SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

 

      SMES AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: THE CASE  OF SOUTH KOREA   
            UNIVERSITY OF NEUCHATEL     MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT     SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE                AYGÜN ERKASLAN     
     
 

1   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
1  . INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................... 1  1.1  1.2  1.3  2  INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 2  RESEARCH OBJECTIVE................................................................................................................................... 2  RESEARCH STRUCTURE ................................................................................................................................. 2 

. ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL CONTEXT FOR IPR ................................................................................... 4  2.1  OVERVIEW OF THE OVERALL OPERATING ENVIRONMENT ..................................................................................... 5  2.1.1  Foreign direct investment in South Korea ......................................................................................... 5  2.1.2  Government Policy and Incentive ...................................................................................................... 6  2.1.3  Market ............................................................................................................................................... 6  2.1.4  Human Resources .............................................................................................................................. 7  2.1.5  Infrastructure .................................................................................................................................... 7  2.2  STATISTICAL OVERVIEW OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY .......................................................................................... 8  2.3  SOUTH KOREA'S INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ‐ FROM THE PAST TO THE PRESENT ....................................................... 10 

. THE MACRO‐ENVIRONMENT  ............................................................................................................. 12  . 3.1  GOVERNMENT ATTITUDE & COMMITMENT ................................................................................................... 13  3.1.1  Government declarations regarding IPR protection and enforcement ........................................... 14  3.1.2  Resources ........................................................................................................................................ 17  3.2  IPR INSTRUMENT STRUCTURE & SCOPE ........................................................................................................ 19  3.2.1  Formal, Legal and Informal options for Intellectual Property protection ........................................ 19  3.2.2  Instruments for the commercialization of IPR ................................................................................. 21  3.2.3  Instruments for the enforcement of IPR .......................................................................................... 24  3.3  SUPPORTING LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT ..................................................................................... 25  3.3.1  Judiciary independence, transparency and corruption  ................................................................... 26  . 3.3.2  Labour Law ...................................................................................................................................... 27 

. THE MESO‐LEVEL ............................................................................................................................... 28  4.1  SECTOR REVIEW & ANALYSIS ...................................................................................................................... 29  4.2  THE INSTITUTIONAL MAP ............................................................................................................................ 33  Institutions involved in creating policy and instruments .............................................................................. 33  Institutions involved in registration, support and enforcement ................................................................... 33  4.3  DEGREE OF INSTITUTIONAL PROACTIVITY ....................................................................................................... 35  4.3.1  Attitude and commitment to IPR related issues – Active provision of IPR related informant and  services 35  4.3.2  Resources ........................................................................................................................................ 36 

. THE MICRO‐LEVEL .............................................................................................................................. 38 

5.1  LEVEL OF USE OF IPR PROTECTION INSTRUMENTS ............................................................................................ 39  5.1.1  Level of Transgressions  ................................................................................................................... 42  . 5.2  FROM AWARENESS TO ACTION .................................................................................................................... 46  5.2.1  Awareness of the importance – knowledge of instruments and institutions .................................. 46  5.2.2  Barriers to the adoption of IPR related measures ........................................................................... 46     

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
6  . GLOBAL SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................... 48  6.1  7  SUMMARY  .............................................................................................................................................. 49  .

. THE SURVEY ...................................................................................................................................... 52  7.1  QUANTITATIVE METHODOLOGY  .................................................................................................................. 53  . 7.1.1  The sample ...................................................................................................................................... 53  7.1.2  Survey Information .......................................................................................................................... 54  7.1.3  Data analysis method ...................................................................................................................... 54  7.2  RESULTS ................................................................................................................................................. 54  7.2.1  Descriptive analysis ......................................................................................................................... 54 
7.2.1.1  7.2.1.2  7.2.1.3  7.2.1.4  Motivation to own Intellectual Property Rights ..................................................................................... 55  Reasons not to own Intellectual Property Rights ................................................................................... 56  Informal Protection Methods ................................................................................................................. 57  List of barriers to operate in this country comparing with the problem of IP ........................................ 58 

7.2.2 

Reliability and Validity Measures .................................................................................................... 59 

7.2.2.1  Reliability Measures ............................................................................................................................... 59  7.2.2.2  Validity Measures ................................................................................................................................... 60  7.2.2.2.1  Discriminant validity (intercorrelation of the research constructs) ................................................... 62  7.2.2.2.2  Intercorrelation of the research constructs' analysis ........................................................................ 64  7.2.2.2.3  General Pattern ................................................................................................................................. 65 

7.2.3 

Correlation between the motivations to own IPR variables and other variables ............................ 66 
To attract financing ................................................................................................................................ 67  To increase bargaining power ................................................................................................................ 67  To have high return on investment ........................................................................................................ 68  To have a stronger market position........................................................................................................ 68  To improve our advertising impact......................................................................................................... 68  To prevent piracy by competitors .......................................................................................................... 68  To block competitors .............................................................................................................................. 69  No need .................................................................................................................................................. 71  Because too bureaucratic ....................................................................................................................... 71  No enough knowledge  ........................................................................................................................... 71  . Too expensive ......................................................................................................................................... 71  No consideration of the relevance of these methods ............................................................................ 72  The protection can disclose information to competitors ....................................................................... 72 

7.2.3.1  7.2.3.2  7.2.3.3  7.2.3.4  7.2.3.5  7.2.3.6  7.2.3.7 

7.2.4 

Correlation between the reasons to not own IPR variables and other variables ............................ 70 

7.2.4.1  7.2.4.2  7.2.4.3  7.2.4.4  7.2.4.5  7.2.4.6 

. CONCLUSION ..................................................................................................................................... 73  8.1  DISCUSSION OF KEY FINDINGS OF THE SURVEY IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NATIONAL BACKGROUND ............................... 74  8.1.1  Macro‐level (Environment) .............................................................................................................. 74  8.1.2  Meso‐level (Institutional) ................................................................................................................ 75  8.1.3  Micro‐level (Enterprise) ................................................................................................................... 76  8.2  IMPLICATIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 76  8.2.1  For Government and policy makers................................................................................................. 76  8.2.2  For SMEs .......................................................................................................................................... 77  8.3  LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH ............................................................................................................ 77 

. REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................................... 78  9.1  9.2  BOOKS, PUBLICATIONS & REPORTS .............................................................................................................. 79  WEBSITES ............................................................................................................................................... 81 

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
10  . APPENDIX ......................................................................................................................................... 83  10.1  APPENDIX: THE SURVEY ............................................................................................................................. 84  10.1.1  Questionnaire  ............................................................................................................................. 84  . 10.2  APPENDIX: STATISTICAL DATA ..................................................................................................................... 89  10.2.1  Descriptive statistics ................................................................................................................... 89  10.2.2  Correlation between manifest variables and latent variables .................................................... 95 
10.2.2.1  Unidimensionality  .................................................................................................................................. 95  . 10.2.2.1.1  Firme Size ......................................................................................................................................... 95  10.2.2.1.2  Degree of Internationalization ......................................................................................................... 95  10.2.2.1.3  Protection Efficiency ........................................................................................................................ 95  10.2.2.1.4  Administrative Procedures ............................................................................................................... 95  10.2.2.1.5  Protection Costs ............................................................................................................................... 96  10.2.2.1.6  Costs Related  ................................................................................................................................... 96  . 10.2.2.1.7  IP Office Satisfaction ........................................................................................................................ 96  10.2.2.1.8  IP Track Record  ................................................................................................................................ 96  . 10.2.2.1.9  Informal Protection Methods  .......................................................................................................... 97  . 10.2.2.2  Convergent Validity ................................................................................................................................ 97  10.2.2.2.1  Firm Size ........................................................................................................................................... 97  10.2.2.2.2  Degree of internationalization ......................................................................................................... 97  10.2.2.2.3  Protection Efficiency ........................................................................................................................ 97  10.2.2.2.4  Administrative Procedures ............................................................................................................... 98  10.2.2.2.5  Protection Costs ............................................................................................................................... 98  10.2.2.2.6  Costs Related  ................................................................................................................................... 98  . 10.2.2.2.7  IP Office Satisfaction ........................................................................................................................ 99  10.2.2.2.8  IP Track Record  ................................................................................................................................ 99  . 10.2.2.2.9  Informal Protection Methods  ........................................................................................................ 100  .

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

                     

   
 
   

1. INTRODUCTION 
 

1   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

1.1 INTRODUCTION 
  Nowadays,  Intellectual  Property  Rights  due  to  their  ubiquity  play  clearly  an  increasing  role  in  our  society.  Indeed,  they  can  foster  innovation  by  allowing  individuals  searchers  and  companies  generating  new  cutting‐edge  products  or  technologies  to  obtain  recognition  and  therefore,  to  take  profit from the benefits of their discoveries. Thus, Intellectual Property plays an important role in the  commercialization  of  innovation  technology.  At  the  same  time,  intangible  assets  help  greatly  to  enhance the competitiveness of companies that use technology that these companies are trying to  market a new product or provide a service based on a new technology. For most technology‐based  companies,  an  effective  protection  of  their  innovations  constitutes  the  key  of  the  success.  In  addition,  Intellectual  Property  often  plays  a  crucial  role  as  a  means  to  facilitate  access  to  trading  partners, sources of initial funding, and also facilitate the establishment of joint ventures. However, it  is  important  to  highlight  that  the  consideration  of  such  rights  is  relatively  recent  in  industrialized  countries  and  therefore,  the  gaps  to  be  filled  as  regards  developing  countries  are  still  numerous.  Such a problem is to be quickly resolved, because nowadays, more and more companies are madding  their  products  in  developing  countries  in  order  to  lower  costs  and  considerations  relating  to  the  protection of intangible assets are not perceived in the same way everywhere in the world. Without  adequate  protection,  it  seems  to  be  very  difficult  for  companies  of  any  size  to  be  competitive  and  maintain a competitive advantage over the competition.   

1.2 RESEARCH OBJECTIVE 
  This  international  study  was  conducted  jointly  with  the  Enterprise  Institute  of  the  University  of  Neuchâtel  in  Switzerland.  The  research  objective  is  to  lead  an  investigation  on  the  environment  of  the  Intellectual  Property  Rights  in  South  Korea  in  order  to  provide  information  to  companies  and  therefore, to take stock of the country's current situation.     In  addition,  the  purpose  is  also  providing  information  to  companies  about  how  to  protect  their  intangibles assets in South Korea and, which procedures to follow in case of infringements. Finally,  the survey is also aiming to make an international comparison with others developing countries.     

1.3 RESEARCH STRUCTURE 
  The  research  structure  is  divided  into  two  main  parts.  The  first  part  of  the  research  focuses  exclusively on an academic investigation. This latter consists of an analysis of the national context for  intellectual  property  rights.  It  includes  three  different  levels:  the  Macro‐Environment,  the  Institutional framework, and the Enterprise level.     The Macro‐Environment level attempts to determine the level of commitment and attitude  of the Korean Government towards the Intellectual Property Rights. It includes the structure  of  the  instruments,  the  legal  support  and  regulatory  environment.  Therefore,  it  is  really  crucial to analyze the macroeconomic level to try to take stock of the current situation of the  Intellectual Property Rights in South Korea.   

2   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

   Regarding  the  Institutional  level,  this  latter  is  aimed  to  draw  a  map  of  Korean  institutions.  Institutions covers a wide range of services provided by the Government, such as the Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  or  all  Governmental  institutions  that  help  companies  to  be  protected  effectively  against  infringements.  To  this  end,  we  will  focus  on  three  different  aspects, ranging from an analysis of the institutional framework to the level of proactivity in  the country as well as their effectiveness.     Finally, the last level of analysis has for purpose to determine what is the level of use of IPR  protection instruments, to focus on the level of infringements and to figure out whether the  legal  system  is  effective  and  if  this  latter  is  capable  to  punish  any  misuse  of  an  intangible  assets.  

  Regarding more accurately the second part of the report, the main purpose is to survey companies  based  in  South  Korea.  To  this  end,  a  questionnaire  was  set  up  to  better  identify  the  positive  and  negative aspects of the  protection of intangible assets in South  Korea. Therefore, more than 1.500  companies  were  contacted.  However,  it  is  important  to  outline  that  various  problems  were  encountered at this stage of the study because fewer than 10 companies responded to the survey.    Going  one  step  beyond  what  is  being  said,  the  report  concludes  with  a  detailed  conclusion  on  the  three levels of analysis. In addition, numerous recommendations are made for the Government and  the limits of the study are outlined.   

3   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

     
             

2. ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL  CONTEXT FOR IPR 
 

4   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

 

2.1 OVERVIEW O OF THE OVERALL OPERAT TING ENVIRO ONMENT 
 

2.1.1 FOREIGN DIRE ECT INVESTME ENT IN SOUTH KOREA  H 
  Followin ng the Asian  Financial Crisis in 1997,  the Republi ic of Korea a adopted a m more liberal e economic  policy  in order  to  en n  nhance  foreign  direct  in nvestment  an foster  the economic  recovery.  In nd  e  ndeed,  as  shown o on the figure e 1, foreign d direct invest ment experi ienced a pos sitive growth h from 1998  to 2000.  However, due to the e terrorist att tacks of Sept tember 11, 2 2001, and the bursting of m bubble,  f the dotcom FDI decli ined consiste ently after peaking in 20 00 and continued their d decline until  2003. Betwe een 2004  and  200 the  inbou FDI  experienced  a  s 08,  und  strong  recov very  amount ting  over  US $  10  billion for  five  S  n  consecut tive years un ntil 2008 (so ource: Minist try of Knowle edge Econom my, South Ko orea). Moreo over, it is  importan nt to highlight that the c current gove ernment led, , since 2008, , a "pro‐busiiness" policy y in order  to  prom mote  foreign  direct  inves stment.  The refore,  desp the  glob slowdow FDI  resumed  and  pite  bal  wn,  increase ed for the firs st time in four years. Alt though the current environment is n ot favorable e because  of  the  g global  econo omic  crisis,  South  Korea "out  of  th storm"  through  the  efforts  and policies  a  he  d  undertak ken in variou us direction including th e simulation n of M&A ma arket (Merge ers and Acqu uisitions),  and  stre engthening  p policies  in  or rder  to  attra foreign  direct  investment,  not  o act  d only  from  th United  he  States  and  the  European  Union, but  also  fro ,  om various  regions  inclu uding  the  M Middle  East  and  China  Economy, So outh Korea). (source: Ministry of Knowledge E  

   
FIGURE 1

5   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

 

2.1.2 GOVERNMEN POLICY AND INCENTIVE NT  D 
  As  ment tioned  earlie FDI  exper er,  rienced  a  ve rapid  incr ery  rease  during the  last  de g  ecade,  and  therefore,  are cons sidered as be eing the engine of the Ko orean econo omy. In order to engende er an increas se of FDI,  incentive es promoted d by the Gov vernment de esigned to attract FDI by removing th he additional costs or  disadvan ntages  comp pared  to  Ko orean  firms  (source:  inv vestkorea.org These  in g).  ncentives  inc clude  tax  relief,  cr reation  of  in ndustrial  site and  specia zone,  site location  an acquisitio and  cash  granting  es  al  e  nd  on,  and othe er types of financial supp port.   

2.1.3 MARKET 
  K ed  Alt hough  the  Korean  economy  suffere with  the  (current)  ket  fina ancial  crisis (figure  2),  Korean  mark offers  numerous  K n adv vantages  an developm nd  ment  oppor rtunities  for foreign  r  com mpanies. One of the maj jor characte ristics  of the Korean  ma arket  is  the  following:  a  domestic  market  with  a  very  a sop phisticated  consumers driving  demand  (source:  s  inv vestkorea.org g). With a GD DP amountin ng to one US S $ trillion  dolllars,  South  Korea  is  an  attractive  market  for  foreign  e  inv vestors.  Nearly  half  of  Global  500  world  companies  is  present in south Kor rea (245 firm ms in 2008, so ource: invest tkoreag.org). Therefore,  consumers w with high  purchasi ing power ar re one of the e major fact tors attractin ng foreign co ompanies loo oking for an  overseas  business s base in Kor rea (source:  investkorea. .org). Thus, t the sophistic cated consum mers driving g demand  means th hat Korean c consumers are continuou usly looking f for the most t advanced te echnologies. "Korean  consume ers are very  familiar with the produc cts manufac ctured by the e world’s lea ading corpor rations,  a  1 reality w which has consequently l led to a shar rp expansion n in Korea’s  domestic ma arket ". For  instance,  many wo orldwide fam mous compa anies such as s P&G, Micro osoft, Motor rola, Ebay, O Olympus and Siemens  are  cons stantly  laun nching  their  new  produ into  the  Korean  ma uct  arket  as  a  t test  market  (source:  investko orea.org).    Another  major  cha   aracteristic  of  the  Korean  market  is  th South  Ko hat  orea  is  consider red  as  bein a  "big  trading  ng  t nation"  having  many  international  trade  e exchange  w with  the  biggest  b economy y around the e world,  as  shown  on  the  figure  3.  This  confirms  its  opennes to  the  world  eco ss  onomy.  FIGUR 3 RE  Moreove er,  as  an nother  imp portant  highlight  tha the  Korean  market,  due  to  its  strategic  characte eristic  to  no ote,  it  is  important  to  h at                                                              
1

FIGURE 2 

 Investm ment Environm ment & Busine ess Opportunit ties Report ‐ Invest Korea, p p.10 

6   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  location,  is  considered  as  being  the  "gateway  to  the  Northeast  Asia".  Indeed,  Korea  lies  between  Japan  and  China,  two  giants  markets.  This  factor  is  particularly  relevant  for  foreign  companies  intending to conquer the Asian market.   

2.1.4 HUMAN RESOURCES 
  The high education level of Koreans has effectively allowed South Korea to become one of the major  economy around the world:  the world’s 11th largest  trading nation (source: Global Competitiveness  Report). Indeed, the 2008 global competitiveness report  outlines that 53% of Koreans aged 25 to 34  have a university degree. This rate is the highest of all OECD countries except Japan and Canada. This  high figure shows the taste of Koreans for higher education.  Therefore, we can say without retained  that  the  Koreans citizens are highly educated, efficient at work and highly involved in their day‐to‐ day tasks. Moreover, other important factors to outline are the following: growing female workforce  and improving labor‐management relations (source: investkorea.org).   

2.1.5 INFRASTRUCTURE 
  The  importance  of  infrastructure,  seen  from  the  perspective  of  transport  is  easily  understood.  The  transport infrastructure includes roads, railways, ports and airports, which facilitate the  delivery of  goods.  Regarding  more  accurately  South  Korea's  infrastructures,  the  Incheon  International  Airport  (the  transportation  hub  of  Northeast  Asia),  the  Busan  Port  and  the  Trans‐Korean  Railway  are  considered  by  far  the  most  important  for  the  country  (source:  investkorea.org).  For  instance,  the  Incheon International Airport welcomes over 30 million passengers per year around the world. It is  positioned at the second largest airport in the world for cargo (source: investkorea.org). Moreover,  freight companies known worldwide such as DHL, FedEX, TNT, UPS, Polar Air, and KWE have installed  freight terminals and logistics centers (source: investkorea.org). Regarding maritime road, the Port of  Busan is located at the 5th place worldwide in terms of container transport. It lies at the crossroads  of  Maritimes  routes  linking  Europe,  Asia  and  North  America.  In  addition,  it  is  also  important  to  highlight the following: South Korea welcomes R&D centers of international companies. For instance,  Microsoft  opened  is  Microsoft  Innovation  Center  (MIC);  IBM  an  Ubiquitous  Computing  Laboratory;  Google an R&D center, and so on (source: investkorea.org). To conclude, the quality of infrastructure  provided by Korea are very attractive and very suitable for companies.  

7   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

 

2.2 ST TATISTICAL O OVERVIEW O OF INTELLEC CTUAL PROPE ERTY 
  Followin ng the end of Japanese c colonization  and the end d of the Wor rld War II, w when the new w Korean  Governm ment  launched  its  first  economic  de e evelopment  plan  (WIPO:  Intellectual  Pro operty  in  Asian Countries,  n  chapter 2.1 1, brief history in IP laws and po olicies in Korea,  2009), South Korea experienced a rap pid economi ic growth  until the e beginning o of the 1990s s. In 1993, K Korea becam me an active  member of  the Organiz zation for  Economic Cooperation and Deve elopment (so ource: invest tkorea.org). However, fr rom 1997 the Korean  economy y suffered fr rom the Asian Financial C Crisis, and therefore the Government t was forced to call in  the  International  Monetary  Fun when  SM and  Larg companie went  bank nd,  MEs  ge  es  krupt  (WIPO:  Intellectual  Property  in Asian  Countries,  chapter  2.1, brief  history  in IP  laws  and  policies  in  Korea 2009).  The  1997  Asian  Financial  n  ,  n  p a,  Crisis  led the  Korean  Governme to  the  v d  ent  verge  of  ban nkruptcy  with  an  increas of  domes debt,  se  stic  increase of  youth  e e  employment reduction  of  FDI  as  well  as  investment  in  enterprises  (source:  t,  1997‐2002),  the  number  of  applica investko orea.org).  Du uring  this  da period  (1 ark  ations  by  IPR type  in  R  South  Korea  decrea ased  dramat tically,  but  a shown  on  the  figure 4  (source:   KIPO),  South  Korea  as  e  experien nced  a  posit tive  growth  in  term  of  applications until  2008  (the  onset  of  the  international  s  financial l crisis).    

    FIGURE 4   In additi ion, it is imp portant to re emind that th he Korean economy exp perienced a p positive grow wth from  2002,  es specially  when  the  World  Cup  footb finals  were  held  in  Korea  and  J ball  Japan  (sourc KIPO).  ce:  Therefor re, major economic indic cators have  been rising  and the num mber of pate ent applications have  also incr reased, as shown by the s statistical ab bove.    ng  curately  Regardin more  acc the  2008  statistical  w,  rea  overview South  Kor was  FIGURE 5  the  wor rld's  fourth  largest  country  for  Inte ellectual  y Right applications,  Property as shown on the figu ure cons  5). Indeed, in n 2008, the o overall numb ber of applica ations for pa atents, utility y models, tra ademarks  (Figure 5 and  desi amounte to  368,56 ranking  S ign  ed  65,  South  Korea  of  Fourth  in the  World   after  China the  US,  n  a,  and  Japa (source:  KIPO,  annua report  20 an  al  008).  More  in  detail,  "Pa atents"  is  th category  with  the  he  8     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  applications  with 167,90 4 records, fo ollowed by t the tradema rks (127,139 9), design  highest  number of a ), and finally utility mode els (17,226).     (56,296)   ion,  as  well  as  for  the  IPR  applicat tions,  once  again  South  Korea  was  ranked  as  being  the  a b In  additi world's f fourth larges st country un nder the Pat tent Coopera ation Treaty (PCT), and t therefore, the second  regardin Asian  cou ng  untries  after Japan.  7,9 08  applicati r  ions  under  PCT  were  re ecorded  in  2008,  as  presente below  (fi ed  igure  6).  Mo oreover,  fro 2003  to  2008,  it  wa noted  an significant  increase  om  as  n  concerni ing the number of applic cations unde er PCT. The fi igure 7 displa ays this phen nomenon. Th herefore,  we can a assume that t the more li iberal econo omic policies adopted by y the Govern nment after  the 1997  Asian  Fin nancial  Crisis  have  foste ered  the  incr rease  of  IPR  type  applica ations  from  foreign  and  national  companies.   

