE Inquiries generated in May = 19 Inquiries registered at dealership = 17 Kotputli Branch Office constitutes of Pawta & Kotputli local.00% Registration efficacy in May month = 17/19 = 0.3947 = 39.  No. of TAFE tractors sold in May = 12  Industry for the month = 38  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) = 15/38 = 0.80 = 80. of Hot Prospect in May = 15  No.47%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 12/15= 0.47% 76 .

of TAFE tractors sold in June = 17  Industry for the month = 45  Coverage Ratio = Total Opening Hot Prospect (OH)% Industry ( I ) 77 .  No. of Hot Prospect in June = 25  No.KOTPUTLI BRANCH OFFICE Inquiries generated in June = 32 Inquiries registered at June = 29 Kotputli Branch Office constitutes of Pawta & Kotputli local.

10 88.39 95.0 0 78. 60 75.1 1 81. 57 JUNE 71.5556 = 55. 39 CONVERSIO N RATIO % 81.76 93.= 25/45 = 0.625% TABULATED PRESENTATION OF DATA ANALYSIS: PLAC E GANGAP UR MONT MARKET H SHARE % APRIL 60. 48 COVERAGE RATIO % 73.6 8 REGISTRATION EFFICIENCY % 95.56%  Conversion Ratio = Delivery (D) % Total Hot Prospect (OH) = 17/25 = 0.59 94. 11 MAY 62.25 JAIPUR 78 .5 9 80.90625= 90.68 = 68% Registration efficacy in June month = 29/32 = 0. 67 78. 79 APRIL 59.

5 5 95. 5 94. 92 68.47 90. conversion ratio & coverage ratio.62 1. 7 68.71 96. 00 37. 6 78.4 55. 4.4 96. Company should take appropriate actions so that registration efficiency can be increased to register all the inquiries at the dealerships & regional offices. 3. 2. Whenever the registration efficiency is higher it has a positive impact on the market share. conversion ratio. 33 25. 6 62. 0 80.60 89.2 40.5 82.12 82.00 95. 0 80. 42 77. Region wise Kotputli needs more focus towards registration efficiency. 20 82. CHAPTER-7 FINDINGS. 4 97.10 85. 00 59.3 73.1 84. 79 .MAY 73 JUNE 42 APRIL DAUSA MAY 38 JUNE 02 APRIL KOTPUT LI 00 MAY 57 JUNE 77 MAJOR FINDINGS: 96 58. 00 75. The Registration efficiency has the direct impact on the market share. 50 31.0 39. 2 71. & coverage ratio.75 97.

RECOMMENDATION S. Unawareness about the terminologies of the system : During the course of the study it was found that at the some places the person who is working 80 .1 FINDINGS After close study of the present efficiency of Lead Management System prevailing in the 10 Places assigned to us. & CONCLUSION 7. following are the observations: WORKING OF LMS: 1.

Sub-Dealers. 5. 81 . TAFE PRODUCT: 1.2 RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. Market Dominance : Through the study it was found that the percentage market share of TAFE tractor is maximum in the visited areas. Competition : It was also found that Mahindra & Mahindra (M&M) and escorts are emerging as major competitors for TAFE. Sales points and Sales persons so. Inquiries Registration efficiency : It was also found that not all the inquiries are registered at the dealerships & regional offices as the percentage was 96% & 94% for Gangapur and Jaipur respectively. 3. Market share : It was also found that TAFE has almost 60-65% market share in the visited areas. System Uniformity : It was also found that there were some places where only a rough copy was maintained for registering the inquiries instead of using proper register. Follow-up : Also it was found that there was proper follow up by the sales team of respective clusters. Dairies maintenance : It was observed that the diaries of sales persons were properly maintained. 7. Uniform system : The organization should focus on the implementation of uniform system at national level because the success of any kind of system depends upon the uniformity in the system.2.effect relationship : It was found that the reasons of sales-lost were not properly placed in LMR register. as to take closer look of each and every case. 4. 2. Inter-organizational communication : There should be regular interaction with the Dealers. 4. One-brand preference : It was found that TAFE ( especially MF 1035 DI ) is the most favoured brand and is sold most. on the lead management system was not fully aware about the terminologies used in the system. 2. 3. 6. Branch Offices. Cause.