FIGURE 6

 

 

9000 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

7911 7066 5 5945 4690 294 42 3565

NUMBER OF APPLICATION

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

APP PLICATION UNDER PCT

 

        9   

FIGURE 7

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  2.3 SOUTH KOREA'S INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ‐ FROM THE PAST TO THE PRESENT    First of all, it is important to highlight that the earliest Korean intellectual property system was not  established by the Korean government itself, but was forced by numerous foreign powers such as the  US and Japan at the beginning of the 20th century (Ji‐Hyng Park, 2008). Indeed, to be more accurate,  the first Korean intellectual property laws was voted by foreign countries in 1908, engendering the  proliferation of several decree as well as Patent, Design, Trademark, and Copyright decree (Ji‐Hyng  Park, Paul Goldstein, 2008). To this end, the Korean Patent Ordinance was established in August 12,  19082. However, following the annexation of Korea by Japan in 1910, the Korean Patent Ordinance  was cancelled and the Japanese Patent Act were instituted remaining into effects until 1945, the end  of the World War II (Ji‐Hyng Park, Paul Goldstein, 2008). From 1945, following the end of Japanese  colonization and Wolrd War II, the current system of intellectual property protection's foundations  was laid by the new Korean Government. Therefore, the first Patent Office was created in order to  protect inventions, designs, and utility models. Regarding the Trademark Act, it was passed into laws  in  1949  ((Ji‐Hyng  Park,  Paul  Goldstein,  2008).  Concerning  more  accurately  Korean's  copyright,  the  Government  applied  the  Japanese  law  until  1957.  From  1961  to  1963,  the  Korean  Government  established and enacted its own patent act which was very similar to that of Japan and the US, and in  the  same  time,  promulgated  a  new  Trademark  Act.  Both  Patent  and  Trademark  Acts  are  still  considered  as  being  the  foundations  of  the  current  Patent  and  Trademark  Acts  of  the  country  (Ji‐ Hyng  Park,  Paul  Goldstein,  2008).  Furthermore,  the  Trademark  Act  promulgated  in  1964  was  amended in 1997, in order to allow South Korea to adopt international treaty such as Madrid System  of  International  Registration  of  Marks  and  the  Trademark  Law  Treaty.  Regarding  the  Patent  Act  enacted in 1961, this latter one has also undergone numerous revisions. From 1980, for instance, the  Korea Patent system joined international treaties, such as the Paris Convention in 1980, the Patent  Cooperation  Treaty  in  1994,  the  Budapest  Treaty  in  1988,  TRIPS  in  1995,  and  UPOV  in  20023.  In  addition, under commercial pressure from the US Government, the Korean Government has forced  to  introduced  in  1986  a  substance  patent  system  which  led  to  grant  patents  covering  chemical  substances  as  well  as  medicines  (Ji‐Hyng  Park,  Paul  Goldstein,  2008).  From  1998,  the  Korean  Intellectual Property Office was established its own guidelines related to biotechnology inventions by  which  numerous  patents  relating  to  plants,  animals  and  human  genes  could  be  granted  as  well  (WIPO,  2009).  In  addition,  since  2000,  it  is  possible  to  grant  patents  for  any  invention  related  to  a  business  model,  thank  the  special  guideline  developed  by  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office.  Furthermore, it is also important to highlight that in order to strengthening the copyrights in films as  well  as  sound  recordings'  enforcement,  the  Korean  Government  promulgated  the  Phonogram  Act  and the Motion Picture Act (Ji‐Hyng Park, Paul Goldstein, 2008).  Finally, "The government also issued  interpretations  of  the  new  legislation  that  may  help  the  music  industry  in  its  legal  battles  against  downloading, uploading, and exchanging computer files of sound recordings without the permission  of  the  rights  holders4".  In  addition,  South  Korea  is  member  of  the  World  Intellectual  Property  Organization since 1979.                                                              
2 3

 WIPO: Intellectual Property in Asian Countries, chapter 2.1, brief history in IP laws and policies in Korea, 2009   WIPO: Intellectual Property in Asian Countries, chapter 2.1, brief history in IP laws and policies in Korea, 2009  4  Godlstein, P., et al, 2008, Intellectual Property in Asia: Law, Economics, History and Politics, , Springer‐Verlag Berling and  Heidelberg Gmbh & Co. k357 p. 

10   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Regarding the current intellectual property system in South Korea, this latter one includes patents,  trademarks, utility models, designs, and copyright (source: KIPO). Although all IPR category is vital to  build  a  sound  business  environment,  and  therefore  to  foster  innovation  and  foreign  direct  investment,  the  one  that  has  been  the  more  changed,  reviewed,  and  strengthened  by  the  Korean  Government  is  the  Patent  System.  Indeed,  since  its  inception  in  1961,  the  Patent  System  has  undergone  30  revisions  (source:  WIPO:  Intellectual  Property  in  Asian  Countries,  2009).  For  the  Korean  Government,  in  order  to  foster  rapid  industrialization  and  to  attract  foreign  companies,  it  was  a  necessity  to  strengthen  the  Patent  System.  The  importance  to  strengthen  the  IP  system  is  easily  understood and can be shown by the increase in the number of patent application. According to the  World Intellectual Property Indicators (source: WIPO, 2009), the Korean Intellectual Property Office is  the  fourth  largest  recipients  in  terms  of  the  number  of  patent  application  in  2007.  Moreover,  it  is  important  to  stress  that  all  the  efforts  undertaken  by  the  Government  had  for  purpose  to  be  in  comply  with  international  patents  systems  (source:  WIPO:  Intellectual  Property  in  Asian  Countries,  2009).  According to Dr. Han Ji‐ Young, professor at the College of Law of Chosun University in Korea, all the  efforts  undertaken  hold  following  features:  "to  enlarge  patentable  subject  matters;  to  increase  effectiveness  of  patent  examination;  to  strengthen  patent  protection  such  as  extension  of  patent  protection  term;  to  control  misuse  of  patent  right;  to  join  international  agreements  on  patent;  to  comply with international trend for patent protection etc". The Korean Patent System in South Korea  has been internationalized thanks to such revisions.     

 

11   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

   
 

   
       

3. THE MACRO‐ENVIRONMENT

12   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

3.1 GOVERNMENT ATTITUDE & COMMITMENT 
  Overall,  Korean  Government's  attitude  towards  the  protection  of  intellectual  property  right  is  well  recognized.  Indeed,  according  to  Dr  Ruth  Taplin5,  for  nearly  2  decades,  the  Government  has  undertaken numerous efforts to foster and strengthen the development in industry throughout fair  competition, and therefore, to engender invention and innovation. "The Korean Government is fully  aware of the compelling economic regards that result from an advanced IPR protection regime. The  Korean Government has embarked on a bold path of upgrading its IPR protection regime. The Korean  Government has promoted its government‐wide efforts to further improve the level of IPR protection  by  cracking  down  on  IPR  infringements  under  the  Master  Plan  for  IPR  protection  established  in  2004"6.  Thus,  the  Korean  Government  has  made  numerous  progresses  on  the  field  of  Intellectual  Property  Right  and  all  these  endeavors  have  been  fruitful  as  outlined  by  the  following  statement:  "The significant progress achieved led the U.S. Government in May 2005 to remove Korea from the  Section  301  priority  watch  list  countries  and  place  Korea  on  a  separate,  lower‐level  watch  list"7.  Moreover,  compared  to  other  Asian  countries,  the  Korean  intellectual  property  system  is  more  advanced  and  more  in  comply  with  the  international  treaties  (source:  ipaustralia.gov.au).  Furthermore, as outlined by the Australian Government,  Korean Government's attitude towards the  prosecution of patent rights has some similarities with European countries and Japan regarding the  protection that can be granted (source: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, www.dfat.gov.au).  So, it is clear that the Korean Government pays great attention to build a sound intellectual property  environment.  For  instance,  the  Korean  State  Council  took  the  initiative  to  set  up  the  Policy  Coordination  Committee  for  intellectual  property  protection,  in  2004  (source:  APEC  publication,  Research  and  IP  protection,  2007).  The  main  purpose  of  this  Committee  was  the  following:  "to  establish  a  permanent  system  for  infringement  investigation  and  penalization,  to  make  advanced  laws and rules concerned, and to guide and build new‐style social culture8". In addition, during 2004,  the  Korean  Policy  Coordination  Committee  decided  to  establish  another  "body"  which  was  directly  attached  to  the  committee:  the  Joint  Intellectual  Property  Infringement  Investigation  Center.  Moreover, during these recent years, and in order to enforce the execution of Intellectual Property  protection, South Korea, in addition to the Korea Intellectual Property Office, set up an International  Patent  Research  and  Training  Center  (source:  APEC  publication,  Research  and  IP  protection,  2007).  This "body" is specialized in training professional patent personnel and providing materials and tools  to  the  public  in  order  to  increase  the  public's  awareness    towards  the  importance  of  intellectual  property protection (source: Korea Intellectual Property Rights Information Service). Already in 2003,  the  Korean  Government  established  the  Intellectual  Property  Protection  Center  given  the  fast  development of electronic‐commerce and Internet‐based activities. All these efforts undertaken by  the Government demonstrate that the importance of Intellectual Property protection in South Korea  has achieved great results. As a reminder, less than a decade ago South Korea was reputed as being a  nation  that  did  not  respect  intellectual  property  right  (Rajendra  K.  Bera,  April  2009).  However,  as                                                              
5 6

 Protect and Survive: Managing Intellectual Property in the Far East ‐ The Case of South Korea, 2004    Korea's Economy 2006, a publication of the Korea Economic Institute and the Korea Institute of International Economic Policy,  Volume 22   7   Korea's Economy 2006, a publication of the Korea Economic Institute and the Korea Institute of International Economic Policy,  Volume 22  8  APEC, Research Report on Paperless Trading Capacity Building and Intellectual Property Protection, 2007, p. 57 

13   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  ned before, t the Korean G Government t has undertaken great e endeavors a nd now are  boasting  mention an IP sys stem in comply with inte ernational st tandards (Rajendra K. Be era, April 200 09). To conclude, it is  also  imp portant  to  highlight  the  following:  " part  of  Korea’s  cont "As  K tinuing  effor to  furthe protect  rts  er  rights ho olders of inte ellectual pro operty, legisllative bills to o revise Kore ea’s Copyrigh ht Act and  Computer  C Program Protection Act  were  introduced  in  the  National  Assem m  n  mbly.  Furthe ermore,  the Korean  e  governm ment’s enforc cement auth horities have e been worki ing tirelessly y to remove  counterfeit p products.  The  Kore governm ean  ment  also  ac ctively  coope erated  in  im mplementing  the  U.S.  go overnment’s  Strategy  9 Targetin ng Organized d Piracy (STOP!) initiative .  e"  

3.1.1 GOVERNMEN NT DECLARATIO ONS REGARDIN IPR PROTECTION AND E NG  ENFORCEMENT   T
  ral,  K ernment  in  term  of  inte t ellectual  pro operty  right  are  well‐ In  gener statements  of  the  Korean  Gove recogniz zed. Indeed,  as outlined  by the Kore ean Intellectual Property y Office's Co mmissioner, , Jung‐Sik  Koh,  South  Korea  is  going  to  provide  furt vors  in  orde to  streng er  gthen  and  make  the  m ther  endeav intellectual property y system more efficient ( (source: KIPO O Annual Report, 2008).  Moreover, M Mr. Jung‐ Sik Koh h highlights th hat the intern national coo peration has s been at the e forefront o of Korea's en ndeavors,  and  will  also  be  in  the  future.  In  addition he  also  underlines  th his  Gove n,  hat  ernment  has actively  s  participa ated  in  the  meeting  of  the  IP5  off fices,  which  corresponds  to  the  ext tent  of  the  trilateral  cooperation (the US S, Japan and  Europe) tha at include Ko orea and Chi ina, as repre esented by the figure  cons (source: KIPO). 

  FIGURE 8   Addition nally,  the  Government  underlines  its  strong  interest  to  bring  a  mo meaningful  and  ore  construc ctive contribution to a ra ange of glob bal intellectu ual property  issues (sour rce: KIPO). R Regarding  more ac ccurately the e internation nal cooperat ion, South K Korea expres ss without  re etained  the  desire to  share  its knowledge and  succe s  e  essful  exper ience  with  developing countries  (s source:  KIPO Annual  O  Report,  2008).  Indeed,  the  Gov vernment  w ould  really  assist  develo oping  count tries  through various  h  ms  cal  s  e  nd program such  as  Technologic Solutions for  Basic  Need  and  One  Village One  Bran 10.  For  informat tion, during t these recent t years, the K Korean Gove ernment has established  a strong and d reliable  network k with more  than 200 loc cal governme ents, including both developed and  developing c countries  (source:  KIPO  Annua Report,  2008).  On  to of  this,  So al  op  outh  Korea  is  also  respo onsible  for  examiner  e training  for ASEAN c countries and all these c commitment ts reflect the e Governme nt's vision o of making  Korea  as being  an  intellectual  property‐orie s  p ented  country  (source:  KIPO).  Indee it  is  impo ed,  ortant  to                                                              
9

  Korea's E Economy 2006,  a publication of f the Korea Eco nomic Institute  and the Korea Institute of Inte ernational Econo omic Policy,  Volume 22  2 10  Improvin ng the quality of life for low‐inc come countries  by providing inf formation on appropriate techn nologies for basic need, and  boosting  t the  level  of  in ncome  in  developing  countrie by  supporting  the  brandin and  tradem es  ng  marking  of  loca products:  al  www.ipfor rliving.org 

14   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  highlight t that one of f the most re elevant Gove ernment's go oal for the future is to s shift from the e current  manufac cturing‐inten nsive society into an inte ellectual prop perty‐intensive country ( (source: KIPO O Annual  Report, 2 2008). There efore, it is ea asily underst ood that bot th a sound b business enviironment as well as a  stronger r IPR protect tion remain  Government t's top prior rities. Furthe ermore, the G t also set  Government up a "Ca ampus Paten nt Strategy U Universiade"  in order to f foster profes ssional and a academician to share  ideas and to collabor rate in open innovation ( (source: KIPO O Annual Report, 2008).      Regardin ng more accu urately the s strategic com mmitments,  the Governm ment has set t five main o objectives  in  term  of  Intellectual  Property Rights,  as  presented  on  the  figur below  (so y  o re  ource:  KIPO  website,  Vision & & Goals). Indeed, South K Korea confir rms its intentions "to become an IP  powerhouse e through  innovative IP admini istration, and d to enhance e technological innovatio on and indus strial develop pment by  11 1 ection of IP ".   facilitati ing the creat tion, utilizatio on, and prote  
STRATEGIC GOAL 1  C STRATEGIC GOAL 2 O S TRATEGIC GOAL 3 L STRA ATEGIC GOAL 4 STRATE GOAL 5 EGIC

TO PR ROVIDE A WORLD‐CLASS IP  D SER RVICES

TO EXPAND GLOBAL IP COOPER RATION

TO IMPROVE IP  COMPETITIVENESS OF COMPANIE ES

TO PROMOTE THE
CREATION AND UTILIZATION OF IP

THE CREATE A
CULTURE OF RE ESPECT FOR IP

FIGURE 9   Moreove for  each  strategic  co er,  ommitment  the  Governm ment  has  se performan goals.  In fact,  all  et  nce  n  expectat tions are pre esented using g the diagram m below (source: KIPO w website, Visio on & Goals).    GOAL 1 XPECTED PER 1  E RFORMANCE
•To provid de High‐quality e examinations  and trials •To make e our examination ns and trial  systems more customer‐f friendly •To opera ate customer‐orie ented IP  systems and establish the e related  ucture infrastru

GOAL 2  EXPECTED PERF FORMANCE
•To contrib bute to the IP5 co ooperation  framewor rk •To promo ote bilateral and m multilateral  cooperatiion •To suppo rt for the develop ping and  least deve eloped countries

GOAL 3 E XPECTED PERFO E ORMANCE
•To expand d IP‐centered tech hnology  procureme ent strategies •To promot te IP‐R&D interac ctive  strategies •To reinforc ce the IP competitiveness of  edium enterprise small & me es

      GOAL 4 EXPECTE PERFORMANC ED CE GOAL 5 EXPEC PERFORMA CTED ANCE   •To r reinforce the capacity to create IP P and  •T To reinforce dome estic IP protectio on    to p promote technolo ogy transfers systems •To e enhance the IP ca apacity of univers sities  •T To establish IP pro otection systems  s    and research institut te overseas o     •To f foster the human resource  •T To cultivate talent ted next‐generat tion IP  development of IP professionals entrepreneurs e     FIGURE 10     In  additi to  these commitments,  it  is  als important to  outline that  since  2 ion  e  so  t  2006,  Korea  Customs  Services  mobilized significant resources to s strengthen it ts actions ag gainst counte erfeiting and d thereby                                                              
11

 Korean I Intellectual Prop perty Office: ww ww.kipo.go.kr ‐ V Vision & Goals 

15   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  e  perty  right  (s source:  Kore Customs  Services).  In ea  ndeed,  as  enhance the  protection  of  intellectual  prop outlined  by  the  Aus stralian  Cust toms  Service "Korea  Cu e,  ustoms  Services  gave  pr riority  to  Intellectual  Property Right  protection  and drawing  u the  Stra y  d  up  ategy  for  IP Protectio for  efficient  and  PR  on  compreh hensive  enfo orcement:  pr rotect  the  r rights  of  con nsumers  and businesses and  build  national  d  s  credibilit ty on IPR enf forcement an nd protectio n and Expan nd Customs’ authority for r IPR enforce ement12".  Since 20 006, the Gov vernment has introduced d "The anticounterfeiting reward sys stem", which has for  purpose  to  reward  companies  with  an  ex cellent  reco of  expos ord  sing  counter rfeit  goods,  but  also  people  who  report  the  manuf facture  of  c counterfeit  goods  (source:  KIPO  An g nnual  Report  2007).  Furtherm more, the Ko orean Interna ational Prope erty Training g Institute (K KIPTI), which  is a sub‐organization  of  the  K KIPO,  plays  a also  a  very  important  r role.  Indeed,  its  contrib bution  is  vita and  regar more  al  rds  specifica on  traini in  the  field  of  intell ectual  prope ally  ing  erty.  The  main  mission  of  the  KIPTI  are  the  13 following :   g   K KIPTI GOALS SUMMARY U   •To offer specia training co al ourses to help KIPO staff achieve a wor p a rld‐class   st tandard of pat tent administ tration     •To develop th expertise of IPR exper in the pri he rts ivate sector t through
tr raining courses tailored t meet their needs and the needs o their to of cu ustomers

   

•To introduce a system of g grooming inv vention geniuses with the help of ex xperienced IP specialists an the system nd mization of inve ention educat tion •To establish in nternational c cooperation and substanti IPR educa a ial ation for

in nternational participants so as to make Korea an IP hu p o K ub     •To create adva anced online IPR invention education th n hrough high‐le evel IPR   ducation information syste ems. ed     In  additi ion,  accordin to  Xinhua,  a  Chinese news  agen ng  e  ncy,  the  Kor rean  Govern nment  will  undertake  more ref forms: "Sout th Korea will l ban import t of products s that violate e local intelle ectual property rights  ach  starting  from  July,  2 2010:  the  ne rules  willl  apply  to  products  that  are  in  brea of  local patents,  ew  p 14 logo and other exclusive rights held b by South Kore ean companies" .  design, l   Regardin future  ac ng  ctivity  plan,  the  followin declaratio are  particularly  inte resting:  "The  Korean  ng  ons  Governm ment  announ nced  the  will  to  strength the  exec hen  cution  again trademar counterfeiting  and  nst  rk  illegal  co opying  throu the  Kor ugh  rean‐America FTA  negotiations.  Th Korean  G an  he  Government  is  trying  positivel to  streng ly  gthen  intelle ectual  prope erty  protecti ion  by  extending  the  s scope  of  intellectual  property right  treat by  borde measure  besides  the  things  men y  ted  er  ntioned  in  Ko orean‐Ameri ican  FTA.  Moreove the  Korea Governm er,  an  ment  will  do  its  best  to  embody  deve e eloped  paten administr nt  ration,  to  raise  national  image to  develop countries level  thro e  ped  es'  ough  the  maintenance  of law  and  sy of  ystem  by 

                                                            
12 13

 APEC ‐ In ntellectual Property Rights Enfo orcements Strate egies, 2006, page 15   Interna ational Proper rty Training Institute Brochu ure, 2009, pag ge 5  14  http://english.peopleda aily.com.cn/9000 01/90778/90858 8/90863/692674 44.html 

16   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  ional  level  i intellectua property  protection  and  the  pro in  al  a omotion  of  e effective,  su ubstantial  internati 15 1 policies c continually" . 

3.1.2 RESOURCES 
  Accordin to  what  has  been  outlined  and said  abov it  is  easi understo ng  o d  ve,  ily  ood  that  the Korean  e  Governm ment  is  dedi icating  impo ortant  resour rces  to  Intellectual  Prop perty  Issues..  Indeed,  wh hether  in  term  of  human  reso ources  or  inf frastructures the  Gover s,  rnment's  inv volvement  is relevant.  Regarding  s  R more in  depth resou urces, the Ko orean Intelle ectual Property Office's h human resou urces is com mposed of  1,511  highly  educated  people,  and  are  "dis patched"  wi a ithin  various regions  of  the  country (source:  s  y  KIPO Annual Report 28). Furthermore, the in ncrease in expenditure of f the Korean  Intellectual Property  Office co onfirms the  commitments of the Go overnment to o become an advanced  IP nation in the 21st  century.  Indeed,  as  shown  on  the  figure  b t below,  betwe 2005  to 2009,  the  overall  expe een  o  enditures  nced an impo ortant contin nuing increas se (source: K KIPO Annual Report 2008 8).   experien  

KOREAN INTELLECTUA PROPERTY OFFICE EXPE N AL ENDITURE
400'000 350'000 300'000 250'000 200'000 150'000 100'000 50'000 0
Expenditure e (billion KRW)

EXPENDITURE

2005 225'020

2006 297'973

2007 311'119

2008 317'964

2009 374'675

    FIGURE 11   Moreove without  g er,  going  more  into  details  at  this  stage of  the  ana e  alysis,  it  is  im mportant  to  highlight  that the   Governmen nt has set up p 29 local IP  Centers nat tionalwide in n order to su upport comp panies, as  ed below (so ource: KIPO A Annual Repo rt 2008).   presente

                                                              
15

FIGURE 12

 KIPO: An nticounterfeiting g activities of KIP PO, 2009 

17   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  In  addition,  Public  Patent  Attorneys  Center  provides  free  Intellectual  Property  consultations  to  individual inventors and companies (source: KIPO, Technical Cooperation Division, 2008). Moreover,  it  is  also  important  to  note  that  the  Korean  Government  is  also  dedicating  important  focus  on  education.  Indeed,  as  mentioned  on  the  previous  chapter  (Government  declarations),  the  Korean  Intellectual Property Office established in 1987 the International Property Training Institute (KIPTI).     Going on step further, Korean Intellectual Property Office has drawn up a specific budget amounting  to 349.8 billion Korean Won for year 2010 (source: Barun IP & Law), which was diminished by 6.6%  compared to 2009 (374.7 billion Korean Won). Therefore16:     "KIPO  has  allotted  30.1  billion  Korean  Won  in  examination  and  trial  support  including  investigation,  analysis  and  classification  of  prior  art,  trademark  and  design,  and  training  of  examiners to thereby improve quality of examination and trial".     "KIPO has allotted a total of 43.4 billion Korean Won in the information business, which falls  within infrastructure of examination and trial, including allotment of 5.8 billion Korean Won  in  the  development  of  third  generation  patent  system  which  is  required  for  signing  international treaties such as Patent Law Treaty and Trademark Law Treaty".  "KIPO has allotted 25.2 billion Korean Won in technology acquisition, focusing on intellectual  property  rights,  strategic  aid  to  intellectual  property  rights  and  R&D  in  the  high‐tech  parts  and materials and support of standard patents to improve competitiveness in R&D.     "KIPO has allotted 17 billion Korean Won in training intellectual property personnel  such  as  fostering  of  next‐generation,  talented  enterprises  based  on  intellectual  property  rights  and  management of IP specialist degree course to secure future growth".  "KIPO  has  allotted  2  billion  Korean  Won  in  the  international  relation  section  to  support  efficient bilateral and multilateral cooperation".    "KIPO  has  allotted  5.7  billion  Korean  Won  in  additional  installation  of  IP‐Desk  and  introduction of intellectual property right lawsuit insurance to respond to Korean companies'  intellectual property rights infringed overseas and international patent dispute".  "KIPO  has  allotted  11.6  billion  Korean  Won  in  the  business  facilitation  sector  to  facilitate  industrialization and transfer of excellent patent technology to operate the patent technology  trading market". 

  

  

  

    Therefore, as witnessed by the previous lines, South Korea has dedicated a specific budget related to  Intellectual Property Rights. 

                                                            
16

 http://www.nahm‐patent.co.kr/eng/bbs_view.asp?boardid=5&num=226 

18   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

3.2 IPR INSTRUMENT STRUCTURE & SCOPE 
 

3.2.1 FORMAL, LEGAL AND INFORMAL OPTIONS FOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PROTECTION 
  Companies  wishing  to  sell  their  products  and  therefore  desiring  to  be  operational  in  South  Korea  need  to  register  their  intellectual  property  with  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  (KIPO).  Indeed, as outlined by the U.S. Commercial Service, "the best way for any companies of any size to  enforce  a  right‐holder's  claims  is  to  have  their  intellectual  property  recognized  by  the  Korean  Government"17. However, depending on the nature of IPR, various laws and authorities are taken into  account. Accordingly, the Korean Intellectual Property Office (KIPO), the Ministry of Culture, Sports  and Tourism (MCT), the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKC), the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries  and Food (MAF), and Korea Customs Service (source: KIPO).     The  main  formal  and  legal  options  available  for  protecting  Intellectual  Property  in  South  Korea  are  summarized on the following table including the type of IPR, related law, and Authorities.      TYPE OF IPR 
Industrial Property  Rights  Patents  Utility Models  Designs  Trademarks 

LAW 
Patent Act  Utility Model Act  Design Act  Trademark Act 

AUTHORITY 

Unfair  Competition  Prevention  and  Unfair Competition Act  Trade Secrets Protection  Semiconductor  Integrated  Circuit  Semiconductor Act  Layout Right  Copyright  Copyright Act 

Korean Intellectual Property  Office (KIPO) 

Sound  Records,  Video  Products  and  Sound Records, Video Products and  Game Software  Game Software Act  Computer Programs  New Breed of Plants  Computer Programs Protection Act  Seed Industry Act 

Ministry of Culture, Sports  and Tourism (MCT)  Ministry of Knowledge  Economy (MKC)  Ministry of Agriculture,  Fisheries and Food (MAF)  Korea Customs Service 

Customs  clearance  regulation  on  Customs Act  counterfeit goods  Source: Korean Intellectual Property Office 

     

 

                                                            
17

 U.S. Commercial Service. Url: http://www.buyusa.gov/korea/en/iproverview.html#2 

19   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  tion,  the  Ko orean  Government  has  undertaken  several  act tions  in  ord to  eradi der  icate  the  In  addit commer rcialization  o counterfe products and  ther of  eit  s,  refore  stren ngthen  the  IPR  protect tion.  For  instance the  Korean Intellectua Property  O e,  n  al  Office  is  incr reasing  its  ad dvertising  ca ampaigns  in  order  to  increase e public awar reness of the e illegality of  counterfeiti ing. Indeed, "KIPO is mak king a lot of efforts to  place  an nti‐counterfe eiting  flyers,  posters,  au udio  an  visu uals  clips  on the  Intern n  net,  in  publi places,  ic  18 subways s, buses, etc" . Moreove " er, in order t to strengthe en its "fight" and discour rage the proliferation  of count terfeit produ ucts, KIPO de ecided to tak ke serious actions such  as "tracking  g down, expo osing and  19 shutting down online  and  offline e sales  outle ets that  deal counterf l in  feited produc cts" . In add dition, as  ned previous sly (Chapter:  Governmen nt declarations), KIPO int troduced "Th he anticount terfeiting  mention reward  s system",  wh hich  has  for  purpose  to  reward  com mpanies  with an  excellen record  of  exposing  nt  counterf feit goods, b but also people who rep port the man nufacture  of  counterfeit  goods (sour rce: KIPO  Annual  Report  2007).  The  following  figur correspon to  the  "system  of  control  counterfeit  re  nds  s" establishe ed by the Kor rean Govern nments, whic ch shows the e main actors s involved in the fight  products against c counterfeit p products (sou urce: KIPO).  

    ng  curately  the  Korean  Inte ellectual  Pro operty  Office its  main  a e,  activities  are to  raise  e  Regardin more  acc consume recognit ers'  tion,  improve  the  system for  intellectual  proper reinforce the  contro against  m  rty,  e  ol  counterf feit products s, and reinfo orce intellect tual property y's capacity (source: KIPO O, Anticount terfeiting  activities s, 2009). Let t us focus on n the contro l against cou unterfeit pro oducts. Indee ed, it is important to  highlight the  followi t  ing:  "KIPO  will  cope  with the  proces systematic w h  ss  cally  to  erad dicate  the  co ounterfeit  products s what are tr ransacted ill legally with  the construc ction of "24 hours monit toring system m against  counterf products to  stamp  out  online  t feit  s"  transactions  of  counterf products in  this  first term"20.  feit  s  t  Therefor the  syste was  esta re,  em  ablished  in  o order  to  facilitate  investigation,  cert tification,  monitoring  and cont trol measure es. 
FIGURE 13 3

                                                            
18 19

 KIPO: An nticounterfeiting g activities of KIP PO, 2009   KIPO: An nticounterfeiting g activities of KIP PO, 2009  20  KIPO: An nticounterfeiting g activities of KIP PO, 2009 

20   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

 

3.2.2 INSTRUMENTS FOR THE COMMERCIALIZA ATION OF IPR R 
  First  of  all,  it  is  imp portant  to  highlight  that since  2005 the  Korean Governme nt  has  attem t  5  n  mpted  to  smooth  the  comme ercialization  of  patented technologi d  ies.  To  this  end,  severa actions  ha been  al  ave  undertak ken:  for  ins stance,  furth financiall  support  fo commerc her  or  cialization,  e establishmen of  the  nt  Patented Technolog Commer d  gy  rcialization  Committee,  and  agree ements  with various  financials  h  f institute es in order to o facilitate th he granting o of  loans to S SMEs and ve enture busine ess (source: KIPO). In  addition, the Govern nment:        i introduced s subsidies to S SMEs for the  appraisal of f their patent ted technolo ogies;   technology b m made the sys stem of transferring pate ented techno ology more f favorable to t buyers;   p promoted te echnology tra ansfers by off ffering inform mation on ex xcellent techn nologies;   o offered publ lic universitie es a 50 perce ent discount o on applicatio on fees;   c continued to o expand the patented te echnology da atabase;   a and,  in  conj junction  with various  te h  echnology  tra ansfer  organ nizations,  an nalyzed  the  trends  in  21 t technology t transfers . 

  er, the Government also expanded th he electronic c‐marketplac ce for all pat tented goods s in order  Moreove to suppo ort SMEs for r enabling th hem to find b both a suitable distribut tion channel  and suitable market  (source:  KIPO,  Annu Report  2005).  Furth ual  2 hermore,  the Government  "also  enc e  couraged  SM with  MEs  patented d technologies to take ad dvantage of  the early bu f uyer recomm mendation sys ystem for gov vernment  organiza ations: the sy ystem enable es SMEs to su upply patent ted products to governme ent organiza ations"22.     ng  ommercializa ation",  the  following  fig f gure  has  for  purpose  to present  r  o  Regardin policy  related  to  "Co some of the most ele ements prom mulgated by  the Korean I Intellectual P Property offiice since 200 23.   05  
FOR THE PATENTEE WHO IS R E INCA APABLE OF INDEPENDENT C COMMERCIALIZA ATION •Facilita ation of the tr ransfert of  patent ted technolog gy •E.g. Un niversity and research  institu utes FOR THE PATENTEE WHO WANTS TO O
INDEPEN NDENTLY COMM MERCIALIZE AND INVENTIO ON

FOR FA AND TRANSP AIR PARENT
SUPPORT

•Provisio on of financia al aid •Suppor rt of expandin ng market  places:  exhibitions, c cyber  shoppin ng malls

•Establish hment of an o objective  appraisa al system

  FIGURE 14   A  more  detailed  an nalysis  is  pre esented  in  t following  paragraph Note  tha all  these  activities  the  hs.  at  related t to the comm mercialization n are superv vised by the  Commercialization Coun ncil. Indeed,  the main  services  of  the  Com mmercializati Council  revolve  around  three  key  element Financial  Support,  ion  k ts:  Collatera Support,  and  Consul al  ltations  Not tifications,  as  shown  be a elow  (Sourc WIPO  Re ce:  esources:  Improvin ng IP recogni ition in Enterprises, KIPO O, 2007).                                                               
21 22

 Korea Int tellectual Prope erty Office, 2005 Annual Report, , p 51   Korea Int tellectual Prope erty Office, 2005 Annual Report, , p 51  23  WIPO Re esources: Impro oving IP recognition in Enterprise es, KIPO, 2007

21   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

   

      e mains services provided d are the following24:   More accurately, the  
COLLATERAL SUP PPORT •Provision of IP infor rmation  •Discou unted applicat tion fees •Nurturing of IP expe erts  entication and  •Authe nteeing of new w  guaran techno ologies •Evalua ation and mar rketing of  new te echnologies •Guidance on manag gerial or  techni ical problems •Advert tising and marketing of  new products   F INANCIAL SUPPORT CONSULT LTATIONS NOTIFICATIONS

FIGURE 15

 

•Funds f for R&D and a acquisition  of IP •Funds f for IP valuatio on and  transac ctions •Funds f for launching new  produc cts •Funds f for establishin ng  enterpr rises •Funds f for facilities and mass  produc ction

•Consulta ations on general  aspects  of commercia alization ouncil’s  •Notifica tion of the co support  programs •KIPA

    In  addit tion  to  serv vices  offered by  the  C d  Commercializ zation  Council,  Korea  IInvention  Pr romotion  Associat tion  (KIPA)  has  an  im mportant  rolle  in  the  commercializ c zation  of  in ntellectual  property.  p ngly, the com mmercializati ion services  includes the following su upport:   Accordin       f funding for c commercializ zation,   t technology t transfer supp port,   t technology v valuation sup pport,  

a and regional l intellectual property ce enter support t (source: KIP PA website, s services).     Note:  al the  follow ll  wing  definitio in  italics are  from  the  Korea  Invention  Pro motion  Asso ons  s  ociation's  website (http://www w.kipa.org/english/biz/su upport_b.jsp p). 
24

                                                            
 WIPO Re esources: Impro oving IP recognition in Enterprise es, KIPO, 2007 

22   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  The funding for commercialization has for purpose to financially support any companies of any size  for the commercialization of pilot products of superior patented inventions (source: KIPA). Firstly, it  includes  the  subsidization  for  international  application  fees,  that  is  "providing  assistance  with  international applications  fees in order  to encourage individuals inventors and SMEs  to venture out  internationally". Secondly, the support for the production of prototypes, which is intended to "boosts  inventors'  morale  and  helps  commercialize  invention  by  providing  government  financing  for  manufacturing  pilot  products".  Thirdly,  it  comprises  the  industrial  technology  development  loan  project,  which  "encourages  enterprises  possessing  patents  to  develop  major  capital  goods  and  products  requiring  sophisticated  technology,  as  well  as  disseminate  innovative  technologies  by  offering long‐term low‐interest loans  that can be used to cover production costs from research and  development  to  the  manufacturing  of  pilot  products".  Fourth,  the  patented  technology  transfer  promotion  fund  which  has  for  purpose  to  "promotes  the  efficient  transfer  of  superior  patented  technologies  (from  local  universities,  research  institutes  and  other  enterprises)  to  recipient  firms  by  lending financial support and helping commercialize such patented technologies"25. Finally, the main  activities of the assistance for the acquisition of good inventions are to "explore the market, increase  the volume of trade, enhance the morale of SMEs and individual inventors, collect the funds for the  development of patented technologies and secure profits".    Regarding  the  technology  transfer  support,  it  includes  the  following  support  and  assistance:  the  patent transfer information center, the IPMart, and the exhibition and fair assistance. For instance,  the  patent  transfer  information  center  provides  free  consulting  services  concerning  technology  transfer.  Regarding  the  IPMART,  this  latter  one  provide  via  online  marketplace  a  powerful  information support regarding the transfer and commercialization of target technologies. It includes  information    about  50,000  technologies  to  be  licensed  (source:  KIPA  website,  services).  Finally,  the  exhibition and fair assistance has for purpose to "explores the demand for and market potential of  superior patented technologies and encourages their transfer to private firms".    The  technology  valuation  support  includes  three  mains  activities,  namely  the  invention  valuation  project, the exhibition and fair assistance, and finally the online patent valuation system. Regarding  the  invention  valuation  project,  it  "designates  valuation  organization  and  supports  the  costs  of  the  valuation performed by them". Concerning the exhibition and fair assistance, from the point of view  of the technology valuation support, it is intended to "assigns IP experts to provide valuation services  at  intellectual  property  rights‐related  fairs  for  an  onsite  analysis  of  the  technologies  on  display".  Finally, the online patent valuation system "allows inventors to get an instant grade for their patents  online which can be used to determine what to do with the technology in terms of budget, licensing  strategy and competition".    The  last  one  concerns  the  regional  intellectual  property  center  support.  It  includes  the  following:  support  for  the  operation  of  local  intellectual  property  centers,  regional  brand  consultation,  and  workshops and seminars. Support for the operation of local intellectual property centers is intended  to  "provides  centers  with  the  funding  and  training  necessary  for  them  to  give  local  inventors  and  SMEs  full  support  for  all  stages  of  commercializing  their  inventions".  Regarding  the  regional  brand                                                              
25

 KIPA. Url: http://www.kipa.org/english/biz/support_a.jsp 

23   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  consultation,  it  "puts  a  stronger  focus  on  geographical  indications  and  other  types  of  regional  branding  to  help  less  developed  regions  of  Korea  establish  themselves  both  nationally  and  internationally". Finally, workshops and seminars are intended to "allows the exchange of up‐to‐date  information  and  strategies  in  the  world  of  intellectual  property  for  centers  to  use  for  their  client  services". 

3.2.3 INSTRUMENTS FOR THE ENFORCEMENT OF IPR 
  In  order  to  prevent  IP  infringements  and  the  proliferation  of  counterfeit  products,  the  Korean  Government relies on an effective system with enforcement agencies. Indeed, seven agencies with  different  missions  contributes  to  the  protection  of  the  intellectual  property  (and  also  to  eradicate  counterfeited  goods)  of  companies,  individuals,  or  inventors.  These  agencies  are  presented  in  the  following.     AUTHORITY  ACTIVITIES26 
 "is  responsible  for  enforcing  four  major  industrial  property  right  (IPR)  laws  –  Patent,  Trademark, Utility Models and Design laws"      "is  responsible  for  enforcing  other  IPR  laws,  such  as  the  Semiconductor  Integrated  Circuit  Layout law and the Unfair Competition Prevention and Trade Secret Protection law"   "carries  out  offline  investigations  to  help  track  down  and  put  a  stop  the  manufacture,  circulation and sale of counterfeit products because they usually result in unfair competition  practices"   "aims to efficiently control counterfeiting activities within its region"   "investigates  and  obtains  detailed  information  about  the  modus  operandi  of  illegal  manufacturers and circulators within its region"   "is  working  closely  with  major,  medium  and  small‐sized  companies  to  address  the  counterfeiting control problems that Korea currently has"   "supports KIPO’s anti‐counterfeiting activities, receives complaints from companies in terms  of  the  difficulties  they  face  due  to  counterfeiting  activities,  monitors  online  circulation  of  counterfeit products and recommends policies for adequately fighting counterfeiting"   "special  prosecutors  established  a  “Joint  Investigation  Headquarters  for  Intellectual  Property  Violation  Criminals”  at  the  Prosecutor‐General’s  Office  to  efficiently  enforce  intellectual property protection leading to the eventual eradication of counterfeit products  and activities"     "joint local investigation teams have been established and charged with the responsibility of  prosecuting IPR violation cased within their jurisdiction"   "responsible  for  managing  imported  and  exported  products  through  unified  customs  boundary, has, in line with the WTO/TRIPs agreement of January 1, 1994 and the Customs  Law, been enforcing the protection of trademarks and copyrights"   "is  endowed  with  special  judicial  police  authority  to  take  action  against  IPR  offenders  in  relation  to  the  import  or  export  of  products  that  violate  trademark,  copyright,  design,  patent or utility model rights"   "has the authority to ban the importation, exportation, sale or production of IPR infringing  products.   The  Korean  Trade  Commission,  depending  on  specific  circumstances,  may  give  over an order for the IPR infringing products to be corrected, prohibited or disposed of" 

KOREAN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY  OFFICE 

LOCAL OFFICES BY REGION 

KOREAN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY  PROTECTION ASSOCIATION  

PROSECUTOR OFFICE AND THE  POLICE 

KOREA CUSTOMS SERVICE 

KOREAN TRADE COMMISSION 

LOCAL SELF‐GOVERNMENT 

 "KIPO  has  entrusted  256  local  self‐governments  throughout  the  nation  with  the  right  to  investigate and eradicate counterfeit products"  

                                                            
26

 Definitions: U.S. Commercial Service Website. Url: http://www.buyusa.gov/korea/en/iproverview.html#_top  

24   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Going one step beyond what is being said, it is important to outline that South Korea's IP system is  supported  by  what  is  called  the  "Trials  System".  Indeed,  this  latter  one  related  to  intellectual  property  rights  is  a  three  instance  procedure  which  includes  the  Intellectual  Property  Tribunal,  the  Supreme Court and the Patent Court (source: KIPO). Its main purpose is to "promote and strengthen  the protection of IPR while guaranteeing fair and prompt settlements of IPR‐related disputes"27.    

3.3 SUPPORTING LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT 
  The  protection  of  intellectual  property  is  promulgated  in  Article  22(2)  of  the  Korean  Constitution,  which underlines that « the rights of authors, inventors and artists shall be protected by law »28.     Regarding  Patents,  Utility  Models,  and  Designs,  it  is  important  to  outline  that  in  South  Korea  invention can be protected depending upon the concerned Act. For instance, patents are protected  pursuant to the Korean Patent Act (source: KIPO). Concerning utility models, protection comes into  force only when the registration is made pursuant to the Utility Model Act (source: KIPO). Note: in  order  to  be  protected  by  the  law,  an  « invention »  must  fulfill  the  basic  requirements  in  terms  of  industrial applicability, novelty, and inventiveness (Goldstein, 2009). Article II of the Patent Act states  that  « the  term  of  protection  for  a  patent  is  twenty  years  from  the  date  of  the  filing  of  the  patent  application »29. The duration of protection for utility models is ten year from the filling date. In terms  of Design protection, it comes into effect  under the Design Act. Article II of  the Design Act defines  any  designs  as  being  « the  shape,  pattern  or  color  of  an  article  or  any  combination  thereof  which  produces an aesthetic impression on the sense of sight »30. Note: patents, utility models, and designs  must be registered with the Korean Intellectual Property Office in order to be protected by the law.    Copyright :  literacy,  scientific  work  or  artistic  domain  falls  under  the  Copyright  Act.  Unlike  patents,  utility models, or designs, no registration is required in order to be protected (source: Copyright Act).  However,  the  copyright  holder  has  the  possibility  to  register  its  work  with  the  Ministry  of  Culture,  Sports and Tourism. By registering, it enables the copyright holder to be more protected against third  parties (Copyright Act, Article 52).    Under  the  Korean  law,  Trademarks  are  protected  according  to  the  Trademark  Act.  Therefore,  a  trademark is qualified as being « a sign, character or figure, or combination thereof which is used by a  person  who  produces,  manufactures,  processes,  certifies  or  sells  goods  for  business,  in  order  to  distinguish his goods from those of others »31. Any marks, associated marks, service marks, collective  marks, and non‐profit business emblems falls under the Trademarks Act (source: Trademark Act).     In  addition  to  the  above,  certain  intellectual  property  rights  are  protected  under  the  Unfair  Competition  Prevention  and  Trade  Secrets  Protection  Act,  which  came  into  effect  in  1992  (Goldstein, 2009). The main purpose of this Act is to avoid and prevent  unfair competition such as                                                              
27 28

 KIPO's website: Korean IP System ‐ Trials   Goldstein, P., 2009, Intellectual Property in Asia: law, economics, history and politics, Springer, 357 p.  29  Patent Act, Article II  30  Design Act, Article II  31  Trademark Act, Article II 

25   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  the  misuse  of  trademarks  and  trade  names,  and  therefore  to  avoid  trade  secrets  infringement  (source: Unfair Competition Prevention and Trade Secret Protection Act).    Going one step beyond what is being said, it is important to highlight that the protection of certain  types of intellectual property rights such as computer program, semiconductor chip layout designs,  sound  records,  video  products  and  game  software  falls  under  specially  legislated  acts  (Goldstein,  2009).    