the major challenge for TAFE is to exploit its current strengths and channelizing them in the right direction as discussed in the recommended plan of action. Regular inspection : There should be a regular check up of all the diaries and registers by the managers of the organization to ensure that the system is working properly without any obstacles. Expert need : There should be a permanent expert at the regional office who should be responsible for checking and examining the current status of Lead management system. has a vast distribution network. so that company can take appropriate actions to counteract these kind of situations in future. To ensure this thing. 8. 6. 7. Training needs : All the person those are working on the lead management system (TPMS)should be well known about the system. 82 . 7. So. company can provide a short term training for them.3. Cause-effect relationship establishment : The reasons for sales lost should be mentioned properly in Lead management register.3 CONCLUSION: TAFE has the necessary strengths to succeed and outsmart the competition in the tractor industry in India. 5. 100% lead generation : Although the percentage of registered inquiries at the dealerships are pretty fair but still it can improve so that all inquiries are registered in the lead management system. competent but they also need some kind of motivation so. Registration efficiency : The DSP’s ( District sales persons ) were found very 4. they can give the 100% accurate information of ground realities without any fear. and is financially sound. It is present across all the market segments.

The Lead Management System of TAFE needs to improve. are as follows: 1.My project with TAFE gave me the true knowledge about the Lead Management System which plays a vital role in customer acquisition & customer retention by using the database of customers which can also referred as customer relationship management. The TAFE has a wide market coverage & has good strong relationship with its Customers. CHAPTER-8 83 . 2. The major things which I found in my whole project. (c) If the company successfully implement the system. such as: (a) it should be uniform at the national level. the company will definitely gain some extra market share ( registering all the inquiries at dealerships & regional offices ). (b) The people working on TPMS needs training to clarify the terminologies of the system.

SWOT ANALYSIS SWOT Analysis 84 .

For example. 6. 2. 4. in comparison to other companies like M&M and Escort. Quality focus through highly strong R & D base. Non-uniformity in system. Good reputation among customers. Examples of such strengths include: 1. Weakness The absence of certain strengths may be viewed as a weakness. Strong brand names. Wide manufacturing base. 3. Favorable access to distribution network.Strengths Business strengths are its resources and capabilities that can be used as a basis for developing a competitive-advantage.. 4.how. 85 . Patents 2. Collaboration with best organizations. 3. No tailor made training for lower level work force. each of the following may be considered weaknesses: 1. Less command in agricultural states like Punjab and U. Cost advantages from proprietary know.P. 8. 7. Unskilled lower level work force. 5.

livestock. Some examples of such examples of such threats include: opportunities include: 1. dairy. Growing domestic & international hand used tractors. products.Opportunity Threats The external environmental analysis may Changes in the external environmental reveal certain new opportunities for profit also may present threats to the firm. Competition from Low cost Chinese products. Product diversification. 8.  Noise.  Safety and ergonomics. 86 . Other income – poultry. 4. 3. Fuel shortage. on: 2. technology. Price). De-fragmentation and nuclear 2. Conformance to European norms families. 7. Rise in MSP (Minimum Support  Electronics. 3. 1. market. Economic growth.  Emission. Irrigation facilities. Improved features and quality of 5. Improvement in standard of living. certification facilities in India. Market presence or sale of second 9. infrastructure 4. Some and growth. Cheap credit. 5. Bottlenecks in form of testing and 6. Enhancement of farm machinery Projects. 6. 10.

CHAPTER-9 LITERATURE REVIEW 87 .