3.3.1 JUDICIARY INDEPENDENCE, TRANSPARENCY AND CORRUPTION 
  In terms of transparency, this latter cannot exist "without a transparent legal system that are freely  and  easily  accessible  to  all,  strong  enforcement  structures,  and  an  independent  judiciary  to  protect  citizens  against  the  arbitrary  use  of  power  by  the  state,  individuals  or  any  other  organization"32.  Concerning the situation in South Korea, although the Government has undertaken many important  reforms, it seems that a lack of transparency of regulations is a major concern for foreign investors  (source:  laposte‐exprort‐solutions).  According  to  the  Transparency  International's  Corruption  Perception  Index  2009,  South  Korea  is  ranked  39th  out  of  179  countries  (source:  transparency  international). The obtained score is 5.5, and the rating scale ranging from 1 to 10, 10 being the best.  Therefore, the level of corruption is perceived as present.     In  addition,  according  to  the  Global  Corruption  Barometer  2009,  political  parties  are  identified  as  being the most corrupt area, followed closely by parliament, private sector, public officials and finally  general  media.  Indeed,  much  of  the  Korean  population  believes  that  corruption  pervades  South  Korea (source: National Integrity System, Transparency International, 2006). For instance, two former  Korean presidents who chaired between 1981 and 1992 were imprisoned for having received illegally  bribes (source: National Integrity System, Transparency International, 2006).     Unlike  the  above  situation,  the  Korean  Constitution  states  the  following:  "judges  must  follow  the  constitution,  laws  and  regulation  to  maintain  judicial  independence  according  to  their  conscience  and in conformity with the constitution and the Court Organization Act"33. The Government stipulates  that  the  judiciary  system  has  to  maintain  independence  from  any  external  institution  (source:  National Integrity System, Transparency International, 2006). Regarding more accurately the current  state of judicial independence, as witnessed by Nack‐Song Sung34, the complete independence of the  Korean judicial system is guaranteed. However, concern tends to regard the independence of judge  (Sung, 2006). Furthermore, to ensure the judiciary independence, the Constitutional Court of Korea,  as an and independent body, monitors governmental powers and protects the people's fundamental  rights  (source:  National  Integrity  System,  Transparency  International,  2006).  To  conclude  with  this  part,  despite  corruption  affecting  the  country,  and  as  outlined  by  the  Korean  Constitution,  the  independence of the judicial system is guaranteed. However, impartiality of judges is challenged.    
32 33

                                                            

 www.lexisnexis.com   National Integrity System, Transparency International, 2006, p. 47  34  Sung, Nack‐Song, Judicial Independence in Korea, Daegu High Court, 2006 

26   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

3.3.2 LABOUR LAW 
  In  South  Korea,  companies  relying  on  secrets  may  conclude  confidentiality  and  other  agreements  with  employees  in  order  to  keep  intellectual  property  from  leaking  out  of  the  company.  Indeed,  employees are required and obligated not to disclose any confidential information related to IPR or  trade secret to a third party during the period of employment contract as well as after retirement,  which  may be perceived  as a business insurance  (source: Ministry of Employment and Labor35). In  addition, Article 10 of the Unfair Competition Prevention and Trade Secret Protection Act states the  following:  "Article  10  acknowledges  the  right  to  request  the  courts  to  take  necessary  measures  to  prohibit  or  prevent  a  person  who  holds  trade  secrets  from  committing  any  acts  of  infringing  such  secrets"36.  Therefore,  it  may  be  stressed  without  retained  that  the  Korean  labour  system  offers  a  well‐defined legal framework for companies of any size. Thus, the Korean labour laws allows for the  enforcement of these agreements. 

35 36

                                                            
 Ministry of Employment and Labor, Labor Law Q&A for Foreign Investors, 131 p.   Ministry of Employment and Labor, Labor Law Q&A for Foreign Investors, p. 17 

27   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

         
   

4. THE MESO‐LEVEL

28   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

4.1 SECTOR REVIEW & ANALYSIS 
  Overall, it is important to outline that the tertiary sector is the one that weights the most in regard  with the Korean Gross Domestic Product, followed by the manufacturing industry (secondary sector)  and agriculture (source: trade.ec.europa.eu). Indeed, the share of service industry amounted to 60.3  %, industry to 37.19, and agriculture about 2.5% of the 2008 GDP (source: trade.ec.europa.eu). We  note  therefore  that  the  first  and  major  part  of  South  Korean  Gross  Domestic  Profit  consists  of  the  service  industry.  The  second  biggest  part  of  the  GDP  is  made  up  by  the  manufacturing  sector,  and  lastly, the smallest by the agricultural sector (source: seoulkoreaasia.com).     Regarding  more  accurately  the  secondary  sector  (industry),  this  latter  consists  of  electronics,  shipbuilding,  automobiles  and  automotives  parts,  armaments,  construction,  textiles  and  footwear,  chemicals,  and  pharmaceuticals  (source:  countrystudies.us).  However,  concerning  the  current  leading  industries  sectors,  according  to  the  Korea  Chamber  of  Commerce,  South  Korea’s  largest  industries are electronics, telecommunication, automobile production and shipbuildings.     Before  going  one  step  further,  in  terms  of  patents  applications  by  technological  field,  namely  electronical engineering, instruments, chemistry, mechanical engineering, and the so‐called « other  fields », area that experienced the largest requests is the electronical engineering with 49.61% of the  total number of applications. The second biggest field is the « mechanical engineering» with 16.27%,  followed  closely  by  chemistry  (13.11%)  and    instruments  (12.29%).  Lastly,  the  « other  fields »  comprise 8.71% of the overall number of patents applications (source: WIPO database 2009). Note:  among  all  technological  « field »,  consideration  of  intellectual  property  issues  is  important,  as  evidenced by the figures below (source: WIPO, 2009).     FIELD OF TECHNOLOGY  Electrical engineering  Instruments  Chemistry  Mechanical engineering  Other fields  NUMBER OF PATENTS APPLICATIONS  PERCENTAGE  372'435  92'283  98'430  122'099  65'406  49.61  12.29  13.11  16.27  8.71 

Total  750'653  100    Let  us  take  each  of  the  above  technological  field  more  in  detail  in  comparison  with  Japan  and  Switzerland.  It  is  important  to  bear  in  mind  that  only  the  percentages  will  be  compared,  not  the  number of applications. The purpose of this comparison is to provide an overall overview in order to  display the respective share of each country by technological field.    Electrical Engineering: in regard with the electrical engineering, compared to the overall number of  patent  applications  filed  by  each  country,  Japan’s  share  amounts  to  31.26%,  Switzerland  to  10.4%  and South Korea to 49.61%. South Korea’s share confirms that the electronics industry is one of the  Korean’s  largest  industries,  and  thus,  IPR  consideration  is  also vital.  Indeed,  among  the  750,653  29     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  applications  filed  in  2009,  nearly  373,000  involved  only  electrical  engineering  (source:  WIPO).  In  addition,  among  categories,  most  applications  filed  in  South  Korea  related  to  telecommunication,  semiconductors, audio‐visual technology, electrical machinery, and computer technology. For more  details, please refer to the table below (source: WIPO).    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Electrical machinery, apparatus, energy  Audio‐visual technology Telecommunications  Digital communication Basic communication processes  Computer technology  IT methods for management  Semiconductors  Total 

SOUTH KOREA 
58'493  65'493  79'456  25'052  9'085  54'046  8'339  72'471  372'435 

JAPAN 
264'686 268'218  197'719  60'386  42'388  242'830  50'958  217'261  1'344'446 

SWITZERLAND 
4'691  1'851  1'985  966  443  3'003  958  1'180  15'077 

    Instruments:  instruments  comprises  optics,  measurements,  analysis  of  biological  materials,  control  and medical technology. Concerning the respective share of each country, Japan with about 30% is  ranked in first position according to overall number of patents applications filed in 2009, followed by  Switzerland, and then, South Korea. Regarding this latter one, the major applications regards optics  instruments with 52,107, trailing far by measurements (15,439) and medical technology (13,893) , as  witnessed by the figures cons (source: WIPO).      INSTRUMENTS 
Optics  Measurement  Analysis of biological materials  Control  Medical technology  Total 

SOUTH KOREA 
52'107  15'430  1'664  9'189  13'893  92'283 

JAPAN 
279'928  147'329  18'210  75'964  746'801  1'268'232 

SWITZERLAND 
2'233  7'747  2'108  2'119  20'489  34'696 

    Chemistry:  the  overall  number  of  patent  applications  filed  in  2009  in  Japan  amounted  to  638,588,  98,430 regarding South Korea, and lastly, 55,995 for Switzerland. Japan’s figures are very impressive,  justifying its ranking as a leader in terms of patenting. Regarding more in details Korea’s chemistry  area,  there  are  two  major  subfield  recording  the  highest  number  of    patents  applications,  namely:  food chemistry and environmental technology.    

30   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan  SOUTH KOREA 
9'224  7'652  7'873  8'092  11'378  10'402  10'960  9'056  1'736  10'713  11'344  98'430 

  CHEMISTRY 
Organic fine chemistry  Biotechnology  Pharmaceuticals  Macromolecular chemistry, polymers  Food chemistry  Basic material chemistry  Material, metallurgy  Surface technology, coating  Micro‐structural and nano‐technology  Chemical engineering  Environmental technology  Total 

JAPAN 
60'706  37'252  43'451  80'038  27'257  77'928  77'897  94'474  5'758  73'566  60'261  638'588 

SWITZERLAND 
13'514  5'067  15'263  3'587  3'517  5'864  1'763  2'455  118  3'913  934  55'995 

  Mechanical  engineering:  as  outlined  previously,  the  second  biggest  field  is  the  mechanical  engineering with 16.27% of the overall number of patents applications. The overall number of patent  applications filed in 2009 in Japan amounted to 802'648, which represents a very impressive figure.  Switzerland  recorded  30'456  patents  applications  and  South  Korea  122'099.  For  more  detailed  information concerning South Korea, please refer to the table below (source: WIPO).      MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Handling  Machine tools  Engines, pumps, turbines  Textile and paper machines  Other special machines  Thermal processes and apparatus  Mechanical elements  Transport  Total 

SOUTH KOREA 
10'517  11'556  13'476  9'661  14'873  19'448  12'056  30'512  122'099 

JAPAN 
100'002  75'586  92'695  126'016  101'012  55'536  105'285  146'516  802'648 

SWITZERLAND 
8'074  3'377  2'527  4'647  5'141  1'621  2'753  2'316  30'456 

  Other fields: finally, patent applications regarding the "other fields" comprises of furniture, games,  other consumer goods, and civil engineering. More detailed information are provided below.    MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Furniture, games  Other consumer goods  Civil engineering  Total 

SOUTH KOREA 
19'027  23'415  22'964  65'406 

JAPAN 
95'748 62'845 88'120 246'713

SWITZERLAND 
2'730 3'007 2'583 8'320

  31     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  To conclude with this part, regarding both attitudes and commitments, the previous analysis display  that consideration related to IPR issues is very strong, which shows that the Korean Government is  strongly  focusing  to  provide  a  very  competitive  business  environment  both  to  Korean  and  foreign  companies.  In  addition,  the  figures  also  underline  that  the  major  tool  used  in  order  to  secure  the  intellectual assets of firms is patenting, in regard with technological field.      

32   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

4.2 THE INSTITUTIONAL MAP 
 

INSTITUTIONS INVOLVED IN CREATING POLICY AND INSTRUMENTS37:  
  Concerning the creation of Intellectual Property policy, it must be highlighted that policy is created in  the  same  way  that  other  national  policies  are  made  in  South  Korea.  Therefore,  the  Government  introduces most of the IP‐related bills. The scope of its activity is nationally.    

INSTITUTIONS INVOLVED IN REGISTRATION, SUPPORT AND ENFORCEMENT: 
  In South Korea, Korean Intellectual Property Office is the major governmental institution that is in  charge of intellectual property matters. Its main mission is to provide the necessary tools in order to  foster industrial development, technological innovation, and secure intellectual assets.     Regarding  more  accurately  the  main  functions  of  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office,  this  governmental  institution  is  in  charge  to  deal  with  affairs  concerning  utility  models,  patents,  trademarks, and responsible for the examination and registration of Intellectual Property Rights. Its  additional  activities  are  as  follows:  “the  conducting  of  trials  on  intellectual  property  disputes;  the  management  and  dissemination  of  information  on  intellectual  property  rights;  the  promotion  and  public  awareness  of  invention  activities;  the  promotion  of  international  cooperation  on  intellectual  property rights; and the training of experts on intellectual property rights”38.    In addition to above, KIPO is also in charge of enforcing other Intellectual Property Rights laws, such  as  the  Unfair  Competition  Prevention  and  Trade  Secret  Protection  law  and  the  Semiconductor  Integrated Circuit Layout law (source: KIPO).     Furthermore,  it  is  important  to  highlight  that  KIPO’s  website  offers  very  effective  tools  for  patents  search. Indeed, the main research gears are KPA Search (Korean Patent Abstracts), K‐PION, and PCT‐ Service. All these allow both individuals and companies to access to information related to IPR, and  obviously,  which  procedure  to  be  followed  in  order  to  file  in  a  patent  application,  but  also  information  related  to  schedule  of  fee  as  well  as  application,  substantive  examination,  and  registration  fee.  Thus,  companies  can  directly  file  in  their  patent  application  via  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office’s  website.  This  latter  is  endowed  with  an  effective  online  system.  In  addition, it is possible to get useful information on various international protections, such as how to  be protected via the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT).     Going  one  step  further,  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  has  established  an  important  and  vast  network  of  institutions  affiliated  with  it.  Indeed,  this  includes;  Korea  Invention  Promotion  Association, which has for purpose to offer assistance to companies, searchers, and individuals from  inventions  to  commercialization,  to  foster  intellectual  property  and  patent  management  support,  and lastly, to train people with IPR issues (source: KIPA); International Intellectual Property Training                                                              
37 38

 According to Paul Goldstein, IP in Asia: law, economics, history and politics, 2009, 357p.   Korean Intellectual Property Office’s website 

33   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Institute, which is a sub‐organization of the Korean Intellectual Property Office, whose major mission  is to provide education on intellectual property; Korea Institute of Patent Information, which fulfils  various activities, such as dissemination of Korean patent information, patent information search for  government‐funded  R&D  projects,  and  patent  information  search  for  the  private  sector  (source:  KIPA); Korea Patent Attorneys Association and IP Academy. In addition, South Korea is member of  the World Intellectual Property Organization since 1979.    In  addition  to  above  institutions,  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  naturally  works  in  conjunction with the Korean Government, as well as Korea Customs Service and Prosecutor Office  and  the  Police.  For  instance,  Korea  Customs  Service  may  be  sought  in  case  of  IPR  infringements.  Indeed,  companies  may  require  Customs  to  take  serious  actions  against  counterfeited  products  in  order to protect their intellectual assets.    Regarding  IP  enforcement,  South  Korea  offers  both  judicial  and  administrative  infrastructures  (source: Goldstein, 2009). At a glance, in terms of judicial infrastructure, the primary means for the  enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights is to bring a civil action before a court. In fact, as outlined  by  Goldstein  (2009),  “criminal  sanctions  may  also  be  imposed  on  the  infringer  if  the  case  is  prosecuted based on related criminal charges”. Moreover, both criminal laws and civil laws apply to  the  enforcement  of  intellectual  property  rights  (Goldstein,  2009).  Therefore,  in  many  cases,  the  enforcement of IPR relies on criminal prosecution.     Concerning the administrative infrastructure, let us underline the following: “under the Patent, Utility  Model, Design, and Trademarks Acts, administrative actions for trials that are closely related to the  enforcement of industrial property rights may be brought before KIPO”39. As a reminder, the Korean  IP System is endowed by the “Trial System”, which consists of the Intellectual Property Tribunal, the  Patent Court and the Supreme Court (source: KIPO). Concerning more in depth the Patent Court, this  latter  comprises  twelve  permanent  judges  and  seventeen  technical  examiners  (source:  Goldstein,  2009).  Since  its  inceptions  in  1994,  the  Patent  Court  handled  more  than  7,000  cases  (source:  http://patents.court.go.kr).     In regard with “entities” which might act as role models for the country, Jeong Hwan Lee, executive  vice‐president  of  LG  Electronics,  is  by  far  the  key  figure  in  intellectual  property.  For  instance,  he  is  one  of  the  protagonists  who  participate  actively  in  the  creation  of  the  Korea  Intellectual  Property  Association (source: managingip.com). Furthermore, as head of the company’s intellectual property  centre, Mr. Hwan Lee is one of the most emblematic figures and influencer in South Korea in regard  with intellectual property’s policy (source: managingip.com), as well as LG Electronics is considered  as a pioneer by being systematically one of the top foreign filers at the USPTO and one of the biggest  user of the PCT system in 2008 (source: managingip.com).   

                                                            
39

 Goldstein, P., ……. 

34   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

4.3 DEGREE OF INSTITUTIONAL PROACTIVITY 
4.3.1 ATTITUDE AND COMMITMENT TO IPR RELATED ISSUES – ACTIVE PROVISION OF IPR RELATED  INFORMANT AND SERVICES 
  First  of  all,  the  consideration  of  IPR  issues  by  the  various  institutions  mentioned  in  the  previous  chapter is strong. In addition to above institutions, and as a reminder, 29 local IP centers were set up  nationwide by the Korean Government in order to support the SMEs day‐to‐day activities related to  intellectual property rights (source: KIPO). For instance, within each regional IP centers, at least two  full‐time consultants are available to serve the various needs of SMEs (source: KIPO’s annual report  2008). Regarding the degree to which services are provided to SMEs, the regional IP centers offer IP  consultations, patent information services and educational programs (source: KIPO). More in depth,  “a  patent  information  consultation  provides  customized  searches  for  patent  trend  analysis  and  technology  direction  and  also  for  preventing  duplicate  and  redundant  investment  as  well  as  patent  disputes” – “a patent commercialization consulting service matches potential licensees with potential  licensors  for  a  successful  technology  transfer  by  utilizing  KIPO’S  database”40.  In  regard  with  customized searches, KIPO’s consultants provide advice on how to proceed and how to prepare an  effective patent application. In addition, financial supports are granted to SMEs willing to file more  patent  applications  overseas  (source:  WIPO).  Moreover,  regarding  educational  programs,  as  mentioned  previously,  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  set  up  the  International  Intellectual  Property  Training  institute  in  1987,  whose  major  mission  is  to  provide  education  on  intellectual  property, and therefore, to foster IP awareness.    In addition to above, additional services are provided to SMEs, as the follow41:       “KIPO  provides  SMEs  with  free‐of‐charge  consultations  on  IPR  infringements  in  cooperation  with the Korea Patent Attorneys Association”.  “KIPO also assists SMEs by offering a patent map on patent infringements. The patent map  helps SMEs cope with patent infringements overseas”. 

  Furthermore,  in  order  to  make  the  system  more  efficient,  the  Government  has  established  the  so‐ called  “IP  Management  Support  Dream  Team”,  which  is  endowed  of  several  specialists,  such  as  patent  agents  and  attorneys,  whose  main  purpose  are  to  support  both  local  IP  centers  and  SMEs  (source:  KIPO).  Further,  South  Korea  launched  in  2008  a  major  project  aimed  for  non‐English  speaking markets in order to foster the penetration of SMEs (source: KIPO).          

40 41

                                                            
 KIPO’s annual report 2008   Baek, J‐H., «Korean National Experience on Building Intellectual Property Awareness and Capacity of Small and Medium‐sized 
Enterprises », July 30, 2008 

35   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

4.3.2 RESOURCES 
  Information  provided  by  the  Korean  institutional  framework  is  very  comprehensive,  up  to  date,  widely  available  and  accessible  to  everyone.  Indeed,  online  information  are  very  accessible,  and  institutions are struggling to keep their website updated. Furthermore, It must also be stressed that  all  information  is  available  in  Korean,  but  also  in  English,  Japanese,  and  Chinese.  Moreover,  the  system is so well established that I have never met contradictory statements from one institution to  another. In fact, the information is very consistent, as well as documentation.    In  addition,  the  Korean  Government  has  built  a  very  effective  network  within  and  outside  the  country.  Indeed,  at  a  national  level,  interactions  between  the  various  bodies and  organizations  are  widely  sufficient,  as  outlined  in  the  previous  chapter.  As  a  reminder,  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  has  established  an  important  and  vast  network  of  institutions  affiliated  with  it.  The  various  institutions  interact  with  each  other,  as  well  as  with  other  governmental  bodies  such  as  Korea  Customs  Service,  Prosecutor  Office  and  the  Police  for  more  improved  IPR  protection.  At  an  international  level,  many  collaborations  were  established.  To  date,  South  Korea  has  joined  13  international  treaties  related  to  Intellectual  Property  (source:  KIPO).  Furthermore,  Korean  Intellectual Property Office has built several collaborations with foreign Intellectual Property Office in  regard with the “Patent Prosecution Highway” (PPH) project. The basic concepts of this latter is the  following: “where the office of first filling has assessed the patentability of a patent application, the  office  of  second  filling  ensure  that  the  applicant  is  entitled  to  benefit  from  an  accelerated  examination for the corresponding application”42.    Regarding  Human  Resources,  it  is  important  to  stress  that  the  level  of  knowledge  of  Korean  specialists  is  high.  Indeed,  the  Government  ensure  that  population  receive  the  best  education  possible.  In  the  field  of  Intellectual  Property  Rights,  one  of  the  biggest  objectives  of  Korean  Intellectual Property Office is to improve the number of highly educated IP specialists (source: KIPO).  In  the  same  vein,  South  Korea  adopted  the  WIPO’s  World  Wide  Academy  Programs  that  is  an  international IPR education program for universities (source: KIPO’S annual report 2008). It is easily  understood  that  the  willingness  to  provide  the  country  with  highly  trained  specialists  is  a  Government’s  objective.  Thus,  as  a  provisional  conclusion,  South  Korean  is  not  one  of  those  countries, which still have some way to go in education.    Finally,  in  terms  of  finance,  financial  supports  may  be  granted  to  SMEs  willing  to  file  more  patent  applications overseas (source: KIPA). Indeed, since 1982 KIPO has been providing financial support to  companies willing to secure their patents fillings or utility model applications overseas (source: KIPA).  Note  the  following:  “For  invention  proven  to  have  superior  quality,  KIPO  subsidizes  the  application  costs  incurred  during  the  two‐year  period  preceding  the  day  to  which  applicants  request  financial  support.  For  PCT  international  applications,  only  applications  that  have  entered  the  national  phase  are  eligible  for  financial  support;  in  this  case,  the  application  costs  for  the  national  phase  and  the                                                              
 KIPO’s website – Objective and Outline of Patent Prosecution Highway 

42

36   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  international phase are covered”43. Furthermore, the Government  is providing financial support for  IPR assessment among SMEs. This latter has for purpose to help SMEs to assess if the technologies  they  plan  to  develop  do  not  conflict  with  existing  technologies  before  starting  the  development  (source: KIPA). In most cases, the Korean Government covers 75 percent of the assessment costs.     In addition to above, financial supports are also provided for promoting sales channels for women’s  invention. This latter is aimed to fill in three main tasks: motivate the invention activities of women,  help  commercialize  the  patented  technologies  of  women  inventors,  and  support  the  business  activities of women (source: KIPA) 

 

 

                                                            
43

 Korea’s Invention Promotion Activities, Experience of the Korean Intellectual Property Office, KIPO, 2003 

 

37   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

                 

   
 

5. THE MICRO‐LEVEL 

38   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

5.1 LEVEL OF USE OF IPR PROTECTION INSTRUMENTS 
  First of all, the following chart highlights the number of patent fillings per million population from  2001 until 2007 in South Korea (source: WIPO’s database).    

EVOLUTION OF PATENT FILLINGS
3000 2500 2000 NUMBER 1500 1000 500 0
Mill. Pop.

2000 1549

2001 1556

2002 1607

2003 1887

2004 2190

2005 2538

2006 2598

2007 2656

    FIGURE 15   As witnessed by the data, the number of patents fillings has experienced a positive growth to reach  the  top  in  2007.  Analysts  said  the  trend  should  continue  (source:  KIPO).  Therefore,  it  must  be  stressed that South Korea has the highest patent fillings per million population worldwide, followed  closely  by  Japan,  and  trailing  far  by  the  United  States  of  America  and  Germany,  as  shown  below  (source: WIPO, 2007).  

PATENT FILLING BY COUNTRY PER MILLION POPULATION
REP. OF KOREA JAPAN USA GERMANY NEW ZEALAND FINLAND MONACO DENMARK DEM. OF KOREA UNITED KINGDOM 0 341 336 303 287 284 500 1000 1500 FIGURE 16 2000 2500 3000 581 447 800 2656 2610

 

 

39   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Furthermore, as for the number of patent fillings per million population, South Korea has recorded  the  highest  number  of  patent  fillings  per  $billion  Gross  Domestic  Product,  and  once  again,  is  followed closely by Japan (source: WIPO, 2007).     PATENT FILLING PER $BILLION GDP
Rep. of Korea Japan Moldova China USA New Zealand Germany Kyrgyzstan Russia Finland

114 82 36 22 17 17 17 15 13 10 0 20 40 60 80 100 120

  FIGURE 17   Note: the same scenario is repeated once again regarding the number of patent fillings per $million  R&D expenditure, ranking South Korea at the top of the list (source: WIPO).    Regarding  more  accurately  the  number  of  patents  granted  by  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office, the finding is that since 1995 it has increased significantly, as witnessed by the figure below  (source: WIPO).    NUMBER OF PATENT GRANTED
900'000 800'000 700'000 600'000 500'000 400'000 300'000 200'000 100'000 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

 

  FIGURE 18        40     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  In regard with the overall number of patents in force, this latter has almost doubled between 2004  and 2008. For instance, the number of patents in force in South Korea amounted to 216,645 in 2004,  to  finally  reach  443,318  in  2008  (source:  WIPO).  The  following  table  summarize  the  number  of  patents in force with Korean Intellectual Property Office and country of origin (source: KIPO Statistics  Database). As witnessed by the figure below,     NUMBER OF PATENTS IN FORCE
Japan USA Germany France Netherlands Switzerland 0 12669 5109 4419 3426 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 120000 38997 100673

    Focusing now on the level of trademarks application, as for the previous trends, it has experienced a  very positive growth until 2007 to reach up to 141,289 applications, before failing in 2008 to 137,461  (source:  WIPO,  2010).  This  fall  may  be  the  result  of  the  global  financial  crisis  that  we  experienced.  Finally, the trademark applications per Gross Domestic Product ($billion) in 2007 amounted to 99.3  (source: WIPO & World Bank).     
FIGURE 19

41   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

5.1.1 LEVEL OF TRANSGRESSIONS  
  Before drawing an overview of the level of IPR transgressions, the following must be stressed: South  Korea is endowed with legislation on the intellectual property in compliance with the international  requirements, as outlined previously. However, its implementation still presents shortcomings. The  Korean  authorities  have  made  real  endeavours  to  strengthen  the  intellectual  property  protection,  but the risk of being copied is always a major concern of companies approaching the Korean Market  (source:  Embassy  of  France  in  Korea44).  Note:  thanks  to  efforts  made  by  the  Government,  South  Korea is no longer placed on the U.S. list of intellectual property rights violators45.    Let’s  focus  now  on  the  level  of  IPR  transgressions.  According  to  the  European  Commission’s  Trade  website,  companies’  most  cases  of  intellectual  property  rights  infringements  in  2006  related  to  trademarks, designs, and copyrights. The most concerned sectors were luxury goods, fashion, video  games,  as  well  as  music  industry  (source:  European  Commission).  The  counterfeiting  sector  was  estimated to € 800 million in 2006 (source: European Commission). In addition, it must be stressed  that about 80% of the Korean population have broadband access, the highest in the world. Given this  highest  broadband  access,  software,  video  game  and  music  industries  were  strongly  affected  because  the  number  of  unauthorized  sources  of  downloads  increased  sharply  and  therefore,  sales  have fallen by more than 55% since 2001 (source: European Commission). Moreover, between 2000  and 2005, 160 of South Korean products were listed (source: Embassy of France in South Korea)    Although  it  seems  difficult  to  obtain  accurate  statistics,  thanks  to  stricter  regulation  as  well  as  Government  pressure,  the  number  of  counterfeit  products  seized  by  Korean  Customs  Service  amounted to 97,751 in 2008, which represents a 276 percent increase from 35,366 in 2007 (source:  KIPO’s  annual  report  2008).  The  following  chart  highlights  that  the  number  of  seized  goods  since  2003 is 9 times greater.     NUMBER OF SEIZED COUNTERFEIT PRODUCTS
160000 140000 120000 100000 80000 60000 40000 20000 0 Number

2003 10160

2004 149555

2005 17742 FIGURE 20

2006 14852

2007 35366

2008 97751

 

                                                              
44 45

 Ambassade de France en Corée, La Propriété Intellectuelle en Corée, 2007   http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2919917 

42   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  er, the numb ber of convic cted counter rfeiters expe erienced a 10 09.2 percent t increase fr rom 1995  Moreove in 2007 t to 214 in 200 08 (source: K KIPO’s annua al report 200 08). In additio on, more tha an 123 websites were  shut  dow in  2008, representin a  256  pe wn  ,  ng  ercent  increa from  48  in  2007  (so ase  ource:  KIPO’ annual  ’s  report 2008).    In  addit tion  to  abov the  follo ve,  owing  table displays  more  accurat e  m tely  the  nu mber  of  co ounterfeit  products seized  in  2008  by  bra name  a nd  category Therefore,  brand  nam most  aff s  and  y.  me  fected  by  counterf feiting  is  Lev with  nearly  half  of  all  seized  go vi’s,  oods,  as  sho own  below.  T most  co The  oncerned  category y is “the othe ers”, which m may compris se glasses, st tationeries, medical supp plies, and labels with  43,700  seizures.  Th second  most  affect he  ted  is  the  “other  trademarks”,  ac ccounting  to 42,910  o  feit products s, trailing far by Louis Vu itton (3,626), MCM (1,99 93), and Cha anel (1,737) a as shown  counterf below (s source: KIPO, , 2009).  

  n step beyon nd what is b being said, re egarding mu usic piracy, th he number o of pirated m music files  Going on found  in South  Kore dropped  by  92  perc n  ea  cent,  betwee 2008  and 2009,  whic represents  a  rare  en  d  ch  46 victory  a against  piracy  (source:  Economist,  2010 ).  Co onsequently, music  sale experienc a  10  ,  es  ced  percent increase in 2 2009, to reac ch $159 milli on, the artic cle said.    In  regard  with  softw ware  piracy,  the  followin statemen is  very  int ng  nt  teresting:  “w while  Korea  has  long  been a h hot spot for  counterfeit c copies of sof ftware, how wever, the na ation appears rs to be making some  47 substant tial strides in combating piracy” . A n  g  According to a joint stud dy conducted d by the Wa ashington  Business s Software A Alliance and M Massachuset tts IT, about 41 percent of software  installations s in South  Korea w were unlicens sed in 2009,  below the g global average, as outlin ned by the fiigure cons. H However,                                                              
46

 Economist, Repelling the e attach, April 2 22, 2010 

47

 Kim Hyu ung‐eun, Piracy o of PC software s sinks, May 12, 20   010 43   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

  orea still has s to make im mprovement.  Indeed, as t the report sa aid, “Althoug gh Korea imp proved, it  South Ko still has  a ways to g go. Korea’s P PC software p piracy rate w was still muc ch higher tha an the avera age of 27  percent  for  countri that  are members  of  the  Or ies  e  rganization  for  Econom Cooperation  and  f mic  Developm ment”.  For  instance,  the  United  Sta ates’  softwa piracy  ra is  the  low are  ate  west,  at  20  percent,  followed d closely by Japan and Lu uxembourg, b both with 21 1 percent (source: Kim Hy yung‐eun, 20 010).    

  FIGURE 21 1   Note: alt though Kore ea’s piracy rate is still hig her than the e average (27 7%) of other  r OECD members, it is  ranked  a among  the  t 30  Lowe Piracy  Ra top  est  ates  in  2009 (source:  Se 9  eventh  Annu al  Business  Software  Alliance, , Global Softw ware Piracy Study).     Going  one  step  furt ther,  according  to  “The  Economic  Benefits  of  Lowering  PC software  Piracy”,  a  B L C  P survey sponsored by y Business So oftware Allia ance, a ten p point reduction of Korea’’s PC softwa are piracy  from  20 008‐2011  wo ould  engend the  crea der  ation  of  an  additional  7,600  new  jobs,  $700  millions  regardin tax  reven ng  nues,  and  $1 billion  in economic  growth,  as  witnessed  by  the  figur below  1.3  n  re  (source:  BSA, 2008).   In addition, the figure a also displays the consequ uences of no ot reducing the piracy  rate, out tlined in blue e.    

    44   
FIGURE 22

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Moreover, the following table shows more accurately the potential impact of any reduction in piracy  in regard with IT spending, IT Industry Employment, and IT Related Tax Revenues, as stressed above.   To  conclude  with  this  chapter,  counterfeiting  is  one  of  the  biggest  problem  to  which  the  Korean  Government  is  confronted.  Therefore,  the  level  of  IPR  infringements  is  high,  as  witnessed  by  the  previous  figures,  which  constraint  Korea  to  act  quickly  in  order  to  counter  this  phenomenon.  However,  it  must  be  stressed  that  South  Korea  has  undertaken  strong  endeavours  to  eradicate  counterfeit products.   

45   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

5.2 FROM AWARENESS TO ACTION 
 

5.2.1 AWARENESS OF THE IMPORTANCE – KNOWLEDGE OF INSTRUMENTS AND INSTITUTIONS 
  Korean  SMEs  are  becoming  better  informed  about  the  purpose  and  usefulness  of  methods  of  protecting intangible assets, especially through courses and seminars propelled by the Government  for  SMEs.  Regarding  more  accurately  IPR  courses  for  SMEs,  they  cover  the  importance  of  IPRs,  government  policies  on  commercialization  of  patented  technologies  and  the  application  procedure  (source:  KIPA).  Therefore,  the  main  purpose  of  the  courses  is  to  increase  the  awareness  of  IPRs  among  SMEs  employees  and  executives,  and  therefore  to  incite  them  to  consider  the  use  of  Intellectual Property Rights as being a core business asset.    In  addition  to  courses,  KIPO  has  conducted  seminars  nationwide  in  order  to  encourage  Intellectual  Property  Rights  acquisitions  among  SMEs  (source:  KIPA48).  Indeed,  “KIPO’s  IPR  seminars,  which  are  cohosted  by  IIPTI,  local  chambers  of  commerce,  municipal  governments  and  the  Korea  Industrial  Complex  Corporation,  are  aimed  at  providing  SMEs  with  basic  knowledge  on  such  topics  as  the  significance of IPRs and the government policies that promote IPR acquisition”49. Thus, seminars are  conducted  in  order  to  heighten  the  awareness  of  the  importance  of  IPR  among  SMEs.  Note:  even  KIPO’s commissioner offered lectures. Therefore, it is easily understood that KIPO is actively engaged  in heightening awareness of IPRs among SMEs. Moreover, the awareness on the importance of IPRs  has  also  increased  among  women  who  manage  SMEs  through  seminars  dedicated  exclusively  for  women (source: KIPA).     To  conclude  with  this  part,  Korean  SMEs  seems  to  be  well  informed  about  options  available  for  protecting their intangible assets as well as institutions responsible for IP registration, support, and  enforcement.  Furthermore,  the  main  advantage  of  the  Korean  IP  system  lies  mainly  in  the  accessibility  to  information,  as  well  as  the  very  effective  network  established  by  KIPO,  as  outlined  previously. Moreover, the high number of patents fillings by Korean companies highlights that SMEs  executives are aware of the importance of the Intellectual Property Rights.   

5.2.2 BARRIERS TO THE ADOPTION OF IPR RELATED MEASURES 
  Going one step beyond what is being said, it must be pinpointed that resources offered to companies  seems  to  be  sufficient  for  the  management  of  their  intangible  assets.  First  of  all,  in  terms  of  information,  the  following  must  be  stressed:  as  witnessed  by  the  number  of  patents  fillings,  or  trademarks applications, it seems that the importance of Intellectual Property has been sufficiently  understood  by  companies.  Moreover,  the  various  tools  made  available  for  protecting  intellectual  property  seems  also  be  clearly  understood  and  used  by  SMEs,  as  emphasized  in  the  previous 

48 49

                                                            
 Korea’s Invention Promotion Activities, Experience of the Korean Intellectual Property Office, KIPO, 2003   Korea’s Invention Promotion Activities, Experience of the Korean Intellectual Property Office, KIPO, 2003 

46   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  chapters. As a reminder, the Government has established a very effective network to support SMEs  day‐to‐day activities related to IPR issues.   Regarding  the  following,  I  have  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  fact  that  it  is  very  difficult  to  get  accurate  information  regarding  the  level  of  know‐how  held  by  companies.  However,  it  may  be  assumed that given the significant used of IPR tools, companies acquired a sufficient level of know‐ how.  Furthermore,  let’s  remind  that  since  more  than  a  decade  one  of  the  biggest  purposes  of  the  Korean Government is to increase the number of IP specialists (source: KIPO’s annual report 2008).  To  this  end,  the  idea  is  that  each  company  is  endowed  by  employees  specialized  in  the  field  of  intellectual property.    Regarding Human Resources, let’s remind that according to the Global Competitiveness Report 2008‐ 2009, more than 53% of Koreans aged 25 to 34 held a university grade, which corresponds to one of  the  highest  rate  among  all  OECD  countries.  Therefore,  it  may  be  assumed  that  both  multinational  companies and SMEs have access to suitably skilled personnel. In addition, let’s also underline that  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  has  been  introducing  since  1999  “IPR  Classes”  as  part  of  the  university  curriculum,  which  is  aimed  at  building  a  Human  Resources  infrastructure  for  Intellectual  Property  Rights  (source:  Korea’s  Invention  Promotion  Activities).  Therefore,  once  again  it  may  be  assumed  that  human  resources  are  not  a  concern,  given  the  above  and  current  situation  in  South  Korea.     

47   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

       
 

  6. GLOBAL SUMMARY 
  

48   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

6.1 SUMMARY 
 

ELEMENT 
Environment   

STRENGTH 
  Strong involvement,  commitment, and  motivation of  Government towards IP.  Serious measures taken  in recent years, real long‐ term vision and strategy.  International  cooperation, treaties,  and compliance with  international standards 

WEAKNESS 
  Although South Korea has  made enormous  progresses, counterfeiting  is still a major problem to  solve. Therefore, it is  considered as an important  challenge for the  Government 

OPPORTUNITY 
  Pursue the fight against  counterfeit goods and  piracy. Increase and  strengthen public  awareness through  advertising campaigns 

THREAT 
    Be perceived as being a  haven for counterfeit  goods such as China. 

INFO GAP 

GOVT ATTITUDE & COMMITMENT 

IPR INSTRUMENTS & STRUCTURE 

Availability,    understandability and  accessibility of tools for  protecting Intellectual  Property. Tools tailored  for enterprises and  individuals. Very effective  network within the  country  Regulation covering the  entire IPR (patents,  trademark, design,  copyright). IP laws in  compliance with  international laws,  treaties and cooperation.  Despite Corruption  judicial independence is  guaranteed  Lack of transparency,  although the Government  is undertaking important  reforms such as  independence of judges.  Furthermore, corruption is  still a concern (not the  most), but it must be taken  into account 

To undertake further  improvements, such as  having been taken in recent  years (speed, efficiency,  and reactivity). 

Being content with current  experiences and acquired:  continuous improvements  forgotten 

 

Transparency of  regulations, fight against  corruption. 

LEGAL & REG. ENVIRONMENT 

Corruption could mitigate  negatively the country's  image. Risk: foreign  companies move away  from South Korea 

 

49   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

ELEMENT 
Institutional   

STRENGTH 
   

WEAKNESS 
 

OPPORTUNITY 
 

THREAT 
   

INFO GAP 

SECTOR ANALYSIS & REVIEW 

INSTITUTIONAL MAP 

Electrical Engineering,  Instruments, Chemistry,  Mechanical Engineering,  Services, Shipbuilding.  Unlike other Asian  countries, South Korea  has a good reputation  (made‐in). Cutting‐edge  technology, leading  companies (LG, Samsung) Very well‐defined  network and framework,  continuous interaction  between various  institutions and no  inconsistency.  Accessibility, availability,  consistency of  information. Information  available in Korean,  English, Chinese,  Japanese.  International network,  cooperation and treaties.  Vision and Strategy in  compliance with  International Standards.  Education and courses  related to IPR offer to  enterprises and  individuals (+University  students)  

Continuous improvement.  Become a global leader in  the field of technology,  promote further  emergence of innovation‐ oriented enterprises such  as LG, Samsung, etc).  

Stay in situation of status  quo 

 

Continuous improvement  and further interaction  with international bodies  

Stay in situation of status  quo 

 

 

Continuous improvement. 

Stay in situation of status  quo 

Availability of further  information regarding the  degree of institutional  proactivity. 

INSTITUTIONAL PROACTIVITY 

50   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

ELEMENT 
Enterprise   

STRENGTH   

WEAKNESS     

OPPORTUNITY     

THREAT   

INFO GAP 

USE OF IPR INSTRUMENTS 

Abundant use of tools    available for protecting  intellectual property  rights: patents,  trademarks, utility  models, and designs (see  statistics). Well above the  world average, "the top  of the pack". Importance  of IPR well understood  Measures undertaken by  the government to  eradicate the  counterfeiting (penalties,  websites breakdown).  Further tools established  to monitor illegal  activities, award system  to foster denunciation.   Counterfeiting, although  important improvements  are undertaken. 

Lack of detailed statistics  regarding the number of  applications by size of  companies (large, SMEs).  

INFRINGEMENT OF IPR 

Pursue the fight against  counterfeit goods and  piracy. Increase and  strengthen public  awareness through  advertising campaigns 

Being content with current  experiences and acquired:  continuous improvements  are necessary in order to  discourage the use of  counterfeit products 

 

FROM AWARENESS TO ACTION 

Awareness of population,    advertising campaigns  (media, concert, cinema),  increasing number of IPR  tools utilization, which  witness awareness of  companies and  individuals. Very  important consideration  of protecting intangibles  assets 

Continue to provide  information to population  and companies in order to  increase awareness.  Further "specials events"  such as concerts, cinema,  movies 

Being content with current  experiences and acquired:  continuous improvements  are necessary in order to  further engender people's  and representatives'  awareness. 

 

51   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

       
                         

7. THE SURVEY

52   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

7.1 QUANTITATIVE METHODOLOGY 
 

7.1.1 THE SAMPLE 
  First of all, it is important to outline that given the small number of companies having participated in  the survey, it is regrettably impossible to make generalizations, and therefore, impossible to infer the  results.  Although  more  than  1,500  companies  were  contacted  and  significant  efforts  have  been  provided, such as taking contact directly with enterprises' managers, the number of questionnaires  received  in  return  is  unfortunately  low.  Indeed,  the  used  sample  size  consists  of  data  from  7  companies only. Several hypothesis can be made to try to explain this phenomenon.      First  of  all,  the  questionnaire  was  very  comprehensive,  and  only  managers  and  representatives were able to fill in the questionnaire. To this end, it must be emphasized that  the filling of the questionnaire required significant processing time for managers.   In  addition,  cultural  distance  may  also  represent  a  major  obstacle.  Indeed,  in  highly  hierarchical country, such as China, Japan, and Korea, people's behaviour differs substantially  from "individualistic" countries (EU, US). Therefore, cultural differences may have an impact  on response rate.    Furthermore, the survey period was not favorable. Indeed, companies were contacted during  the summer period and especially during the holiday period, which may explain the difficulty  to  get  in  touch  directly  with  companies'  representatives.  Therefore,  many  representatives  were  unreachable,  or  simply  were  not  interested  in  this  investigation.  In  addition,  it  is  important to highlight that because of the jet lag, the contacting with companies was more  difficult.    Moreover,  I  assume  that  companies  having  not  participated  to  the  survey  have  been  reluctant because of confidentiality, although all information would have been confidentially  handled. It is legitimate for companies to be reluctant about the use of information sent via  the Internet. 

  

  Indeed, all these above factors may contribute to "justify" the very low response rate despite having  contacted  more  than  1,500  companies  and  provided  important  efforts  to  get  in  touch  with  enterprises' representatives. In addition, one might think that other more weighing factors could be  taken into account to try  to explain this very low response rate, such as the political tensions with  North  Korea.  However,  from  my  point  of  view,  relations  with  the  North  should  have  no  impact  on  this study, according to the current situation. Note: given the above, it is very important to bear in  mind that the following findings cannot be generalized and therefore must not to be considered as  representative of the current situation in South Korea regarding Intellectual Property Rights.   

53   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

7.1.2 SURVEY INFORMATION 
  First of all, the information of the survey included a first part relative to the company with questions  regarding the company's age, the company's turnover, the number of employee, its industry, and so  on. In a sense, introductory questions.     Moreover,  the  second  part  included  questions  regarding  Intellectual  Property,  more  accurately  questions,  such  as  the  level  of  protection  of  the  company,  its  motivations  to  own  intellectual  property rights or not having any protection. To this end, a copy of the questionnaire is available in  annex.   

7.1.3 DATA ANALYSIS METHOD 
  Overall, SPSS was used to analyze the results. Indeed, this powerful statistical tool was used to make  a first descriptive analysis in order to try to understand key relationship of the questionnaire, such as  finding  out  what  are  the  main  reasons  causing  companies  to  own  Intellectual  Property  Rights.  In  addition,  the  second  part  of  the  analysis  is  more  analytical,  that  is  to  say  with  the  definition  of  various construct and their correlations with other variables.     Initially, it was necessary  to assess the reliability and the validity of measures. Indeed,  in statistics,  reliability deals with the extent to which the measurement process yields consistent results when the  process  is  repeated  in  some  way  (Dröge,  1996).  To  this  end,  one  basic  assessment  to  measure  the  reliability  with  SPSS  consists  of  using  the  Cronbach's  Alpha.  Therefore,  the  reliability  is  confirmed  when  the  Cronbach's  alpha  value  is  over  or  equal  to  0.6  (Dröge,  1996).  In  addition,  the  second  assessment is the validity, which represents the degree to which a measure precisely describe what it  is  supposed  to.  Therefore,  unidimensionality,  convergent  and  discriminant  validity  are  the  main  criteria that are used to measure the Validity.    A more detailed description of methods will be provided in the following chapters of this report.   