These are unqualified sales opportunities gathered at various situations. businesses consider Lead management as one of the important activities in their organization-wide sales & marketing process. advertisements. if rightly tracked and nurtured. seminars. one must have the right process and tools in place to make sure these are properly guided towards the most likely result of sales planning. trade shows. viz. In TAFE lead management is a powerful solution to automate and enhance the most inconsistent. WHAT IS LEAD MANAGEMENT? Lead management is an important business process that combines tools with techniques to enable effective leads generation. disorganized and error-prone processes involved in acquiring and tracking leads through their entire life-cycle.: Every sales lead. management and tracking of new sales opportunities. purchases from external sources and other marketing campaigns for the purpose of sales. The different stages in TAFE lead management process are: • • • • Lead Generation Lead Allocation or Distribution Lead Qualification Lead Conversion 88 . However. can be a revenue generating opportunity. WHAT ARE LEADS? Leads are considered as raw details of company.R. For this reason.LITERATURE REVIEW LEAD MANAGEMENT AS A INTEGRAL PART OF CUSTOMER ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT FOR C. person or business opportunity.M.

TPMS provides different methods to generate leads: Form Filling. etc. Quick Create. who may be interested in a purchase.. Importing. phone calls. Web Forms and Developer API. campaigns. branding.LEAD GENERATION: Lead generation refers to the capturing of consumers interest towards products or services. exhibitions. referrals. 89 . These sales leads are captured through various sources. viz.

LEAD ASSIGNMENT OR DISTRIBUTION: Manually assigning new leads to specific individual (owner) can be tedious. 90 . TPMS allows to create a workflow rule to assign new leads to sales persons based on specific criteria. such as geographic region. etc. activity.

direct mail. such as Web downloads. Import leads from external sources. At this point. a Lead is transformed to Account. lead management process is complete and there is no reverting to Lead process. TAFE lead management process (TPMS) provides the necessary tools and techniques in acquiring and tracking leads through the entire life cycle. and other types of campaigns Facilitate faster sales Lead Distribution through the lead assignment rules Qualify leads to next stage based on the information captured in lead details Customize lead management process (B2B and B2C business scenarios) as per your organization sales process Standard reports and dashboards bundled for a fast learning curve Export leads data to spreadsheet software for further data analysis 91 . WHAT DO TAFE GAIN FROM LEAD MANAGEMENT (TPMS)? Across all industry sectors. trade shows. seminars. TAFE’s BENEFITS: • • • • • • • • Manage a 360 degree view of the leads' life cycle (from creating leads to converting them into business opportunities) Capture leads online using Web-to-lead form and manage effectively in TPMS. marketing campaigns and brand promotion activities are the initial steps to finding and attracting new customers. However. Contact and business opportunity.LEAD CONVERSION: Once there is scope for business opportunity through further negotiations or follow-ups. you must effectively nurture the leads until they grow up to prospective buyers.

Crisil Research. Feb.wikipedia.. Richard G. Christensen. Harvard Business School Note 383-015. Last accessed on May 23. 6.. Ltd. 5.org/Activities%20Files/A0611/P-in. Yahoo search: (www. 2010.in 92 . Future'.R.icra.pdf.com/research/research-industry-information-reporttractors-contents. 2.tafe.. http://www. Last accessed on March 9. http://www. Hamermesh. Research Methodology. www. Google search: (www. 'Note on Implementing Strategy'.com) E. 'The Tractor Industry in India – Present and 3. Web sites: A.com. www. 2010. New Delhi Vikas publishing House Pvt.tafe. 2010.com) D. Last accessed on May 15. Ramesh C. Clayton M. 2010. 4.tafechannel.unapcaem. www.crisil.pdf.com B. 'Tractors Update'.com G. 'The Process of Strategy Development and Implementation 7.BIBLIOGRAPHIES 1. and Tara Donovan. Kothari C. 2010. Wikipedia search: (www.com) F. www.yahoo. TAFE Website. http://www.com C.google. Jain.scribd.

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