7.2 RESULTS 
 

7.2.1 DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS 
  At this stage of the investigation, 5 main tables will be presented. Indeed, the first ones, available in  appendix, represents the table of descriptive statistics, which includes all variables and ordinal scale  with the mean, the minimum and maximum values, and the standard deviation. To this end, many  relevant  prior  information  can  be  noticed,  such  as  the  average  size  of  firms  that  responded  to  the  survey,  their  annual  turnovers,  their  ages,  the  percentage  of  turnover  earned  outside  the  country,  and the number of countries in which they are established. All these information are summarized on  the  table  cons.  Indeed,  concerning  companies'  size,  as  witnessed  by  the  figures  below,  the  mean  54     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  amounts  to  3.14.  Therefore,  the  majority  of  companies  having  being  surveyed  are  composed  of  at  least  21  employees,  and  a  maximum  of  50  employees,  according  to  our  definition.  This  underlines  that  the  surveyed  companies  are  SMEs.  Regarding  more  accurately  their  annual  turnovers,  the  obtained mean amounts to 3.1. Therefore, according to our scale's definition, their annual turnovers  are  greater  or  equal  to  3  millions,  but  in  no  case  exceed  5  millions.  In  addition,  the  majority  of  companies are established since about 10 years, as witnessed by the figure. Finally, regarding more  accurately their turnovers earned outside South Korea and the number of countries in which they are  established, the majority of companies engender between 21% to 40% of their turnover abroad and  have  their  factories  within  one  country.  For  further  and  detailed  information,  please  refer  to  appendix.   
MINIMUM FIRM SIZE (NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES) ANNUAL TURNOVER PERCENTAGE TURNOVER EARNED
OUTSIDE THE COUNTRY

MAXIMUM 7.00 6.00 6.00 22.00 2.00

MEAN 3.1429 3.1429 3.4286 9.8571 1.4286

ST. DEV. 2.54484 1.95180 2.14920 8.35521 0.53452

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

FIRM AGE NUMBER OF COUNTRIES WHERE YOU
ARE ESTABLISHED

  7.2.1.1 Motivation to own Intellectual Property Rights    One  of  the  most  important  question  is  to  figure  out  what  drives  companies  to  own  Intellectual  Property Rights. As witnessed by the table below (in order of importance on a scale from 1 to 5), the  primary  reason  that  drives  companies  to  protect  their  innovation  is  to  have  a  stronger  market  position, and therefore, to overcome competition.   
MOTIVATION TO OWN IPR To have stronger market position To prevent piracy of competitors To have reputation creation To have direct income by licensing To have high return on investment To block competitors To have a better advertising impact To facilitate R&D cooperation To convince partners To attract finance To increase negotiation power MEAN 3.83 3.50 3.50 3.33 3.16 3.16 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.50 2.33

  55   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Moreover, companies resort to intellectual property in order to prevent piracy, which represents still  a major concern in South Korea, and also to have "reputation creation". Regarding more accurately  the  piracy,  it  is  easily  understood  why  companies  are  resorting  to  Intellectual  Property  Rights.  Indeed,  although  South  Korea  has  provided  very  important  endeavors  against  counterfeiting,  this  latter ones represents still a major problem for both domestics and foreign companies. Regarding the  others main reasons, SMEs are attracted by Intellectual Property in order to have direct income by  licensing, to have high return on investment, and to block competitors. Note: according to companies  having  being  surveyed,  the  bargaining  power  represents  the  least  important  motivation.  The  following histogram displays all the motivations to own IPR.   

MOTIVATIONS TO ONW IPR
4.5 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 3.83

3.5

3.5

3.33

Level

3.16

3.16

3

3

3 2.5 2.33

 
 

7.2.1.2  

Reasons not to own Intellectual Property Rights 

REASONS NOT TO OWN IPR You don't own IPRs, because it is difficult to enforcing rights You don't own IPRs, because it is too expensive You don't own IPRs, because we don't consider these methods relevant You don't own IPRs, because you don't have enough knowledge We don't protect our IP because it can disclose information to competitors You don't own IPRs, because you don't need IPR You don't own IPRs, because too bureaucratic

MEAN 3.4000 3.4000 3.2000 3.2000 3.0000 2.8000 2.6000

  As witnessed by the table above (in order of importance on a scale from 1 to 5), the major reasons  that  lead  companies  not  to  own  Intellectual  Property  Rights  regard  the  enforcing  of  rights  and  the  56   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  costs required to protect intellectual assets. Indeed, it seems that the real problem does not concern  the awareness or the availability of tools to protect innovations, but the difficulty to enforce rights  and  the  costs  required  by  the  Government  in  order  to  be  protected  by  the  law.  In  addition,  companies  are  not  resorting  to  Intellectual  Property  Rights  because  they  feel  not  having  enough  information about. Another important reason regards the disclosure of information to competitors.  Finally, the following histogram displays the major reasons of companies of not owning IPR.   

REASONS NOT TO OWN IPR
4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 3.4 3.4 3.2 3.2

3

Level

2.8

2.6

Colonne1

     7.2.1.3   Informal Protection Methods 

INFORMAL PROTECTION METHODS (IN ORDER OF IMPORTANCE ON A SCALE FROM 1 TO 3) We keep secret key knowledge from some of the employees, partners, clients We conclude confidentiality agreement with employees, partners, clients We divide knowledge between several employees in the aim to have no single person knowing all concerning a new product or service We conclude agreement of non-competition with employees We conclude agreement on transfer of rights with employees

MEAN 2.50 2.28 2.14 2.00 1.71

  According  to  companies  having  being  surveyed,  the  most  important  informal  protection  methods  resorted is to keep secret key knowledge from some of the employees, partners, and clients. Indeed,  this way of doing allows companies to keep Intellectual Property from leaking out of the company.  The  second  most  informal  protection  methods  used  is  to  conclude  confidentiality  agreement  with  employees,  partners,  and  clients.  As  a  reminder,  in  South  Korea,  employees  are  obliged  not  to  disclose any confidential information related to IPR or trade secret to a third party during the period  of employment contract as well as after retirement, according to Ministry of Employment and Labor.  It  easily  understood  why  companies  are  resorting  to  confidentially  agreement.  Finally,  SMEs  are  57   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  rarely  concluding  agreement  on  transfer  or  rights  with  employees,  as  shown  above.  The  following  histogram has for purpose to display the major informal protection methods.   

INFORMAL PROTECTION METHODS
3 2.5 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 We keep secret key knowledge from some of the employees, partners, clients We conclude We divide We conclude confidentiality knowledge between agreement of non‐ agreement with several employees competition with employees, in the aim to have employees partners, clients no single person knowing all concerning a new product or service We conclude agreement on transfer of rights with employees 2.28 2.14 2 1.71

 

  7.2.1.4 List of barriers to operate in this country comparing with the problem of IP    In order of importance on a scale from 1 to 3, the analysis displays that the most relevant concern  regards the cost of establishing a legal entity, followed closely by high taxation. However, one of the  most  amazing  "finding"  regards  the  access  to  quality  labor  force.  Indeed,  the  2008  global  competitiveness report  outlines that 53% of Koreans aged 25 to 34 have a university degree, which  represent the highest of all OECD countries, except Japan and Canada. In addition, it is also amazing  to  figure  out  that  transport  and  logistics  infrastructures  represent  a  major  "Barrier"  to  operate  in  South Korea.  
LIST OF BARRIERS Cost of establishing a legal entity High taxation Access to quality labor force Difficulties with administrative requirements Transport & logistic infrastructures Banks lack of credit accessibility Risk of inflation Lack of access to innovation Banks high interest rates Telecommunication infrastructures MEAN 2.16 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.85 1.71 1.71 1.71 1.71

58   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  In addition to above, telecommunication infrastructures, credit accessibility, risk of inflation and the  lack of access to innovation seem not to be considered as being barriers to operate in South Korea  comparing  with  the  problem  of  Intellectual  Property.  The  following  histogram  has  for  purpose  to  summarize the above score obtained.   

LIST OF BARRIERS
2.5 2 Level 1.5 1 0.5 0 2.16 2 2 2 2

1.85

1.71

1.71

1.71

1.71

   

7.2.2 RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY MEASURES 
  7.2.2.1 Reliability Measures    In  this  section,  the  goal  is  to  determine  whether  the  reliability  is  respected.  As  a  reminder,  the  reliability  of  measurement  "denotes  a  function  describing  the  probability  of  failure"50.  A  poor  reliability  may  degrades  the  accuracy  of  a  single  measurement,  and  therefore,  may  reduce  the  aptitude  to  track  changes  in  a  measurement  in  experimental  studies  (statsoft.com).  As  stressed  earlier, one basic appraisal to assess the reliability consists of using the Cronbach's Alpha. Therefore,  the reliability is confirmed when the Cronbach's alpha value is equal or over to 0.6 (Dröge,1996).     Focusing  now  on  the  Cronbach's  Alpha,  as  witnessed  by  the  table  below,  the  degree  of  internationalization obtains an alpha less than 0.6. Indeed, the obtained coefficient is strongly low.  The reliability is rejected, and this latter should therefore be taken off during the analysis. Apart from  this, Cronbach's Alpha Coefficient of the other dimensions are greater than 0.6. Thus, the reliability is  accepted.                                                                   
 http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/reliability‐and‐item‐analysis/ 

50

59   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
CRONBACH'S ALPHA Firm Size Degree of Internationalization Country Protection Efficiency Country Administrative Procedures Country Protection Costs Country Costs Related IP Office Satisfaction IP Track Record Informal Protection Methods SCORE 0.892 0.093 0.915 0.889 0.940 0.912 0.882 0.762 0.652

  Regarding  the  value  obtained  for  the  degree  of  internationalization,  and  as  stressed  above,  the  Cronbach's alpha is very low. To be very frankly, it is very difficult to figure out accurately the main  reason  that  led  to  this  result.  However,  I  assume  that  there  was  inconsistency  in  responses,  which  may also be the result of the very low number of questionnaire received in return. Given that, the  variables composing the "degree of internationalization" are taken off.     7.2.2.2 Validity Measures    In addition to the previous chapter, the second assessment consists of the validity, which refers to  "the  extent  to  which  a  concept,  conclusion  or  measurement  is  well‐founded  and  corresponds  accurately  to  the  real  world"51.  Therefore,  unidimensionality,  convergent  and  discriminant  validity  are the main criteria that are used to measure the Validity. To this end, Unidimensionality is done by  conducting  an  exploratory  factor  analysis.  "Scales  which  are  unidimensional  measure  a  single 

trait.  This  property  is  a  basic  assumption  of  measurement  theory  and  is  absolutely  essential  for  unconfounded  assessment  of  variable  interrelationships  in  path  modeling"52.  Convergent  Validity  is  shown  when  each  measurement  item  is  strongly  correlated  with  its  construct,  in  others  words,  it  refers  to  the  degree  to  which  a  measure  is  correlated  with  other  measures  that  is  theoretically  predicted to correlate with. In principle, convergent validity is usually satisfied by retaining variables  whose loadings are greater than 0.5. Finally, Discriminant Validity "appears when each measurement  item  is  weakly  correlated  with  all  other  constructs  except  for  the  one  to  which  it  is  theoretically  associated"53.    Regarding  more  accurately  the  unidimensionality,  only  the  first  eigen  value  should  be  over  one  (Dröge,1996).  However,  the  computation  suggests  not  to  consider  the  scale  of  two  constructs  as  being  unidimensional:  IP  Track  Record,  and  Informal  Protection  Method.  Therefore,  unidimensionality is rejected for these constructs. For a detailed overview, please refer to appendix.     In addition to above, let us focus now on the convergent validity. First of all, as the loadings of all the  indicators related to their constructs are not always over 0.5, convergent validity of some constructs 
51 52
53

                                                            
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Validity_(psychometric)   A.H. SEGARS, 1998, Assessing the unidimensionality of measurement, Clemson University 
 Enterprise Observatory, Results ‐ Analysis 

60   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  is  not  confirmed.  Therefore,  some  indicators  have  been  omitted  when  computing  the  Average  Variance Extracted (see below). For more detailed information, please refer to the section regarding  the discriminant validity.     Going one step further what is being said, the discriminant validity is also not confirmed for all the  constructs.  Indeed,  in  order  to  be  confirmed,  the  values  of  the  diagonal  have  to  be  significantly  higher  than  the  other  loadings  in  the  same  column  and  line.  Therefore,  discriminant  validity  is  confirmed for the following constructs:         Company's Size  Administrative Procedures  Protection Costs  Costs Related 

  Note: The Average Variance Extracted of the "IP Track Record" is not higher than the other loadings  in the same line, that is to say, the value is the same of another value (intercorrelation with Utility  Model  Commercial  Value).  Therefore,  given  what  is  said,  the  discriminant  validity  should  not  be  confirmed.       

61   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan   
4          1  0.97**  0.69*  0.21  0.16  0.45  ‐0.142  ‐0.63  0.28  ‐0.5  ‐0.26  0.97**  5            1  0.69*  0.17  0.33  0.53  6              1  ‐0.11  0.36  7                1  0.34  8                  1  0.59  ‐0.13  ‐0.10  0.54  ‐0.26  0.77*  0.15  9                    1  0.12  10                      **** 11                        12                          0.85a  0.35  0.72*  0.72  13                            0.907a 0.36  ‐0.18  14                              1  0  15                                ****  0.8525 

  7.2.2.2.1

Discriminant validity (intercorrelation of the research constructs) 

VARIABLES 
1. Age  2. Size  3A. Degree of internationalization  3B. Degree of Internationalization  4. Degree of innovation  5. Patent commercial value  6. Utility model commercial value  7. Trademark commercial value  8. Design commercial value  9. Copyright commercial value  10. Protection efficiency  11. Administrative procedures  12. Protection cost  13. Costs related  14. Government measures  15. IP Office Satisfaction 

1  1  0.86**  ‐0.77*  ‐0.29  0.63  0.66  0.56  0.03  0.25  0.23  ‐ 0.7* 

2    0.9496a  ‐0.78*  ‐0.43  0.53  0.58  0.37  ‐0.38  ‐0.04  0.01  ‐ 0.87**

3A      1  0.07  ‐0.02  ‐0.13  ‐0.01  0.36  ‐0.06  0.05  0.95**  0.76*  0.68*  0.72*  0.43  0.26 

3B        1  ‐0.52  ‐0.60  ‐0.74*  0.51  ‐0.29  0.07  0.36  0.45  0  0.3  0  ‐0.14 

‐0.01  0.74* 0.53  0.25 

‐0.264 ‐0.22  ‐0.68* ‐0.54  0.28  ‐0.54  ‐0.14  0.89* 

‐ 0.92** ‐ 0.96** ‐0.2  ‐ 0.92** ‐0.38  0.26  ‐0.53  ‐0.77*  ‐0.64  0.15 

‐0.09  0.83* 0.913a  0.68* 0.67* 0.42 

0.13  0.75* ‐0.62  ‐0.04  0.22  0.09  0.41  0.64 

‐0.04  0.74* 0.90** 0.43  0.81* 0.40  0.23  0.54  ‐0.34 

62   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 
1  0.5  2  3A  3B  1**  0  4  1**  5  6  7  0.5  8  9  10  0.5  0.09  ‐0.09  ‐0.32  0.31  11  ‐0.5  0.10  ‐0.31  12  13  14  0  15  1  16  0.86a  0  1  1  0  17    1  0.33  0.4  18      1  0.8*  19        1  20          ****  0.6986 

 
  16. IP track record  17. IP management strategy  18. External IP assistance  19. Check infringements  20. Informal protection methods  0.5  ‐0.86 1**  0.86  ‐0.5  0.86  ‐ ‐0.70  0.90 0  0  0.10  ‐0.1  0.84  ‐0.5  ‐0.57 0.30  0 

‐0.49  0.09  0.10  0 

‐0.21 ‐0.31 ‐0.31 ‐0.60

‐ ‐0.14 0.73

0.29  0.10  ‐0.7  0.73 0.72  0.51  ‐0.3  * ‐ ‐0.9  0.41  ‐0.1  0.31  0.37  0.28  ‐0.68 0.85

‐0.10 ‐0.21 0.74 

‐0.28  ‐0.26 0.01  ‐0.19 0.18  0.39  0.53  0.31  0.8* 0.34 

‐0.41  ‐0.49  0.43  ‐0.4  ‐0.06 0.09  0.12  ‐0.06 0.47  0.16 

‐0.14 0.74  0.73 

  NOTES: * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level. ** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level. a Diagonal: (Average Variance Extracted)1/2 = (Σλi2/n)1/2    IF THE VALUES OF THE DIAGONAL ARE SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN THE OTHER LOADINGS IN THE SAME COLUMN AND LINE, DISCRIMINANT VALIDITY IS CONFIRMED.    **** : The Average Variance Extracted should not be computed because the loadings of the indicators related to "Protection Efficiency" are less than 0.5, namely ‐0.23 and  ‐0.39. However, the current loadings would have engendered the following AVE: ( (‐0.23)2 + (‐0. 39)2 )0.5 / 2  = 0.3201. Discriminant validity rejected.    ****: Not all the indicators related to the construct are over 0.5. For a detailed overview, please refer to the following.      IP OFFICE SATISFACTION. Among the four indicators, the loading of one is less than 0.5. The indicators are the followings: 0.918, 0.289, 0.889, and 0.74. Therefore, the ones  inferior to 0.5 should not be taken into account. AVE without the loading less than 0.5:  ( (0.918)2 + (0.889)2 + (0.74)2  )0.5 / 3 = 0.8525. Discriminant validity is rejected,  because the other loadings in the same line and column are higher than the value of the diagonal.    INFORMAL PROTECTION METHODS. Among the five indicators, one of them obtains a loading inferior to 0.5. The indicators are the following: 0.42, 0.89, 0.503, 0.503, and 0.80.  AVE without the loading inferior to 0.5: ( (0.89)2 + (0.51)2 + (0.51)2 + (0.8)2  )0.5 / 4 = 0.6986. Discriminant validity is rejected, because the other loadings in the same line and  column are higher than the value of the diagonal.

63   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  7.2.2.2.2 Intercorrelation of the research constructs' analysis    Note:  for  the  sake  of  simplicity  and  clarity,  the  following  analysis  has  for  purpose  to  highlight  only  some  of  correlations  having  been  identified.  For  a  detailed  overview,  please  refer  to  the  "general  pattern" and the previous table, which display accurately all the significant correlations found.    The correlations having been found thanks to the table above are highlighted in the following lines.  Therefore,  the  first  finding  regards  the  commercial  value  of  patents.  Indeed,  patent  commercial  value is strongly correlated with the degree of innovation, which means that companies will tend to  hold patents, the more they will be innovation‐oriented.     Afterwards,  the  second  interesting  finding  regards  the  commercial  value  of  utility  model,  which  reveals  initially  a  negative  correlation  with  the  number  of  countries  in  which  the  company  is  established, and secondly, a positive correlation with the degree of innovation. Indeed, the first one  means that the more the company is operational abroad, the less it will use utility model. The second  underlines that companies tend to possess utility model as one goes along their degree of innovation  will increase.    In  addition  to  above,  the  results  reveal  that  protection  efficiency  is  correlated  with  the  company's  age  and  company's  size,  as  well  as  the  percentage  of  turnover  engendered  abroad.  Therefore,  the  perception  of  protection  efficiency  within  the  country  in  which  companies  operate  will  depend  on  the firm profile, more accurately the company's age and company's size, and its commitment abroad.    Going  one  step  further  in  the  analysis,  another  interesting  correlation  regards  the  External  IP  assistance with the degree of innovation. Indeed, the more the company's degree of innovation, the  more the external IP assistance. The assumption is that companies will tend to seek the assistance of  external offices or institutions when their degree of innovation increases, that is to say, when they  produce  cutting‐edge  technologies/products  requiring  effective  protection  in  order  to  prevent  any  infringements.    Finally,  the  last  highlight  regards  the  informal  protection  methods.  Indeed,  informal  methods  are  correlated with the government measures, which is once again, a very interesting finding. The more  the Government's measures for improving the protection of IPRs will be effective, the more company  will take support on informal protection methods, such as by concluding confidentiality agreement or  agreement of non‐competition with employees, and vice versa.   

64   

 

  7.2.2.2.3       General Pattern 

Firm profile        Country of the Head Office    (qu0.2)      Type of firm (qu0.3) 

0.97**   0.67*  ‐0.74*  

Firm  perception  of  the  importance  for  capturing  commercial  value  for  each  of  these methods of protection      Patent (qu9.1)   Utility model (qu9.2)   Trademark (qu9.3)   Design (qu9.4)     Copyright (qu9.5)

Motivations to own IPR     To attract financing (qu5.1)     To be more attractive to partners (qu5.2)   To increase bargaining power (qu5.3)   To facilitate R&D cooperation (qu5.4)     To have high return on investment (qu5.5)   To have direct income through licensing (qu5.6)   To have a stronger market position (qu5.7)      To improve the advertising impact (qu5.8)                       To enhance the reputation (qu5.9)                                    To prevent piracy by competitors (qu5.10)   To block competitors (qu5.11)                                                                     
0.8*  

1.00**  

     Mode of establishment               (qu0.8)          Age (qu0.7)                             Size (qu0.4, qu0.5    Degree of                                                                      internationalization (qu0.6,                  qu0.9)         Sector (qu0.10)            Degree of innovation (qu2)                              

 ‐0.7*  0.88**  0.95**  ‐0.92*  ‐0.96**  0.76* 

Protection efficiency (qu10.1, qu10.2)

Administrative procedures (qu10.10,  qu10.11)  Protection costs (qu10.5, qu10.6,  qu10.11)  Costs related (lawyers, assistance)  (qu10.8, qu10.9)  Government’s measures & efficiency (qu10.13) IP office satisfaction (qu13.1 to  qu13.4) 
0.97**  

IP  track  record  &  operational  issues      IP  Track  Record  (qu3.1  to    qu3.4)                   IP Management strategy  (qu6)  External IP assistance (qu7)      Check infringements (qu0.8)                        Informal protection Informal protection methods             methods (qu11.1 to qu11.5)  (qu11.1 to qu11.5) 

Reasons to NOT own IPR     No need (qu4.1)     Too bureaucratic procedure (qu4.2)                  No enough knowledge (qu4.3) Too expensive (qu4.4) Difficult to enforce rights (qu4.5) No  consideration  of  the  relevance  of  these  methods (qu4.6) The  protection  can  disclose  information  to  competitors (qu4.7)                     

65   
1.00** ,1.00** , 0.73* 

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

7.2.3 CORRELATION BETWEEN THE MOTIVATIONS TO OWN IPR VARIABLES AND OTHER VARIABLES 
 
 
To attract financing  To be more attractive  to partners  To increase  bargaining power  To facilitate R&D  cooperation  To have high return  on investment  To have direct  income through  licensing  To have a stronger  market position  To improve our  advertising impact  To enhance our  reputation  To prevent piracy by  competitors  To block competitors  1  2  3A  3B  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20 

‐0.7 

‐0.8* 

0.89** 

‐0.11 

0.01 

‐0.06 

0.36 

0.14 

‐0.14 

‐0.25 

0.75* 

0.68 

0.45 

0.5 

0.31 

0.13 

0.21

0.21  ‐0.06 

0.54 

‐0.33 

‐0.39 

0.46 

‐0.22 

0.03 

‐0.03 

0.61 

‐0.18

‐0.18 

‐0.53 

0.27 

0.22 

‐0.03 

0.0 

0.31

0.31 

0.03 

0.52 

‐0.94** ‐0.88**  0.95** 

0.10 

‐0.19 

‐0.28 

‐0.18 

0.22 

‐0.31 

0.13 

0.9** 

0.93**

0.52 

0.9** 

0.33 

0.026 

0.3 

‐0.09 

0.28 

0.06 

0.43 

‐0.12 

0.12 

‐0.55 

‐0.49 

0.06 

‐0.12 

‐0.35 

‐0.3 

‐0.58 

0.16 

‐ 

0.4 

‐0.36  ‐0.37 

‐0.23 

‐0.9 

0.46 

‐0.22 

0.76* 

0.68 

0.09 

0.28 

‐0.09 

0.46 

0.43 

0.09 

0.45 

0.31 

‐0.01 

0.86 

0.21 0.73*  0.39 

0.46 

‐0.52 

‐0.2 

0.53 

‐0.25 

0.33 

0.22 

0.22 

‐0.21

‐0.53 

‐0.32 

0.42 

0.22 

0.32 

‐0.33 

0.44 

0.7 

0.7 

0.42 

0.44 

0.20 

0.52 

‐0.17 

‐0.33 

0.73* 

0.72 

‐0.03 

‐0.04

‐0.4 

0.46 

‐0.17 

‐0.42  ‐ 0.88** ‐0.62 

‐0.06  ‐ 0.98** ‐0.8* 

‐0.31 

0.73 

‐ 

0.21 0.73*  0.63 

0.18 

0.97** 

0.71 

‐0.8* 

0.32 

0.38 

0.38 

0.36 

0.18 

‐0.78* 

‐0.35 

‐0.25 

0.18 

‐1 

0.40

‐0.12  ‐0.21 

0.83* 

0.38 

‐0.47 

0.32 

0.44 

0.43 

0.31 

0.45 

0.31 

0.37 

‐0.37 

‐0.12 

0.36 

‐1 

‐0.5

‐0.1 

‐0.4 

‐0.28 

0.01 

0.02 

0.12 

0.32 

0.46 

0.4 

‐0.5 

0.59 

‐0.04 

0.72 

0.32 

0.06 

0.43 

0.3 

0.01 

0.68 

‐1 

‐0.1

0.1 

‐0.06  ‐0.23 

‐0.62 

‐0.38 

0.56 

0.32 

0.07 

‐0.03 

‐0.62 

0.31 

‐0.5 

0.19 

0.71 

0.56 

0.34 

0.78* 

‐0.06 

0.28 

‐ 

0.4 

0.1 

0.01 

‐0.1 

66   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  First of all, as a reminder, below the necessary conditions to accept or reject any correlation. Indeed,  in statistics, correlation is confirmed when the p‐value is less than 0.05, which means that there is  only a risk of 5% to make a mistake by accepting the correlation. Note: when the result is followed by  **, it means that the relationship is significant at the 0.01 level, when followed by *, the relationship  is significant at the 0.05 level.     

REMINDER ‐ CORRELATION ACCEPTANCE CONDITION  
  We must reject H0 and conclude that the relationship between variables exists if the p‐value (asymptotic  significance bilateral) is less than 0.05 (95%) or 0.01 (99%) 
 

Si p > 0.05  Si p  0.05 

Correlation not confirmed. The relationship does not exist until proven. Independency.  Correlation confirmed. The relationship exists. Dependency. 

    Therefore,  regarding  more  accurately  the  correlation  between  the  motivations  to  own  Intellectual  Property Rights variables and others variables, the following analysis has for purpose to present the  most  relevant  correlations  found  between  variables.  For  a  detailed  overview  of  all  correlations  ,  please refer to appendix.     7.2.3.1 To attract financing    Korean  firms  correlate  the  attraction  of  funds  with  the  percentage  turnover  earned  outside  the  country, and the protection efficiency. Indeed, going one step further what is being said, companies  desiring to attract financing will generate a share of their turnover outside the country in which they  are  established.  The  assumption  is  that  by  interacting  not  only  within  the  country  but  also  with  foreign partners, firms have more opportunities to attract foreign investors. In addition, enterprises  seeking further funds will (probably) be more aware about the protection efficiency by assessing if  IPR are clearly defined and well protected by law within the country.    7.2.3.2 To increase bargaining power    Results  reveal  significant  correlations  with  the  percentage  turnover  earned  abroad,  the  protection  efficiency and administrative procedures within the country in which companies are established, and  costs related. Indeed, in order to increase their bargaining power, once again firm tend to generate a  portion  of  their  turnover  abroad  and  focus  on  the  efficiency  protection  within  the  country.  In  addition,  they  also  tend  to  carefully  determine  whether  the  necessary  time  to  protect  their  innovations  is  short  or  long,  as  well  as  the  administrative  procedures  are  reasonable.  Finally,  the  higher the related costs, the more the power of negotiation.  

67   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  7.2.3.3 To have high return on investment    In addition to above, enterprises correlate to have a high return on investment with the  degree of  innovation, and the external IP assistance. Indeed, innovation‐oriented is significantly correlated with  expectation of high return on investment. Therefore, the higher companies are innovation‐oriented,  and  the  more  they  are  expecting  high  ROI.  Furthermore,  it  also  seems  to  have  a  significant  relationship between having an external IP assistance and to have high return on investment.    7.2.3.4 To have a stronger market position    At  this  stage  of  the  analysis,  results  reveal  significant  correlations  between  the  fact  of  having  a  stronger  market  position  with  the  degree  of  innovation,  the  satisfaction  of  IP  Office  concerning  trademark,  and  the  external  IP  assistance.  First  of  all,  it  seems  to  be  easily  understood  that  being  strongly  innovation‐oriented  may  provide  the  company  with  a  stronger  market  position,  and  therefore, to overcome competition. In addition, the more satisfaction of IP Office within the country  regarding  trademark,  the  highest  probability  to  have  a  stronger  market  position.  Moreover,  companies  correlate  also  a  stronger  market  position  with  an  external  IP  assistance.  Indeed,  the  assumption is that if companies are provided with external assistance regarding Intellectual Property  Rights from specialized agencies or offices, opportunities for having a stronger market position could  increase because they will receive tailored and professional assistance.     7.2.3.5 To improve our advertising impact    First of all, the first finding reveals a significant relationship with the company's age. Therefore, given  the  high  level  of  correlation,  the  desire  to  improve  advertising  impact  is  correlated  with  the  company's  age.  Going  one  step  further  what  is  being  said,  the  protection  efficiency  is  negatively  correlated  with  the  fact  to  improve  advertising  impact,  which  means  that  a  lack  of  efficient  protection within the country will lead companies to improve their advertising impact. In the same  vein, the more administrative procedures, the more advertising impact. The last finding regards the  related costs. Indeed, the analysis reveals a positive correlation, that is to say that Korean companies  tend to improve their impact when the costs are high, such as lawyers costs and IP assistance costs.    7.2.3.6 To prevent piracy by competitors    The only correlation that results reveals concerns the satisfaction of IP Office regarding trademark.  Therefore,  it  seems  that  preventing  piracy  by  competitors  is  more  facilitate  when  companies  are  satisfied with the domestic IP Office. Thus, the assumption is the following: if companies are satisfied  with  the  domestic  IP  Office,  it  means  that  services  and  advices  provided  by  the  Korean  office  are  well‐done, and therefore, allow companies to prevent any piracy or infringements.         68     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  7.2.3.7 To block competitors    Above all, the fact to protect the company from the competition requires logically important funds,  and  therefore,  requires  to  mobilize  enough  resources.  To  this  end,  the  analysis  reveals  a  positive  relationship with the related costs. Indeed, the motivation to own Intellectual Property Rights, more  accurately in order to block competitors, engender an increase of both attorneys and IP Assistance.      

69   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

7.2.4 CORRELATION BETWEEN THE REASONS TO NOT OWN IPR VARIABLES AND OTHER VARIABLES 
 
  1  2  3A  3B  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16 
‐ 0.86 ‐ 0.86

17 

18 

19 

20 

No need 

‐0.28  ‐0.26  0.02  0.44 

‐0.1 

‐0.5 

0.54 

‐0.16 

0.57 

0.07 

0.13 

0.18 

0.13 

0.14  0.94*

‐0.27 0.54

‐0.26 

0.39 

Too bureaucratic  procedure  No enough  knowledge 

‐0.29  ‐0.29  ‐0.14  1**  ‐0.44 ‐0.59

‐0.88* 

0.15 

‐0.91* 

‐0.14 

0.14 

0.3 

‐0.61 

0.3 

‐0.66

0.0 

0.57 

‐ 0.57

‐1** 

‐0.44 

0.68 

0.8 

‐0.8 

0.34 

0.57 

0.47 

0.35 

0.8 

‐0.8 

‐0.82* 

‐0.82* 

0.31 

‐0.81

‐0.22 

Too expensive 

0.74 

0.59  ‐0.14  ‐0.16  0.88* 0.88*

0.44 

0.91* 

0.30 

0.88* 

‐0.14 

‐0.76 

0.61 

‐0.76 

‐0.16

0.89  0.86

‐0.57 0.57

‐0.14 

Difficult to enforce  rights  No consideration  of the relevance of  these methods 

0.72 

0.72  ‐0.72  0.40 

0.36 

0.36 

‐0.18 

0.55 

‐0.18 

0.54 

‐0.54 

‐0.74 

‐0.25 

‐0.74 

‐0.61

0.25 

‐0.33

‐ 0.33

‐0.57 

‐0.72 

0.76 

0.76  ‐0.52  ‐0.14  0.65  0.81*

0.26 

0.73 

0.43 

0.94**

‐0.55 

0.86* 

0.36 

‐0.86* 

0.6 

0.5 

‐0.77 0.25

‐0.132 

The protection can  disclose  0.97** 0.87*  ‐0.41  ‐0.28  0.87* 0.87* information to  competitors 

0.56 

0.63 

0.36 

0.667 

‐0.41 

‐ 0.94**

0.35 

‐ ‐0.28 0.94**

0.6 

0.5 

‐0.77 0.25

‐0.46 

70   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  7.2.4.1 No need    First of all, the fact of not to need Intellectual Property Rights is strongly correlated with the IP Office  Satisfaction. Indeed, this finding is somehow amazing because the more the IP Office Satisfaction is  high, the more companies feel not to need IPRs.     7.2.4.2 Because too bureaucratic    At  this  stage  of  the  analysis,  results  reveal  correlations  with  the  number  of  countries  in  which  companies  are  established,  the  commercial  value  of  utility  model  and  design,  and  check  infringements. According to the results obtained, companies do not own Intellectual Property Rights  because  the  process  is  too  bureaucratic.  More  accurately,  it  seems  that  the  more  the  number  of  countries where firms are established is high, the more companies consider the procedure as being  too  bureaucratic.  However,  the  commercial  value  of  both  utility  model  and  design  are  negatively  correlated,  that  is  to  say,  the  more  the  companies  hold  utility  model  and  design,  the  less  the  procedure is seen as being bureaucratic, and vice versa.    7.2.4.3 No enough knowledge    Korean  firms  correlate  "negatively"  the  lack  of  having  enough  knowledge  with  the  administrative  procedures and the related costs. First of all, according to the results, the more knowledge is low, the  less administrative procedures are ineffective. Regarding more in‐depth the related costs, it is easily  understood  that  when  companies  encounters  difficult  to  got  enough  knowledge,  the  related  costs  are low. The assumption is that firms are therefore not spending funds to lawyers and IP Assistance,  and thus, the expenditures decrease.    7.2.4.4 Too expensive    Firstly, let us focus on the relationship with the degree of innovation. Indeed, the more the degree of  innovation is high, the more IPR are seen as being too expensive. Therefore, protecting innovations  and new cutting‐edge technologies are very high, regardless of company size. Thus, the assumption is  that companies are not owing IPR because they requires to spend important financial resources. In  addition,  the  commercial  value  of  patent,  trademark,  and  copyright  are  also  correlated  with  "too  expensive". Indeed, as stressed, the fact to protect innovations in order to prevent infringements is  costly,  and  therefore,  holding  patent,  trademark,  and  copyright  will  also  engender  an  increase  of  perception of being too expensive.        

71   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  7.2.4.5 No consideration of the relevance of these methods    In  addition  to  above,  companies  tend  to  not  own  Intellectual  Property  Rights  because  they  do  not  consider  these  methods  as  being  relevant.  This  finding  is  correlated  with  patent  and  copyright  commercial value, administrative procedure, and finally the related costs. Regarding more accurately  the  patent  and  copyright  commercial  value,  companies  do  not  use  such  method  in  order  to  be  effectively  protected  against  infringements,  because  they  are  perceived  as  being  not  relevant.  In  addition,  the  more  the  administrative  procedure,  the  more  no  consideration  of  the  relevance  of  these methods. And the more the related costs, the more no consideration of the relevance of these  methods.  7.2.4.6 The protection can disclose information to competitors    Additionally to above, and going one step further, some companies consider the protection as being  a mean to disclose key information to competitors. Therefore, the more company's age and size are  important, the more the risk to disclose information is high. Indeed, the surveyed companies do not  own  IPR  due  enterprise's  philosophy  and  strategy.  In  the  same  vein,  the  more  the  degree  of  innovation, the more the risk of disclosing crucial information to competitors. The same scenario is  repeated for the commercial value of patent.            

72   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

                                     

8. CONCLUSION 
 

73   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

8.1 DISCUSSION OF KEY FINDINGS OF THE SURVEY IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NATIONAL  BACKGROUND 
 

8.1.1 MACRO‐LEVEL (ENVIRONMENT) 
  Findings  regarding  the  macro‐level  reveals  many  interesting  information  that  must  be  highlighted.  Let  us  remind  that  the  Government's  attitude  towards  intellectual  property  is  very  favorable,  as  witnessed  by  the  various  measures  and  statements  initiated.  Indeed,  many  efforts  have  been  undertaken  to  make  the  Korean  system  compatible  with  international  requirements.  Therefore,  numerous  agreements  and  treaties  were  signed,  various  international  cooperations  were  established, and specialized bodies were set up in order to support the business environment as well  the  intellectual  property  field.  South  Korea  is  going  to  provide  further  endeavors  in  order  to  strengthen  and  make  the  intellectual  property  system  more  efficient  and  further  international  openness is still one of the highest  goal of Government. In addition, in order to achieve the above  ambitions,  the  Korean  Government  has  allotted  important  resources,  such  as  human  resources,  funds, spending increases, as well as specialized bodies dedicated to training related to intellectual  property rights. But, among all the efforts undertaken by South Korea, one of the most important is  certainly  the  wrestling  against  counterfeit  products.  Indeed,  in  just  a  few  years,  Government's  behaviour has evolved positively and many measures were taken to combat this scourge. All these  endeavors  have  been  fruitful  to  allow  South  Korea  to  be  removed  from  the  Section  301  priority  watch list countries and place Korea on a separate, lower‐level watch list. However counterfeiting is  still an issue that Government must consider.     In addition to above, South Korea has established a very comprehensive legal environment allowing  companies  to  protect  their  Intellectual  assets  through  formal  tools  such  as  patenting,  trademark,  utility  models,  design,  trademarks,  copyright,  and  so  on.  Moreover,  to  protect  businesses,  Korean  Governments has also set up specialized courts to settle any dispute that may arise. Further, certain  intellectual property rights are protected under the Unfair Competition Prevention and Trade Secrets  Protection Act, which main purpose is to avoid and prevent unfair competition such as the misuse of  trademarks and trade names, and therefore to avoid trade secrets infringement. However, although  the Government has undertaken many reforms in the field of legal framework and has established a  comprehensive  legal  environment,  it  seems  that  a  lack  of  transparency  and  corruption  are  still  a  major  concern  for  foreign  investors.  But  despite  a  relatively  moderate  level  of  corruption  affecting  the country, and as outlined by the Korean Constitution, the independence of the judicial system is  guaranteed. However, impartiality of judges is challenged.     Going  beyond  what  is  being  said  and  regarding  more  accurately  labor  law,  companies  relying  on  secrets may conclude confidentiality with employees to keep intellectual property from leaking out  of the company. Employees are required not to disclose any confidential information to a third party  during the period of employment contract as well as after retirement. Therefore, South Korea offers  a comprehensive labor regulation to companies. 

74   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Finally, , the final word is that South Korea attempts to provide a "sound environment" to companies  of  any  size  and  any  provenance,  which  is  witnessed  by  the  various  endeavors  undertaken  by  the  Government.   

8.1.2 MESO‐LEVEL (INSTITUTIONAL) 
  First of all, among all technological field, consideration of intellectual property issues is relevant and  seems to be very well understood by both Korean companies and foreign investors, as witnessed by  the increasing number of applications (patent, trademark, utility models, designs, etc). But, the most  remarkable  thing  is  that  the  Government  has  established  a  very  comprehensive  institutional  network. In fact, the various institutions interact with each other, as well as with other governmental  bodies such as Korea Customs Service, Prosecutor Office and the Police for improving the level of IPR  protection. At an international level many collaborations were established. To date, South Korea has  joined  13  international  treaties  related  to  Intellectual  Property.  Furthermore,  to  foster  an  enabling  environment,  each  institution  is  responsible  for  very  specific  tasks  and  are  subject  to  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office.  In  addition,  29  local  IP  centers  were  set  up  nationwide  by  the  Korean  Government in order to support the SMEs day‐to‐day activities related to intellectual property rights.  Each regional IP center offers IP consultations, patent information services and educational programs  to  companies.  Moreover,  consultants  provide  advice  on  how  to  proceed  and  how  to  prepare  an  effective patent application. In addition, financial supports are granted to SMEs willing to file more  patent  applications  overseas.  Going  on  step  further,  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office  has  set  up  the International Intellectual Property Training institute in 1987, whose major mission is to provide  education  on  intellectual  property,  and  therefore,  to  foster  IP  awareness.  Therefore,  it  is  easily  understood  that  Korean  Government  is  providing  further  endeavors  to  meet  the  needs  of  various  businesses.    Moreover,  information  accessibility  and  reliability  and  very  well‐done  websites  provide  additional  value to the country. Let us remind that information is provided in various languages, such as Korean,  English,  Chinese,  and  Japanese.  This  accessibility  improve  the  extent  of  information  spread.  Thus,  information  provided  by  the  Korean  institutional  framework  is  very  comprehensive,  up  to  date,  widely available and accessible to everyone.    Finally, regarding resources, one of the biggest objectives of Korean Intellectual Property Office is to  improve  the  number  of  highly  educated  IP  specialists.  Indeed,  the  purpose  is  to  provide  company  with  highly  skilled  employees.  Moreover,  financial  supports  may  be  granted  to  SMEs  willing  to  file  more patent applications overseas.   

75   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

8.1.3 MICRO‐LEVEL (ENTERPRISE) 
  The first finding concerning the micro‐level reveals a very positive use of IPR protection instruments.  Indeed,  the  number  of  patents  fillings  experienced  a  positive  growth  in  recent  years,  which  ranks  South  Korea  as being the  country with the highest  patent fillings per  million  population worldwide  and the highest number of patent fillings per $billion Gross Domestic Product. Therefore, the level of  use of IPR protection instruments is undoubtedly remarkable, which witnesses again that businesses  have  absorbed  the  importance  of  protecting  their  Intellectual  Assets.  Although  this  finding  is  particularly  interesting  and  that  Korean  authorities  have  made  real  endeavours  to  strengthen  the  intellectual  property  protection,  the  risk  of  being  copied  is  always  a  major  concern  of  companies  approaching the Korean Market. Indeed, as mentioned earlier, the major problem that South Korea  is facing regards the level of counterfeit products. However, thanks to impressive efforts made by the  Government, South Korea is no longer placed on the U.S. list of intellectual property rights violators.  Furthermore, in 2009, 41 percent of software installations in South Korea were unlicensed, but this  figure  is  below  the  global  average.  However,  South  Korea  still  has  to  make  improvements.  And  although  Korea’s  piracy  rate  is  still  higher  than  the  average  of  other  OECD  members,  it  is  ranked  among  the  top  30  Lowest  Piracy  Rates  in  2009.  Moreover,  benefits  of  lowering  PC  software  piracy  would provoke the creation of an additional 7,600 new jobs, $700 millions regarding tax revenues,  and $1.3 billion in economic growth. Hence the importance of fighting against this scourge.   

8.2 IMPLICATIONS 
 

8.2.1 FOR GOVERNMENT AND POLICY MAKERS 
  Overall,  the  country  must  avoid  a  situation  of  status  quo.  Indeed,  it  is  vital  to  continue  to  provide  efforts in a fast pace in order to further enhance the protection network and make it more effective.  Therefore,  to  strengthen  the  global  business  environment,  South  Korea  needs  to  mobilize  more  resources (financial, human, infrastructures) in order to intensify the fight against counterfeiting and  piracy. In the same vein, South Korea should continue to bear a strong interest in training by further  providing  lectures  and  courses,  which  will  lead  to  a  strongest  awareness  of  population  as  well  as  companies' employees and CEOs. Although significant steps are taken, awareness campaigns need to  be intensified and the exposure of messages must be pervasive, which could lead the population to  not buy counterfeit products as well as counterfeits not to produce imitations goods.    In  addition  to  above,  another  concern  that  South  Korea  is  facing  regards  the  level  of  Corruption.  Indeed,  the  Korean  Government  has  to  take  serious  steps  by  further  empowering  anti‐corruption  institutions with more investigative and authorities powers. Therefore, the level of Corruption may  be reduced by the introduction of a whistleblowing system, which consists of denouncing any act of  corruption.  But  the  main  challenge  for  anti‐corruption  efforts  will  be  the  sustainability  of  political  commitment  towards  a  rational  and  sound  anti‐corruption  environment.  Moreover,  further  law  enforcement  and  transparency  could  help  the  Government's  efforts  to  be  successful.  In  addition,  76     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  South Korea has to promote professional ethics and pursue to increase public, political high‐ranking  officials, and businesses awareness to be able to implement a solid national integrity system.    

8.2.2 FOR SMES 
  According to the statistics and the various services  provided by the government, it is important to  note  again  that  business  support  is  particularly  relevant  especially  for  SMEs.  This  can  be  explained  due to the large number of SMEs in South Korea. According to statistics, almost 99% of enterprises  are considered as SMEs. From then on, it is easily understood why the system of intellectual property  is  so  much  tailored  to  this  kind  of  companies.  However,  one  of  the  major  implications  for  SMEs  regards  the  level  of  counterfeiting.  Indeed,  it  would  be  particularly  interesting  to  form  pressure  groups  to  create  lobbies  to  pressure  the  Government  to  take  further  initiatives  and  measures  to  lower the level of counterfeit goods. At the same time, these pressure groups could include pressure  to  make  the  system  more  transparent,  and  the  judiciary  system  more  independent.  Finally,  the  country must avoid a situation of status quo and should continue to provide additional resources to  SMES and Big companies in order to become ever more attractive.    

8.3 LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH 
  One of the first reviews concern the number of companies surveyed. Indeed, given the small number  of companies having participated in the survey, it is regrettably impossible to make generalizations,  and  therefore,  impossible  to  extrapolate  the  results.  The  used  sample  size  consists  of  data  from  7  companies only. At first, it would have been interesting to question only companies, and from then  on,  to  separate  the  present  study  in  two  different  studies.  Although  significant  efforts  have  been  provided, such as taking contact directly with enterprises' managers and institutions54, the number of  questionnaires  received  in  return  is  unfortunately  low.  Several  hypothesis  can  be  made  to  try  to  explain this phenomenon. The first assumption concerns the survey period. Indeed, companies were  contacted during the summer period and especially during the holiday period, which may explain the  difficulty to get in touch directly with companies' representatives. The second hypothesis relates to  the timing, that is to say, the time available to conduct the current investigation, in our case, about  three  months.  To  this  end,  it  would  be  necessary  to  lead  a  specific  study  having  for  objective  to  sound only companies in order to increase the probability to receive more questionnaires in return,  and therefore, to increase the credibility of the study. Indeed, it would have been ideal to survey at  least  hundred  of  companies,  because  otherwise,  it  is  very  difficult,  even  impossible,  to  make  significant conclusions and to take stock of the current companies' viewpoints. Finally, my warmest  recommendation  is  to  conduct  a  joint  study,  that  is  to  say,  lead  a  survey  collectively  by  group  of  students in order to increase the survey's credibility.                                                                       
54

 Korea Chamber of Commerce, European Chamber of Commerce in South Korea, Korean Intellectual Property Office. 

77   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

         
   

9. REFERENCES 

78   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

9.1 BOOKS, PUBLICATIONS & REPORTS 
 

Ahn  Chong‐Ghee,  (2005),  Korea's Economy  2006,  Korea Economic  Institute  &  Korea  Institute  of  International Economic Policy, 8 p.  Asama  R.  et  al.,  (2008),  Les  Brevets,  Nouvelle  Arme  de  la  Guerre  Economique:  Au  pays  des  Samouraïs, le brevet supplante le sabre, Assocation de l'Ecole de Guerre Economique, 127 p.  Asia‐Pacific  Economic  Cooperation  Economic  Policy  Report,  (2009),  Republic  of  Korea:  Developments in Regulatory Reform, 4 p.  Asia‐Pacific  Economic  Cooperation,  (2004),  APEC  Training  Program  on  the  Enforcement  of  Intellectual Property Rights for Developing Member Economies, APEC Publishing, 402 p.  Asia‐Pacific  Economic  Cooperation,  (2006),  APEC  IPR  Public  Education  and  Awareness:  Platform  Workshop on Effective Strategies for IPR Public Education, APEC Publishing, 351 p.  Asia‐Pacific Economic Cooperation, (2006), APEC Workshop on Intellectual Property for Small and  Medium‐Sized Enterprises and Micro‐Enterprise, APEC Publishing, 122 p.  Asia‐Pacific  Economic  Cooperation,  (2006),  Intellectual  Property  Rights  Enforcement  Strategies,  APEC Publishing, 35 p.  Asia‐Pacific Economic Cooperation, (2007), APEC Research Report on Paperless Trading Capacity Building and Intellectual Property Protection, APEC Publishing, 185 p.  Assafa Endeshaw, (2007), Do Asian Nations Take Intellectual Property Rights Seriously?, SCRIPT‐ ed, Volume 4, Issue 2, 14 p.  Bakiewicz  Anna,  (2008),  Small  and  Medium  Enterprises  in  South  Korea.  In  the  Shadow  of  Big  Brothers, ASIA & Pacific Studies, 26 p.  Bhavan  Nirman,  (2010),  Implementation  of  the  Scheme  Building  Awareness  on  Intellectual  Property Rights for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises, Government of India, 38 p.  Business  Software  Alliance,  (2010),  Seventh  Annual  BSA/IDC  Global  Software:  09  Piracy  Study,  BSA Publishing, 22 p.  Goldstein  Paul  et  al.,  (2009),  Intellectual  Property  in  Asia:  law,  economics,  history  and  politics,  Associate Editors, 357 p.  Han  Ji‐Young  &  Jang  Kwang‐Chul,  (),  Intellectual  Property  in  Asian  Countires:  Studies  on  Infrastructure and Economic Impact, WIPO Publication NO. 1018e, 287 p.  Hunter  Rodwell  Consulting,  (2008),  Intellectual  Property  Rights  Primer  for  Korea,  UK  Trade  Et  Investment, 40 p.  Invest Korea, (2009), Korea your wise and profitable choice, Invest Korea, 40 p.  Jun  Ji‐Yun,  (2003),  La  Propriété  Intellecutelle  en  Corée  du  Sud,  Mission  Economique  Française,  DGTPE, 4 p.  Korea  Trade‐Investment  Promotion  Agency,  The  Investment  Environment  of  Major  Asian  Countries, KOTRA, 176 p.  Korean Intellectual Property Office, (2005), Annual Report, KIPO Publishing, 84 p.  Korean Intellectual Property Office, (2008), Ubiquitous IPR Management, KIPO Publishing, 49 p.
79     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Korean Intellectual Property Office, (2009), Annual Report, KIPO Publishing, 88 p. 

Korean Intellectual Property Office, (2009), Anticounterfeiting Activities of KIPO, KIPO Publishing,  6 p.  Korea's  Invention  Promotion  Activities,  (2003),  Experience  of  the  Korean  Intellectual  Property  Office, KIPO Publishing, 68 p.  Linsu  Kim,  (1997),  Imitation  to  innovation:  the  dynamics  of  Korea's  technological  learning,  Harvard Business Press, 301 p.  Linsu  Kim,  (2003),  Technology  Transfer  &  Intellectual  Property  Rights:  The  Korean  Experience,  UNCTAD‐ICTSD, 42 p.  Meynard  Sophie  et  al.,  (2005),  Propriété  Intellectuelle  et  lutte  anti‐contrefaçon,  Mission  Economique Française, DGTPE, 4 p.  Minxin  Pei,  (2005),  Intellectual  Property  Rights:  A  Survey  of  the  Major  Issues,  Asia  Business  Council, 12 p.  Nack‐Song Sung, (2006), Judicial Independence in Korea, Daegu High Court, 19 p.  Nagesh  Kumar,  (),  Intellectual  Property  Rights,  Technology  and  Economic  Development:  Experiences of Asian Countries, IPR Commission, 52 p.  Nikkei Microdevices, (2006), Intellectual Property Strategies in Asia: Protecting Against Chinese,  Taiwanese and Korean Intellectual Property Piracy, InterLingua Publishing, 138 p.  Nugent Jeffrey B. et al., (2001), Small and Medium Enterprise in Korea: Achievements, Constraints  and Policy issues, The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank,  42 p.  OECD,  (2003),  Turning  science  into  business:  patenting  and  licensing  at  public  research,  OECD  Publishing, 308 p.  Rajendra K., (2010), Intellectual Property fuels a global sense of competitiveness, Current Science,  Vol 96, NO 7., 6 p.  Ryan Michael Patrick, (1995), Playing by the Rules: American trade power and diplomacy in the  Pacific, 228 p.  Sang‐Yirl  Nam,  (2005),  Innovation  and  SME  Development:  Korea's  Perspective  and  APEC  Cooperation, APEC Publishing, 14 p.  Silkenat  James  R.  et  al.,  (2009),  The  ABA  guide  to  international  business  negotiations:  a  comparison  of  cross‐cultural  issues  and  successful  approaches,  American  Bar  Association,  3rd  Edition, 1106 p.  Taplin Ruth, (2004), Protect and Survive: Managing Intellectual Property in the Far East ‐ The case  of South Korea, Thomson Scientific, 3 p.  Transparency International, (2001), Asia and the Pacific: South Korea, Transparency International  Publishing, 58 p.  Transparency  International,  (2006),  National  Integrity  System:  Republic  of  Korea,  Transparency  International Publishing, 78 p. 
80     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  Wei Shi, (2008), Intellectual Property in the Global Trading System: EU‐China, Springer, 324 p.

WIPO, (2007), Improving IP recognition in Enterprises: focus on IP and Economy, WIPO & KIPO, 24  p.  WIPO, (2007), KIPO'S Policy for Supporting the Use of Intellectual Property Assets, WIPO & KIPO,  30 p.  WIPO, (2009), World Intellectual Property Indicators, WIPO Publishing, 110 p.  World Economic Forum, (2010), The Global Competitiveness Report, WEF Publishing, 492 p.  

9.2 WEBSITES 
 

AIPPI Korea. Url: www.aippikorea.org  APEC Publication Database. Url: http://publications.apec.org  Association Internationale pour la protection de la PI. Url: https://www.aippi.org  Country Studies ‐ South Korea. Url: http://countrystudies.us/south‐korea/50.htm  Economic Freedom. Url: www.heritage.org  Economy Watch. Url: http://www.economywatch.com/  French Korean Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Url: www.fkcci.com  Gobizkorea. Url: www.gobizkorea.com  Intellectual Property Watch. Url: www.ip‐watch.org  International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development. Url: http://ictsd.org  International Intellectual Property Training Institute. Url: www.iipti.org  Invest Korea Journal. Url: www.ikjournal.com  Invest Korea Online. Url: www.investkorea.org  IP Academy. Url: http://global.ipacademy.net  Korea Customs Service. Url: www.customs.go.kr/eng  Korea Institute for International Economic Policy. Url: www.kiep.go.kr/eng  Korea Institute of Patent Information. Url: http://eng.kipi.or.kr/main  Korea Intellectual Property Rights Information Service. Url: http://eng.kipris.or.kr/eng/main  Korea Invention Promotion Association. Url: www.kipo.org/english  Korean Intellectual Property Office. Url: www.kipo.go.kr/en  Managing Intellectual Property. Url: www.managingip.com  Seoulkoreaasia. Url: www.seoulkoreaasia.com  SMBA. Url: http://eng.smba.go.kr/main.jsp  South Korea Business Information. Url: www.asianz.org.nz  South Korea Trade Directory. Url: www.southkoreapages.com  Statistics Korea. Url: http://kostat.go.kr 

81   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  The European Union Chamber of Commerce in Korea. Url: www.eucck.org  The Korea Chamber of Commerce & Industry. Url: http://english.korcham.net/  U.S. Commercial Service. Url: www.buyusa.gov  World Intellectual Property Organization. Url: www.wipo.int   

           
 

82   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 

 
                           

10 . APPENDIX

83   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Ay Aygün Erkaslan  a

 

10.1 APPENDIX: THE SURVEY 
 

10.1.1 QUESTIONNA   AIRE
 

            84     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A ygün Erkaslan  a

 

        85   

   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A ygün Erkaslan  a

 

      86     

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A ygün Erkaslan  a

 

  87   

   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A ygün Erkaslan  a

 

  88   

 

   

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

A Aygün Erkasla an 

 

10.2 APPENDIX: STATISTICAL DATA 
 

10.2.1 DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS 
 
Statis stiques descriptives N F Firm Size (num mber of e employees): A Annual Turnov ver P Percentage tu urnover earned d o outside the co ountry in which h y are opera you ating: F Firm Age N Number of Co ountries where e y are establ you lished: 7 7 1.00 1.00 22.00 2.00 9.8571 1.4286 8.35521 .53452 7 1.00 6.00 3.4286 2.14920 7 1.00 6.00 3.1429 1.95180 7 Minimum 1.00 Maximum m 7.00 Moyenne 3.1429 Ecart type e 2.54484

89   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
1. Do you consider Intellectual Property (IP) protection a relevant issue for your company? 2. How innovative is your company? 3.a Does your firm own patents? 3.a Number Patent registered: 3.b Does your firm own utility models? 3.b Number Utiliry model registered: 3.c Does your firm own trademarks? 3.c Number Trademark registered: 3.d Does your firm own designs? 3.d Number Design registered: 4.1 You don't own IPRs, because you don't need IPR: 4.2 You don't own IPRs, because too bureaucratic: 4.3 You don't own IPRs, because you don't have enough knowledge: 4.4 You don't own IPRs, because it is too expensive: 4.5 You don't own IPRs, because it is difficult to enforcing rights: 4.6 You don't own IPRs, because we don't consider these methods relevant: 4.7 We don't protect our IP because it can disclose information to competitors 5 1.00 5.00 3.0000 1.58114 5 1.00 5.00 3.2000 1.48324 5 3.00 5.00 3.4000 .89443 5 3.00 4.00 3.4000 .54772 5 2.00 5.00 3.2000 1.09545 5 2.00 3.00 2.6000 .54772 5 1.00 5.00 2.8000 1.48324 1 3.00 3.00 3.0000 . 4 1.00 2.00 1.7500 .50000 2 1.00 15.00 8.0000 9.89949 4 2.00 2.00 2.0000 .00000 1 2.00 2.00 2.0000 . 4 1.00 2.00 1.5000 .57735 3 4.00 50.00 20.6667 25.48202 6 1.00 2.00 1.8333 .40825 7 2.00 5.00 3.5714 .97590 7 3.00 5.00 3.7143 .95119

90   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
5.1 You protect IPRs in the aim to attract finance 5.2 You protect IPRs in the aim to convince partners 5.3 You protect IPRs in the aim to increase negociation power 5.4 You protect IPRs in the aim to facilitate R&D cooperation 5.5 You protect IPRs in the aim to have high return on investment 5.6 You protect IPRs in the aim to have direct income by licensing 5.7 You protect IPRs in the aim to have stronger market position 5.8 You protect IPRs in the aim to have a better advertising impact 5.9 You protect IPRs in the aim to have reputation creation 5.10 You protect IPRs in the aim to prevent piracy of competitors 5.11 You protect IPRs in the aim to block competitors 6. Do you have an IP Management strategy? 7. Do you have an external IP assistance? 8. Does your firm actively check for potential infringements? 6 1.00 5.00 2.8333 1.60208 6 1.00 2.00 1.5000 .54772 6 1.00 2.00 1.5000 .54772 6 2.00 5.00 3.1667 1.16905 6 2.00 5.00 3.5000 1.37840 6 2.00 5.00 3.5000 1.04881 6 2.00 4.00 3.0000 .89443 6 3.00 5.00 3.8333 .75277 6 2.00 4.00 3.3333 1.03280 6 2.00 4.00 3.1667 .75277 6 2.00 4.00 3.0000 .89443 6 1.00 4.00 2.3333 1.21106 6 1.00 4.00 3.0000 1.26491 6 1.00 4.00 2.5000 1.22474

91   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
9.1 Please indicate level of importance to your firm's strategy for capturing commercial value from its innovation concerning patents: 9.2 Please indicate level of importance to your firm's strategy for capturing commercial value from its innovation concerning utility models: 9.3 Please indicate level of importance to your firm's strategy for capturing commercial value from its innovation concerning trademarks: 9.4 Please indicate level of importance to your firm's strategy for capturing commercial value from its innovation concerning designs: 9.5 Please indicate level of importance to your firm's strategy for capturing commercial value from its innovation concerning copyrights: 10.1 In this country, Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) are clearly defined 10.2 IPRs are well protected by law 10.3 IPRs are not enforceable 10.4 In general the costs of formal protection are very cheap 7 2.00 4.00 3.0000 .57735 7 2.00 3.00 2.7143 .48795 7 2.00 5.00 3.4286 .97590 7 3.00 5.00 3.7143 .75593 7 2.00 5.00 3.5714 1.27242 7 1.00 5.00 3.2857 1.60357 7 2.00 5.00 3.7143 1.11270 7 .00 5.00 2.5714 1.61835 7 1.00 5.00 3.0000 1.63299

92   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
10.5 The cost of patent protection is too high 10.6 The cost of trademark protection is too high 10.7 The cost of design protection is too high 10.8 Lawyers cost is too high 10.9 IP Assistance cost is too high 10.10 The time of procedure to protect our innovations is very long 10.11 Administrative procedures to protect our innovations are heavy 10.12 Formal IP protection is not sufficient 10.13 Government's measures for improving the protection of IPRs are very effective 10.14 Right is unenforceable 10.15 Legal disputes concerning IP are easily resolved 11.1 We conclude confidentiality agreement with employees, partners, clients 11.2 We conclude agreement of non-competition with employees 11.3 We conclude agreement on transfer of rights with employees 11.4 We keep secret key knowledge from some of the employees, partners, clients 6 2.00 3.00 2.5000 .54772 7 1.00 3.00 1.7143 .75593 7 1.00 3.00 2.0000 .81650 7 2.00 3.00 2.2857 .48795 7 1.00 3.00 2.2857 .75593 7 1.00 3.00 2.1429 1.06904 7 1.00 3.00 2.2857 .75593 7 1.00 3.00 2.5714 .78680 7 1.00 5.00 3.1429 1.21499 7 1.00 5.00 3.5714 1.27242 7 7 2.00 1.00 4.00 4.00 3.5714 3.1429 .78680 1.06904 7 1.00 3.00 2.7143 .75593 7 1.00 3.00 2.7143 .75593 7 2.00 4.00 3.0000 .57735

93   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
11.5 We divide knowledge between several employees in the aim to have no single person knowing all concerning a new product or service 12.1 Transport & logistic infrastructures 12.2 Telecommunication infrastructures 12.3 Difficulties with administrative requirements (permits, regulations, etc...) 12.4 Access to quality labor force 12.5 Cost of establishing a legal entity 12.6 High taxation 12.7 Banks high interest rates 12.8 Banks lack of credit accessibility 12.9 Lack of access to innovation 12.10 Risk of inflation 13.1 Satisfaction of IP office of your country concerning patent 13.2 Satisfaction of IP office of your country concerning utility model 13.3 Satisfaction of IP office of your country concerning trademark 13.4 Satisfaction of IP office of your country concerning design 6 2.00 4.00 3.0000 1.09545 6 2.00 4.00 3.3333 1.03280 6 .00 4.00 2.3333 1.36626 6 2.00 5.00 3.3333 1.03280 7 1.00 3.00 1.7143 .75593 7 1.00 2.00 1.7143 .48795 7 1.00 3.00 1.8571 .69007 7 7 1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.0000 1.7143 .57735 .48795 6 1.00 3.00 2.1667 .75277 6 1.00 3.00 2.0000 .63246 7 1.00 3.00 2.0000 .57735 7 1.00 3.00 1.7143 .75593 7 1.00 3.00 2.0000 1.00000 7 1.00 3.00 2.1429 .89974

94   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

 
14.1 In the country in which you are operating, do you have any other source of IP support N valide (listwise) 0 5 1.00 2.00 1.4000 .54772

 

10.2.2 CORRELATION BETWEEN MANIFEST VARIABLES AND LATENT VARIABLES 
  10.2.2.1 Unidimensionality   10.2.2.1.1 Firme Size 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

dimen 1 sion0 2

1.834 .166

91.704 8.296

91.704 100.000

1.834

91.704

91.704

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

10.2.2.1.2 Degree of Internationalization 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

dimen 1 sion0 2

1.104 .896

55.181 44.819

55.181 100.000

1.104

55.181

55.181

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

10.2.2.1.3 Protection Efficiency 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

dimen 1 sion0 2

1.871 .129

93.571 6.429

93.571 100.000

1.871

93.571

93.571

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

10.2.2.1.4 Administrative Procedures 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

dimen 1 sion0 2

1.801 .199

90.043 9.957

90.043 100.000

1.801

90.043

90.043

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

95   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  10.2.2.1.5 Protection Costs 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

1 dimen 2 sion0 3

2.690 .310 -3.605E-17

89.675 10.325 -1.202E-15

89.675 100.000 100.000

2.690

89.675

89.675

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

10.2.2.1.6 Costs Related 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

dimen 1 sion0 2

1.878 .122

93.876 6.124

93.876 100.000

1.878

93.876

93.876

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

10.2.2.1.7 IP Office Satisfaction 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

1 dimen 2 sion0 3 4

3.097 .729 .175 -3.753E-17

77.420 18.215 4.365 -9.383E-16

77.420 95.635 100.000 100.000

3.097

77.420

77.420

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

  10.2.2.1.8 IP Track Record 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

1 dimen 2 sion0 3 4

1.866 1.064 .667 .403

46.654 26.611 16.667 10.068

46.654 73.265 89.932 100.000

1.866 1.064

46.654 26.611

46.654 73.265

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

 

 

96   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  10.2.2.1.9 Informal Protection Methods 
Valeurs propres initiales Composante Total % de la variance % cumulés Total % de la variance % cumulés Extraction Sommes des carrés des facteurs retenus

1 2 dimen 3 sion0 4 5

2.283 1.431 1.033 .253 1.212E-16

45.668 28.614 20.665 5.054 2.425E-15

45.668 74.281 94.946 100.000 100.000

2.283 1.431 1.033

45.668 28.614 20.665

45.668 74.281 94.946

Méthode d'extraction : Analyse en composantes principales.

10.2.2.2 Convergent Validity    10.2.2.2.1 Firm Size 
Firm Size (number SIZE_FIRM of employees): Coefficient de corrélation Rho de Spearman SIZE_FIRM Sig. (unilatérale) N 1.000 . 7 .935
**

Annual Turnover .964
**

.001 7

.000 7

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral).

  10.2.2.2.2 Degree of internationalization 
Percentage turnover DEGREE_INTERN AL earned outside the country in which you are operating: Coefficient de corrélation Rho de DEGREE_INTERNAL Spearman N 7 7 7 Sig. (unilatérale) . .000 .211 1.000 .954
**

Number of Countries where you are established: .364

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral). Should be taken off

  10.2.2.2.3 Protection Efficiency 
10.1 In this country, Intellectual PROT_EFFICENC Property Rights (IPRs) are clearly Y defined Coefficient de Rho de Spearma n N 7 7 7 PROT_EFFICENCY Sig. (unilatérale) . .307 .189 1.000 corrélation -.234 -.397 protected by law 10.2 IPRs are well

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral).

97   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  10.2.2.2.4 Administrative Procedures 
10.10 The time 10.11 Administrative of procedure to ADMINI_PROCED protect our URES innovations is heavy very long Coefficient de 1.000 Rho de Spearman ADMINI_PROCEDURE S corrélation Sig. (unilatérale) N . 7 .003 7 .001 7 .898
**

procedures to protect our innovations are

.929

**

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral). *. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,05 (unilatéral).

  10.2.2.2.5 Protection Costs 
10.5 The cost of patent PROTEC_COSTS protection is too high Rho de Spearm PROTEC_COSTS an Coefficient de corrélation Sig. (unilatérale) N 1.000 . 7 1.000 . 7
**

10.6 The cost of trademark protection is too high .764
*

10.7 The cost of design protection is too high .764
*

.023 7

.023 7

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral). *. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,05 (unilatéral).

  10.2.2.2.6 Costs Related 
10.8 Lawyers COSTS_RELATED cost is too high Coefficient de corrélation Rho de COSTS_RELATED Spearman N 7 7 7 Sig. (unilatérale) . .009 .000 1.000 .840
**

10.9 IP Assistance cost is too high .970
**

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral). *. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,05 (unilatéral).

   

 

98   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  10.2.2.2.7 IP Office Satisfaction 
13.2 13.4 13.1 Satisfaction of IP office of IP_OFFICE_ your country SAT concerning patent country concerning utility model Coefficient de 1.000 Rho de Spearman IP_OFFICE _SAT corrélation Sig. (unilatérale) N . 5 .014 5 .318 5 .022 6 .076 6 .918
*

Satisfaction of IP office of your

13.3 Satisfaction Satisfaction of of IP office of IP office of your country your country concerning concerning trademark design

.289

.889

*

.740

*. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,05 (unilatéral).

    10.2.2.2.8 IP Track Record 
3.b Does 3.a Does your IP_TRACKRE firm own CORD patents? models? Coefficient de 1.000 Rho de Spearman IP_TRACKRE CORD corrélation Sig. (unilatérale) N . 3 .167 6 .167 6 0.167 6 .167 6 .866 .866 0.866 .866 own utility own trademarks? designs? your firm 3.c Does your firm firm own 3.d Does your

     

99   

 

SÉMINAIRE DE SYNTHÈSE 

Aygün Erkaslan 

  10.2.2.2.9 Informal Protection Methods 
11.5 We divide knowledge 11.4 We 11.1 We 11.2 We conclude conclude confidentiality agreement of INFORMAL_P ROTECTION agreement nonwith competition employees, with partners, employees clients clients new product or service Coefficient de Rho de INFORMAL_PR Spearma OTECTION n N 6 7 7 7 6 7 Sig. (unilatérale) . .200 .009 .151 .155 .028 1.000 corrélation .426 .890
**

between keep secret 11.3 We key conclude knowledge agreement on from some transfer of of the rights with employees, employees partners, concerning a knowing all person have no single the aim to employees in several

.509

.503

.800

*

**. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,01 (unilatéral). *. La corrélation est significative au niveau 0,05 (unilatéral).

 

100   

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful