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Subject: Fwd: Snyder Media Advisory for Monday, Feb.

22, 2016
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/21/2016 4:52 PM
To: "Raymer, Marjory" <wismarjo@umflint.edu>, "Hannan, Randy" <Randy.Hannan@lansingmi.gov>, Karen Weaver
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Looks like the Gov. having a press event tomorrow morning in Flint as well!

Kristin Moore

Public Relations Director

City of Flint

Office: (810) 237-2039
Mobile: (810) 875-2576

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
Date: Sun, Feb 21, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Subject: Snyder Media Advisory for Monday, Feb. 22, 2016
To: kmoore@cityofflint.com

COMM Media Advisory

Sunday, Feb. 21, 2016
Contact: Dave Murray, Laura Biehl or Anna Heaton
Office: 517-335-6397

Monday, Feb. 22, 2016 at 9:30 a.m.
Gov. Rick Snyder will visit and tour operations at the new State Emergency Operations Center and provide an update to
media on Sentinel Site testing in Flint. He will be joined by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Michigan Department of
Environmental Quality Director Keith Creagh, as well as Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue and Capt. Chris Kelenske of the
Michigan State Police.

Media will be permitted to take photos and b-roll during the tour. Questions will be permitted during a media
availability immediately following. Valid press credentials with photo ID must be presented on-site.

NOTE: Media can enter the building beginning at 9 a.m.

Location:
State Emergency Operations Center
7150 Harris Drive
Dimondale, MI
#

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This email was sent to kmoore@cityofflint.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the Governor · 111 South
Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858
Subject: Re: today's media advisory
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 3/23/2016 2:19 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
CC: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>,
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Matt
Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>

Providing with the Mayor with a draft of a news release about a plan, a day/few hours before you announce
it to everyone, is not including her in the process of creating a plan for the city she was elected to lead. She
was not included in the process.
(By the way, the Mayor says they only sent her a copy of the release to get her approval of a quote from her
they included. Which she asked them to remove because she was not involved.)

And we were surprised by the announcement because we didn't know what their plans were.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

This back from Ari…can we rebut his points?

From: Adler, Ari (GOV) [mailto:AdlerA@michigan.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 1:56 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: You guys need to start communicating with Mayor Weaver

Dave,

There are a lot of misinformed accusations in your email, so please check your facts and your tone.

The mayor was provided the 75-point plan and press release before it was issued. In fact, we even gave
her a version that had a quote from her in the news release. The only response our office received was that
she did not wish to be in the news release, so her quote was removed and we moved forward with the
announcement.

The independent Flint Water Task Force was responsible for the release of their report today and who it
was shared with beforehand. We only assisted with logistics and distribution of their report and release
because they did not have the capacity to do so.
Lt. Governor Calley is in Flint regularly every week. He is busy working with many members of the
community and has even gone door-to-door with water resource teams helping to deliver water and help
determine the location of lead pipes. Just because he isn’t meeting with the Mayor doesn’t mean he isn’t in
the city working hard to solve problems and support the people of Flint.

Rich Baird, as a leader with Mission Flint, has been in very regular contact with the Mayor and her key
staff.

I will gladly escalate this as you suggest, by sharing your unwarranted veiled threat with key senior staff
who have been involved every day with helping the people of Flint. I suspect they will be quite alarmed at
what the Mayor and her hired public relations firm are proposing to do in an unfortunate attempt to disrupt
the work the state has been and will continue to do for the people of Flint.

Ari

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:36 AM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski
<akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com;
Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>

Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Agreed. However, I'm not sure how far that will go with Mr. Adler. ​He is quoted in a Detroit News article a
couple weeks ago saying : The city “made the decision” not to use corrosion controls “because they didn’t
think they needed it,” Adler said.

That is a lie. As proven by the attached email that was recently released (from 2015). In it a city
employee is stating that DEQ told them to wait to add the corrosion control.

This is common knowledge at this point. Why Adler would lie and say the city is to blame is beyond me.
But, I think it says a lot about the gov. and his team.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/03/10/disaster-warning-preceded-flint-water-
switch/81629048/

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:20 AM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Kristin and Mayor Weaver:
With your ok, I’d like to call the governor’s communications director, Ari Fleisher, and be pretty forceful
in making that case…that it’s bad policy on any number of levels.

And I would hope that even sterner rebukes would be made directly to Rich Baird by the mayor. This is
simply not acceptable. The city and state may not be exactly on the same page on every issue, but they
need to communicate, as you try to do with them.

David Waymire

From: Kathy Hoffman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:18 AM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver
<weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>; Dave
Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

I agree. I’ll plan to take that angle in the press release.

I can’t believe they didn’t tell the mayor the report was comng out today or that the governor would be
in town. That’s just simple courtesy.

Kathy
From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:16 AM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver
<weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

I also think we need to start including something about how the governor is making all these plans for
Flint, WITHOUT the input from the Mayor and her staff.

We had no idea about the 75 point plan, until the press release came out. We had no idea about this
meeting and that he was in town, until the release came out. I think all this shows he's really not interested
in working collaboratively with the Mayor and therefore not serious about doing what's best for Flint.​

Also, a number of things included in his plan for Flint, are programs etc. that have been in the works
for months. Nothing new started by him. He's just taking credit for them to make it seem like he's making
things happen. He's not.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi, Kristin.

I’d suggest just getting out the advisory now with the two addresses. We can always mention in
tomorrow’s advisory that a third house was done, if there is one.

Also, I’m going to write a press release on the Flint Water Advisory Task Force report being released
right now. The report criticizes the use of emergency managers and places new blame on the Michigan
Department of Health and Human Services, along with MDEQ, for the lead-tainted pipes and the
Legionnaire’s disease outbreak. I’ll plan to have that to you early this afternoon for you and the mayor to
review.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 9:03 AM
To: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Thank. I just saw the email from Gen. McDaniel. Looks like Genesee is not yet a sure thing.

But, the others are as far as you know?

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:29 AM, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi Kristin,

I attached word and PDF versions of today’s MA with the three sites receiving pipe replacements.

Thank you!

Andrea
Subject: RE: today's media advisory
From: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Date: 3/23/2016 2:00 PM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
CC: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>,
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Matt
Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>

This back from Ari…can we rebut his points?

From: Adler, Ari (GOV) [mailto:AdlerA@michigan.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 1:56 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: You guys need to start communicating with Mayor Weaver

Dave,

There are a lot of misinformed accusations in your email, so please check your facts and your tone.

The mayor was provided the 75-point plan and press release before it was issued. In fact, we even gave her
a version that had a quote from her in the news release. The only response our office received was that she
did not wish to be in the news release, so her quote was removed and we moved forward with the
announcement.

The independent Flint Water Task Force was responsible for the release of their report today and who it was
shared with beforehand. We only assisted with logistics and distribution of their report and release because
they did not have the capacity to do so.

Lt. Governor Calley is in Flint regularly every week. He is busy working with many members of the
community and has even gone door-to-door with water resource teams helping to deliver water and help
determine the location of lead pipes. Just because he isn’t meeting with the Mayor doesn’t mean he isn’t in
the city working hard to solve problems and support the people of Flint.

Rich Baird, as a leader with Mission Flint, has been in very regular contact with the Mayor and her key staff.

I will gladly escalate this as you suggest, by sharing your unwarranted veiled threat with key senior staff who
have been involved every day with helping the people of Flint. I suspect they will be quite alarmed at what
the Mayor and her hired public relations firm are proposing to do in an unfortunate attempt to disrupt the
work the state has been and will continue to do for the people of Flint.
Ari

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:36 AM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>;
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward
<matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Agreed. However, I'm not sure how far that will go with Mr. Adler. ​He is quoted in a Detroit News article a
couple weeks ago saying : The city “made the decision” not to use corrosion controls “because they didn’t
think they needed it,” Adler said.

That is a lie. As proven by the attached email that was recently released (from 2015). In it a city employee is
stating that DEQ told them to wait to add the corrosion control.

This is common knowledge at this point. Why Adler would lie and say the city is to blame is beyond me. But,
I think it says a lot about the gov. and his team.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/03/10/disaster-warning-preceded-flint-water-
switch/81629048/

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:20 AM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Kristin and Mayor Weaver:
With your ok, I’d like to call the governor’s communications director, Ari Fleisher, and be pretty forceful in
making that case…that it’s bad policy on any number of levels.

And I would hope that even sterner rebukes would be made directly to Rich Baird by the mayor. This is
simply not acceptable. The city and state may not be exactly on the same page on every issue, but they
need to communicate, as you try to do with them.

David Waymire

From: Kathy Hoffman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:18 AM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>; Dave Waymire
<dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

I agree. I’ll plan to take that angle in the press release.

I can’t believe they didn’t tell the mayor the report was comng out today or that the governor would be in
town. That’s just simple courtesy.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:16 AM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

I also think we need to start including something about how the governor is making all these plans for
Flint, WITHOUT the input from the Mayor and her staff.

We had no idea about the 75 point plan, until the press release came out. We had no idea about this
meeting and that he was in town, until the release came out. I think all this shows he's really not interested
in working collaboratively with the Mayor and therefore not serious about doing what's best for Flint.​

Also, a number of things included in his plan for Flint, are programs etc. that have been in the works for
months. Nothing new started by him. He's just taking credit for them to make it seem like he's making things
happen. He's not.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi, Kristin.

I’d suggest just getting out the advisory now with the two addresses. We can always mention in
tomorrow’s advisory that a third house was done, if there is one.

Also, I’m going to write a press release on the Flint Water Advisory Task Force report being released
right now. The report criticizes the use of emergency managers and places new blame on the Michigan
Department of Health and Human Services, along with MDEQ, for the lead-tainted pipes and the
Legionnaire’s disease outbreak. I’ll plan to have that to you early this afternoon for you and the mayor to
review.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 9:03 AM
To: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Thank. I just saw the email from Gen. McDaniel. Looks like Genesee is not yet a sure thing.

But, the others are as far as you know?

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:29 AM, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com> wrote:
Hi Kristin,

I attached word and PDF versions of today’s MA with the three sites receiving pipe replacements.

Thank you!

Andrea
Subject: RE: today's media advisory
From: Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Date: 3/23/2016 2:07 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>, 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
CC: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>,
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

This is all very rebuttable, and should be rebutted. But the Mayor’s office knows the story firsthand, so
Kristin should start the rebut, and we can give any tips about messaging. Matt

From: Dave Waymire [mailto:dwaymire@martinwaymire.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 2:01 PM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>;
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward
<matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

This back from Ari…can we rebut his points?

From: Adler, Ari (GOV) [mailto:AdlerA@michigan.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 1:56 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: You guys need to start communicating with Mayor Weaver

Dave,

There are a lot of misinformed accusations in your email, so please check your facts and your tone.

The mayor was provided the 75-point plan and press release before it was issued. In fact, we even gave her
a version that had a quote from her in the news release. The only response our office received was that she
did not wish to be in the news release, so her quote was removed and we moved forward with the
announcement.

The independent Flint Water Task Force was responsible for the release of their report today and who it was
shared with beforehand. We only assisted with logistics and distribution of their report and release because
they did not have the capacity to do so.

Lt. Governor Calley is in Flint regularly every week. He is busy working with many members of the
community and has even gone door-to-door with water resource teams helping to deliver water and help
determine the location of lead pipes. Just because he isn’t meeting with the Mayor doesn’t mean he isn’t in
the city working hard to solve problems and support the people of Flint.

Rich Baird, as a leader with Mission Flint, has been in very regular contact with the Mayor and her key staff.

I will gladly escalate this as you suggest, by sharing your unwarranted veiled threat with key senior staff who
have been involved every day with helping the people of Flint. I suspect they will be quite alarmed at what
the Mayor and her hired public relations firm are proposing to do in an unfortunate attempt to disrupt the
work the state has been and will continue to do for the people of Flint.

Ari

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:36 AM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>;
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward
<matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Agreed. However, I'm not sure how far that will go with Mr. Adler. ​He is quoted in a Detroit News article a
couple weeks ago saying : The city “made the decision” not to use corrosion controls “because they didn’t
think they needed it,” Adler said.

That is a lie. As proven by the attached email that was recently released (from 2015). In it a city employee is
stating that DEQ told them to wait to add the corrosion control.

This is common knowledge at this point. Why Adler would lie and say the city is to blame is beyond me. But,
I think it says a lot about the gov. and his team.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/03/10/disaster-warning-preceded-flint-water-
switch/81629048/

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:20 AM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Kristin and Mayor Weaver:
With your ok, I’d like to call the governor’s communications director, Ari Fleisher, and be pretty forceful in
making that case…that it’s bad policy on any number of levels.

And I would hope that even sterner rebukes would be made directly to Rich Baird by the mayor. This is
simply not acceptable. The city and state may not be exactly on the same page on every issue, but they
need to communicate, as you try to do with them.

David Waymire

From: Kathy Hoffman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:18 AM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>; Dave Waymire
<dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

I agree. I’ll plan to take that angle in the press release.

I can’t believe they didn’t tell the mayor the report was comng out today or that the governor would be in
town. That’s just simple courtesy.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:16 AM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory
I also think we need to start including something about how the governor is making all these plans for
Flint, WITHOUT the input from the Mayor and her staff.

We had no idea about the 75 point plan, until the press release came out. We had no idea about this
meeting and that he was in town, until the release came out. I think all this shows he's really not interested
in working collaboratively with the Mayor and therefore not serious about doing what's best for Flint.​

Also, a number of things included in his plan for Flint, are programs etc. that have been in the works for
months. Nothing new started by him. He's just taking credit for them to make it seem like he's making things
happen. He's not.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi, Kristin.

I’d suggest just getting out the advisory now with the two addresses. We can always mention in
tomorrow’s advisory that a third house was done, if there is one.

Also, I’m going to write a press release on the Flint Water Advisory Task Force report being released
right now. The report criticizes the use of emergency managers and places new blame on the Michigan
Department of Health and Human Services, along with MDEQ, for the lead-tainted pipes and the
Legionnaire’s disease outbreak. I’ll plan to have that to you early this afternoon for you and the mayor to
review.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 9:03 AM
To: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Thank. I just saw the email from Gen. McDaniel. Looks like Genesee is not yet a sure thing.

But, the others are as far as you know?

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:29 AM, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi Kristin,

I attached word and PDF versions of today’s MA with the three sites receiving pipe replacements.

Thank you!

Andrea
Subject: Re: Flint Community Schools Ribbon Cutting, Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:00 a.m.
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 10/31/2016 1:33 PM
To: "Tracey Shavers Jr." <tshavers@lambert-edwards.com>
BCC: Maxine Murray <mmurray@cityofflint.com>, Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Hello Tracey,

Thank you for inviting the Mayor to attend the ribbon cutting event Thursday. The opening of this new early
learning childhood center is great news for the City of Flint. Unfortunately, because of the short notice the
Mayor already has another commitment.

Thanks again for reaching out. Have a great event Thursday.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
Website: https://www.cityofflint.com/

On Mon, Oct 31, 2016 at 9:44 AM, Tracey Shavers Jr. <tshavers@lambert-edwards.com> wrote:

Hello Kristin,

By way of introduction my name is Tracey Shavers and I work with Flint Community Schools (and the Flint
& Genesee Chamber of Commerce) providing PR support.

Elaine Redd from FGCC provided me with your contact information as FCS will be holding a ribbon cutting
ceremony on Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. for Cummings Great Expectations, An Early
Childhood Center.

It would be great if Mayor Weaver could attend and say a few words as representatives from the State,
Genesee County ISD, Michigan Department of Education and Senators from the area have been invited.

We understand this is rather short notice but feel it is important that we extend an opportunity for our
local leadership to have a presence at this awesome event.

Please feel free to contact me should you have questions.

Thank you,
Tracey

______________________________________________________
Tracey L. Shavers Jr., Senior Associate
Lambert, Edwards & Associates
313-309-9505 p | 248-864-6874 c
Tshavers@lambert-edwards.com
Detroit | Lansing | Grand Rapids
PROI Worldwide partner | Crain’s “Cool places to work”
lambert-edwards.com f_logo (1)twitter-bird-white-on-blueyt-brand-standard-logo-630px

***CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail message including attachments, if any, is intended for the
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FCS Logo

October 31, 2016

Greetings,

On behalf of Flint Community School students, staff, and administrators, it is with great pleasure that I
extend to you an invitation to attend the ribbon cutting ceremony for Cummings Great Expectations, An Early
Childhood Center. This event will be held on Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. and will be located
at G-2200 Walton Ave. in Flint, Michigan. A tour of the school will be conducted after the ceremony.

Formerly Cummings Elementary School, the new building officially reopened today, following extensive
renovations, as Cummings Great Expectations, An Early Childhood Center, a hub for early childhood
education services. The new program is serving more than 200 children and is free of charge to Flint
families. Additionally, the site will serve as a center to identify and address the educational, behavioral and
health needs of children ages two months to five years.

We will celebrate the opening with Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley and program partners from the
Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, Pritzker Children’s Initiative and University of Michigan-Flint, among
others.

The benefits of early childhood education are far-reaching and extremely important to the foundation of
lifelong learning. We would be delighted if you could share in our enthusiasm for continued excellence in
education and community building.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.
Educationally Yours,

Bilal K. Tawwab

Superintendent

Flint Community Schools
Subject: Fwd: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
From: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/17/2017 9:36 AM
To: Kristin Moore <Kmoore@cityofflint.com>

For your reference

Dr. Karen W. Weaver
Mayor
City of Flint
1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Baird, Richard (GOV) <bairdr@michigan.gov>
Date: Tue, Jan 24, 2017 at 1:53 PM
Subject: Fwd: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Gil Gilcreast <gilgilcreast@gmail.com>

Fyi

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Adler, Ari (GOV)" <AdlerA@michigan.gov>
Date: Jan 24, 2017 1:37 PM
Subject: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
To: "Scott, Allison (GOV)" <scotta12@michigan.gov>,"Agen, Jarrod (GOV)" <AgenJ@michigan.gov>,"Emmitt, Beth
(GOV)" <emmittb@michigan.gov>,"Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>,"Calley, Brian (GOV)"
<calleyb11@michigan.gov>,"Forstner, Nathaniel (GOV)" <forstnern1@michigan.gov>,"Stoken, Laura (GOV)"
<Stokenl@michigan.gov>,"Nyberg, David (GOV)" <nybergd@michigan.gov>,"Heaton, Anna (GOV)"
<HeatonA@michigan.gov>,"Paciorek, Josh (GOV)" <Paciorekj@michigan.gov>,"Posthumus, Dick (GOV)"
<Posthumusd@michigan.gov>,"Ackerman, Darin (GOV)" <ackermand3@michigan.gov>,"Lange, Michelle (GOV)"
<LangeM3@michigan.gov>,"Clement, Elizabeth (GOV)" <clemente@michigan.gov>,"Weber, Travis (GOV)"
<WeberT7@michigan.gov>,"Bedan, Morgan (GOV)" <BedanM@michigan.gov>,"Walsh, John (GOV)"
<WalshJ@michigan.gov>,"Mcbride, Bill (GOV)" <mcbrideb@michigan.gov>,"Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>,"Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>,"Biehl, Laura (GOV)"
<BiehlL@michigan.gov>,"Hansen, Rachel (GOV)" <hansenr3@michigan.gov>
Cc:

Attached is the final version of the Flint Water press release being issued momentarily by the DEQ.

Note these key points:

· Water is testing below the federal action level for Lead and Copper Rule. The LCR data for six months shows
the level for lead at 12 ppb. The latest round of sentinel sites in Flint (November) shows it had dropped to 8 ppb.

· The city will need to continue its work to remain in compliance with the LCR, and the state remains committed
to Flint, as well.

· Due to the new levels being achieved, the payment of water credits will continue for water used through the end
of February, and funding for the source water from GLWA also will continue through the end of February.

· There is no change regarding bottled water.

· Filter cartridges will remain available due to lead service line replacement projects continuing within the city
this year.

Attachments/Flint Water Compliance_Release.docx
Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 3/20/2017 12:13 PM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>
BCC: Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>

Mayor,
A reporter wants to know if you have any thoughts/comments Lt. Gov. Brian Calley being given this public
health award? The release says, the award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead
exposure and promoting healthy lifestyles...

​Mayor or Pam, please let me know if either of you are interested in providing a comment on this.​

Kristin

Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations

City of Flint

1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502

Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576

kmoore@cityofflint.com

www.cityofflint.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Violet Ikonomova <vikonomova@metrotimes.com>
Date: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM
Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
To: kmoore@cityofflint.com

Seeking Mayor's thoughts on this

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 2:46 PM
Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington
D.C.
To: vikonomova@metrotimes.com

COMM News Release

Contacts: Laura Biehl
517-373-4062

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, March 16, 2017

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington D.C.

LG Award

Washington D.C. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley was honored Thursday for his work advancing public health and
healthy lifestyles while attending the National Lieutenant Governors Association’s Federal-State Relations
meeting.

The Public Leadership in Advancing Healthy Lifestyles Award, given annually by the NLGA and Takeda
Pharmaceuticals, was presented to Calley for his efforts to improve the lives of Americans dealing with
mental health and addiction issues as well as his autism advocacy.

“Improving public health means thinking outside the box and treating mental health with the same
importance as physical health,” Calley said. “I’m proud of the progress that Michigan has made and look
forward to continuing to make improving public health a priority in our state.”

The award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead exposure and promoting healthy
lifestyles through marathon running, including hosting a 5k for all State of Michigan employees each fall.

Calley serves as chair of the Midwest Region on the NLGA Executive Committee and hosted the NLGA
summer conference in Michigan in 2016.

#
STAY CONNECTED:
Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter Visit us on YouTube Sign up for email updates
This email was sent to vikonomova@metrotimes.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the Governor ·
111 South Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858

--
Violet Ikonomova
Staff writer
Cell: 571.295.8451
vikonomova@metrotimes.com | @violetikon

Detroit Metro Times
1200 Woodward Heights
Ferndale, MI 48220
metrotimes.com
Subject: Re: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
From: Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>
Date: 3/20/2017 12:35 PM
To: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
CC: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>

I guess no comment about it. Just don't respond

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:13 PM, Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com> wrote:

> Mayor,
> A reporter wants to know if you have any thoughts/comments Lt. Gov. Brian Calley being given this public
health award? The release says, the award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead
exposure and promoting healthy lifestyles...
>
> ​Mayor or Pam, please let me know if either of you are interested in providing a comment on this.​
>
> Kristin
>
> Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations
>
> City of Flint
>
> 1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502
>
> Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576
>
> kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
>
> www.cityofflint.com
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Violet Ikonomova <vikonomova@metrotimes.com>
> Date: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM
> Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
> To: kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
> Seeking Mayor's thoughts on this
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
> Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 2:46 PM
> Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington
D.C.
> To: vikonomova@metrotimes.com
>
>
> COMM News Release
>
> Contacts: Laura Biehl
> 517-373-4062
>
>
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
> Thursday, March 16, 2017
>
> Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington D.C.
>
> LG Award
>
> Washington D.C. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley was honored Thursday for his work advancing public health and
healthy lifestyles while attending the National Lieutenant Governors Association’s Federal-State Relations
meeting.
>
> The Public Leadership in Advancing Healthy Lifestyles Award, given annually by the NLGA and Takeda
Pharmaceuticals, was presented to Calley for his efforts to improve the lives of Americans dealing with
mental health and addiction issues as well as his autism advocacy.
>
> “Improving public health means thinking outside the box and treating mental health with the same
importance as physical health,” Calley said. “I’m proud of the progress that Michigan has made and look
forward to continuing to make improving public health a priority in our state.”
>
> The award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead exposure and promoting healthy
lifestyles through marathon running, including hosting a 5k for all State of Michigan employees each fall.
>
> Calley serves as chair of the Midwest Region on the NLGA Executive Committee and hosted the NLGA
summer conference in Michigan in 2016.
>
>#
> STAY CONNECTED:
> Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter Visit us on YouTube Sign up for email updates
> This email was sent to vikonomova@metrotimes.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the Governor ·
111 South Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858
>
>
>
> --
> Violet Ikonomova
> Staff writer
> Cell: 571.295.8451
> vikonomova@metrotimes.com | @violetikon
>
> Detroit Metro Times
> 1200 Woodward Heights
> Ferndale, MI 48220
> metrotimes.com
>
Subject: Re: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 3/20/2017 12:38 PM
To: Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>
CC: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>

Ok. Got it.​

Kristin

Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations

City of Flint

1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502

Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576

kmoore@cityofflint.com

www.cityofflint.com

On Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:35 PM, Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

I guess no comment about it. Just don't respond

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:13 PM, Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com> wrote:

> Mayor,
> A reporter wants to know if you have any thoughts/comments Lt. Gov. Brian Calley being given this
public health award? The release says, the award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood
lead exposure and promoting healthy lifestyles...
>
> ​Mayor or Pam, please let me know if either of you are interested in providing a comment on this.​
>
> Kristin
>
> Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations
>
> City of Flint
>
> 1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502
>
> Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576
>
> kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
>
> www.cityofflint.com
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Violet Ikonomova <vikonomova@metrotimes.com>
> Date: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM
> Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
> To: kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
> Seeking Mayor's thoughts on this
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
> Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 2:46 PM
> Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
> To: vikonomova@metrotimes.com
>
>
> COMM News Release
>
> Contacts: Laura Biehl
> 517-373-4062
>
>
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
> Thursday, March 16, 2017
>
> Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington D.C.
>
> LG Award
>
> Washington D.C. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley was honored Thursday for his work advancing public health
and healthy lifestyles while attending the National Lieutenant Governors Association’s Federal-State Relations
meeting.
>
> The Public Leadership in Advancing Healthy Lifestyles Award, given annually by the NLGA and Takeda
Pharmaceuticals, was presented to Calley for his efforts to improve the lives of Americans dealing with
mental health and addiction issues as well as his autism advocacy.
>
> “Improving public health means thinking outside the box and treating mental health with the same
importance as physical health,” Calley said. “I’m proud of the progress that Michigan has made and look
forward to continuing to make improving public health a priority in our state.”
>
> The award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead exposure and promoting
healthy lifestyles through marathon running, including hosting a 5k for all State of Michigan employees each
fall.
>
> Calley serves as chair of the Midwest Region on the NLGA Executive Committee and hosted the NLGA
summer conference in Michigan in 2016.
>
> #
> STAY CONNECTED:
> Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter Visit us on YouTube Sign up for email updates
> This email was sent to vikonomova@metrotimes.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the
Governor · 111 South Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858
>
>
>
> --
> Violet Ikonomova
> Staff writer
> Cell: 571.295.8451
> vikonomova@metrotimes.com | @violetikon
>
> Detroit Metro Times
> 1200 Woodward Heights
> Ferndale, MI 48220
> metrotimes.com
>
Subject: 18-0044 FOIA Request
From: Foia Request <foiarequest@cityofflint.com>
Date: 1/19/2018 10:37 AM
To: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>, Robert Bincsik <rbincsik@cityofflint.com>

Kristin and Rob - We received this request this week. I let the requestor know that we cannot provide any social media
or personal email information. If you can think of any other communications that may have gone to the Lt. Governor
please forward them to me. Thank you for your assistance.

Jennifer Delaney
Paralegal/ FOIA Coordinator
City of Flint
Department of Law
(810) 766-7146

Attachments-1/18-0044 Request.PDF
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
News Release

January 24, 2017

For More Information:
Tiffany Brown, 517-242-1376, brownt22@michigan.gov
Michael Shore, 517-284-6713, shorem2@michigan.gov

City of Flint's water system now meeting federal Lead and Copper Rule,
action levels comparable to cities with similar size and age of
infrastructure in Michigan and across the U.S.
State remains committed to continuing work in Flint as city and residents recover

FLINT, MICH. The City of Flint’s water system is now testing below action levels of the federal
Lead and Copper Rule and at levels comparable to cities with similar size and age of
infrastructure in Michigan and across the nation. The notification of this finding, based on results
from the most recent 6-month monitoring period, was provided this morning by the Michigan
Department of Environmental Quality to the Mayor of Flint.

“This is good news and the result of many partners on the local, county, state and federal levels
working together to restore the water quality in the City of Flint,” said MDEQ Director Heidi
Grether. “The Flint water system is one of the most monitored systems in the country for lead
and copper, and we remain committed to continuing work in Flint as the city recovers.”

The 90th percentile lead value of samples collected from Tier 1 sites for the 6-month
compliance period between July 1, 2016, and Dec. 31, 2016, was 12 ppb, which is less than the
15 ppb action level for lead. Tier 1 sites are residential sites confirmed as having lead service
lines or copper plumbing with lead solder installed between 1983 and 1988.

Further, the four rounds of sentinel site sampling collected within the same 6-month compliance
period indicate the system continues to recover, with the 90th percentile value of the most recent
round of sentinel site test results at 8 ppb.

“The remarkable improvement in water quality over the past year is a testament to all levels of
government working together and the resilient people of Flint helping us help them through
participation in the flushing programs,” said Gov. Rick Snyder. “There is still more work to do in
Flint, and I remain committed to helping the residents recover and restore their city. Programs
related to providing water filters, funding lead service line replacements, increasing access to
health care, improving educational opportunities, growing Flint’s economy, and more will
continue. It was important to attain a water quality that remains below action levels of the federal
Lead and Copper Rule and is comparable to cities with similar size and age of infrastructure in
Michigan and the U.S. This is not the end of our work in Flint, but it is one more step along the
path toward Flint’s future.”

In its letter, the DEQ laid out a series of actions the city must continue to take to remain in
compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule and the Safe Water Drinking Act as a whole.
The State of Michigan has been providing water credits to help residents pay for water they
could not use because it did not meet state and federal quality standards. The remaining credits
will be available to help pay for water used through the end of February. The state has been
providing water credits for water use dating back to April 2014.

The state also has been paying for the city’s source water from the Great Lakes Water Authority
since October 2015. The state will continue to provide funding for source water through the end
of February.

As a reminder, the state continues its recommendation that residents use filtered water for
drinking and cooking for everyone in their household due to the chance for disruption to pipes
as the city replaces lead service lines. The state will continue to provide filter cartridges because
of the ongoing lead service line replacement.

###
Compilation of 2011-2015 "990 Reports"

Program Investment Released from Total
Contributions, Misc Revenue Full-Time Part-Time Contract Total
Year Service Income & Revenue restrictions or Total Revenue Functional
Gifts, Grants (Room Rental) Employees Employees Employees Employees
Revenue Royalties fund balance Expenses
FGCC and
Subsidiaries 2015 $ 9,616,339 $ 830,964 $ 2,997 $ 1,180,048 $ 11,630,348 $ (7,560,035) $ 4,070,313 $ 11,374,261 86 299** 2 387**

URC & Subsidiaries
2015 $ 2,191,234 $ 4,437,444 $ 176,126 $ 2,611,726 $ 9,416,530 $ 9,416,530 $ 4,262,376 2 2 4
Farmers' Market 2015 $ 253,492 $ - $ - $ 524,179 $ 777,671 $ - $ 777,671 $ 811,127 3 8 11
GRAND TOTALS
$ 12,061,065 $ 5,268,408 $ 179,123 $ 4,315,953 $ 21,824,549 $ (7,560,035) $ 14,264,514 $ 16,447,764 91 0 15
** Count includes 126 DNR youth jobs

FGCC and
Subsidiaries 2014 $ 11,566,887 $ 584,098 $ 2,809 $ 1,167,809 $ 13,321,603 $ (6,353,766) $ 6,967,837 $ 11,746,219 82 352 33 467
URC & Subsidiaries 2014 $ 13,095,573 $ 655,088 $ 111,949 $ 1,875,248 $ 15,737,858 $ 15,737,858 $ 7,994,660 2 1 3
Farmers' Market 2014 $ 44,147 $ 604,317 $ 648,464 $ 648,464 $ 729,323 3 8 11
GRAND TOTALS $ 24,706,607 $ 1,239,186 $ 114,758 $ 3,647,374 $ 29,707,925 $ (6,353,766) $ 23,354,159 $ 20,470,202 87 352 481

FGCC and
Subsidiaries 2013 $ 9,701,113 $ 524,939 $ 6,179 $ 1,006,689 $ 11,238,920 $ (1,856,967) $ 9,381,953 $ 11,435,551 74 94 21 189
URC & Subsidiaries 2013 $ 2,541,131 $ 2,293,567 $ 250,287 $ 122,911 $ 5,207,896 $ 10,415,792 $ 3,226,375 0
Farmers' Market 2013 $ 87,896 $ 143,097 $ 100,261 $ 331,254 $ 662,508 $ 468,967 2 5 7
GRAND TOTALS $ 12,330,140 $ 2,961,603 $ 256,466 $ 1,229,861 $ 16,778,070 $ (1,856,967) $ 20,460,253 $ 15,130,893 76 99 196
Program Investment Misc Revenue Total
Contributions, Full-Time Part-Time Contract Total
Year Service Income & (Room Total Revenue Functional
Gifts, Grants Employees Employees Employees Employees
Revenue Royalties Rental…) Expenses
FGCC and
Subsidiaries 2012 $ 11,312,255 $ 428,937 $ 14,284 $ 1,109,082 $ 12,864,558 $ (5,828,356) $ 7,036,202 $ 10,194,232 56 86 27 169
URC & Subsidiaries 2012 $ 2,328,911 $ 2,037,502 $ 4,366,413 $ 4,366,413 $ 3,458,210 0
Farmers' Market 2012 $ 182,079 $ 259,291 $ 441,370 $ 441,370 $ 436,425 2 5 7
GRAND TOTALS $ 13,823,245 $ 2,725,730 $ 14,284 $ 1,109,082 $ 17,672,341 $ (5,828,356) $ 11,843,985 $ 14,088,867 58 91 27 176

Genesee Regional
Chamber and
Subsidiaries 2011 $ 7,847,336 $ 410,578 $ 29,582 $ 180,953 $ 8,468,449 $ (4,639,611) $ 3,828,838 $ 8,733,256 37 162 36 235
URC & Subsidiaries
2011 $ 2,217,333 $ 29,718 $ 1,256,772 $ 3,503,823 $ 3,503,823 $ 1,911,715 0
Farmers' Market 2011 $ 337,080 $ 225,175 $ 562,255 $ 562,255 $ 424,193 1 5 6
GRAND TOTALS $ 10,401,749 $ 635,753 $ 59,300 $ 1,437,725 $ 12,534,527 $ (4,639,611) $ 7,894,916 $ 11,069,164 38 167 36 241
Compilation of 2011-2015 "990 Reports"

CEO Compensation For Years: 2009-2015
Year Base Salary Bonus Total
2016 $ 250,013
2015 $ 250,013 $ 25,000 $ 275,013
2014 $ 200,013 $ 50,000 $ 250,013
2013 $ 200,013 $ 50,000 $ 250,013
2012 $ 200,013 $ 30,000 $ 230,013
2011 $ 193,336 $ 15,000 $ 208,336
2010 $ 193,336 $ 15,000 $ 208,336
2009 $ 170,257 $ 10,000 $ 180,257

** Count includes 126 DNR youth jobs
Program Investment Released from
Contributions, Misc Revenue
Year Service Income & Revenue restrictions or
Gifts, Grants (Room Rental)
Revenue Royalties fund balance

Flint &
Genesee
Chamber of
Commerce
and
Subsidiaries
2014

URC &
Subsidiaries 2014
Farmers'
Market 2014
GRAND
TOTALS $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -

Flint &
Genesee
Chamber of
Commerce
and
Subsidiaries
2013 $ 7,844,146 $ 524,939 $ 6,179 $ 1,006,689 $ 11,238,920 $ (1,856,967)

URC &
Subsidiaries 2013 $ 2,541,131 $ 2,293,567 $ 250,287 $ 122,911
Farmers'
Market 2013 $ 87,896 $ 143,097 $ 100,261
GRAND
TOTALS $ 10,473,173 $ 2,961,603 $ 256,466 $ 1,229,861 $ 11,238,920 $ (1,856,967)
Total Functional Full-Time Part-Time Contract Total
Total Revenue
Expenses Employees Employees Employees Employees

$ - 0

$ - $ - 0 0 0

$ 9,381,953 $ 11,435,551 74 94 21 189

$ 5,207,896 $ 3,226,375 0

$ 331,254 $ 468,967 2 5 7

$ 14,921,103 $ 15,130,893 76 99 196
Program Investment Misc Revenue Total
Contributions,
Year Service Income & (Room Revenue Total Revenue Functional
Gifts, Grants
Revenue Royalties Rental) Expenses

URC &
Subsidiaries 2015 $ 2,191,234 $ 4,437,444 $ 176,126 $ 2,611,726 $ 9,416,530 $ 9,416,530 $ 4,262,376
Farmers'
Market 2015 $ 253,492 $ - $ - $ 524,179 $ - $ 811,127

URC &
Subsidiaries 2014 $ 13,095,573 $ 655,088 $ 111,949 $ 1,875,248 $ 15,737,858 $ 15,737,858 $ 7,994,660
Full-Time Contract Total
Employees Employees Employees

2 2 4

3 8 11

2 1 3
2016 Action Groups’ and Business Units’ Accomplishments

Economic Development
• Successful Flint NOW business grant implementation – approx. 2/3 of funds distributed
• Flint business water distribution center created and operated
• 196 retention visits completed (August)
• 49 assistance projects undertaken with previously inactive clients (August)
• 710 jobs created and 625 retained (August)
• $320,455,000 million invested YTD (August)
• Project announcements with C3 Venture, Crust, iSource Worldwide/Skypoint Ventures, Performance Fabricators,
Creative Foam, Capitol Theater,
• Dramatically increased collaboration with state departments including MEDC, DEQ, and MDARD
• Multiple new, large agribusiness leads due to our targeted marketing efforts
• EDA funding for Buick City Accelerator building plan (Oct 3 announcement planned)
• Flint Grocery Store initiative – market study complete. Moving to implementation mode
• Regional ACCELERATE plan nominated for Michigan Planning award
• Over $1 million in new funds for regional collaboration in last 6 years
PTAC
• Program on track to exceed $105 million contracts goal ($85,254,619.00 currently)
• Program increased FY grant dollars by $240,000
• FY grant period completed & goals exceeding by 145% to 167% of goals
• All seven (I-69 Thumb Region) counties are now actively served by Region 6 PTAC with 50% growth

Community Outreach & Public Policy
• Coordinated with over 250 community leaders to support and execute 30 community based projects.
• Endorsed candidates, ballot proposals and community enriching millages for education.
• Hosted key state and federal officials throughout the year to build relationships and help communicate
advocacy for Flint Water Crisis, MEDC, and local priorities.

Convention & Visitors Bureau
• Received the 2016 Presidents Award: Michigan Chapter of the Society of Government Meeting Professionals
• 236, and climbing, CTAs in inaugural year
• More than 1,000 attendees at 2016 Be A Tourist in Your Hometown
• Won three year bid for the VFW State Veterans of Foreign War Conference – 2017-2019
• Won three year bid for the American Legion Midwest Conference – 2017-2019
• Won bid for 2018 American Legion State Convention
• Won bid for Lions of Michigan 2019 State Conference
• Hosted Inaugural Flint Forecheck Hockey tournament and acted as housing bureau for reservations
• Participated as a community stop on the Circle Michigan FAM Tour
• Conducted five (5) community motor coach tours to improve the perception of Flint and Genesee
• Participated in the invitation only Pure Michigan Meredith Corporation Editorial Tradeshow in Iowa
• Hosted the Winter Guard International Midwest Tournament
• Participated in the Flint Walk & Bike group collaborative effort to start Flint Bike Share
• Achieved all identified metrics goals
• Hosted the Claressa Shields Homecoming Celebration
• Collaborated with Economic Development on the regional Agritourism guide
• Assisted with Fight for Flint Boxing event to benefit Catholic Charities
• Hosted Great Lake Planetarium Association State Conference
• Collaborated to provide fact sheets for the Michigan Democratic Presidential Debate to improve perception of
Flint & Genesee
• Hosted Travel Michigan / Pure Michigan FAM tour
• Hosted Michigan Travel Commissioners mini FAM and winter meeting

Operations
• Insuring Strategic Plan remains in the forefront of our work, via staff meetings and Playbook updates.
• Worked with Collaborative Team in implementation of tools and messaging to promote and monitor an inclusive
and collaborative culture.
• Worked with Sustainability Team to develop and write plan for Chamber.
• Managed warehouses and facilities.
• Evaluated and successfully coordinated contract management, purchasing, and risk management processes.
• Monitored the institution of a blanket purchase order for office supplies through Office Depot.
• Coordinated RFP, Review Team and selection of accounting firm for audit of all Chamber affiliated finances.
• Represented the Chamber and business interests regarding Flint water issues by taking part in the Emergency
Operations Center (EOC)
• Coordinated warehousing and transportation of water for Chamber business usage.
• Developed, coordinated and executed work on the Flint Homecoming event.
• Began writing or review of Chamber processes and policies.
• Instituted Visitor Procedures & Directional Signage
• Sat on various committees to move Chamber initiatives forward.

Finance
• Hired consultants to assist with implementation of the BI-360 Budget and Forecasting Module
• Management of all budgets inclusive of Projects, grants and departments
• Implemented the Mekorma check signing software
• Implemented an electronic time sheet program
• Developed the ability to print time sheet from new system
• Implemented an electronic expense report system
• Assist with the Chamber Accreditation
• Implemented the accounting side of Chamber Master software member and event software
• Completed Great Plains(GP) accounting software major upgrade
• Managed a 401K audit
• Completed Unemployment Audit
• Completed Annual Audit for the FGCC/GCF/GAFF/EDC
• Completed State of MI and Federal Government audits for, DLA(PTAC) and MEDC(PTAC) Programs
• Completed Annual Workman’s Comp Audit
• Prepared RFP for audit of Next Michigan Corporation
• Set-up a new sub-grantee program
• Managed 180 additional participant employees
• Managed full accounting for 8 companies
• Assist Grants Department in budgets for pending projects
• Managed 76 Grants and Projects
• Managed 100 Sub-grant Agreements
• Managed 200 Vendor Contracts
Member Services
• 76 Business Professionals attended the Young Professional’s Leadercast professional development at IINN
• Annual Golf Classic sold out within first month of announcing it
• Hosted over 1000 attendees at the Hot Rod and Hot Dogs Member Appreciation Party
• Completed the second year of four-year Chamber Certification Program (Institute of Organization
Management) through the US Chamber of Commerce Foundation
• Served on the Michigan Association of Chamber Professional’s, an arm of the Michigan Chamber of
Commerce Membership and Program Committee’s
• Facilitated a connection between our Chamber and Mick Fleming, President of the Association of Chamber of
Commerce Executives (ACCE), leading to an article in The Chamber Executive, a national industry magazine
• Launched the implementation of Chamber Master, a dynamic online member directory and management
system
• Hosted 1444 attendees to date at Member Services Program Events
• Fostered state and national relationships by attending The ACCE Sales Conference and The National ACCE
Convention
• Team is at 77% of an 85% New Member Annual Goal
• Implemented a change in the structure for Young Professionals. To better align the committee with our other
committees, we removed the YP dues and allowed YP’s of existing members to be a part of the
committee. Adding a benefit to a member’s existing investment. If a young person wants to join the
committee, they can join for $150 or it becomes a lead for a new membership.

Human Resources
• Worked with Rite Aid to present staff Flu Shot Clinic
• Developed and presented training to entire YouthQuest Team – Workplace Cohesiveness and Confidentiality in
the Workplace
• Updated the Employee Handbook
• Developed and implemented YouthQuest Onboarding Process
• HR Staff development to include training for staff on the following:
o Conducting interviews
o Unemployment Compensation Claims
o Workers Compensation Claims
o Employment Verifications and Documentation Maintenance
• Maintain legislative changes that impact the organization. i.e. Overtime Legislation
• Successfully hired and on-boarded 76 YQ employees and 10 FGCC

Data Collection
• Completed the extension of the Memorandum of Agreement with the United States Department of Commerce
(USDOC) and the International Trade Administration (ITA).
• UM Flint GIS center and Mott Foundation Data Platform “Map Flint” project (work in progress), Phase 1 almost
done and Phase 2 in negotiation and approval process.
• Worked with Metrics Assessment Team, moving forward FGCC Metrics recommendations for 2017.
• Connect Michigan Certification for Genesee County - Certification took place August 31st 2016. Worked on
implementing an action plan and Genesee County potential projects.
• Focused on creating strong and valuable connection with UM Flint and UM Ann Arbor around entrepreneurship.
• Assisted with the development of a University “E.D.A Center” (or U.C.E.D.A) at UM Flint in collaboration with
US Department of Commerce and UM Ann Arbor.
• Conducted research on Network evaluation software in partnership with UM Flint outreach and UM Flint Art &
Science, creation of FGCC working group with Brandon, Kristina and Roy.
• Participated in the Downtown / Incubator Community Platform and Urban Community Research Center with UM
Flint (work in progress with Doug Knerr UM Flint Provost, Vahid Lotfi UM Flint Senior Vice Provost and Paula
Nas UM Flint Director, Center for Economic Education) – work in progress
• Collaborated on “Ferris Wheel” and “Innovation Hub” projects with Sky Points Venture, Mike Finney and UM
Flint. Mott Community College and Kettering.
• Work on bringing XLerateHealth cohort from Kentucky and Venture Capital Company with UM Flint, Genesys,
Sky Points Venture, Diplomat Pharmacy and University of Louisville’s Nucleus Innovation Park.
• Collected data for Opportunity Youth and Flint & Genesee Literacy and Basic Skills Network
• Partnered with UM Ann Arbor Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and Economy to increase or
capacity of having access to strong research paper to implement cohesive trend.
• Created a strong and valuable partnership with MSU EDA* University center for Regional Economic Innovation.
• Partnered with Kettering University on the “Stevenson Neighborhood” project and other projects that can result
in opportunities for Flint neighborhoods around housing and economic development growth through
methodological research and analysis.

Grants
• Pursued 67 grants so far this year
• Over $6.9 Million dollars awarded for grants submitted in 2016 (through September)
• Supported over $22 Million in grant applications for other agencies
• Project-managed the implementation of the organization’s Sustainability Plan
• Launched the Moving Flint Forward Fund at the Community Foundation of Greater Flint
• Developed program model and funding strategy for the Flint Grocery Initiative
• Developed the project model, implementation tools, and grant reporting for the Moving Flint Forward Small
Business Grant program and supported the acquisition and management of $1 million
• Secured an Economic Development Administration (EDA) grant of nearly $200,000 for a feasibility study for a
Business Accelerator at the former Buick City site
• Supported Foundation for Uptown Reinvestment Corporation grant proposals including Farmers’ Market grants
• Supported many outside grant projects through narrative contributions, data sharing, matching funds, letters of
support, convening and facilitation of working groups, training for fellow grant-writers, and even writing several
grants for other agencies. Even unsuccessful grant applications created new and stronger relationships with
partner organizations. Major grant support was provided for:
• Department of Labor Grants with SIPI (Tech Hire Grant) and Genesee-Shiawassee-Thumb Michigan Works
(Summer Jobs and Beyond Grant)
• Department of Defense grant with a variety of local partners, as well as the lead agency IQM Research Institute
out of Ann Arbor, to bring a Robotics in Manufacturing Environments Manufacturing Innovation Institute to
Flint
• Department of Education Promise Neighborhoods grant with University of Michigan-Flint in the lead, but many
local partners at the table
• Lead the Flint & Genesee Opportunity Youth Coalition which included:
• Finalization and prioritization of the group’s action plan
• Launched www.opportunityflintandgenesee.org and producing multiple print pieces
• Conducted research and data collection about young people ages 16-24 not engaged in school or work with a
contract with University of Michigan-Flint
• Began recruitment and youth engagement activities with WOW Outreach
• Producing a Business Plan for a Flint Re-Engagement Center, in partnership with Mott Community College and
Corporation for a Skilled Workforce to
• Hired a former Opportunity Youth to support the Coalition (part-time, temporary position)
• Lead and managed the US Chamber Accreditation process (ongoing)
• Refined processes for managing member prospects, accepting charitable donations, and boosting member
engagement
• Met with over 40 new fund development clients, resulting in new memberships, volunteers, in-kind and cash
donors (totaling over $150,00 in investment), in addition to the $1 million contribution to the Moving Flint
Forward Fund

IT
• Deployed new network space to accommodate more wireless devices.
• Implemented new virtual server infrastructure, server purchased includes space to deploy additional servers for
new services such as Microsoft GP Web servers.
• Upgrade all Youth Quest computers to Windows 10, taking advantage of the free upgrade from Microsoft. This
upgrade will also take better advantage of the current hardware we have and integrates better with Office 365.
• Implemented new backup software and procedures to take advantage of faster virtual system backup and reduce
recovery point objective (RPO) and recover time objective (RTO).
• Upgraded the chamber primary internet connection to faster and redundant service.
• Negotiated new printer contract that reduced both the lease costs and print overage costs.
• Refreshed the event equipment to support this year’s 100% increase in events needing technology support.
• Deployed new POE+ switches to support new work spaces on the south side of the office.
• Migrated the network file storage to a new larger virtual server.
• Added two new redundant authentication servers to improve uptime and productivity.
• Implemented a new helpdesk ticking, inventory, network monitor service that tracks both technology user issues
and hardware for better technology management.
• Collaborated with Membership and Events to employ Chamber Master with a go live date of October 3rd.
• Installed GP Web Client servers to support PTE timesheet electronic approval process.
• Created new Conference room configurations in both hardware and software to allow for technology such as 70-
inch touchscreen presentations and wireless presentations from mobile devices.
• Deployed website development server to support the update of the new mobile ready website.
• Implemented 20 new workstations and 4 new IP Phones in keeping with both our growth and capital
improvement best practices.
• Created a process to take advantage of our office 365 OneDrive storage to record receipts for new electronic
expense report.
• Multiple trainings sessions on subjects such as security, Seymour employee intranet, Office 365, and printing,
supporting our efforts in collaboration, increasing organization effectiveness and efficiency, and regulatory
compliance.

Marketing
• Promotion of the Flint & Genesee destination brand via website, print, broadcast, digital, out-of-home, point-of-
sale, promotional merchandise, displays, signage, video, and more
• Media buys and media placement across out-of-home, broadcast, print, and digital in support of all action groups,
yielding over 9,000,000 impressions as of August 2016
• Extensive work toward the launch of an improved website for the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce, to be
competed in fall 2016, including the creation of the first marketing position focused on content strategy
• Improved workflow and increased internal capacity in marketing for web content strategy, analytics, and project
content support
• Improved targeting through MLive contract to bolster website traffic and search engine optimization, resulting in
an average of 7,800 visitors to the FGCC website per month
• New testimonial content in the form of video, photography, and interviews for programs like Leadership NOW,
Summer Youth Initiative, and Opportunity Youth
• Collaboration with action groups on content strategy for existing and new initiatives, to target audiences more
directly and efficiently
• Support for the seven-county I-69 Thumb Region initiative with website development, event collateral, and
additional support for initiatives like the Agribusiness Directory and craft food and beverage business plan
competition.
• Marketing and web support for community initiatives like Moving Flint Forward, the Leadership Summit, Flint
Homecoming, Flint Sprint, as well as partnership events like the inaugural Summer Learning Provider
Conference
• Collaboration with Flint Community Schools and Crim’s Community Education to create marketing and
advertising materials for youth programming
• Increased marketing and advertising support for YouthQuest and TeenQuest, and expanded materials for
Education & Training programs like Career Edge
• Production of the 2016 SEE Visitor’s Guide Magazine
• Evolved support for Shared Services business training programming, including a 16-page booklet, 2016 Business
Training Offerings and targeted digital and email advertising
• Posters for Michigan Department of Education’s Michigan Out of School Time (MOST) standards
• Total of 5 reports (4 individual counties and 1 region) created for the I-69 Thumb Region partners graphically
showing results from the 2016 Wage & Benefit survey
• 2015 Annual Report, Flint and Genesee: A Story of Resilience
• Supported Annual Meeting, Leadercast, Be a Tourist in Your Hometown, Hot Dogs & Hot Rods, Art of
Achievement Awards, Lunches On Us and After Hours Wine Downs, ArtQuest, Manufacturing Day, and more
• Monthly My City Magazine advertorial spreads

Shared Services
• Successfully merged the Flint & Genesee’s Leadership Alliance program and the United Way’s Best Leadership
Non-Profit Institute program to form Leadership NOW a joint program of the Flint and Genesee Chamber of
Commerce & The United Way of Genesee County
 Leadership NOW first class graduated 9 participants
 Leadership NOW 2nd Class in progress with 12 participants
• Launched the first Flint and Genesee Chamber Business Training Catalog, and more than tripled training
opportunities for the membership to grow and build capacity.
 Established training partnerships with Crim Fitness Foundation, Hurley Medical Center, American
Advertising Federation, MLive, Minder Planning Group, American Red Cross, and Butzel Long
 Achieved our stretch goals for the 2016 calendar year as it relates to the metrics around business
training. We have hosted over 115 training events, with 5,943 participants attending them;
representing over 2,800 firms.
• Implemented the Flint Sprint initiative which represents 250k of pro bono program management support from
Deloitte and over 5m in pro bono corporate sponsor support on 22 collaborative community based projects that
will improve the quality of life for the residents of Flint.
 The leadership role of the Chamber and Shared Services Department has positioned the region for
ongoing community impact through relationships that have been built across the state of Michigan.
• Formed an Information Technology Cooperative for Non-Profits in Genesee County.
• Secured 10k to support the Mundy Township and Swartz Creek Police Authority initiative. This initiative is the
first in our region and has the potential to tremendously impact the region’s ability to increase safety for our
residents.
• Achieved certification in the Leadership Effectiveness Analysis LEA360™ assessment tool
• Entire department achieved CTA certification

Communications & Public Relations
• Strategic advice and counsel for FGCC executives and partners
• Leadership, strategic and execution role in water crisis public relations and communications
• FGCC member survey
• Management of workflow by retained PR firm – account manned by four communicators
• Google Consumer Survey to gage perception of Flint across Michigan
• Strategic communications plan
• Campaign messaging and proof points
• Communications package for FGCC board and city, county and state partners
• Media tour to share FGCC’s role in supporting Flint business community
• Lead media relations for Flint Restaurant Week
• Media Relations
• Managed high pressure media relations with national and trade media regarding the business communities
position and status related to the water crisis:
• CNN, Inc., New York Times, Washington Post, Risk & Insurance magazine, National Public Radio
• Secured news coverage for the first time in outlets such as: Michigan Retailers Association, Michigan Business
Network, Destination magazine, Afterschool Snack, Chamber Executive, Crossings magazine, Innovative Health
magazine, Sports Event magazine
• Achieved over 730 positive news stories through August
• Continued to use social media as a strategy to inform and engage Chamber members, friends and the Flint &
Genesee community at large
• Surpassed goals for growing the Chamber’s Facebook fans this year. To date, we have 3,541 fans – up 29 percent
when compared to Dec. 31, 2015
• Continued editorial calendar that is aligned with strategy and brand values
• Merged the See What’s Possible and Trending Flint & Genesee pages to form Explore Flint & Genesee, which
has more than 20,000 fans on Facebook
• Continued FACES campaign generating great visibility of Chamber members and eco dev. clients
• Grew readership engagement of Inside Business e-newsletter, writing 242 articles that provided news, opinions
and information to members and community.
• Open Rate, as of September 21 = 20.6% (industry average, per Constant Contact = 10%)
• Click-Through Rate, as of September 21 = 18.21% (industry average = 8.9%)
• Bounce Rate = 4.62% (industry average = 9.9%)
• Unsubscribe Rate = 0.22% (industry average = 0.12%)
• Leadership Summit: Lead role in the strategic planning and execution
• Event oversight with Wilkinson
• Goal and objective-setting
• Agenda, speaker lineup
• Multiple communications (speakers, participants, boards, etc.)
• Speaker relations and messaging discussions
• Media relations

Education & Training
• Served on GST MI Works Talent Advisory Group, Flint Community Schools Community Education Initiative
Steering Committee and the Education Foundation for Flint Community Schools
• Successful program performance resulted in grants to fund TeenQuest/Summer Youth Initiative totaling
$1,417,000
• Over 600 teens were hired through SYI/DNR programs
• Developed new relationships and retained existing partnerships with area nonprofits and for profits through SYI
employment opportunities with 16 nonprofits providing summer programs
• Secured DNR grants of $438,000 to hire 185 teens, with 158 working through the summer
• Partnered with 15 area employers who provided work for the DNR teens. Feedback was very positive about the
teens’ performance.
• Partnered with Seven Lakes and Holly Recreation Area staff for four workdays offering much needed capacity to
tackle large projects as part of the overall DNR program.
• Completed second year of the 21stCCLC grant for 3 Flint Community School sites. This is for a 5-year cycle.
• Hosted two FGCC Job Fairs with area employers and SYI/TQ/DNR alumni in April and September 2016. In
collaboration with Member Services, Economic Development, MEDC, and Baker College of Flint, we hosted
two Job Fairs to connect alumni with training and employment opportunities in Flint/Genesee County.
• Established SYI/Career Edge Alumni 50/50 partnerships with: Bridge Street Exchange, Webster & Garner,
PrintComm, MTA, and Rally’s to provide employment opportunities for SYI/Career Edge alumni
• 209 people attended Career Edge workshops, with 168 completing the entire series.
• 65 TeenQuest/Career Edge alumni reported securing employment through FGCC Job Fairs
• Successful team event management of 6 TeenQuest graduations and volunteer events, SYI Job Fair, SYI
Volunteer Service Day, YouthQuest ArtQuest, and YouthQuest End of Year Games
• Hired new Education & Training Coordinator, Amy Watts, to provide support for all E&T program events and
vendor relationships.
• In 2016, we held nearly 200 events with 20,324 in attendance (through August 2016).
• Developed new partnership with Deluxe Dental who provided dental packages to all YouthQuest students,
presented 12 free bikes to YouthQuest students, and contributed $5,000 for programming
• Confirmed grants to support YouthQuest totaling $4,172,428, including new funding sources of Hagerman
Foundation, Herman Miller Cares, Whiting Foundation, and Deluxe Dental
• Secured $3.1 million renewal grant for YouthQuest from the C. S. Mott Foundation
• Secured $1,017,428 renewal grant from Michigan Department of Education for YouthQuest
• Pending grants in the amount of $587,623 for YouthQuest
• Partnered with Title 1 Staff and 21st Century Staff in Flint Community Schools, Carman-Ainsworth, and
International Academy of Flint to provide summer enrichment program at YouthQuest sites
• Partnered with Crim Foundation for competitive sports program for Flint students for the 2015-16 school year
• Continued partnership with IMA Brookwood golf pro, Joe Simpson, as golf instructor at all YouthQuest sites
• Partnered with IMA Brookwood and the PGA of America for a family golf day of fun with YouthQuest
• Partnered with Sphinx Orchestra program serving students in the Flint Community Schools’ elementary sites
with free violins, onsite lessons, and free tickets to several theatrical performances at The Whiting
• Secured new YouthQuest vendors with Chica’s Fitness, Andrew Aikens Theatre Program, Kevin Collins African
Drum and Music, and American Sign Language with Angela Horne.
• 99 middle/high school YouthQuesters went on an overnight trip to Traverse City Great Wolf Lodge and Sleeping
Bear Dunes as their culminating activity of the Summer on the Road program
• Partnered with Weikart Center for the program quality assessment resulting in successful implementation and
site-based aggregate data
• Successful staff management/retention/development resulting in upward moves for several learning guides to
Lead Learning Guides; Lead Learning Guides to Site Team Leaders, and Site Team Leaders to Site Managers,
and Site Manager to Program Director.
• Continue to provide high quality YouthQuest professional development for all YQ staff
• Provided 49 workshops to over 2300 students through the school day career preparation program as of August. A
new direction for career preparation resources will focus on talent tours and connections with area students and
employers in current and emerging careers.
• Manufacturing Day 2016, planned for October 6, 2016, has over 600 students registered to visit several
manufacturers to learn more about 21st century processes and opportunities.
• Successful management of 2016 budget for CD/EETC programs

Event Management:
• Hired new Events Manager and provided leadership to FGCC Events. Cathy George has supported 112 events,
ranging from small to large, engaging over 7000 people in 2016 through August 2016.
Subject: FW: EO No. 2016-1 Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 1/13/2016 1:11 PM
To: "Karen Weaver - City of Flint (kweaver@cityofflint.com)" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, 'Maxine Murray'
<mmurray@cityofflint.com>

Greetings,

Attached for your reference is the Executive Order creating the Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee.
Thank you, again, for your prompt response for scheduling tomorrow’s conference call.

~Stacie

Stacie Clayton, Assistant Director

Harvey Hollins III, Director

Governor’s Office of Urban Initiatives

3044 West Grand Boulevard, Ste. 14-650

Detroit, MI 48202

313.456.4994 (office)

claytons3@michigan.gov

Attachments/EO+2016-1.pdf
Subject: Executive Order 2016 - 1
From: Natasha Henderson <nhenderson@cityofflint.com>
Date: 1/14/2016 8:32 AM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Thanks,

Natasha L. Henderson, City Administrator
1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI
Email: nhenderson@cityofflint.com
Phone: (810) 237-2057
www.cityofflint.com

Attachments-1/EO+2016-1.pdf
Subject: Fwd: Snyder Media Advisory for Monday, Feb. 22, 2016
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/21/2016 4:52 PM
To: "Raymer, Marjory" <wismarjo@umflint.edu>, "Hannan, Randy" <Randy.Hannan@lansingmi.gov>, Karen Weaver
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Looks like the Gov. having a press event tomorrow morning in Flint as well!

Kristin Moore

Public Relations Director

City of Flint

Office: (810) 237-2039
Mobile: (810) 875-2576

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
Date: Sun, Feb 21, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Subject: Snyder Media Advisory for Monday, Feb. 22, 2016
To: kmoore@cityofflint.com

COMM Media Advisory

Sunday, Feb. 21, 2016
Contact: Dave Murray, Laura Biehl or Anna Heaton
Office: 517-335-6397

Monday, Feb. 22, 2016 at 9:30 a.m.
Gov. Rick Snyder will visit and tour operations at the new State Emergency Operations Center and provide an update to
media on Sentinel Site testing in Flint. He will be joined by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Michigan Department of
Environmental Quality Director Keith Creagh, as well as Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue and Capt. Chris Kelenske of the
Michigan State Police.

Media will be permitted to take photos and b-roll during the tour. Questions will be permitted during a media
availability immediately following. Valid press credentials with photo ID must be presented on-site.

NOTE: Media can enter the building beginning at 9 a.m.

Location:
State Emergency Operations Center
7150 Harris Drive
Dimondale, MI
#

STAY CONNECTED:
Visit us on Facebook isit us on Twitter isit us on YouTube ign up for email updates
This email was sent to kmoore@cityofflint.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the Governor · 111 South
Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858
Subject: Re: today's media advisory
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 3/23/2016 2:19 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
CC: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>,
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Matt
Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>

Providing with the Mayor with a draft of a news release about a plan, a day/few hours before you announce
it to everyone, is not including her in the process of creating a plan for the city she was elected to lead. She
was not included in the process.
(By the way, the Mayor says they only sent her a copy of the release to get her approval of a quote from her
they included. Which she asked them to remove because she was not involved.)

And we were surprised by the announcement because we didn't know what their plans were.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

This back from Ari…can we rebut his points?

From: Adler, Ari (GOV) [mailto:AdlerA@michigan.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 1:56 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: You guys need to start communicating with Mayor Weaver

Dave,

There are a lot of misinformed accusations in your email, so please check your facts and your tone.

The mayor was provided the 75-point plan and press release before it was issued. In fact, we even gave
her a version that had a quote from her in the news release. The only response our office received was that
she did not wish to be in the news release, so her quote was removed and we moved forward with the
announcement.

The independent Flint Water Task Force was responsible for the release of their report today and who it
was shared with beforehand. We only assisted with logistics and distribution of their report and release
because they did not have the capacity to do so.
Lt. Governor Calley is in Flint regularly every week. He is busy working with many members of the
community and has even gone door-to-door with water resource teams helping to deliver water and help
determine the location of lead pipes. Just because he isn’t meeting with the Mayor doesn’t mean he isn’t in
the city working hard to solve problems and support the people of Flint.

Rich Baird, as a leader with Mission Flint, has been in very regular contact with the Mayor and her key
staff.

I will gladly escalate this as you suggest, by sharing your unwarranted veiled threat with key senior staff
who have been involved every day with helping the people of Flint. I suspect they will be quite alarmed at
what the Mayor and her hired public relations firm are proposing to do in an unfortunate attempt to disrupt
the work the state has been and will continue to do for the people of Flint.

Ari

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:36 AM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski
<akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com;
Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>

Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Agreed. However, I'm not sure how far that will go with Mr. Adler. ​He is quoted in a Detroit News article a
couple weeks ago saying : The city “made the decision” not to use corrosion controls “because they didn’t
think they needed it,” Adler said.

That is a lie. As proven by the attached email that was recently released (from 2015). In it a city
employee is stating that DEQ told them to wait to add the corrosion control.

This is common knowledge at this point. Why Adler would lie and say the city is to blame is beyond me.
But, I think it says a lot about the gov. and his team.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/03/10/disaster-warning-preceded-flint-water-
switch/81629048/

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:20 AM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Kristin and Mayor Weaver:
With your ok, I’d like to call the governor’s communications director, Ari Fleisher, and be pretty forceful
in making that case…that it’s bad policy on any number of levels.

And I would hope that even sterner rebukes would be made directly to Rich Baird by the mayor. This is
simply not acceptable. The city and state may not be exactly on the same page on every issue, but they
need to communicate, as you try to do with them.

David Waymire

From: Kathy Hoffman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:18 AM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver
<weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>; Dave
Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

I agree. I’ll plan to take that angle in the press release.

I can’t believe they didn’t tell the mayor the report was comng out today or that the governor would be
in town. That’s just simple courtesy.

Kathy
From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:16 AM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver
<weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

I also think we need to start including something about how the governor is making all these plans for
Flint, WITHOUT the input from the Mayor and her staff.

We had no idea about the 75 point plan, until the press release came out. We had no idea about this
meeting and that he was in town, until the release came out. I think all this shows he's really not interested
in working collaboratively with the Mayor and therefore not serious about doing what's best for Flint.​

Also, a number of things included in his plan for Flint, are programs etc. that have been in the works
for months. Nothing new started by him. He's just taking credit for them to make it seem like he's making
things happen. He's not.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi, Kristin.

I’d suggest just getting out the advisory now with the two addresses. We can always mention in
tomorrow’s advisory that a third house was done, if there is one.

Also, I’m going to write a press release on the Flint Water Advisory Task Force report being released
right now. The report criticizes the use of emergency managers and places new blame on the Michigan
Department of Health and Human Services, along with MDEQ, for the lead-tainted pipes and the
Legionnaire’s disease outbreak. I’ll plan to have that to you early this afternoon for you and the mayor to
review.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 9:03 AM
To: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Thank. I just saw the email from Gen. McDaniel. Looks like Genesee is not yet a sure thing.

But, the others are as far as you know?

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:29 AM, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi Kristin,

I attached word and PDF versions of today’s MA with the three sites receiving pipe replacements.

Thank you!

Andrea
Subject: RE: today's media advisory
From: Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Date: 3/23/2016 2:07 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>, 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
CC: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>,
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

This is all very rebuttable, and should be rebutted. But the Mayor’s office knows the story firsthand, so
Kristin should start the rebut, and we can give any tips about messaging. Matt

From: Dave Waymire [mailto:dwaymire@martinwaymire.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 2:01 PM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>;
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward
<matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

This back from Ari…can we rebut his points?

From: Adler, Ari (GOV) [mailto:AdlerA@michigan.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 1:56 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: You guys need to start communicating with Mayor Weaver

Dave,

There are a lot of misinformed accusations in your email, so please check your facts and your tone.

The mayor was provided the 75-point plan and press release before it was issued. In fact, we even gave her
a version that had a quote from her in the news release. The only response our office received was that she
did not wish to be in the news release, so her quote was removed and we moved forward with the
announcement.

The independent Flint Water Task Force was responsible for the release of their report today and who it was
shared with beforehand. We only assisted with logistics and distribution of their report and release because
they did not have the capacity to do so.

Lt. Governor Calley is in Flint regularly every week. He is busy working with many members of the
community and has even gone door-to-door with water resource teams helping to deliver water and help
determine the location of lead pipes. Just because he isn’t meeting with the Mayor doesn’t mean he isn’t in
the city working hard to solve problems and support the people of Flint.

Rich Baird, as a leader with Mission Flint, has been in very regular contact with the Mayor and her key staff.

I will gladly escalate this as you suggest, by sharing your unwarranted veiled threat with key senior staff who
have been involved every day with helping the people of Flint. I suspect they will be quite alarmed at what
the Mayor and her hired public relations firm are proposing to do in an unfortunate attempt to disrupt the
work the state has been and will continue to do for the people of Flint.

Ari

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:36 AM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>;
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward
<matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Agreed. However, I'm not sure how far that will go with Mr. Adler. ​He is quoted in a Detroit News article a
couple weeks ago saying : The city “made the decision” not to use corrosion controls “because they didn’t
think they needed it,” Adler said.

That is a lie. As proven by the attached email that was recently released (from 2015). In it a city employee is
stating that DEQ told them to wait to add the corrosion control.

This is common knowledge at this point. Why Adler would lie and say the city is to blame is beyond me. But,
I think it says a lot about the gov. and his team.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/03/10/disaster-warning-preceded-flint-water-
switch/81629048/

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:20 AM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Kristin and Mayor Weaver:
With your ok, I’d like to call the governor’s communications director, Ari Fleisher, and be pretty forceful in
making that case…that it’s bad policy on any number of levels.

And I would hope that even sterner rebukes would be made directly to Rich Baird by the mayor. This is
simply not acceptable. The city and state may not be exactly on the same page on every issue, but they
need to communicate, as you try to do with them.

David Waymire

From: Kathy Hoffman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:18 AM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>; Dave Waymire
<dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

I agree. I’ll plan to take that angle in the press release.

I can’t believe they didn’t tell the mayor the report was comng out today or that the governor would be in
town. That’s just simple courtesy.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:16 AM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory
I also think we need to start including something about how the governor is making all these plans for
Flint, WITHOUT the input from the Mayor and her staff.

We had no idea about the 75 point plan, until the press release came out. We had no idea about this
meeting and that he was in town, until the release came out. I think all this shows he's really not interested
in working collaboratively with the Mayor and therefore not serious about doing what's best for Flint.​

Also, a number of things included in his plan for Flint, are programs etc. that have been in the works for
months. Nothing new started by him. He's just taking credit for them to make it seem like he's making things
happen. He's not.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi, Kristin.

I’d suggest just getting out the advisory now with the two addresses. We can always mention in
tomorrow’s advisory that a third house was done, if there is one.

Also, I’m going to write a press release on the Flint Water Advisory Task Force report being released
right now. The report criticizes the use of emergency managers and places new blame on the Michigan
Department of Health and Human Services, along with MDEQ, for the lead-tainted pipes and the
Legionnaire’s disease outbreak. I’ll plan to have that to you early this afternoon for you and the mayor to
review.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 9:03 AM
To: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Thank. I just saw the email from Gen. McDaniel. Looks like Genesee is not yet a sure thing.

But, the others are as far as you know?

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:29 AM, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi Kristin,

I attached word and PDF versions of today’s MA with the three sites receiving pipe replacements.

Thank you!

Andrea
Subject: RE: today's media advisory
From: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Date: 3/23/2016 2:00 PM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
CC: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>,
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Matt
Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>

This back from Ari…can we rebut his points?

From: Adler, Ari (GOV) [mailto:AdlerA@michigan.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 1:56 PM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: You guys need to start communicating with Mayor Weaver

Dave,

There are a lot of misinformed accusations in your email, so please check your facts and your tone.

The mayor was provided the 75-point plan and press release before it was issued. In fact, we even gave her
a version that had a quote from her in the news release. The only response our office received was that she
did not wish to be in the news release, so her quote was removed and we moved forward with the
announcement.

The independent Flint Water Task Force was responsible for the release of their report today and who it was
shared with beforehand. We only assisted with logistics and distribution of their report and release because
they did not have the capacity to do so.

Lt. Governor Calley is in Flint regularly every week. He is busy working with many members of the
community and has even gone door-to-door with water resource teams helping to deliver water and help
determine the location of lead pipes. Just because he isn’t meeting with the Mayor doesn’t mean he isn’t in
the city working hard to solve problems and support the people of Flint.

Rich Baird, as a leader with Mission Flint, has been in very regular contact with the Mayor and her key staff.

I will gladly escalate this as you suggest, by sharing your unwarranted veiled threat with key senior staff who
have been involved every day with helping the people of Flint. I suspect they will be quite alarmed at what
the Mayor and her hired public relations firm are proposing to do in an unfortunate attempt to disrupt the
work the state has been and will continue to do for the people of Flint.
Ari

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:36 AM
To: Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>; Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>;
Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>; kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward
<matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Agreed. However, I'm not sure how far that will go with Mr. Adler. ​He is quoted in a Detroit News article a
couple weeks ago saying : The city “made the decision” not to use corrosion controls “because they didn’t
think they needed it,” Adler said.

That is a lie. As proven by the attached email that was recently released (from 2015). In it a city employee is
stating that DEQ told them to wait to add the corrosion control.

This is common knowledge at this point. Why Adler would lie and say the city is to blame is beyond me. But,
I think it says a lot about the gov. and his team.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/politics/2016/03/10/disaster-warning-preceded-flint-water-
switch/81629048/

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:20 AM, Dave Waymire <dwaymire@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Kristin and Mayor Weaver:
With your ok, I’d like to call the governor’s communications director, Ari Fleisher, and be pretty forceful in
making that case…that it’s bad policy on any number of levels.

And I would hope that even sterner rebukes would be made directly to Rich Baird by the mayor. This is
simply not acceptable. The city and state may not be exactly on the same page on every issue, but they
need to communicate, as you try to do with them.

David Waymire

From: Kathy Hoffman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:18 AM
To: 'Kristin Moore' <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>; Dave Waymire
<dwaymire@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: RE: today's media advisory

I agree. I’ll plan to take that angle in the press release.

I can’t believe they didn’t tell the mayor the report was comng out today or that the governor would be in
town. That’s just simple courtesy.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:16 AM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>; Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>;
kweaver@cityofflint.com; Matt Ward <matt.ward@strategiesdc.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

I also think we need to start including something about how the governor is making all these plans for
Flint, WITHOUT the input from the Mayor and her staff.

We had no idea about the 75 point plan, until the press release came out. We had no idea about this
meeting and that he was in town, until the release came out. I think all this shows he's really not interested
in working collaboratively with the Mayor and therefore not serious about doing what's best for Flint.​

Also, a number of things included in his plan for Flint, are programs etc. that have been in the works for
months. Nothing new started by him. He's just taking credit for them to make it seem like he's making things
happen. He's not.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com> wrote:

Hi, Kristin.

I’d suggest just getting out the advisory now with the two addresses. We can always mention in
tomorrow’s advisory that a third house was done, if there is one.

Also, I’m going to write a press release on the Flint Water Advisory Task Force report being released
right now. The report criticizes the use of emergency managers and places new blame on the Michigan
Department of Health and Human Services, along with MDEQ, for the lead-tainted pipes and the
Legionnaire’s disease outbreak. I’ll plan to have that to you early this afternoon for you and the mayor to
review.

Kathy

From: Kristin Moore [mailto:kmoore@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 9:03 AM
To: Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com>
Cc: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
Subject: Re: today's media advisory

Thank. I just saw the email from Gen. McDaniel. Looks like Genesee is not yet a sure thing.

But, the others are as far as you know?

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
kmoore@cityofflint.com

On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 8:29 AM, Andrea Kerbuski <akerbuski@martinwaymire.com> wrote:
Hi Kristin,

I attached word and PDF versions of today’s MA with the three sites receiving pipe replacements.

Thank you!

Andrea
Subject: FWICC Items for 4.29 meeting
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 4/27/2016 5:52 PM
To: "'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us'" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Creagh, Keith (DEQ)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, 'Marc
Edwards' <edwardsm@vt.edu>, "'Mona Hanna-Attisha'" <MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, "Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)"
<KhouriN@michigan.gov>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>,
"'jim@koskiconsult.com'" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Becker, Timothy (DHHS)" <beckert1@michigan.gov>,
'Lawrence Reynolds' <lrey52@gmail.com>, "'Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)'" <lsulliva@kettering.edu>,
"'mvalacak@gchd.us'" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "'Karen Weaver - City of Flint (kweaver@cityofflint.com)'"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)" <WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "'Michael McDaniel
(fastflint2016@gmail.com)'" <fastflint2016@gmail.com>, 'Scott Hiipakka' <shiipakka@gmail.com>, "Baird, Richard
(GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Weise, Kevin (GOV)" <WeiseK@michigan.gov>, "Guerrant, Kyle (MDE)"
<GuerrantK@michigan.gov>, "Lord, Daniel (DNR)" <LordD1@michigan.gov>, "Adler, Ari (GOV)"
<AdlerA@michigan.gov>, "'sjones@cityofflint.com'" <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)"
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>, "'sbranch@cityofflint.com'" <sbranch@cityofflint.com>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)"
<ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "'Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)'" <vvanburen@cityofflint.com>
CC: "'Bishop, Melissa'" <MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ)" <THELENM2@michigan.gov>,
"Garza, Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)" <DoyleM4@michigan.gov>,
"Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)" <GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>, "Granger, Patricia (DHHS)" <GrangerP@michigan.gov>,
"'mmurray@cityofflint.com'" <mmurray@cityofflint.com>, "Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>,
"Houseman, Jennifer (MDE)" <HousemanJ1@michigan.gov>, "Burton, Diane (LARA)" <BurtonD2@michigan.gov>,
"Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)" <wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>, "Biehl, Laura (GOV)" <BiehlL@michigan.gov>,
"Bedan, Morgan (GOV)" <BedanM@michigan.gov>, "Saunders, Kelli (GOV)" <saundersk1@michigan.gov>

Greetings,

Attached is the agenda for this Friday’s FWICC meeting and the draft Lead Copper Rules Resolution that will be
discussed under New Business.

Please note this week ONLY the meeting will be held at the Genesee County Community Action Resource Department
(GCCARD) Building in Flint. The building is located at 601 N. Saginaw between University Avenue and Fourth
Avenue.

The parking lot is behind the building and can be entered from University Avenue or Fourth Avenue. The building
entrance is located off the parking lot.

Best regards,

~Stacie

Stacie Clayton, Assistant Director
Harvey Hollins III, Director

Governor’s Office of Urban Initiatives

3044 West Grand Boulevard, Ste. 14-650

Detroit, MI 48202

313.456.4994 (office)

claytons3@michigan.gov

Attachments-3/FWICC Agenda for 4.29.16.pdf
Attachments-3/FWICC LCR Resolution 2016-04 Final 4.29.16.pdf
Subject: Re: Request for Mackinac Panel Call
From: "Saunders, Kelli (GOV)" <saundersk1@michigan.gov>
Date: 5/30/2016 3:09 PM
To: Wendy Nodge <wnodge@detroitchamber.com>
CC: "LMaxwell@mott.org" <LMaxwell@mott.org>, "Mmurrray@cityofflint.com" <Mmurrray@cityofflint.com>,
"Rwhite@mott.org" <Rwhite@mott.org>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Tammy
Carnrike <tcarnrik@detroitchamber.com>, Sandra McGuire <smcguire@detroitchamber.com>

Wednesday is better for the Lt. Governor and he can do any time in that time frame.

Tomorrow we are booked solid.

Thank you,

Kelli

Sent from my iPhone

On May 30, 2016, at 3:06 PM, Wendy Nodge
<wnodge@detroitchamber.com<mailto:wnodge@detroitchamber.com>> wrote:

Happy Memorial Day!

We are looking forward to having Lt. Governor Calley, Mayor Weaver and Mr. White participate in the
“Government and Philanthropy Working Together to Help Flint Recover and Rise” session at the Detroit
Regional Chamber Mackinac Policy Conference. The session is confirmed for Thursday afternoon from 2:25
– 3:00 p.m. at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.

I apologize for the short notice, but I need to schedule a 15-20 minute conference call for the panel
participants for either tomorrow, May 31st or Wednesday, June 1. Please let me know availability during
any of the following times:

Tuesday
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Wednesday
8 a.m. – 10 a.m.

Once I have your feedback, I will confirm and provide call information.

Please let me know your availability as soon as possible.

Many thanks,

Wendy

Wendy K. Nodge
Senior Director, Signature Events
Detroit Regional Chamber
(313) 596-0336
www.detroitchamber.com<http://www.detroitchamber.com>

This Internet message may contain information that is privileged, confidential, and exempt from disclosure.
It is intended for use only by the person to whom it is addressed. If you have received this in error, please
(1) do not forward or use this information in any way: and (2) contact me immediately. Neither this
information block, the typed name of the sender, nor anything else in this message is intended to constitute
an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message
Subject: Request for Mackinac Panel Call
From: Wendy Nodge <wnodge@detroitchamber.com>
Date: 5/30/2016 3:05 PM
To: "LMaxwell@mott.org" <LMaxwell@mott.org>, "Mmurrray@cityofflint.com" <Mmurrray@cityofflint.com>,
"saundersk1@michigan.gov" <saundersk1@michigan.gov>
CC: "Rwhite@mott.org" <Rwhite@mott.org>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>,
Tammy Carnrike <tcarnrik@detroitchamber.com>, Sandra McGuire <smcguire@detroitchamber.com>

Happy Memorial Day!

We are looking forward to having Lt. Governor Calley, Mayor Weaver and Mr. White participate in the
“Government and Philanthropy Working Together to Help Flint Recover and Rise” session at the Detroit
Regional Chamber Mackinac Policy Conference. The session is confirmed for Thursday afternoon from 2:25
– 3:00 p.m. at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.

I apologize for the short notice, but I need to schedule a 15-20 minute conference call for the panel
participants for either tomorrow, May 31st or Wednesday, June 1. Please let me know availability during
any of the following times:

Tuesday

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Wednesday

8 a.m. – 10 a.m.

Once I have your feedback, I will confirm and provide call information.

Please let me know your availability as soon as possible.

Many thanks,

Wendy
Wendy K. Nodge

Senior Director, Signature Events

Detroit Regional Chamber

(313) 596-0336

www.detroitchamber.com

This Internet message may contain information that is privileged, confidential, and exempt from disclosure.
It is intended for use only by the person to whom it is addressed. If you have received this in error, please
(1) do not forward or use this information in any way: and (2) contact me immediately. Neither this
information block, the typed name of the sender, nor anything else in this message is intended to constitute
an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message
Subject: RE: Request for Mackinac Panel Call
From: Wendy Nodge <wnodge@detroitchamber.com>
Date: 5/31/2016 11:09 AM
To: "Mmurrray@cityofflint.com" <Mmurrray@cityofflint.com>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>
CC: Tammy Carnrike <tcarnrik@detroitchamber.com>

Good morning,

I am just following back up to determine Mayor Weaver’s availability for a call. I have heard back from LT.
Governor and Mr. White and they are both available tomorrow morning between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. for a
20 minute call. Any chance you are available at this time?

Please advise and I will send a message back out to the group.

Thank you!

Wendy

From: Wendy Nodge
Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 3:06 PM
To: 'LMaxwell@mott.org'; 'Mmurrray@cityofflint.com'; 'saundersk1@michigan.gov'
Cc: 'Rwhite@mott.org'; 'kweaver@cityofflint.com'; Tammy Carnrike; Sandra McGuire
Subject: Request for Mackinac Panel Call
Importance: High

Happy Memorial Day!

We are looking forward to having Lt. Governor Calley, Mayor Weaver and Mr. White participate in the
“Government and Philanthropy Working Together to Help Flint Recover and Rise” session at the Detroit
Regional Chamber Mackinac Policy Conference. The session is confirmed for Thursday afternoon from 2:25
– 3:00 p.m. at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.

I apologize for the short notice, but I need to schedule a 15-20 minute conference call for the panel
participants for either tomorrow, May 31st or Wednesday, June 1. Please let me know availability during
any of the following times:

Tuesday
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Wednesday

8 a.m. – 10 a.m.

Once I have your feedback, I will confirm and provide call information.

Please let me know your availability as soon as possible.

Many thanks,

Wendy

Wendy K. Nodge

Senior Director, Signature Events

Detroit Regional Chamber

(313) 596-0336

www.detroitchamber.com

This Internet message may contain information that is privileged, confidential, and exempt from disclosure.
It is intended for use only by the person to whom it is addressed. If you have received this in error, please
(1) do not forward or use this information in any way: and (2) contact me immediately. Neither this
information block, the typed name of the sender, nor anything else in this message is intended to constitute
an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message
Subject: Meeting in Green Room at 11:30 a.m. - Mackinac Panel
From: Wendy Nodge <wnodge@detroitchamber.com>
Date: 6/2/2016 12:41 AM
To: "Rwhite@mott.org" <Rwhite@mott.org>, "cmacsam@gmail.com" <cmacsam@gmail.com>,
"saundersk1@michigan.gov" <saundersk1@michigan.gov>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>
CC: Tammy Carnrike <tcarnrik@detroitchamber.com>, Sandra McGuire <smcguire@detroitchamber.com>,
"Mmurrray@cityofflint.com" <Mmurrray@cityofflint.com>, "LMaxwell@mott.org" <LMaxwell@mott.org>

Good evening,

Please plan to join your fellow panelists tomorrow morning in the Green room for a final briefing at 11:30
a.m.

Many thanks,

Wendy

Sent from my iPad

On May 30, 2016, at 3:05 PM, Wendy Nodge <wnodge@detroitchamber.com> wrote:

> Happy Memorial Day!
>
>
>
> We are looking forward to having Lt. Governor Calley, Mayor Weaver and Mr. White participate in the
“Government and Philanthropy Working Together to Help Flint Recover and Rise” session at the Detroit
Regional Chamber Mackinac Policy Conference. The session is confirmed for Thursday afternoon from 2:25
– 3:00 p.m. at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island.
>
>
>
> I apologize for the short notice, but I need to schedule a 15-20 minute conference call for the panel
participants for either tomorrow, May 31st or Wednesday, June 1. Please let me know availability during
any of the following times:
>
>
>
> Tuesday
>
> 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
>
> 2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
>
>
>
> Wednesday
>
> 8 a.m. – 10 a.m.
>
>
>
> Once I have your feedback, I will confirm and provide call information.
>
>
>
> Please let me know your availability as soon as possible.
>
>
>
> Many thanks,
>
>
>
> Wendy
>
>
>
>
>
> Wendy K. Nodge
>
> Senior Director, Signature Events
>
> Detroit Regional Chamber
>
> (313) 596-0336
>
> www.detroitchamber.com
>
>
This Internet message may contain information that is privileged, confidential, and exempt from disclosure.
It is intended for use only by the person to whom it is addressed. If you have received this in error, please
(1) do not forward or use this information in any way: and (2) contact me immediately. Neither this
information block, the typed name of the sender, nor anything else in this message is intended to constitute
an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message
Subject: Special Edition: Thursday Afternoon Wraps up with Soledad O'Brien, Flint Panel Discussion and Rick
Snyder
From: eDetroiter Weekly <members@detroitchamber.com>
Date: 6/2/2016 10:59 PM
To: kweaver@cityofflint.com

Pipes and jobs – these are the two main objective Flint leaders are focusing on both in the short and long-
term to address the water crisis and help the city rise.
Click here if you are having trouble viewing this message.
Special Edition of the eDetroiter at the Mackinac Policy Conference
Flint Session Focuses on Immediate Recovery, Economic Growth
Pipes and jobs – these are the two main objectives Flint leaders are focusing on both in the short and long-
term to address the water crisis and help the city rise. Gathering on Michigan’s Center Stage, Flint Mayor
Karen Weaver and Charles Stewart (C.S.) Mott Foundation President Ridgway White were joined by Lt. Gov.
Brian Calley. The session focused on the ways in which they are partnering together to build trust and a
better future for Flint’s residents. Read more about the future of Flint.

Snyder: Let’s Write State’s Next Chapter as “One Michigan”
During Michigan’s “Lost Decade,” the state sometimes seemed fated to continue its economic decline.
However, a dramatic reinvention, under the leadership of Gov. Rick Snyder, helped create more than
460,000 private-sector jobs and write a new comeback story for Michigan. Today, Snyder used his keynote
address to look to the future, urging Conference attendees to overcome divisions, find solutions and write
the state’s next chapter together, as “One Michigan.” Read more from the Governor's keynote.

WATCH: Soledad O'Brien Delivers Mackinac Moment on Race in America
Starfish Media Group CEO Soledad O’Brien speaks to the discomfort, yet need, to discuss race in America,
what she considers the “elephant” in America’s room. Watch the full video online.

Detroit 67 Panel: The Test for Detroit’s Viability is Inclusiveness
As the 50th anniversary of Detroit’s 1967 civil unrest approaches, business and community leaders must be
willing to have tough conversations in order to better understand that moment in time and the underlying
issues of opportunity in order to move forward inclusively. Moderated by Soledad O'Brien, the panel included
Rev. Wendell Anthony, president of NAACP-Detroit, Xavier de Souza Briggs, vice president of economic
opportunity and markets at the Ford Foundation, Sheila Cockrel, president of Crossroads Consulting and
Communications Group, and Sebastian Jackson, founder of The Social Club Grooming Co. Read more from
the Detroit 67 panel.

Education Experts: Reform Needed Now as Michigan Students Fall Behind
Drawing on best practices from programs across the country, education experts Kati Haycock, CEO of The
Education Trust; and Michael Sentance, education reform consultant and a former education secretary for
Massachusetts, issued a stern warning that Michigan’s students are falling behind and major reform is
needed. Read more about the panel, moderated by Stephen Henderson, editorial page editor for the Detroit
Free Press.

Chamber Announces Stephen Polk as the 2017 Mackinac Policy Conference Chair
Today, the Detroit Regional Chamber announced automotive expert, philanthropist and Highgate CEO
Stephen Polk as Chair of the 2017 Mackinac Policy Conference. Archer Corporate Services’ President and
2016 Conference Chair Dennis Archer Jr. made the announcement from the main stage. Read the full
announcement online.

Follow the Chamber on Social Media

News Coverage
Detroit Free Press: Flint mayor at Mackinac conference: 'People don't want to leave'

WXYZ: Rhodes: Detroit schools need to bring back some of the 27,000 suburban students who live in city
Detroit Hub Blog: Q&A: Mackinac Policy Conference keynote Ron Fournier on Trump, the Flint crisis and
Loving That Boy

The Detroit News: Snyder: 'Huge disaster' looms without DPS rescue

Gov. Rick Snyder focuses on 'big picture' in re-writing state's future
Tweets of the Day
@emilyjanelawler: "Let’s solve the water situation but let’s strengthen all of Flint," says @onetoughnerd at
#MPC16

@JGallagherFreep: Sheila Cockrel: '67 events were rebellion, not riots, prompted by outrageous police
brutality and lack of jobs #mpc16 #freep

@rossmanmckinney: .@TheSharkDaymond is a true entrepreneur sharing his @FUBUnyc story - based on his
Mom's guidance and his own gut instincts. #MPC16

@detroitchamber: Fathom, an underwater drone, is expected tor retail at $600 - making it the most
affordable product of its type #MPC16

@MiWeek: What is YOUR Coronary artery calcium score? @drjkahn explains its importance at #MPC16:
http://mivote.org

@BBBBoss48076: #MPC16 70% of everything a soldier shoots, drives, flies, wears, eats & communicates
w/is contracted in MI. Awesome!
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email lists. To manage which emails you receive, please visit the Email Preferences page.
Unsubscribe
Subject: Fwd: WRDA PR draft
From: "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>
Date: 9/8/2016 2:19 PM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Sylvester Jones <sjones@cityofflint.com>, Steven Branch
<sbranch@cityofflint.com>

I am told that this will not drop til next week. Here is what we will say when it does.

Rich

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Heaton, Anna (GOV)" <HeatonA@michigan.gov>
Date: Sep 8, 2016 12:26 PM
Subject: WRDA PR draft
To: "Agen, Jarrod (GOV)" <AgenJ@michigan.gov>,"Emmitt, Beth (GOV)" <emmittb@michigan.gov>,"Sachs,
Tori (GOV)" <SachsT@michigan.gov>,"Walsh, John (GOV)" <WalshJ@michigan.gov>,"Baird, Richard
(GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>,"Mcbride, Bill (GOV)" <mcbrideb@michigan.gov>,"Brown, Eric (GOV)"
<BrownE15@michigan.gov>,"Posthumus, Dick (GOV)" <Posthumusd@michigan.gov>,"Zimmer, Mike (GOV)"
<ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>,"Calley, Brian (GOV)" <calleyb11@michigan.gov>
Cc: "Adler, Ari (GOV)" <AdlerA@michigan.gov>,"Paciorek, Josh (GOV)" <Paciorekj@michigan.gov>

We are planning to send this following Senate approval (fingers crossed!) of the WRDA bill today. Please let
me know if anything needs to be changed – I am planning to share with the Governor at 3:30.

Gov. Rick Snyder thanks U.S. Senate for passage of measure that includes aid for Flint

Governor worked with key senators, staff on approval of Water Resources Development Act over past nine
months

LANSING, Mich. – Gov. Rick Snyder today thanked the U.S. Senate for passage of the Water Resources
Development Act, which includes millions of dollars for water infrastructure funding for Flint and other cities
nationwide.

"I greatly appreciate the Senate’s action today in approving funding for Flint’s water infrastructure to
complement the state’s efforts,” Snyder said. “Federal, state and local officials continuing to work together
are going to help restore Flint and help the people of Flint recover.”

The governor has spoken with Sen. Inhofe, R-Okla., who chairs the Senate Environment and Public Works
Committee, to discuss the remaining needs in Flint and how this funding will benefit residents. The
Governor’s Office has worked closely with the committee since January to put together a bill package to
complement the state’s ongoing efforts to address infrastructure in Flint. State officials also worked with
Congressional committee staff who visited Flint last week, which helped spur movement of the funding bill.

The city of Flint has been allocated $27 million to date from state taxpayers to replace lead service lines in
the city. This is part of the total of $234 million committed by the state to provide health care services and
clean water resources for residents of Flint.

Resources from the federal WRDA bill will help with other infrastructure improvements, and include:

· $100 million for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF), available for use in states which
have an emergency declaration under the Stafford Act related to contaminants in drinking water.

· $70 million in Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation (WIFIA) Fund credit subsidies, which
would ultimately provide up to $700 million in secured financing for water infrastructure projects nationwide.

· Debt forgiveness available to any state with an emergency declaration under the Stafford Act due to
contaminants in drinking water to forgive outstanding debt on DWSRF loans incurred prior to this fiscal year.

· $50 million for public health initiatives, including: a health registry to monitor health in a community
with lead contamination in the local drinking water system; an advisory committee to review federal efforts
related to lead poisoning; the CDC Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Fund; the HUD Healthy Homes
Program, and the HHS Healthy Start Initiative.

####

Anna Heaton

Press Secretary, Gov. Rick Snyder

o: 517-241-6049│c: 517-242-2187

@Republicanna
Subject: Re: Flint Community Schools Ribbon Cutting, Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:00 a.m.
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 10/31/2016 1:33 PM
To: "Tracey Shavers Jr." <tshavers@lambert-edwards.com>
BCC: kweaver@cityofflint.com

Hello Tracey,

Thank you for inviting the Mayor to attend the ribbon cutting event Thursday. The opening of this new early
learning childhood center is great news for the City of Flint. Unfortunately, because of the short notice the
Mayor already has another commitment.

Thanks again for reaching out. Have a great event Thursday.

Kristin Moore
Public Relations Director
City of Flint
Office: (810) 237-2039
Cell: (810) 875-2576
Website: https://www.cityofflint.com/

On Mon, Oct 31, 2016 at 9:44 AM, Tracey Shavers Jr. <tshavers@lambert-edwards.com> wrote:

Hello Kristin,

By way of introduction my name is Tracey Shavers and I work with Flint Community Schools (and the Flint
& Genesee Chamber of Commerce) providing PR support.

Elaine Redd from FGCC provided me with your contact information as FCS will be holding a ribbon cutting
ceremony on Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. for Cummings Great Expectations, An Early
Childhood Center.

It would be great if Mayor Weaver could attend and say a few words as representatives from the State,
Genesee County ISD, Michigan Department of Education and Senators from the area have been invited.

We understand this is rather short notice but feel it is important that we extend an opportunity for our
local leadership to have a presence at this awesome event.

Please feel free to contact me should you have questions.

Thank you,
Tracey

______________________________________________________
Tracey L. Shavers Jr., Senior Associate
Lambert, Edwards & Associates
313-309-9505 p | 248-864-6874 c
Tshavers@lambert-edwards.com
Detroit | Lansing | Grand Rapids
PROI Worldwide partner | Crain’s “Cool places to work”
lambert-edwards.com f_logo (1)twitter-bird-white-on-blueyt-brand-standard-logo-630px

***CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail message including attachments, if any, is intended for the
person or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. If you are
not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the original
message.***

FCS Logo

October 31, 2016

Greetings,

On behalf of Flint Community School students, staff, and administrators, it is with great pleasure that I
extend to you an invitation to attend the ribbon cutting ceremony for Cummings Great Expectations, An Early
Childhood Center. This event will be held on Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. and will be located
at G-2200 Walton Ave. in Flint, Michigan. A tour of the school will be conducted after the ceremony.

Formerly Cummings Elementary School, the new building officially reopened today, following extensive
renovations, as Cummings Great Expectations, An Early Childhood Center, a hub for early childhood
education services. The new program is serving more than 200 children and is free of charge to Flint
families. Additionally, the site will serve as a center to identify and address the educational, behavioral and
health needs of children ages two months to five years.

We will celebrate the opening with Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley and program partners from the
Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, Pritzker Children’s Initiative and University of Michigan-Flint, among
others.

The benefits of early childhood education are far-reaching and extremely important to the foundation of
lifelong learning. We would be delighted if you could share in our enthusiasm for continued excellence in
education and community building.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.
Educationally Yours,

Bilal K. Tawwab

Superintendent

Flint Community Schools
Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of
all
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 11/17/2016 1:59 PM
To: "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, 'Marc Edwards' <edwardsm@vt.edu>, 'Mona Hanna-
Attisha' <MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, "'Sylvester Jones'" <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)"
<KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)" <KhouriN@michigan.gov>,
"'jim@koskiconsult.com'" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)" <LyonN2@michigan.gov>,
'Lawrence Reynolds' <lrey52@gmail.com>, "'Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)'"
<lsulliva@kettering.edu>, "'mvalacak@gchd.us'" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "'Karen Weaver - City of Flint
(kweaver@cityofflint.com)'" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)"
<WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "'Michael McDaniel
(fastflint2016@gmail.com)'" <fastflint2016@gmail.com>, "'Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)'"
<vvanburen@cityofflint.com>, "'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us'" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Hollins, Harvey
(GOV)" <hollinsh@michigan.gov>
CC: "Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR)" <TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>, 'Schuyler Davis' <sdavis@cityofflint.com>, "Garza,
Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)" <DoyleM4@michigan.gov>,
"Richards, Denise (DHHS)" <richardsd@michigan.gov>, 'Maxine Murray' <mmurray@cityofflint.com>,
"Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>, "Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)"
<wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>, "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "'Bishop, Melissa'"
<MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>,
"Scorsone, Eric (TREASURY)" <ScorsoneE@michigan.gov>, "Manolakoudis, Virginia (GOV)"
<ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>

NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of all

Greetings FWICC Members,

As you may recall, FWICC supported the Flint Water Advisory Task Force recommendation to re-establish the
Michigan Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Commission. On May 20, 2016, Governor
Snyder signed Executive Order 2016-9 establishing the Michigan Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board,
chaired by Lt. Governor Calley.

Today the Commission released its report and recommendations. We will have a presentation on the final
report and its recommendations at our December FWICC meeting. In the meantime, below is the news
release with a link to the report.

COMM News Release

Contacts:
Laura Biehl, Lt. Governor’s Office
517-335-6397

Jen Eisner, DHHS
517-241-2112

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of all
Calley unveils recommendations of Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board

LANSING, Mich. – In order to eliminate child lead exposure in Michigan, a greater focus on primary
prevention tactics will be crucial for success, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said today.

Gov. Rick Snyder formed the Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board in May to design a long-term strategy
for addressing child lead exposure and poisoning in Michigan. Snyder appointed Calley to chair the board and
asked for recommendations by November.

“The impact of lead exposure on a child can be life-altering. By taking a proactive and coordinated statewide
approach, we can begin targeting lead hazards instead of relying on reactive tactics after a child has been
exposed,” Calley said.

The board developed a comprehensive roadmap that included both primary and secondary prevention
strategies within five key areas:

· Testing of children for elevated blood lead levels;

· Follow-up monitoring and services, including case management;

· Environmental lead investigations;

· Remediation and abatement; and

· Dashboards and reporting.

The report includes more than 100 recommendations to address these issues including:

· Require that all children are tested for lead poisoning between 9 and 12 months and 24 to 36 months
of age.

· Ensure that all medical professionals caring for children receive professional education regarding lead
testing and elevated blood lead level management.

· Develop and manage a centralized data and reporting system to track cases of children with elevated
blood levels to determine which follow-up services should be or are being provided.

· Support continued research and development of policies for water testing in homes and interpreting
the results.

· Adopt a consistent, statewide code enforcement model that is proactive and addresses exposure from
lead-based paint and its causes.

· Convene a meeting to discuss updating federal regulations affecting remediation and abatement with
Environmental Protection Agency and Housing and Urban Development officials.

· Collaborate with state departments to increase the lead abatement workforce in Michigan.

· Broaden training and outreach to homeowners and tenants regarding lead safety on home projects,
health effects of lead exposure and availability of testing and remediation options.

· Explore under what conditions the state could publish addresses of homes that have historically been
locations where poisoned children and/or lead hazards were identified to prevent further exposure.

· Require information on lead testing and lead poisoning levels to be widely disseminated.

· Create a permanent commission that will work with all stakeholders to coordinate child lead exposure
elimination efforts across the state.

· Utilize existing programs whose primary focus may not be lead elimination to support efforts to reduce
exposure risk.

· Develop protocols for improving collection of data, data analysis and data sharing to better identify
risks of lead exposure.

· Create pilot programs to assess primary prevention practices in local communities and assess the
impact on child lead exposure rates.

· Develop protocols to identify residence “hot zones” where young children are being exposed to lead
and implement these protocols across Michigan.

The board included individuals with various professional backgrounds to provide a solid cross-section of
support, including Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha of Hurley Children’s Hospital and Michigan State University in
Flint.

“Current blood screening practices create gaps in data and can miss groups of exposed children. Testing
every child in the state is the best way to identify exposure and then to target elimination,” Hanna-Attisha
said.

To download the full report, visit Michigan.gov/calley.

#

CLPEB Report.pdf
Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed
efforts of all
From: Maxine Murray <mmurray@cityofflint.com>
Date: 11/18/2016 11:10 AM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Maxine Murray
Executive Assistant to
Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, MI 48502
810.237.2035 Telephone
810.766.7218 Fax

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Clayton, Stacie (GOV) <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: Thu, Nov 17, 2016 at 1:59 PM
Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of
all
To: "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, Marc Edwards <edwardsm@vt.edu>, Mona Hanna-
Attisha <MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, Sylvester Jones <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)"
<KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)" <KhouriN@michigan.gov>,
"jim@koskiconsult.com" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)" <LyonN2@michigan.gov>,
Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>, "Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)"
<lsulliva@kettering.edu>, "mvalacak@gchd.us" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "Karen Weaver - City of Flint
(kweaver@cityofflint.com)" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)"
<WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "Michael McDaniel
(fastflint2016@gmail.com)" <fastflint2016@gmail.com>, "Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)"
<vvanburen@cityofflint.com>, "jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Hollins, Harvey
(GOV)" <hollinsh@michigan.gov>
Cc: "Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR)" <TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>, Schuyler Davis <sdavis@cityofflint.com>, "Garza,
Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)" <DoyleM4@michigan.gov>,
"Richards, Denise (DHHS)" <richardsd@michigan.gov>, Maxine Murray <mmurray@cityofflint.com>,
"Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>, "Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)"
<wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>, "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Bishop, Melissa"
<MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>,
"Scorsone, Eric (TREASURY)" <ScorsoneE@michigan.gov>, "Manolakoudis, Virginia (GOV)"
<ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>

Greetings FWICC Members,

As you may recall, FWICC supported the Flint Water Advisory Task Force recommendation to re-establish the
Michigan Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Commission. On May 20, 2016, Governor
Snyder signed Executive Order 2016-9 establishing the Michigan Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board,
chaired by Lt. Governor Calley.

Today the Commission released its report and recommendations. We will have a presentation on the final
report and its recommendations at our December FWICC meeting. In the meantime, below is the news
release with a link to the report.
COMM News Release

Contacts:
Laura Biehl, Lt. Governor’s Office
517-335-6397

Jen Eisner, DHHS
517-241-2112

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of all

Calley unveils recommendations of Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board

LANSING, Mich. – In order to eliminate child lead exposure in Michigan, a greater focus on primary
prevention tactics will be crucial for success, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said today.

Gov. Rick Snyder formed the Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board in May to design a long-term strategy
for addressing child lead exposure and poisoning in Michigan. Snyder appointed Calley to chair the board and
asked for recommendations by November.

“The impact of lead exposure on a child can be life-altering. By taking a proactive and coordinated statewide
approach, we can begin targeting lead hazards instead of relying on reactive tactics after a child has been
exposed,” Calley said.

The board developed a comprehensive roadmap that included both primary and secondary prevention
strategies within five key areas:

· Testing of children for elevated blood lead levels;

· Follow-up monitoring and services, including case management;

· Environmental lead investigations;

· Remediation and abatement; and

· Dashboards and reporting.

The report includes more than 100 recommendations to address these issues including:

· Require that all children are tested for lead poisoning between 9 and 12 months and 24 to 36 months
of age.

· Ensure that all medical professionals caring for children receive professional education regarding lead
testing and elevated blood lead level management.

· Develop and manage a centralized data and reporting system to track cases of children with elevated
blood levels to determine which follow-up services should be or are being provided.

· Support continued research and development of policies for water testing in homes and interpreting
the results.

· Adopt a consistent, statewide code enforcement model that is proactive and addresses exposure from
lead-based paint and its causes.
· Convene a meeting to discuss updating federal regulations affecting remediation and abatement with
Environmental Protection Agency and Housing and Urban Development officials.

· Collaborate with state departments to increase the lead abatement workforce in Michigan.

· Broaden training and outreach to homeowners and tenants regarding lead safety on home projects,
health effects of lead exposure and availability of testing and remediation options.

· Explore under what conditions the state could publish addresses of homes that have historically been
locations where poisoned children and/or lead hazards were identified to prevent further exposure.

· Require information on lead testing and lead poisoning levels to be widely disseminated.

· Create a permanent commission that will work with all stakeholders to coordinate child lead exposure
elimination efforts across the state.

· Utilize existing programs whose primary focus may not be lead elimination to support efforts to reduce
exposure risk.

· Develop protocols for improving collection of data, data analysis and data sharing to better identify
risks of lead exposure.

· Create pilot programs to assess primary prevention practices in local communities and assess the
impact on child lead exposure rates.

· Develop protocols to identify residence “hot zones” where young children are being exposed to lead
and implement these protocols across Michigan.

The board included individuals with various professional backgrounds to provide a solid cross-section of
support, including Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha of Hurley Children’s Hospital and Michigan State University in
Flint.

“Current blood screening practices create gaps in data and can miss groups of exposed children. Testing
every child in the state is the best way to identify exposure and then to target elimination,” Hanna-Attisha
said.

To download the full report, visit Michigan.gov/calley.

#

CLPEB Report.pdf
Subject: Water Crisis Outreach
From: Handy Lindsey <hlindsey@ruthmott.org>
Date: 11/22/2016 5:00 PM
To: "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Dear Mayor Weaver,

As I am sure you have been informed by Steve Branch, since May the Ruth Mott Foundation in partnership
with the United Way, Community Foundation of Greater Flint and the U of Michigan-Flint has been convening
residents, nonprofit leaders and state government officials as we learned there were still families in Flint
who were unaware of the severity of the public health emergency–and they were still drinking unfiltered tap
water. Our concern led to the conduct of a pilot project in the Civic Park neighborhood that we called the
“What To Know and Do About Water” project. The pilot project included a water information expo that took
place in July, door to door canvasing of the hardest to reach Civic Park residents about their needs for
information and services, and water/filter distribution which has continued weekly through November. We
have produced a report on this project and sent it to Governor Rick Snyder accompanied by a letter urging
him to consider the report’s recommendations which would insure that every Flint resident has access to safe
water. As I thought you would like to be aware of this effort, I have attached both the report and the letter
to Governor Snyder to this email. Please let me know if you have any questions and I would be pleased to
respond. Thank you for your attention.

Best regards,

Handy

Handy Lindsey Jr.

President
Ruth Mott Foundation/Applewood
111 E. Court Street, Suite 3C
Flint, MI 48502
(810) 233-0170
www.ruthmottfoundation.org

Ruth Mott Foundation Applewood

facebook

flickr

YouTube

Attachments-4/Letter to Gov Snyder 11 2016.pdf
Attachments-4/Water Project Final Report_final.pdf
Subject: Tim Herman - Evaluation
From: "Rummel, Robert" <robert.rummel@chase.com>
Date: 12/5/2016 9:56 AM
To: "'steve.landaal@landaal.com'" <steve.landaal@landaal.com>, "'jserra@serrausa.com'"
<jserra@serrausa.com>, "'garyh@mgt.div.com'" <garyh@mgt.div.com>, "'jeffrey.lamarche@gm.com'"
<jeffrey.lamarche@gm.com>, "'cpierce@hamiltonchn.org'" <cpierce@hamiltonchn.org>,
"'b.walkergriffea@mcc.edu'" <b.walkergriffea@mcc.edu>, "'kweaver@cityofflint.com'"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "'myoung@co.genesee.mi.us'" <myoung@co.genesee.mi.us>,
"'don.kooy@mclaren.org'" <don.kooy@mclaren.org>, "'tshade@lewis-knopf.com'" <tshade@lewis-
knopf.com>, "'jworthing@genpackaging.com'" <jworthing@genpackaging.com>
CC: "Rummel, Robert" <robert.rummel@chase.com>, "VanCamp, Cathy" <cathy.vancamp@chase.com>

Members of the FGCC Operating Board,

It is that time of year to evaluate Tim Herman’s performance. I have attached for your review a number of
documents that will assist you in your evaluation, including Tim’s self-assessment and a listing of Chamber
accomplishments over the past year. I am asking each of you to take a few minutes to review the
information and complete the FGCC CEO Evaluation form no later than this Friday, December 9th. Please
return your completed CEO Evaluation form via email to my Assistant Cathy VanCamp at
cathy.vancamp@chase.com.

Thank you for taking the time to help in evaluating Tim’s performance.

Bob

Robert L. Rummel / Michigan Market Manager, Senior Vice President / Chase Business Banking

( Office: 810-237-3740 / Ê Fax: 810-237-3768 / › Email: robert.rummel@chase.com

For excellent service log on to www.chase.com or call our Business Platinum Line @ 877-425-8100.

This transmission may contain information that is proprietary, privileged, confidential, and/or exempt from
disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any
disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein (including any reliance thereon)
is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this transmission in error, please immediately contact the sender
and destroy the material in its entirety, whether in electronic or hard copy format. Although this transmission
and any attachments are believed to be free of any virus or other defect that might affect any computer
system into which it is received and opened, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that it is virus
free and no responsibility is accepted by JPMorgan Chase & Co., its subsidiaries and affiliates (collectively,
"JPMC"), as applicable, for any loss or damage arising in any way from its use. Please note that any
electronic communication that is conducted within or through JPMC's system is subject to interception,
monitoring, review, retention and external production; may be stored or otherwise processed in countries
other than the country in which you are located; and will be treated in accordance with JPMC's policies and
applicable laws and regulations.
Attachments-5/Final Bob Rummel Letter.pdf
Attachments-5/990 Report 2011 - 2015.xlsx
Attachments-5/2016 Chamber Accomplishments.docx
Attachments-5/Chamber Activity Related to Water Crisis v1A.DOCX
Attachments-5/Self Evaluation Form - 2016.xls
Attachments-5/FGCC-CEO Evaluation Form - 2016-blank.xls
Subject: Flint Water Pilot Project Report
From: "Shaler, Karen (DEQ)" <SHALERK@michigan.gov>
Date: 12/7/2016 11:45 AM
To: "hlindsey@ruthmott.org" <hlindsey@ruthmott.org>, "sborrego@umflint.edu" <sborrego@umflint.edu>,
"khorton@cfgf.org" <khorton@cfgf.org>, "jgaskin@unitedwaygenesee.org" <jgaskin@unitedwaygenesee.org>
CC: "Snyder, Rick (GOV)" <Rick.Snyder@michigan.gov>, "Calley, Brian (GOV)" <Brian.Calley@michigan.gov>,
"kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, "Grether,
Heidi (DEQ)" <GretherH@michigan.gov>, "Wagner, Robert (DEQ)" <WAGNERR1@michigan.gov>, "Epkey, Amy
(DEQ)" <epkeya@michigan.gov>, "Feighner, Bryce (DEQ)" <FEIGHNERB@michigan.gov>, "Krisztian, George
(DEQ)" <krisztiang@michigan.gov>, "Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)" <wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>, "Manolakoudis,
Virginia (GOV)" <ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>, "Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR)" <TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>, "Thelen,
Mary Beth (DEQ)" <THELENM2@michigan.gov>, "Wilcox, Candra (DEQ)" <WilcoxC2@michigan.gov>, "Ruch,
Suzann (DEQ)" <RuchS@michigan.gov>

Good morning,

Please see the attached letter from Department of Natural Resources Director Keith Creagh, which is in response to your
letter dated November 21, 2016, regarding the Flint Water Pilot Project Report. Thank you.

Karen Shaler, Executive Management Assistant to

Program Deputy Director Robert Wagner

Department of Environmental Quality

Constitution Hall, 6th Floor South

Phone: 517-284-6709

Fax: 517-241-7401

shalerk@michigan.gov

Attachments-6/12-7-16 Response - Flint Water Pilot Project Report.pdf
Attachments-6/11-21-16 Letter - Flint Water Pilot Project Report.pdf
Subject: FWICC Agenda for 12.16.16
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 12/14/2016 12:19 PM
To: "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, Marc Edwards <edwardsm@vt.edu>, Mona Hanna-Attisha
<MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, "'Sylvester Jones'" <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)"
<KhouriN@michigan.gov>, "'jim@koskiconsult.com'" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)"
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>, "'Lawrence Reynolds'" <lrey52@gmail.com>, "Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)"
<lsulliva@kettering.edu>, "'mvalacak@gchd.us'" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "Karen Weaver - City of Flint
(kweaver@cityofflint.com)" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)" <WhistonB@michigan.gov>,
"Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "Michael McDaniel (fastflint2016@gmail.com)"
<fastflint2016@gmail.com>, "Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)" <vvanburen@cityofflint.com>,
"'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us'" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "'Bishop, Melissa'" <MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>
CC: "Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ)" <THELENM2@michigan.gov>, "Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR)"
<TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>, "Krisztian, George (DEQ)" <krisztiang@michigan.gov>, 'Schuyler Davis'
<sdavis@cityofflint.com>, "Garza, Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Richards, Denise (DHHS)"
<richardsd@michigan.gov>, "Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)" <GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)"
<DoyleM4@michigan.gov>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>, "Scorsone, Eric
(TREASURY)" <ScorsoneE@michigan.gov>, "'mmurray@cityofflint.com'" <mmurray@cityofflint.com>, "Guerrant,
Kyle (MDE)" <GuerrantK@michigan.gov>, "Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>, "Dempkowski,
Angela (Treasury)" <DempkowskiA@michigan.gov>, "Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)" <wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>,
"Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Manolakoudis, Virginia (GOV)"
<ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>, "Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)" <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>, "Saunders, Kelli (GOV)"
<saundersk1@michigan.gov>, "Heaton, Anna (GOV)" <HeatonA@michigan.gov>, "Biehl, Laura (GOV)"
<BiehlL@michigan.gov>, "Adler, Ari (GOV)" <AdlerA@michigan.gov>, "Weir, Elizabeth (GOV)"
<WeirE@michigan.gov>

Greetings FWICC Members,

Attached is the agenda for this Friday’s meeting. Below is the link in case you would like to review the final report
from the Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/snyder/CLPEB_Report--Final_542618_7.pdf

If you have not done so already, please confirm your attendance. The meeting will be held:

U of M Flint—University Center

Happenings Room

400 Mill Street

Flint, MI 48502-1950

Parking Info: Guests can park in the Mill Street Parking Ramp or surface Lot A outside the Recreation Center (both are
open parking).

We will see you on Friday!

~Stacie

Attachments-7/FWICC Agenda for 12.16.16.pdf
Subject: Fwd: Water Credit
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 12/15/2016 3:39 PM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Office Desktop <Office@grace247.org>
Date: Thu, Dec 15, 2016 at 3:14 PM
Subject: Water Credit
To: MissionFlint@michigan.gov
Cc: brian.calley@michigan.gov, mayor@cityofflint.com, Pastor Gary <garyc@grace247.org>

Dear Rich Baird,

As a Community Leader and Pastor of a church in Flint, I have received several notices about the progress at
what is being done about the water crisis – I would like to share just one area where this effort is failing.

As resident of Flint, we received a water credit but my understanding was that people who lived in Flint
during the water credit refund would also get theirs, even if they no longer live in Flint. What is NOT shared
clearly is HOW to get that credit. When this was first all discussed, I contacted the water department and
was told the credit our account would receive – but the water bill was initially in my mother’s name for part
of that time, even though we paid the bill.

I was told –

· When explaining the situation that it was in Rovena Nitz’s name but we paid the bill, “We have no way
to tell who paid the bill”

· How does she get her refund? “People who are currently residents would get the refund first then
people who have moved”

· “We can’t cut checks for the State, the State will have to refund those who have moved”

What was NOT communicated was that there was an application process on the FLINT website that those
outside of Flint would have to go through (I found out several months after the initial contacting about the
refund) to even start the provess.
On that application, it states that “you will be contacted within four weeks to provide additional information.”
My mother is 85 and sometimes things are forgotten so I have to remind her to look out for the request for
additional information. After the four weeks (around the 4th of November) I called back to the City to ask
about progress and was told that they were only at the beginning of August in regards to applications.
Reminding the person what the website said, I am sure they have changed it. But here is what is damaging
to this “effort”….the customer service representative told me “There is only one gal working on this and she
has additional duties and can only get to it when she can.” Frankly, I find that outrageous. That tells me a
lot about the priority of this effort and getting to people what is their rightful refund – in my mother’s case,
$911!! Not a gracious way to treat a 85 year old LIFE LONG citizen of Flint & Flint Township.

I sincerely you look into this…any of you.

Regards,

Gary Cech

3111 Westwood Pkwy

Flint, MI 48503

GaryC@Grace247.org
Subject: Gentle Reminder: Holiday Giving
From: "Brown, Tiffany (DEQ)" <BrownT22@michigan.gov>
Date: 12/15/2016 1:04 PM
To: "Weise, Kevin (GOV)" <WeiseK@michigan.gov>, "Thompson, Sheryl D. (DHHS)"
<ThompsonS2@michigan.gov>, "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>
CC: "Guerrant, Kyle (MDE)" <GuerrantK@michigan.gov>, "Amiee Evans (MEDC)" <evansa3@michigan.org>,
"Brown, Melanie (TED)" <BrownM45@michigan.gov>, "Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ)"
<THELENM2@michigan.gov>, "Smith, Brenda (MDARD)" <smithbl9@michigan.gov>, "Krisztian, George
(DEQ)" <krisztiang@michigan.gov>, Scott Hiipakka <shiipakka@gmail.com>, "Bankowski, Jeffrey S.
(DTMB)" <BankowskiJ@michigan.gov>, "Moon, Jason (LARA)" <moonj@michigan.gov>, "Hollins, Harvey
(GOV)" <hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Sanford, Shawn (MDCR)" <SanfordS1@michigan.gov>, "Creagh, Keith
(DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, "Burton, Diane (LARA)" <BurtonD2@michigan.gov>, "Wells, Eden
(DHHS)" <WellsE3@michigan.gov>, "Feighner, Bryce (DEQ)" <FEIGHNERB@michigan.gov>, "Kelenske,
Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>,
"Welehodsky, Jared (DHHS)" <WelehodskyJ@michigan.gov>, "Saunders, Kelli (GOV)"
<saundersk1@michigan.gov>, "Hardiman, Bill (DHHS)" <HardimanB@michigan.gov>, "Steve Arwood
(MEDC)" <arwoods1@michigan.org>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)" <LyonN2@michigan.gov>, "Scott, Jackie
(DHHS)" <ScottJ14@michigan.gov>, "dwyerje@msu.edu" <dwyerje@msu.edu>,
"lauren.underwood@hhs.gov" <lauren.underwood@hhs.gov>, "Golzynski, Diane (MDE)"
<GolzynskiD@michigan.gov>, "Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)" <GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>, "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)"
<claytons3@michigan.gov>, "Edgerton, Shelly (LARA)" <EdgertonS1@michigan.gov>, "Clover Adams,
Jamie (MDARD)" <CloveradamsJ@michigan.gov>, "Geiger, Ben (GOV)" <geigerb@michigan.gov>, "Valerie
Hoag (MEDC)" <hoagv@michigan.org>, "Arbulu, Agustin (MDCR)" <ArbuluA@michigan.gov>, "Nate Zimmer
(MEDC)" <zimmern5@michigan.org>, "Kirkey, Alicia (TIA)" <KirkeyA1@michigan.gov>, Vicki VanBuren
<vvanburen@cityofflint.com>, "Stokes, Wanda (TIA)" <StokesW@michigan.gov>, "lsears@msu.edu"
<lsears@msu.edu>, Maxine Murray <mmurray@cityofflint.com>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Joyce, Shavaughn (DHHS)" <JoyceS@michigan.gov>, "Payne, Nicholas (GOV)"
<PayneN2@michigan.gov>, "McNeely, Jacques (DTMB)" <mcneelyj@michigan.gov>, "Hiipakka, Scott
(GOV)" <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>, "Vreibel, Nancy (DHHS)" <VreibelN@michigan.gov>, "Geller, Jennifer
(DHHS)" <GellerJ@michigan.gov>

Hello all. Just a gentle reminder that tomorrow is your last chance to help sponsor several Flint families and
individuals this holiday season.

We have a wish list of children in foster care, young adults who have transitioned out of foster care, young
men from the Big Brother Big Sister's 100 Boys/100 Men program, and I'd also like to partner with our
Hispanic Community to support one of their initiatives. At this point, Rich and Lt. Governor Calley and some
other Mission Flint staff have agreed to assist with gift delivery.

There is still time! Please consider giving a donation at tomorrow's Mission Flint meeting. Besides, we all
owe Rich for his generosity of agreeing to match whatever we raise to help give back and support some
deserving Flint families this holiday season.

Thanks for your support! --Tiff

From: Brown, Tiffany (DEQ)
Sent: Monday, December 5, 2016 10:59 AM
Subject: Re: Holiday Giving

THANKS, Kevin, for setting the bar! I hate to break the news to you, but someone (who wants to remain
anonymous) just knocked you out of the number one spot by smacking FIVE BEN FRANKLIN BIG FACES on
my desk (SMACK)!
Any challengers??

Rich, it's like you are in the dunk tank and everyone is excited for their chance to take a shot at you!! I
wonder why??

On a serious note, I am already very much overwhelmed, humbled and grateful for the response I have
gotten from everyone. However, I must say that I am NOT SURPRISED by the compassion of this group.

Thank you all so very much for your support and I look forward to the donations to come to REALLY make a
difference in the lives of Flint families this holiday season.

Again, donations can be left with either me or Virginia and will be collected through the week before
Christmas.

Thanks again!

“No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.”

From: Weise, Kevin (GOV)
Sent: Friday, December 2, 2016 4:24 PM
Subject: RE: Holiday Giving

Put me down for a Ben Franklin to set the standard. It will help Rich's back problem to thin that wallet he
sits on!!

Kev

Kevin Weise
Chief of Staff
Mission Flint
517-420-2652 (m)
From: Thompson, Sheryl D. (DHHS)
Sent: Friday, December 02, 2016 3:12 PM
Subject: Re: Holiday Giving

I'm in.

Sheryl Thompson

On Dec 2, 2016, at 1:16 PM, Brown, Tiffany (DEQ) <BrownT22@michigan.gov> wrote:

> Mission Flint Team:
>
> With the holiday season in full swing, now is a perfect time to reflect and give back.
>
> Please join me in providing a Flint-area family with holiday dinner and toys/clothing/items from their wish
list to a deserving family this Christmas. Based on your donations, we may be able to sponsor several
families -- that would truly be a blessing!
>
> Rich has generously agreed to match whatever we raise -- God bless that man! But, let's make him DIG
DEEP!
>
> Myself and Virginia will collect donations, so feel free to drop it off to her in the Romney Building or give it
to me in the Flint State Office Building. We will also collect donations at our next in-person Mission Flint
meeting on December 16. I will then purchase the items and deliver them, perfectly wrapped as if from
Santa's sleigh, the week before Christmas.
>
> Please don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions. Thanks for your support! --Tiff
>
> “No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.” – Aesop
>
> Tiffany Brown
>
> Communications Director, Mission Flint
> Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
> Brownt22@michigan.gov
> 517-242-1376 (mobile)
Subject: Re: Gentle Reminder: Holiday Giving
From: "Edgerton, Shelly (LARA)" <EdgertonS1@michigan.gov>
Date: 12/15/2016 1:10 PM
To: "Brown, Tiffany (DEQ)" <BrownT22@michigan.gov>
CC: "Weise, Kevin (GOV)" <WeiseK@michigan.gov>, "Thompson, Sheryl D. (DHHS)"
<ThompsonS2@michigan.gov>, "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Guerrant, Kyle (MDE)"
<GuerrantK@michigan.gov>, "Amiee Evans (MEDC)" <evansa3@michigan.org>, "Brown, Melanie (TED)"
<BrownM45@michigan.gov>, "Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ)" <THELENM2@michigan.gov>, "Smith, Brenda
(MDARD)" <smithbl9@michigan.gov>, "Krisztian, George (DEQ)" <krisztiang@michigan.gov>, Scott Hiipakka
<shiipakka@gmail.com>, "Bankowski, Jeffrey S. (DTMB)" <BankowskiJ@michigan.gov>, "Moon, Jason
(LARA)" <moonj@michigan.gov>, "Hollins, Harvey (GOV)" <hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Sanford, Shawn
(MDCR)" <SanfordS1@michigan.gov>, "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, "Burton, Diane
(LARA)" <BurtonD2@michigan.gov>, "Wells, Eden (DHHS)" <WellsE3@michigan.gov>, "Feighner, Bryce
(DEQ)" <FEIGHNERB@michigan.gov>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Zimmer, Mike
(GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "Welehodsky, Jared (DHHS)" <WelehodskyJ@michigan.gov>,
"Saunders, Kelli (GOV)" <saundersk1@michigan.gov>, "Hardiman, Bill (DHHS)"
<HardimanB@michigan.gov>, "Steve Arwood (MEDC)" <arwoods1@michigan.org>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)"
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>, "Scott, Jackie (DHHS)" <ScottJ14@michigan.gov>, "dwyerje@msu.edu"
<dwyerje@msu.edu>, "lauren.underwood@hhs.gov" <lauren.underwood@hhs.gov>, "Golzynski, Diane
(MDE)" <GolzynskiD@michigan.gov>, "Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)" <GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>, "Clayton, Stacie
(GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>, "Clover Adams, Jamie (MDARD)" <CloveradamsJ@michigan.gov>,
"Geiger, Ben (GOV)" <geigerb@michigan.gov>, "Valerie Hoag (MEDC)" <hoagv@michigan.org>, "Arbulu,
Agustin (MDCR)" <ArbuluA@michigan.gov>, "Nate Zimmer (MEDC)" <zimmern5@michigan.org>, "Kirkey,
Alicia (TIA)" <KirkeyA1@michigan.gov>, Vicki VanBuren <vvanburen@cityofflint.com>, "Stokes, Wanda
(TIA)" <StokesW@michigan.gov>, "lsears@msu.edu" <lsears@msu.edu>, Maxine Murray
<mmurray@cityofflint.com>, "kweaver@cityofflint.com" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Joyce, Shavaughn
(DHHS)" <JoyceS@michigan.gov>, "Payne, Nicholas (GOV)" <PayneN2@michigan.gov>, "McNeely, Jacques
(DTMB)" <mcneelyj@michigan.gov>, "Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)" <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>, "Vreibel, Nancy
(DHHS)" <VreibelN@michigan.gov>, "Geller, Jennifer (DHHS)" <GellerJ@michigan.gov>

I will drop something with Virginia. Thanks for doing the work.

Shelly Edgerton, Director
Chief Data Systems Officer
MI Department of Licensing & Regulatory Affairs
edgertons1@michigan.gov
517/241-7124
517/282-5628

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 15, 2016, at 1:04 PM, Brown, Tiffany (DEQ) <BrownT22@michigan.gov> wrote:

> Hello all. Just a gentle reminder that tomorrow is your last chance to help sponsor several Flint families
and individuals this holiday season.
>
>
> We have a wish list of children in foster care, young adults who have transitioned out of foster care, young
men from the Big Brother Big Sister's 100 Boys/100 Men program, and I'd also like to partner with our
Hispanic Community to support one of their initiatives. At this point, Rich and Lt. Governor Calley and some
other Mission Flint staff have agreed to assist with gift delivery.
>
>
> There is still time! Please consider giving a donation at tomorrow's Mission Flint meeting. Besides, we all
owe Rich for his generosity of agreeing to match whatever we raise to help give back and support some
deserving Flint families this holiday season.
>
>
> Thanks for your support! --Tiff
>
> From: Brown, Tiffany (DEQ)
> Sent: Monday, December 5, 2016 10:59 AM
> Subject: Re: Holiday Giving
>
>
> THANKS, Kevin, for setting the bar! I hate to break the news to you, but someone (who wants to remain
anonymous) just knocked you out of the number one spot by smacking FIVE BEN FRANKLIN BIG FACES on
my desk (SMACK)!
>
>
> Any challengers??
>
>
> Rich, it's like you are in the dunk tank and everyone is excited for their chance to take a shot at you!! I
wonder why?? <OutlookEmoji-.png>
>
>
> On a serious note, I am already very much overwhelmed, humbled and grateful for the response I have
gotten from everyone. However, I must say that I am NOT SURPRISED by the compassion of this group.
>
>
> Thank you all so very much for your support and I look forward to the donations to come to REALLY make
a difference in the lives of Flint families this holiday season.
>
>
> Again, donations can be left with either me or Virginia and will be collected through the week before
Christmas.
>
>
> Thanks again!
>
>
> “No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.”
>
> From: Weise, Kevin (GOV)
> Sent: Friday, December 2, 2016 4:24 PM
> Subject: RE: Holiday Giving
>
> Put me down for a Ben Franklin to set the standard. It will help Rich's back problem to thin that wallet he
sits on!!
>
> Kev
>
> Kevin Weise
> Chief of Staff
> Mission Flint
> 517-420-2652 (m)
> From: Thompson, Sheryl D. (DHHS)
> Sent: Friday, December 02, 2016 3:12 PM
> Subject: Re: Holiday Giving
>
> I'm in.
>
> Sheryl Thompson
>
>
> On Dec 2, 2016, at 1:16 PM, Brown, Tiffany (DEQ) <BrownT22@michigan.gov> wrote:
>
>> Mission Flint Team:
>>
>> With the holiday season in full swing, now is a perfect time to reflect and give back.
>>
>> Please join me in providing a Flint-area family with holiday dinner and toys/clothing/items from their
wish list to a deserving family this Christmas. Based on your donations, we may be able to sponsor several
families -- that would truly be a blessing!
>>
>> Rich has generously agreed to match whatever we raise -- God bless that man! But, let's make him DIG
DEEP!
>>
>> Myself and Virginia will collect donations, so feel free to drop it off to her in the Romney Building or give
it to me in the Flint State Office Building. We will also collect donations at our next in-person Mission Flint
meeting on December 16. I will then purchase the items and deliver them, perfectly wrapped as if from
Santa's sleigh, the week before Christmas.
>>
>> Please don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions. Thanks for your support! --Tiff
>>
>> “No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.” – Aesop
>>
>> Tiffany Brown
>>
>> Communications Director, Mission Flint
>> Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
>> Brownt22@michigan.gov
>> 517-242-1376 (mobile)

Attachments:
OutlookEmoji-.png 0 bytes
Subject: UPDATED: FWICC Agenda for 12.16.16
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 12/15/2016 11:29 AM
To: "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, 'Marc Edwards' <edwardsm@vt.edu>, 'Mona Hanna-Attisha'
<MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, "'Sylvester Jones'" <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)"
<KhouriN@michigan.gov>, "'jim@koskiconsult.com'" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)"
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>, "'Lawrence Reynolds'" <lrey52@gmail.com>, "'Laura L. Sullivan
(lsulliva@kettering.edu)'" <lsulliva@kettering.edu>, "'mvalacak@gchd.us'" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "'Karen Weaver -
City of Flint (kweaver@cityofflint.com)'" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)"
<WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "'Michael McDaniel
(fastflint2016@gmail.com)'" <fastflint2016@gmail.com>, "'Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)'"
<vvanburen@cityofflint.com>, "'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us'" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "'Bishop, Melissa'"
<MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>
CC: "Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ)" <THELENM2@michigan.gov>, "Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR)"
<TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>, "Krisztian, George (DEQ)" <krisztiang@michigan.gov>, 'Schuyler Davis'
<sdavis@cityofflint.com>, "Garza, Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Richards, Denise (DHHS)"
<richardsd@michigan.gov>, "Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)" <GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)"
<DoyleM4@michigan.gov>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>, "Scorsone, Eric
(TREASURY)" <ScorsoneE@michigan.gov>, "'mmurray@cityofflint.com'" <mmurray@cityofflint.com>, "Guerrant,
Kyle (MDE)" <GuerrantK@michigan.gov>, "Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>, "Dempkowski,
Angela (Treasury)" <DempkowskiA@michigan.gov>, "Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)" <wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>,
"Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Manolakoudis, Virginia (GOV)"
<ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>, "Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)" <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>, "Saunders, Kelli (GOV)"
<saundersk1@michigan.gov>, "Heaton, Anna (GOV)" <HeatonA@michigan.gov>, "Biehl, Laura (GOV)"
<BiehlL@michigan.gov>, "Adler, Ari (GOV)" <AdlerA@michigan.gov>, "Weir, Elizabeth (GOV)"
<WeirE@michigan.gov>

Please note that an update from the Water Infrastructure Subcommittee has been added to the agenda.

~Stacie

From: Clayton, Stacie (GOV)
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2016 12:20 PM
To: Creagh, Keith (DNR) <creaghk@michigan.gov>; Marc Edwards <edwardsm@vt.edu>; Mona Hanna-Attisha
<MHanna1@hurleymc.com>; 'Sylvester Jones' <sjones@cityofflint.com>; Hollins, Harvey (GOV)
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>; Kelenske, Chris (MSP) <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>; Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)
<KhouriN@michigan.gov>; 'jim@koskiconsult.com' <jim@koskiconsult.com>; Lyon, Nick (DHHS)
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>; 'Lawrence Reynolds' <lrey52@gmail.com>; Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)
<lsulliva@kettering.edu>; 'mvalacak@gchd.us' <mvalacak@gchd.us>; Karen Weaver - City of Flint
(kweaver@cityofflint.com) <kweaver@cityofflint.com>; Whiston, Brian (MDE) <WhistonB@michigan.gov>; Zimmer,
Mike (GOV) <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>; Michael McDaniel (fastflint2016@gmail.com)
<fastflint2016@gmail.com>; Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com) <vvanburen@cityofflint.com>;
'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us' <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>; 'Bishop, Melissa' <MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>
Cc: Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ) <THELENM2@michigan.gov>; Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR) <TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>;
Krisztian, George (DEQ) <krisztiang@michigan.gov>; 'Schuyler Davis' <sdavis@cityofflint.com>; Garza, Oralya
(MSP) <GarzaO@michigan.gov>; Richards, Denise (DHHS) <richardsd@michigan.gov>; Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)
<GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>; Doyle, Maureen (Treasury) <DoyleM4@michigan.gov>; Steckelberg, Larry
(TREASURY) <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>; Scorsone, Eric (TREASURY) <ScorsoneE@michigan.gov>;
'mmurray@cityofflint.com' <mmurray@cityofflint.com>; Guerrant, Kyle (MDE) <GuerrantK@michigan.gov>;
Carefoot, Karen (MDE) <CarefootK@michigan.gov>; Dempkowski, Angela (Treasury)
<DempkowskiA@michigan.gov>; Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV) <wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>; Baird, Richard (GOV)
<bairdr@michigan.gov>; Manolakoudis, Virginia (GOV) <ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>; Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)
<HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>; Saunders, Kelli (GOV) <saundersk1@michigan.gov>; Heaton, Anna (GOV)
<HeatonA@michigan.gov>; Biehl, Laura (GOV) <BiehlL@michigan.gov>; Adler, Ari (GOV)
<AdlerA@michigan.gov>; Weir, Elizabeth (GOV) <WeirE@michigan.gov>
Subject: FWICC Agenda for 12.16.16

Greetings FWICC Members,

Attached is the agenda for this Friday’s meeting. Below is the link in case you would like to review the final report
from the Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board.

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/snyder/CLPEB_Report--Final_542618_7.pdf

If you have not done so already, please confirm your attendance. The meeting will be held:

U of M Flint—University Center

Happenings Room

400 Mill Street

Flint, MI 48502-1950

Parking Info: Guests can park in the Mill Street Parking Ramp or surface Lot A outside the Recreation Center (both are
open parking).

We will see you on Friday!

~Stacie

Attachments-8/FWICC Agenda for 12.16.16.pdf
Subject: Fwd: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
From: "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>
Date: 1/24/2017 1:53 PM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Gil Gilcreast <gilgilcreast@gmail.com>

Fyi

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Adler, Ari (GOV)" <AdlerA@michigan.gov>
Date: Jan 24, 2017 1:37 PM
Subject: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
To: "Scott, Allison (GOV)" <scotta12@michigan.gov>,"Agen, Jarrod (GOV)" <AgenJ@michigan.gov>,"Emmitt, Beth
(GOV)" <emmittb@michigan.gov>,"Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>,"Calley, Brian (GOV)"
<calleyb11@michigan.gov>,"Forstner, Nathaniel (GOV)" <forstnern1@michigan.gov>,"Stoken, Laura (GOV)"
<Stokenl@michigan.gov>,"Nyberg, David (GOV)" <nybergd@michigan.gov>,"Heaton, Anna (GOV)"
<HeatonA@michigan.gov>,"Paciorek, Josh (GOV)" <Paciorekj@michigan.gov>,"Posthumus, Dick (GOV)"
<Posthumusd@michigan.gov>,"Ackerman, Darin (GOV)" <ackermand3@michigan.gov>,"Lange, Michelle (GOV)"
<LangeM3@michigan.gov>,"Clement, Elizabeth (GOV)" <clemente@michigan.gov>,"Weber, Travis (GOV)"
<WeberT7@michigan.gov>,"Bedan, Morgan (GOV)" <BedanM@michigan.gov>,"Walsh, John (GOV)"
<WalshJ@michigan.gov>,"Mcbride, Bill (GOV)" <mcbrideb@michigan.gov>,"Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>,"Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>,"Biehl, Laura (GOV)"
<BiehlL@michigan.gov>,"Hansen, Rachel (GOV)" <hansenr3@michigan.gov>
Cc:

Attached is the final version of the Flint Water press release being issued momentarily by the DEQ.

Note these key points:

· Water is testing below the federal action level for Lead and Copper Rule. The LCR data for six months shows
the level for lead at 12 ppb. The latest round of sentinel sites in Flint (November) shows it had dropped to 8 ppb.

· The city will need to continue its work to remain in compliance with the LCR, and the state remains committed
to Flint, as well.

· Due to the new levels being achieved, the payment of water credits will continue for water used through the end
of February, and funding for the source water from GLWA also will continue through the end of February.

· There is no change regarding bottled water.

· Filter cartridges will remain available due to lead service line replacement projects continuing within the city
this year.

Attachments-9/Flint Water Compliance_Release.docx
Subject: Sabuda Communication
From: Maxine Murray <mmurray@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/8/2017 2:32 PM
To: Kathy Hoffman <khoffman@martinwaymire.com>
CC: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Good afternoon Kathy,

I was asked to email the attached communication to your attention.

Thank you,

Maxine Murray
Executive Assistant to
Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, MI 48502
810.237.2035 Telephone
810.766.7218 Fax

Attachments-10/Sabuda Communication.PDF
Subject: Fwd: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
From: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/17/2017 9:36 AM
To: Kristin Moore <Kmoore@cityofflint.com>

For your reference

Dr. Karen W. Weaver
Mayor
City of Flint
1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Baird, Richard (GOV) <bairdr@michigan.gov>
Date: Tue, Jan 24, 2017 at 1:53 PM
Subject: Fwd: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Gil Gilcreast <gilgilcreast@gmail.com>

Fyi

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Adler, Ari (GOV)" <AdlerA@michigan.gov>
Date: Jan 24, 2017 1:37 PM
Subject: NEWS ALERT: Flint water news release
To: "Scott, Allison (GOV)" <scotta12@michigan.gov>,"Agen, Jarrod (GOV)" <AgenJ@michigan.gov>,"Emmitt, Beth
(GOV)" <emmittb@michigan.gov>,"Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>,"Calley, Brian (GOV)"
<calleyb11@michigan.gov>,"Forstner, Nathaniel (GOV)" <forstnern1@michigan.gov>,"Stoken, Laura (GOV)"
<Stokenl@michigan.gov>,"Nyberg, David (GOV)" <nybergd@michigan.gov>,"Heaton, Anna (GOV)"
<HeatonA@michigan.gov>,"Paciorek, Josh (GOV)" <Paciorekj@michigan.gov>,"Posthumus, Dick (GOV)"
<Posthumusd@michigan.gov>,"Ackerman, Darin (GOV)" <ackermand3@michigan.gov>,"Lange, Michelle (GOV)"
<LangeM3@michigan.gov>,"Clement, Elizabeth (GOV)" <clemente@michigan.gov>,"Weber, Travis (GOV)"
<WeberT7@michigan.gov>,"Bedan, Morgan (GOV)" <BedanM@michigan.gov>,"Walsh, John (GOV)"
<WalshJ@michigan.gov>,"Mcbride, Bill (GOV)" <mcbrideb@michigan.gov>,"Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>,"Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>,"Biehl, Laura (GOV)"
<BiehlL@michigan.gov>,"Hansen, Rachel (GOV)" <hansenr3@michigan.gov>
Cc:

Attached is the final version of the Flint Water press release being issued momentarily by the DEQ.

Note these key points:

· Water is testing below the federal action level for Lead and Copper Rule. The LCR data for six months shows
the level for lead at 12 ppb. The latest round of sentinel sites in Flint (November) shows it had dropped to 8 ppb.

· The city will need to continue its work to remain in compliance with the LCR, and the state remains committed
to Flint, as well.

· Due to the new levels being achieved, the payment of water credits will continue for water used through the end
of February, and funding for the source water from GLWA also will continue through the end of February.

· There is no change regarding bottled water.

· Filter cartridges will remain available due to lead service line replacement projects continuing within the city
this year.

Attachments-11/Flint Water Compliance_Release.docx
Subject: Fwd: Inspiring the next generation of tech innovators: CS First at MSU's Breslin Center on Tues.,
Feb. 28
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/24/2017 8:31 AM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Frank Provenzano <provenzanof@michigan.org>
Date: Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 5:34 PM
Subject: Inspiring the next generation of tech innovators: CS First at MSU's Breslin Center on Tues., Feb. 28
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

Michigan Economic Development Corporation
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Frank Provenzano
February 23, 2017 517-335-4590

For all recent stories and announcements, please visit MEDC NEWSROOM

provenzanof@michigan.org

Inspiring the next generation of tech innovators
Students, teachers from around state gather at Tuesday’s second annual ‘CS First’ interactive event at MSU’s
Breslin Center

MEDIA ADVISORY: Michigan Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Rob Biederman (Google), and Jenell Leonard (MFDMO)
will be available for media interviews.

LANSING, Mich. – For most middle-school students, the major life decision about their career path probably
hasn’t quite come into focus. Michigan Film & Digital Media Office (MFDMO) and Google, however, have a
straight-forward entreaty to career-minded 4th-8th grade students: Your professional future starts now.

On Tuesday, Feb. 28, MFDMO and Google will host “Computer Science First” (CS First) at the Jack Breslin
Student Events Center on Michigan State University campus in East Lansing. The CS First event will offer
compelling online demonstrations, and hands-on experiences with robotics, drones and other tech devices to
help students learn that studying computer science isn’t merely an academic exercise.

The interactive stations at CS First are provided by Google, MSU, Master of Art in Education Technology
(MAET), ITEC of Lansing, Square One, Strength in Numbers, and Pixo Group.

“The purpose of the ‘CS First’ event is to elevate computer science education and expose middle school
students to this high-tech, high-wage industry,” said MFDMO Commissioner Jenell Leonard. “It’s important to
teach students about the opportunities in the commuter science field early in their education so that they
can help fill the talent pipeline of this ever-growing industry.”
By 2020, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts there will be 1 million more computer science jobs than
graduating students who qualify for the jobs. Growth for computer science positions in Michigan is increasing
at three-and-a-half times the average compared to other industries.

“Google has made it possible for middle school students to gain access to computer science education
regardless of where they go to school,” said Leonard. “This has the potential to provide the foundation for
learning that leads students into productive careers and jobs in science, computer programing and the
creative services.”

While Google provides the curriculum (available through a website to classrooms) to schools around the
U.S., the introduction of “CS First” in Michigan marks the first time a state agency has been the primary
coordinator of the program.

"We have a responsibility to inspire the next generation of tech innovators,” said Rob Biederman, Google's
head of Midwest public affairs. “Teaching middle-school students about computer science can lead to some
of the most rewarding jobs in the world. Kids from all neighborhoods and all backgrounds should be
encouraged to be creators – not just consumers – of technology."

Students and teachers from the following schools will participate in Tuesday’s event: Advanced Technology
Academy, Dearborn; Christa McAuliffe Middle School, and Washington Elementary School, Bay City; Ferndale
Middle School, Ferndale; J.O. Strong Middle School, Melvindale; and, Sashabaw Middle School, Clarkston.

About CS First

“CS First” is an online-based curriculum (offered at no cost) designed for students in grades 4th-8th. Nearly
5,000 students from around the state are enrolled in the CS First program this school year. The goal is to
offer an affordable, highly accessible path to help increase proficiency in a discipline where mastery is a
highly marketable skill to current and future job prospects.

“CS First” includes support for computer science clubs run by teachers and/or volunteers; flexible program
design that fits in class or after class requirements; and, several focus areas, including game design, art,
storytelling, fashion/design, music/sound, social media and sports.

# # #

“CS First” AGENDA

10:00 a.m. – Introduction, short computer science video and welcome video by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley

10:05 a.m. – Welcome: Jenell Leonard, commissioner, Michigan Film & Digital Media Office

10:10 a.m. – Rob Biederman, head of Midwest public affairs, Google

10:15 a.m. – Overview of interactive station process and student activities

10:30 a.m. – Lt. Gov. Calley arrives

10:45 a.m. –Lt. Gov. Calley tours interactive stations

12 p.m. – Event concludes. Participants depart.

# # #

LIST OF PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS IN “Computer Science First” program (statewide):

ALLEGAN COUNTY: Bentheim Elementary School, Hamilton; Hamilton Middle School, Hamilton.
BAY COUNTY: McAlear-Sawden Elementary School, Bay City; Washington Elementary School, Bay City.

BERRIEN COUNTY: Benton Harbor Area Schools, Benton Harbor; Countryside Academy, Benton Harbor;
Berrien Springs Middle School, Berrien Springs; Lincoln Elementary School, St. Joseph.

CALHOUN COUNTY: Lillian Fletcher Elementary School, Homer.

CHIPPEWA COUNTY: Ojibwe Charter School, Brimley.

CLARE COUNTY: Clare Middle School, Clare; Harrison Middle School, Harrison.

CLINTON COUNTY: Gateway North Elementary, St. Johns; Pewamo-Westphalia Community School,
Westphali.

DICKINSON COUNTY: Holy Spirit Catholic School, Norway.

GENESEE COUNTY: Atherton Elementary, Burton.

GLADWIN COUNTY: Gladwin Intermediate Schools, Gladwin.

GRATIOT COUNTY: Ithaca North Elementary, Ithaca.

HURON COUNTY: Laker Elementary School, Pigeon.

INGHAM COUNTY: JW Sexton School (grades 7-8), Lansing.

KALAMAZOO COUNTY: Gull Lake Middle School, Richland; Vicksburg Middle School, Vicksburg.

KENT COUNTY: Grand Rapids Public Museum School, Grand Rapids; Our Savior Lutheran School, Grand
Rapids.

LENAWEE COUNTY: Clinton Elementary School, Clinton; Ruth McGregor Elementary, Sand Creek.

MACOMB COUNTY: Chesterfield Township Library, Chesterfield Township; Mt. Clemens Montessori Academy.

MUSKEGON COUNTY: Holton Middle School, Holton; Oehrli elementary, Ontague.

OAKLAND COUNTY: Greenfield Elementary, Beverly Hills; Bloomfield Township Public Library, Bloomfield
Hills; Madison Elementary School, Madison Heights; Muir Middle School, Milford; Novi high School, Novi; Oak
Park Preparatory Academy, Oak Park; Addams Elementary, Royal Oak; Northwood elementary School, Royal
Oak; Oakland Elementary School, Royal Oak; Pembroke Elementary, Troy; JIA-PTO, Waterford.

OTTAWA COUNTY: Blue Star Elementary School; Sandyview Elementary School, Holland; Our Homeschool,
Zeeland.

SAGINAW COUNTY: Saginaw Arts & Sciences Academy, Saginaw; Swan valley School District, Saginaw.

ST. CLAIR COUNTY: Marine City Middle School, Cottreville Township.

SHIAWASSE COUNTY: New Lothrop Elementary School, New Lothrup.

TUSCULOA COUNTY: Millington Junior High School, Millington.

VAN BUREN COUNTY: Hartford Middle School, Hartford; North Shore Elementary School, South Haven.

WASHTENAW COUNTY: Manchester Middle School, Manchester; Heritage Elementary School, Saline.
WAYNE COUNTY: Brownstown Middle School, Brownstown Township; Durfee Middle School, Detroit; Summit
Academy, Flat Rock; Grandview Elementary, Livonia; Trombly Elementary School, Grosse Pointe Park;
Universal Learning Academy, Westland.

About Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC)

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation is the state’s marketing arm and lead advocate for
business development, job awareness and community and talent development with the focus on growing
Michigan’s economy. For more information on the MEDC and our initiatives, visit www.MichiganBusiness.org.
For Pure Michigan® tourism information, your trip begins at www.michigan.org. Visit Pure Michigan Talent
Connect at www.mitalent.org for more information on Michigan’s online marketplace for connecting job
seekers and employers. Join the conversation on: Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

###

If you would rather not receive future communications from Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
let us know by clicking here.
Michigan Economic Development Corporation, 300 N. Washington Square 3rd Floor, Lansing, MI 48913
United States
Subject: Lt. Governor Calley confirmed for this year's MI Leadership Forum!
From: Katherine Howard <khoward@erepublic.com>
Date: 3/17/2017 10:06 AM
To: Karen Williams Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Please plan on joining us on May 2

Join Lt. Governor Calley at this year's
Michigan Leadership Forum!

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley, State of Michigan

First elected as lieutenant governor in 2010, Calley has worked in partnership with Gov. Rick Snyder to play an integral
role in Michigan’s comeback, combining skills acquired from an accomplished private sector career in the financial
services industry with a heart for public service. A pragmatic and inclusive solutionist with a long-range vision, Calley
approaches every issue with a focus on addressing the needs of current and future generations through positive
advancements in public policy. Read More...
Reserve Your Seat Today

Registration is complimentary for government professionals!

Michigan Leadership Forum
May 2, 2017 | Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center | East Lansing, MI
Event Home

Agenda

Advisory Board

For questions or assistance registering, please contact:
Katherine Howard | 916.932.1300 ext. 1421 | khoward@governing.com
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Forward to Friend

This email was sent to kweaver@cityofflint.com on behalf of Governing.
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Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 3/20/2017 12:13 PM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>

Mayor,
A reporter wants to know if you have any thoughts/comments Lt. Gov. Brian Calley being given this public
health award? The release says, the award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead
exposure and promoting healthy lifestyles...

​Mayor or Pam, please let me know if either of you are interested in providing a comment on this.​

Kristin

Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations

City of Flint

1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502

Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576

kmoore@cityofflint.com

www.cityofflint.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Violet Ikonomova <vikonomova@metrotimes.com>
Date: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM
Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
To: kmoore@cityofflint.com

Seeking Mayor's thoughts on this

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 2:46 PM
Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington
D.C.
To: vikonomova@metrotimes.com

COMM News Release

Contacts: Laura Biehl
517-373-4062

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, March 16, 2017

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington D.C.

LG Award

Washington D.C. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley was honored Thursday for his work advancing public health and
healthy lifestyles while attending the National Lieutenant Governors Association’s Federal-State Relations
meeting.

The Public Leadership in Advancing Healthy Lifestyles Award, given annually by the NLGA and Takeda
Pharmaceuticals, was presented to Calley for his efforts to improve the lives of Americans dealing with
mental health and addiction issues as well as his autism advocacy.

“Improving public health means thinking outside the box and treating mental health with the same
importance as physical health,” Calley said. “I’m proud of the progress that Michigan has made and look
forward to continuing to make improving public health a priority in our state.”

The award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead exposure and promoting healthy
lifestyles through marathon running, including hosting a 5k for all State of Michigan employees each fall.

Calley serves as chair of the Midwest Region on the NLGA Executive Committee and hosted the NLGA
summer conference in Michigan in 2016.

#
STAY CONNECTED:
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This email was sent to vikonomova@metrotimes.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the Governor ·
111 South Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858

--
Violet Ikonomova
Staff writer
Cell: 571.295.8451
vikonomova@metrotimes.com | @violetikon

Detroit Metro Times
1200 Woodward Heights
Ferndale, MI 48220
metrotimes.com
Subject: Re: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
From: Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>
Date: 3/20/2017 12:35 PM
To: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
CC: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>

I guess no comment about it. Just don't respond

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:13 PM, Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com> wrote:

> Mayor,
> A reporter wants to know if you have any thoughts/comments Lt. Gov. Brian Calley being given this public
health award? The release says, the award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead
exposure and promoting healthy lifestyles...
>
> ​Mayor or Pam, please let me know if either of you are interested in providing a comment on this.​
>
> Kristin
>
> Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations
>
> City of Flint
>
> 1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502
>
> Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576
>
> kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
>
> www.cityofflint.com
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Violet Ikonomova <vikonomova@metrotimes.com>
> Date: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM
> Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
> To: kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
> Seeking Mayor's thoughts on this
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
> Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 2:46 PM
> Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington
D.C.
> To: vikonomova@metrotimes.com
>
>
> COMM News Release
>
> Contacts: Laura Biehl
> 517-373-4062
>
>
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
> Thursday, March 16, 2017
>
> Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington D.C.
>
> LG Award
>
> Washington D.C. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley was honored Thursday for his work advancing public health and
healthy lifestyles while attending the National Lieutenant Governors Association’s Federal-State Relations
meeting.
>
> The Public Leadership in Advancing Healthy Lifestyles Award, given annually by the NLGA and Takeda
Pharmaceuticals, was presented to Calley for his efforts to improve the lives of Americans dealing with
mental health and addiction issues as well as his autism advocacy.
>
> “Improving public health means thinking outside the box and treating mental health with the same
importance as physical health,” Calley said. “I’m proud of the progress that Michigan has made and look
forward to continuing to make improving public health a priority in our state.”
>
> The award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead exposure and promoting healthy
lifestyles through marathon running, including hosting a 5k for all State of Michigan employees each fall.
>
> Calley serves as chair of the Midwest Region on the NLGA Executive Committee and hosted the NLGA
summer conference in Michigan in 2016.
>
>#
> STAY CONNECTED:
> Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter Visit us on YouTube Sign up for email updates
> This email was sent to vikonomova@metrotimes.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the Governor ·
111 South Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858
>
>
>
> --
> Violet Ikonomova
> Staff writer
> Cell: 571.295.8451
> vikonomova@metrotimes.com | @violetikon
>
> Detroit Metro Times
> 1200 Woodward Heights
> Ferndale, MI 48220
> metrotimes.com
>
Subject: Re: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
From: Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com>
Date: 3/20/2017 12:38 PM
To: Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net>
CC: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>

Ok. Got it.​

Kristin

Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations

City of Flint

1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502

Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576

kmoore@cityofflint.com

www.cityofflint.com

On Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:35 PM, Karen Weaver <weaverkaren@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

I guess no comment about it. Just don't respond

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:13 PM, Kristin Moore <kmoore@cityofflint.com> wrote:

> Mayor,
> A reporter wants to know if you have any thoughts/comments Lt. Gov. Brian Calley being given this
public health award? The release says, the award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood
lead exposure and promoting healthy lifestyles...
>
> ​Mayor or Pam, please let me know if either of you are interested in providing a comment on this.​
>
> Kristin
>
> Kristin Moore, Public Information/Relations
>
> City of Flint
>
> 1101 S. Saginaw Street | Flint, MI 48502
>
> Office: 810.237.2039 | Mobile 810.875.2576
>
> kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
>
> www.cityofflint.com
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Violet Ikonomova <vikonomova@metrotimes.com>
> Date: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM
> Subject: Fwd: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
> To: kmoore@cityofflint.com
>
>
> Seeking Mayor's thoughts on this
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: GOV Newsroom <govnewsroom@govsubscriptions.michigan.gov>
> Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2017 at 2:46 PM
> Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in
Washington D.C.
> To: vikonomova@metrotimes.com
>
>
> COMM News Release
>
> Contacts: Laura Biehl
> 517-373-4062
>
>
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
> Thursday, March 16, 2017
>
> Lt. Gov. Brian Calley honored with public health leadership award in Washington D.C.
>
> LG Award
>
> Washington D.C. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley was honored Thursday for his work advancing public health
and healthy lifestyles while attending the National Lieutenant Governors Association’s Federal-State Relations
meeting.
>
> The Public Leadership in Advancing Healthy Lifestyles Award, given annually by the NLGA and Takeda
Pharmaceuticals, was presented to Calley for his efforts to improve the lives of Americans dealing with
mental health and addiction issues as well as his autism advocacy.
>
> “Improving public health means thinking outside the box and treating mental health with the same
importance as physical health,” Calley said. “I’m proud of the progress that Michigan has made and look
forward to continuing to make improving public health a priority in our state.”
>
> The award also recognizes Calley for working to prevent childhood lead exposure and promoting
healthy lifestyles through marathon running, including hosting a 5k for all State of Michigan employees each
fall.
>
> Calley serves as chair of the Midwest Region on the NLGA Executive Committee and hosted the NLGA
summer conference in Michigan in 2016.
>
> #
> STAY CONNECTED:
> Visit us on Facebook Visit us on Twitter Visit us on YouTube Sign up for email updates
> This email was sent to vikonomova@metrotimes.com on behalf of: The Executive Office of the
Governor · 111 South Capitol Avenue · Lansing, MI 48909 · 517-335-7858
>
>
>
> --
> Violet Ikonomova
> Staff writer
> Cell: 571.295.8451
> vikonomova@metrotimes.com | @violetikon
>
> Detroit Metro Times
> 1200 Woodward Heights
> Ferndale, MI 48220
> metrotimes.com
>
Subject: RE: Meeting Synopsis - 10 January 2018
From: "Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)" <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>
Date: 1/10/2018 2:49 PM
To: Yvonne Lewis <ylewis@countyhealthplans.org>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>, Steve Branch
<sbranch@cityofflint.com>
CC: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>, Bilal Tawwab
<btawwab@flintschools.org>, "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>

Yvonne,

Your question: ( Clarify the role of the State as a “flushing partner” beyond this testing period, which would
require the Schools to continue flushing until the end of 2018)

Answer: The schools are the “flushing partner” meaning that they will support the flushing of the pipes so as
to ensure that the water is moving in the system.

Question: (for the community as well as the schools.)

Answer: We are clarifying this statement in the next version per the request of Pam Pugh given that the
schools has received financial support from the third-party coalition to purchase water if they so choose.

Question: How long after the announcement will FWICC be in place?

Answer: In accordance with the Executive Order, the FWICC has no formal end date. Appointees were
appointed till 12/31/18 for their first term. After the initial appointments, members of the Coordinating
Committee shall serve terms of three years. See the attached-Section I. B. of Executive Order 2016-1 and
the Amendment for specifics.

R,

Scott

Scott Hiipakka

C: 248.303.4618

hiipakkas@michigan.gov

From: Yvonne Lewis [mailto:ylewis@countyhealthplans.org]
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 2:01 PM
To: Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>; Steve Branch <sbranch@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>; Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>; Bilal Tawwab
<btawwab@flintschools.org>; Baird, Richard (GOV) <bairdr@michigan.gov>; Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)
<HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>
Subject: RE: Meeting Synopsis - 10 January 2018
Importance: High

Greetings and Thank you for the update.

I would appreciate some clarity on the highlighted items below. You may have covered these after I left the
meeting, so I again apologize for having to leave prior to the close of the meeting.

Yvonne

E. Yvonne Lewis

Director of Outreach

Genesee Health Plan

ylewis@countyhealthplans.org

810-232-7740 ext. 226

Confidential Health Information Enclosed

This e-mail may contain Protected Health Information that is of a sensitive and confidential nature. It is
being sent to you with the authorization of the individual enrolled in the Plan or under circumstances where
authorization is not required. You are required to maintain this information in a secure and confidential
manner and are prohibited from re-disclosing it without first obtaining the individual’s authorization as
otherwise permitted by law. Unauthorized re-disclosure may subject you to federal and state law penalties.

IMPORTANT WARNING: This message is intended for the use of the person or entity to which it is addressed
and may contain information that is confidential or privileged, the disclosure of which is governed by
applicable law. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any
dissemination, distribution, or copying of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this
message by error, please notify us immediately and destroy the related message.

From: Pamela Pugh [mailto:ppugh@cityofflint.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 1:11 PM
To: Steve Branch <sbranch@cityofflint.com>
Cc: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>; Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>; Bilal Tawwab
<btawwab@flintschools.org>; Yvonne Lewis <ylewis@countyhealthplans.org>; Richard Baird
<bairdr@michigan.gov>; Hiipakka, Scott (GOV) <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>
Subject: Re: Meeting Synopsis - 10 January 2018

Steve,

Here are my suggested edits/considerations. Thanks.

This sentience could possibly read that FCS is agreeing to discontinue bottled water prior to the end of the
current school year which Superintendent Tawwab stated this morning was not the case:

In the event that the FCS testing data affirms the water quality, the State and the City of Flint Leadership
will announce the results and the cessation of bottled water and delivery of water. The schools and the
medical community will be invited to also be a part of any announcement.

For item 4, I would suggest: FCS agrees to move forward with the creation of the Model School Water
Testing, Monitoring, Maintenance, and Education Program. Funding for this pilot is $1 million from MI
Department of Education and will create a best practices tutorial for flushing and testing protocols for all
Michigan schools.

On Wed, Jan 10, 2018 at 12:51 PM, Steve Branch <sbranch@cityofflint.com> wrote:

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Hiipakka, Scott (GOV) <HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>
Date: Wed, Jan 10, 2018 at 12:34 PM
Subject: RE: Meeting Synopsis - 10 January 2018
To: Steve Branch <sbranch@cityofflint.com>
Cc: "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>

Steve,

Rich connected with the Governor and he, along with the Mayor, have both approved the project
approach identified below. Would ask that you please distribute that to the meeting participants from this
morning. Further, when you distribute the email if you could please indicate that both the Mayor and the
Governor have jointly approved the concept, that would be beneficial to demonstrate the partnership.

Thank You,
Scott

Scott Hiipakka

C: 248.303.4618

hiipakkas@michigan.gov

Begin forwarded

The following agreement was reached 1/10/18 at Mayor Weaver’s Chambers. The following
individuals affirmed their support for the points listed:

Mayor Karen Weaver

Superintendent Bilal Tawwab

Dr. Lawrence Reynolds

Dr. Pam Pugh

Mr. Gilcreast

Mr. Stephen Branch

Ms. Yvonne Lewis

Mr. Scott Hiipakka

Mr. Richard Baird

1. The State of Michigan (LARA and DEQ) agrees to conduct flushing and testing protocols
throughout the Flint Community Schools beginning immediately and culminating after the 3rd testing round.
Members of the Mayor’s Health Technical Advisory group will collaborate with DEQ on the testing protocols
(to be confirmed on January 11) and will be invited to join the testing teams.

2. All parties agreed that the continuous testing protocol begin as soon as possible and
commence each weekend and conclude no later than the weekend of March 17.

Each of the 3 testing rounds will comprise three consecutive weekends in FCS. Superintendent
commits to physical access to the schools and commits to be a “flushing partner” with the State in between
testing periods and through the remainder of 2018. ( Clarify the role of the State as a “flushing partner”
beyond this testing period, which would require the Schools to continue flushing until the end of 2018)

The Schedule is as follows:

Weekend of January 13 (Will try to get a team scheduled but may not be possible due to lateness
of request).

Weekends of January 20, 27, Feb 3 will constitute Round 1 of Testing and Flushing.

Weekends of Feb 10, 17 and 24 will constitute Round 2

Weekends of March 3, 10 and 17 will constitute Round 3

3. The State agrees to keep the community water distribution process in place until the
conclusion of the FCS testing rounds. In the event that the data reflects a water quality that exceeds a 90th
percentile value of 15 PPB based on unfiltered samples, or other issues of water contamination are
discovered, the State agrees to exercise best efforts to assist the School district in remediation of the
problem.

In the event that the FCS testing data affirms the water quality, the State and the City of Flint
Leadership will announce the results and the cessation of bottled water and delivery of water (for the
community as well as the schools.) The schools and the medical community will be invited to also be a part
of any announcement.

4. FCS agrees to move forward with the creation of the School Water Training Program. Funding
for this pilot is $1 million from MI Department of Education and will create a best practices tutorial for
flushing and testing protocols for all Michigan schools.

5. Supt. Tawwab will be appointed to the FWICC Subcommittee on Water Quality which will
examine and recommend best practices for K-12 water testing and flushing.

How long after the announcement will FWICC be in place?

Respectfully Submitted

Richard L. Baird
--

Steve Branch, Chief of Staff & Acting City Administrator

City of Flint - Mayor's Office

1101 South Saginaw Street

Flint, Michigan 48502

Direct Line: (810) 237-2022

Cell: (810) 874-5113

Email: sbranch@cityofflint.com

--

Pamela Pugh, DrPH, MS

Chief Public Health Advisor

City of Flint

1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502

(810)237-2041 (Office)

(810)875-4647 (Cell)

ppugh@cityofflint.com

NOTICE: This e-mail, including attachments, is intended for the exclusive use of the addressee and may
contain proprietary, confidential or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient, any
dissemination, use, distribution or copying is strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error,
please notify me via e-mail and permanently delete the original and destroy all copies. Thank you.

Attachments-12/FWICC Exec Order-Pt 1.pdf
Attachments-12/FWICC Exec Order-Ammenement.pdf
Subject: agenda items
From: Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>
Date: 1/16/2018 7:37 PM
To: laura Sullivan <lsulliva@kettering.edu>, laura Sullivan <dr.laura2@gmail.com>, Pamela Pugh
<ppugh@cityofflint.com>, "Bilal K. Tawwab" <btawwab@flintschools.org>, "Hiipakka, Scott (GOV)"
<HiipakkaS@michigan.gov>, "Richard Baird, (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, Karen Weaver
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Dear Mayor Weaver and colleagues ,

I am still reviewing the Guidance document sent by Scott this morning . I am struggling to assemble a timeline that
put it and our January 10th agreement and January 11th protocol in the same series of discussions.

Equally significant is the December 12 ,2017 EPA letter which stresses the need to use the FWICC, and I presume the
key subcommittees , for independent expert , city, Flint Community Schools , and community input and review.Please
refer to the section 1 of the enclosure regarding transparency. Please let me know if this letter should be ignored in our
deliberations and dismissed as the appropriate process in light of specific EPA instruction.

I have also attached Governor Snyder's Executive Order creating the FWICC to be sure that I/we have not
misinterpreted that document and the intent.

I respectfully request that we clarify these concerns first on tomorrow's agenda.

--
Lawrence Reynolds

Attachments-13/Flint Water Agreement-10Jan18.docx
Attachments-13/Protocol draft 5 January 10.docx
Attachments-13/12-12-2017_epa_letter_to_weaver_and_creagh_re_order_rqmts.pdf
Attachments-13/EO_2016-8_522733_7.pdf
Subject: Re: FWICC Agenda for 2/9/2018
From: Laura Sullivan <lsulliva@kettering.edu>
Date: 1/29/2018 9:15 PM
To: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
CC: "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, "Hollins,
Harvey (GOV)" <hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Karen Weaver - City of Flint (kweaver@cityofflint.com)"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)"
<KhouriN@michigan.gov>, Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)"
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>, Marc Edwards <edwardsm@vt.edu>, Mona Hanna-Attisha <MHanna1@hurleymc.com>,
"Nolden, Bryant" <BNolden@co.genesee.mi.us>, Pamela Pugh <ppugh@cityofflint.com>, Santino Guerra
<sguerra@cityofflint.com>, Steve Branch <sbranch@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)"
<WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "Young, Mark" <myoung@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)"
<ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "jim@koskiconsult.com" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "mcdanielm@cooley.edu"
<mcdanielm@cooley.edu>

Hi Stacie,

I’m attaching a paper for all on the committee regarding sample bias in the LCR testing in Flint. I would like this to
be discussed and to suggest the paper’s author be invited to present his evidence at the March meeting.

Thanks so much,

Laura Sullivan

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 11:46 AM Clayton, Stacie (GOV) <claytons3@michigan.gov> wrote:

Greetings FWICC Members,

As requested in our December FWICC meeting, please send me any suggested agenda items for the February 9
FWICC meeting by January 31 (Wednesday).

Thank you,

~Stacie

Stacie Clayton, Assistant Director

Governor’s Office of Urban Initiatives

3044 West Grand Boulevard, Ste. 14-650

Detroit, MI 48202

313.456.4994 (office)
claytons3@michigan.gov

Attachments-14/Goovaerts_2017_Sample bias in lead monitoring in Flint.pdf
FLINT & GENESEE CHAMBER ACTIVITY RELATED TO THE WATER CRISIS

Following are examples of how the Flint & Genesee Chamber is working with its partners to help
businesses and youth impacted by the water crisis.

Aid to Small Businesses
• Small Business Assistance Sessions. In collaboration with City of Flint, Small Business Development
Center and other partners, we co-hosted sessions for small businesses in Flint to connect them to
sources of assistance including talent and marketing. Locations included Berston Fieldhouse.
• Small business grant program. In partnership with Huntington Bank and FlintNOW, and the
Community Foundation of Greater Flint, the Genesee Chamber foundation is administering small
business grants, up to $10,000 for qualifying businesses. To date
o Met with 555 small business leaders to date
o Approved over $780,000 in grants
o $350,000 in grants have been disbursed
o 77% minority-owned; 63% of businesses located in north Flint
• Intro to pre-existing resources. As part of the grant program, businesses are counseled about pre-
existing services such as GAIN$ IDA (federal grant funds); 0% interest loan from KIVA Flint; eTEAM
services and MEDC programs.
• Water distribution. Continue to distribute free bottled water twice a week to Flint businesses
affected by the ongoing water crisis.
o 74 businesses served
o 12,430 cases of water distributed as of Sept. 30
• Major publicity support for Restaurant Week

Economic Development
• Flint Grocery Store Plan. To help provide Flint residents greater access to fresh foods, the Chamber
commissioned a market feasibility study to determine the best locations – and best structure — for
grocery stores on the north side of Flint. The study was funded by $90,000 in grants from the MEDC.
Assessments have been conducted by an audit team to determine areas of focus to improve existing
grocery stores. Grant applications totaling $250,000 were submitted to funders for grocery store
enhancements.
• Job Creation. The Chamber, MEDC, Mission Flint and the Flint Recovery Task Force are working
toward a goal of creating 1,000 jobs by the end of 2016. The current status is as follows:
o 1,886 jobs committed
o 1,012 located in Flint; 874 not in Flint, but will be filled with Flint residents
o 421 jobs created
• Flint Business Summit. Over 400 businesses attended the Flint Matchmaker Summit on Sep
22. Supported by the MEDC’s Pure Michigan Business Connect program, the event brought
corporate buyers and small business owners from across Michigan to meet with Flint businesses and
identify new sales opportunities.
• Pursue New Funding Sources. Chamber staff have pursued sources of new funding for youth and
business development programs by writing proposals and hosting investor groups. Examples of
success include EDA Brownfield Redevelopment, DNR Youth Employment, RPI Manufacturing Day
Transportation, MEDC Ontario Business Recruitment, MEDC Craft Food & Beverage Business
Competition, (get more from Kristina?)
• Host Influencers. Leadership Summit (Chamber & Business Reps), Flint Matchmaker Summit,
MEDC, MDARD, MDEQ, Federal Delegation, SBA, EDA, EPA, Consumers Energy, Connect Michigan …

1
• Pursue Programs that Highlight Our Assets/Strengths. Consumers Energy “Energy Ready Sites,”
Connect Michigan Connected Community Status, MDARD Wastewater Treatment Capacity
Assessment,

Community Support
• Flint Sprint. An extension of the Leadership Summit, Flint Sprint leverages the power of public-
private partnerships to make an immediate impact on the quality of life in Flint. The goal is to
harness the statewide business community to provide pro bono support on projects related to
infrastructure, education, talent development, transportation, awareness and communication,
health and wellness, and public safety – completing projects within 60 days. Some 15 out of 20
community projects have been matched with corporate sponsors.
• Training for Hoteliers. The Flint & Genesee CVB held training sessions during the initial months of
the crisis to assist hoteliers with proper engagement of visitors into the region.
• Water Web Page. Developed a dedicated Flint Water Emergency web page with regular updates on
the latest and most accurate information.
• Community Engagement. Launched #ChooseFlint, a social media challenge to drive business and
tourism to the city of Flint amidst the ongoing water crisis. The challenge aims to show to the
general public that Flint is open for business.

Advocacy
• Advocacy. Hosted four legislative meetings which provided local business and faith-based leaders
access to state leadership as a means to discuss their concerns related to the impact of the water
crisis.
o Joint Select Committee on the Flint Water meeting with Senators Jim Stamas, Jim Ananich
and Representative Ed McBroom. (2 meetings)
o Mission Flint meetings with Lt. Governor Calley and Kevin Weiss, Chief of Staff. (2 meetings)
o As a result of input from Chamber members and others, Senate members of the committee
lobbied the Senate for $148 million supplemental to the state budget. The Senate approved
the recommendation and the $148 million is in the budget and was sent to the House. We
were told that the Chamber interaction was a vital part of convincing the legislature to act
immediately with emergency funding.
o Strategy/update meetings with U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow and U.S. Congressman Dan
Kildee

Perception Initiatives
• Shifting opinions about Flint. Retained a public relations firm, Lambert, Edwards & Associates, to
help shift public perception and aid in telling Flint’s story. Through this partnership we are
communicating positive messages regarding the region’s strengths and assets, with a goal to help
restore Flint’s reputation as a vibrant place to do business, live and visit over the years.
• Editorial Meetings. Part of the communications efforts is to sit with editorial boards at key media
outlets. So far the Chamber has met with Crain’s Detroit Business, The Detroit News.
• Developed “4 Pillar” Messaging – Includes overarching campaign messaging and proof points.
Serves as the editorial foundation for communications and public relations efforts.
• Community Tours. Leadership Summit participants (Statewide Chamber and Business executives);
The Detroit News’ Nolan Finley (editorial page editor) and Neal Rubin (lifestyle columnist); members
of the Travel Michigan Team; Collaborative Development Council (regional economic developers)

2
• Leadership Summit. Held the Moving Flint Forward Leadership Summit with over 100 top business
leaders from around the state. The purpose was to inform participants on the current state of the
city, current recovery initiatives, and leverage these leaders’ expertise and company resources to
help expedite Flint’s recovery. In addition, participants were taken on a tour of the community.
Between the activities and conversation held during the meeting and the eye-opening tour, many
participants stated that their perception of Flint was significantly improved.
• Speaking Engagements. Chamber leadership have the opportunity to speak in front of many
audiences. Since the beginning of the water crisis speeches are focused on recovery efforts for the
business community and how Flint is continuing to build on the economic momentum achieved
prior to the water crisis.
• Perception Survey. Conducted a perception survey to better understand Flint’s image throughout
Michigan.

Youth Initiatives

YouthQuest Efforts: Many students have been directly impacted by the Flint water crisis, prompting the
program to incorporate several practices to help meet the needs of students and their families. Some of
these efforts include:

• Lead-related professional development for staff. YouthQuest employees have received training on
the effects of lead as well as signs that lead exposure is affecting student behavior or academic
performance. They have also been informed of referral resources available to participants in need.
• Nutrition education. Nutrition is a core element of YouthQuest’s programming, which includes
cooking classes, healthy meals and project-based learning. During these activities, there is now an
emphasis on using healthy foods to mitigate the effects of lead exposure, as well as the importance
of using filtered or bottled water when cooking.
• Recycling education. With water bottles continuing to pile up, YouthQuest students will be
educated and challenged to start recycling efforts in their neighborhoods. These initiatives will be
driven by the student-led Youth Advisory Councils.
• Resources for families. YouthQuest family nights feature resources and educational materials that
connect Flint families to the services and items they need.
• Student engagement in the crisis response. Northwestern High School is partnering with the Food
Bank of Eastern Michigan to launch an on-site pantry at the school, providing healthy foods and
personal hygiene products that require minimal water. YouthQuest students have played a role in
the planning, preparation and execution of the pantry, where they will help with inventory and
unloading donations.

Summer Youth Initiative (SYI) Efforts. SYI sites are providing work experiences that directly and
indirectly relate to the Flint water crisis. Specifically, they address issues such as food and nutrition,
capacity building and economic security.

• Food and Nutrition – Distribution and Education. Several of the work sites provide meals and
access to healthy food that mitigates the effects of lead exposure. In many cases these sites also
provide materials and educational programming for the public regarding the importance of nutrition
under the circumstances of the Water Crisis and in everyday life.

3
Examples:
Catholic Charities
Through Catholic Charities' Mr. Gaines' Gardening Program PLUS, youth workers learn the
importance of eating healthy foods and developing proper nutritional habits through the
fundamentals of cultivating and maintaining vegetable gardens and in the development of basic
culinary skills. As a new addition to the program, Catholic Charities has added two new gardens
in the north end of Flint and has added educational components to educate/instruct teens on
the current water crisis and how it affects gardening, preparing and cooking foods/meals, and
health. Life skills, menu planning, food handling, and other lessons will also help improve health
outcomes for the teen workers.

Teen workers will support Catholic Charities' Summer Camp which will serve 60-70 children in
Flint. The Flint Water Crisis will be discussed at camp with lesson plans to incorporate
nutrition/health lifestyles and choices, and other identified/needed family supports. Program
partners include: USDA - providing cases of water and healthy food to families in need on a
regular basis, at no cost. Additionally, campers are incentivized to attend through the provision
of healthy food, personal need items, and water.

Food Bank of Eastern Michigan
Teen workers will help feed over 330,000 people that are fed by the Food Bank of Eastern
Michigan; over 70,000 of those are children. In addition to their daily tasks in the production
kitchen, warehouse, office, and in the food reclamation area, the 60 teen workers will receive
supplemental health education that improves their overall health and combats the effects of
lead exposure.

GCCARD
As nutrition ambassadors, the workers at GCCARD, will not only work to prepare and distribute
healthy food, they will also learn about nutrition and ways that they can mitigate the challenges
of lead-exposure that could affect them and their family and friends.

GCCARD is uniquely positioned to serve young people who are most likely to be impacted by the
water crisis. Their programming includes: neighborhood-based food distribution, meet up and
eat up for school-age children, meals on wheels for homebound residents, and head start/early
start programs, among others.

• Capacity Building for Agencies in the Recovery Efforts. Several of the SYI work sites have been
actively involved in the water crisis recovery efforts, consuming resources (both human and
financial) but are still tasked with providing essential programs and services to residents. In these
cases, several SYI work sites will recoup some of the lost resources and retain their services with the
help of the SYI youth workers. For example, Christ Enrichment Center, does food and water
distribution on-site which has taken up physical space at their facility and consumed volunteer and
administrative time. They have also realized cash expenses to accommodate the challenges of
moving large quantities of water around their building. Meanwhile, Christ Enrichment Center
continues to be tasked with running youth summer camps, family literacy programs, and a host of
other services. Having youth workers from the SYI program, ensures that they are able to maximize
their resources and continue to provide valuable programming to the community. Other SYI sites
documented as part of the recovery efforts, include: Catholic Charities, City of Flint, Flint Community
Schools, Flint Public Library, and GCCARD. It’s likely that other SYI work sites have also been

4
impacted and are providing services or work experiences that support our communities’ recovery. It
should also be noted that many of these SYI work sites partner with other agencies and businesses
to provide work experiences, which have also likely been affected by the crisis.

• Individuals’ Economic Security. The TeenQuest and Summer Youth Initiative program impacts
young people, a vast majority of which are Flint residents, in many ways. Not only are the workers
often the beneficiary of services at their work sites, but they also connect with their community
through volunteer service and receive a wage that can contribute to the household income.
Economic security and job skills can have lasting effects on a young person, especially in a
community with widely resonating effects of this health emergency.

-end-

5
STATE OF MICHIGAN

RICK SNYDER EXECUTIVE OFFICE BRIAN CALLEY
GOVERNOR LANSING LT. GOVERNOR

EXECUTIVE ORDER
No. 2016-8

AMENDMENT TO EXECUTIVE ORDER 2016-1

FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF STATE POLICE

WHEREAS, Section 1 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 vests the
executive power of the state of Michigan in the Governor; and

WHEREAS, Section 2 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963
empowers the Governor to make changes in the organization of the Executive Branch
or in the assignment of functions among its units that he considers necessary for
efficient administration; and

WHEREAS, municipal water in the City of Flint showed elevated lead levels after
the City of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River; and

WHEREAS, the County of Genesee and the City of Flint have taken actions to
cope with the situation, including but not limited to, switching back to the Detroit water
system on October 16, 2015, declaring local states of emergency, activating the
emergency response and recovery aspects of their emergency operations plan,
marshaling and distributing required resources on a city-wide level, and issuing
emergency public information and bulletins; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force was formed as an independent
advisory task force charged with reviewing actions regarding water use and testing in
Flint; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force has made an interim
recommendation that the state government should coordinate a sustained, public-health
focused response to remedy, to the fullest extent possible, the impacts on the Flint
community; and

WHEREAS, on January 5, 2016, the Governor issued a proclamation declaring a
state of emergency in the County of Genesee and the City of Flint; and

WHEREAS, multiple state departments and local authorities share the
responsibility for ensuring safe drinking water and the coordination of efforts to address

GEORGE W. ROMNEY BUILDING • 111 SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE • LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov
the consequences resulting from the presence of elevated lead levels in drinking water;
and

WHEREAS, ensuring safe drinking water and addressing the consequences of
elevated lead levels in drinking water will require collaboration and communication
between state departments, local governments, and subject matter experts; and

WHEREAS, the establishment of a Flint Water Interagency Coordinating
Committee within the Michigan Department of State Police will facilitate the
collaboration and communication between state departments, local governments, and
subject matter experts necessary to effectively coordinate a response and recovery
effort;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Richard D. Snyder, Governor of the state of Michigan, by
virtue of the power and authority vested in the Governor by the Michigan Constitution of
1963 and Michigan law, order the following:

I. AMENDMENT

A. Section I. B. of Executive Order 2016-1 is amended as follows:

The Coordinating Committee shall be composed of the following eighteen (18)
members who shall serve an initial term expiring on December 31, 2018.

• The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor;
• The Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland
Security within the Michigan Department of State Police;
• The Director of the Department of Environmental Quality, or his or her
designee;
• The Director of the Department of Health and Human Services, or his or
her designee;
• The Director of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, or his
or her designee;
• The State Treasurer, or his or her designee;
• The Superintendent of Public Instruction, or his or her designee;
• The elected Mayor of the City of Flint who shall be appointed to the
Coordinating Committee by the Governor;
• Three (3) additional representatives of the City of Flint who shall be
submitted by the Mayor of the City of Flint and appointed to the
Coordinating Committee by the Governor;
• One (1) additional representative of the City of Flint who shall be
submitted by the Flint City Council and appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) representatives of Genesee County who shall be submitted by
the Genesee County Board of Commissioners and appointed to the
2
Coordinating Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) subject matter experts who shall be appointed to the
Coordinating Committee by the Governor.

After the initial appointments, members of the Coordinating Committee appointed
under this subsection shall serve terms of three years.

II. MISCELLANEOUS

A. All other provisions of Executive Order 2016-1 not specifically amended by
this Order shall remain unchanged.

B. A member of the Coordinating Committee appointed and serving under
section I. B. of Executive Order 2016-1 shall continue under this Order as a member of
the Coordinating Committee.

C. This Order does not invalidate any actions already taken by the
Coordinating Committee created pursuant to Executive Order 2016-1.

The Executive Order shall become effective upon filing.

Given under my hand and the Great
Seal of the state of Michigan this
Q:l~ day of April, in the year of our
Lord, Two Thousand Sixteen

BY THE GOVERNOR:

FILED WITH SECRETARY OF STATE

3
ON 4{z.z.{11o AT f:20 plY)
STATE OF MICHIGAN

RICK SNYDER EXECUTIVE OFFICE BRIAN CALLEY
GOVERNOR LT. GOVERNOR
LANSING

EXECUTIVE ORDER
No. 2016-1

CREATION OF
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF STATE POLICE

WHEREAS, Section 1 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 vests the
executive power of the state of Michigan in the Governor; and

WHEREAS, Section 2 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 empowers the
Governor to make changes in the organization of the Executive Branch or in the assignment of
functions among its units that he considers necessary for efficient administration; and

WHEREAS, municipal water in the City of Flint showed elevated lead levels after the
City of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River; and

WHEREAS, the County of Genesee and the City of Flint have taken actions to cope with
the situation, including but not limited to, switching back to the Detroit water system on October
16, 2016, declaring local states of emergency, activating the emergency response and recovery
aspects of their emergency operations plan, marshaling and distributing required resources on a
city-wide level, and issuing emergency public information and bulletins; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force was formed as an independent
advisory task force charged with reviewing actions regarding water use and testing·in Flint; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force has made an interim recommendation
that the state government should coordinate a sustained, public-health focused response to
remedy, to the fullest extent possible, the impacts on the Flint community; and

WHEREAS, on January 5, 2016, the Governor issued a proclamation declaring a state
of emergency in the County of Genesee and the City of Flint; and

WHEREAS, multiple state departments and local authorities share the responsibility for
ensuring safe drinking water and the coordination of efforts to address the consequences
resulting from the presence of elevated lead levels in drinking water; and

WHEREAS, ensuring safe drinking water and addressing the consequences of elevated
lead levels in drinking water will require collaboration and communication between state
departments, local governments, and subject matter experts; and

WHEREAS, the establishment of a Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee
within the Michigan Department of State Police will facilitate the collaboration and

GEORGE W. ROMNEY BUILDING o 111 SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE o LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov
communication between state departments, local governments, and subject matter experts
necessary to effectively coordinate a response and recovery effort;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Richard D. Snyder, Governor of the state of Michigan, by virtue
of the power and authority vested in the Governor by the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and
Michigan law, order the following:

I. CREATION OF THE FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee ("Coordinating Committee")
is created as an advisory body within the Michigan Department of State Police (the
"Department").

B. The Coordinating Committee shall be composed of the following seventeen (17)
members who shall serve an initial term expiring on December 31, 2018.

• The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor;
• The Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security
within the Michigan Department of State Police;
• The Director of the Department of Environmental Quality, or his or her designee;
• The Director of the Department of Health and Human Services, or his or her
designee;
• The Director of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, or his or her
designee;
• The State Treasurer, or his or her designee;
• The Superintendent of Public Instruction, or his or her designee;
• The elected Mayor of the City of Flint who shall be appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor;
• Three (3) additional representatives of the City of Flint who shall be submitted by
the Mayor of the City of Flint and appointed to the Coordinating Committee by the
Governor;
• Three (3) representatives of Genesee County who shall be submitted by the
Genesee County Board of Commissioners and appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) subject matter experts who shall be appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor.

After the initial appointments, members of the Coordinating Committee appointed under
this subsection shall serve terms of three years.

C. A vacancy on the Coordinating Committee occurring other than by expiration of a
term shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment for the balance of the
unexpired term. A member may continue serving until his or her successor is appointed. A
member may serve successive terms if reappointed.

2
II. CHARGE TO THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Coordinating Committee shall act in an advisory capacity to the Governor
and subject to the Governor's review and approval, shall do all of the following:

1. Create an incident action plan designed to assist state and local authorities in
ensuring safe drinking water for the residents of the City of Flint and addressing
the consequences of elevated lead levels in drinking water.

2. Review recommendations made by the Flint Water Advisory Task Force and
propose statutory, regulatory, or contractual actions necessary for
implementation of such recommendations.

3. Identify staff with competencies in emergency planning, operations, logistics, and
finance as outlined under the National Incident Management System (NIMS) to
work with the Coordinating Committee to track resource requests and document
progress on the incident action plan.

4. Establish a standard process for sharing pertinent information between all
members including use of the NIMS and Unified/Incident Command as
appropriate.

5. Establish routine communications protocols at the local, executive, and
legislative levels as appropriate.

6. Establish a public information protocol to effectively inform the community.

7. Make recommendations for acceptable standards for potable water.

8. Make recommendations regarding the health impacts for the affected population.

9. Assess the status of infrastructure and determine feasible actions to upgrade the
water system.

10. Establish subcommittees among its members to specifically address, at a
minimum, each of the three following topic areas: Water Quality, Community
Health, and Education.

11. Assist the Governor and the Department in implementing appropriate operations
permitted under the Michigan Emergency Management Act or the federal Stafford
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, including local emergency operations
plans and guides.

12. Explore any avenues of funding for response and recovery efforts including
federal grants, legislative appropriations, and private partners.

B. The Coordinating Committee shall provide other information or advice as
requested by the Governor or the Department.

3
Ill. OPERATIONS OF THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Coordinating Committee shall be staffed and assisted by personnel from the
Department as directed by the Department Director. Any budgeting, procurement, and related
management functions of the Coordinating Committee shall be performed under the direction
and supervision of the Department Director.

B. The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor and the Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security shall
together serve as the Statewide Coordinators responsible for the administrative functions of the
Coordinating Committee.

C. The Coordinating Committee may utilize subcommittees and advisory panels
composed of its members to assist in completing the functions of the Coordinating Committee.
The Coordinating Committee may request public participation on advisory panels as the
Coordinating Committee deems necessary.

D. When making recommendations to the Governor, a majority of the serving
members of the Coordinating Committee must concur.

E. The Coordinating Committee shall meet at the call of either of the Statewide
Coordinators and as may be provided in procedures adopted by the Coordinating Committee.

F. The Coordinating Committee may, as appropriate to perform its duties, make
inquiries, conduct studies, consult with outside experts and federal agencies, and receive
comments from the public.

G. Members of the Coordinating Committee shall serve without compensation but
may receive reimbursement for necessary travel and expenses according to relevant statutes
and the rules and procedures of the Civil Service Commission, and the Department of
Technology, Management and Budget, subject to available funding.

H. The Coordinating Committee may accept donations of labor, services, or other
items of value from any public or private agency or person. Any donations shall be expended in
accordance with applicable laws, rules, and procedures.

I. Members of the Coordinating Committee shall refer all legal, legislative, and
media contacts to the Department.

J. A writing prepared, owned, used, in the possession of, or retained by the
Coordinating Committee in the performance of an official function is subject to the Freedom of
Information Act, 1976 PA 442, as amended, MCL 15.231 to 15.246.

IV. MISCELLANEOUS

A. All departments, committees, commissioners, or officers of this state or of any
political subdivision of this state may give to the Coordinating Committee, or to any member or
representative of the Coordinating Committee, any necessary assistance required by the

4
Coordinating Committee, or any member or representative of the Coordinating Committee, in
the performance of the duties of the Coordinating Committee so far as is compatible with its, his
or her duties.

B. Any suit, action, or other proceeding lawfully commenced by, against, or before
any entity affected under this Order shall not abate by reason of the taking effect of this Order.

C. The invalidity of any portion of this Order shall not affect the validity of the
remainder of the Order.

The Executive Order shall become effective upon filing.

Given under my hand and \~~real Seal of
the state of Michigan this day of
January, in the year of our Lord, Two
Thousand Sixteen

BY THE GOVERNOR:

FILED WITH SECRETARY OF STATE

ON J/ II ,hla AT lb :aS AM

5
STATE OF MICHIGAN

RICK SNYDER EXECUTIVE OFFICE BRIAN CALLEY
GOVERNOR LT. GOVERNOR
LANSING

EXECUTIVE ORDER
No. 2016-1

CREATION OF
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF STATE POLICE

WHEREAS, Section 1 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 vests the
executive power of the state of Michigan in the Governor; and

WHEREAS, Section 2 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 empowers the
Governor to make changes in the organization of the Executive Branch or in the assignment of
functions among its units that he considers necessary for efficient administration; and

WHEREAS, municipal water in the City of Flint showed elevated lead levels after the
City of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River; and

WHEREAS, the County of Genesee and the City of Flint have taken actions to cope with
the situation, including but not limited to, switching back to the Detroit water system on October
16, 2016, declaring local states of emergency, activating the emergency response and recovery
aspects of their emergency operations plan, marshaling and distributing required resources on a
city-wide level, and issuing emergency public information and bulletins; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force was formed as an independent
advisory task force charged with reviewing actions regarding water use and testing·in Flint; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force has made an interim recommendation
that the state government should coordinate a sustained, public-health focused response to
remedy, to the fullest extent possible, the impacts on the Flint community; and

WHEREAS, on January 5, 2016, the Governor issued a proclamation declaring a state
of emergency in the County of Genesee and the City of Flint; and

WHEREAS, multiple state departments and local authorities share the responsibility for
ensuring safe drinking water and the coordination of efforts to address the consequences
resulting from the presence of elevated lead levels in drinking water; and

WHEREAS, ensuring safe drinking water and addressing the consequences of elevated
lead levels in drinking water will require collaboration and communication between state
departments, local governments, and subject matter experts; and

WHEREAS, the establishment of a Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee
within the Michigan Department of State Police will facilitate the collaboration and

GEORGE W. ROMNEY BUILDING o 111 SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE o LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov
communication between state departments, local governments, and subject matter experts
necessary to effectively coordinate a response and recovery effort;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Richard D. Snyder, Governor of the state of Michigan, by virtue
of the power and authority vested in the Governor by the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and
Michigan law, order the following:

I. CREATION OF THE FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee ("Coordinating Committee")
is created as an advisory body within the Michigan Department of State Police (the
"Department").

B. The Coordinating Committee shall be composed of the following seventeen (17)
members who shall serve an initial term expiring on December 31, 2018.

• The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor;
• The Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security
within the Michigan Department of State Police;
• The Director of the Department of Environmental Quality, or his or her designee;
• The Director of the Department of Health and Human Services, or his or her
designee;
• The Director of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, or his or her
designee;
• The State Treasurer, or his or her designee;
• The Superintendent of Public Instruction, or his or her designee;
• The elected Mayor of the City of Flint who shall be appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor;
• Three (3) additional representatives of the City of Flint who shall be submitted by
the Mayor of the City of Flint and appointed to the Coordinating Committee by the
Governor;
• Three (3) representatives of Genesee County who shall be submitted by the
Genesee County Board of Commissioners and appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) subject matter experts who shall be appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor.

After the initial appointments, members of the Coordinating Committee appointed under
this subsection shall serve terms of three years.

C. A vacancy on the Coordinating Committee occurring other than by expiration of a
term shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment for the balance of the
unexpired term. A member may continue serving until his or her successor is appointed. A
member may serve successive terms if reappointed.

2
II. CHARGE TO THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Coordinating Committee shall act in an advisory capacity to the Governor
and subject to the Governor's review and approval, shall do all of the following:

1. Create an incident action plan designed to assist state and local authorities in
ensuring safe drinking water for the residents of the City of Flint and addressing
the consequences of elevated lead levels in drinking water.

2. Review recommendations made by the Flint Water Advisory Task Force and
propose statutory, regulatory, or contractual actions necessary for
implementation of such recommendations.

3. Identify staff with competencies in emergency planning, operations, logistics, and
finance as outlined under the National Incident Management System (NIMS) to
work with the Coordinating Committee to track resource requests and document
progress on the incident action plan.

4. Establish a standard process for sharing pertinent information between all
members including use of the NIMS and Unified/Incident Command as
appropriate.

5. Establish routine communications protocols at the local, executive, and
legislative levels as appropriate.

6. Establish a public information protocol to effectively inform the community.

7. Make recommendations for acceptable standards for potable water.

8. Make recommendations regarding the health impacts for the affected population.

9. Assess the status of infrastructure and determine feasible actions to upgrade the
water system.

10. Establish subcommittees among its members to specifically address, at a
minimum, each of the three following topic areas: Water Quality, Community
Health, and Education.

11. Assist the Governor and the Department in implementing appropriate operations
permitted under the Michigan Emergency Management Act or the federal Stafford
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, including local emergency operations
plans and guides.

12. Explore any avenues of funding for response and recovery efforts including
federal grants, legislative appropriations, and private partners.

B. The Coordinating Committee shall provide other information or advice as
requested by the Governor or the Department.

3
Ill. OPERATIONS OF THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Coordinating Committee shall be staffed and assisted by personnel from the
Department as directed by the Department Director. Any budgeting, procurement, and related
management functions of the Coordinating Committee shall be performed under the direction
and supervision of the Department Director.

B. The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor and the Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security shall
together serve as the Statewide Coordinators responsible for the administrative functions of the
Coordinating Committee.

C. The Coordinating Committee may utilize subcommittees and advisory panels
composed of its members to assist in completing the functions of the Coordinating Committee.
The Coordinating Committee may request public participation on advisory panels as the
Coordinating Committee deems necessary.

D. When making recommendations to the Governor, a majority of the serving
members of the Coordinating Committee must concur.

E. The Coordinating Committee shall meet at the call of either of the Statewide
Coordinators and as may be provided in procedures adopted by the Coordinating Committee.

F. The Coordinating Committee may, as appropriate to perform its duties, make
inquiries, conduct studies, consult with outside experts and federal agencies, and receive
comments from the public.

G. Members of the Coordinating Committee shall serve without compensation but
may receive reimbursement for necessary travel and expenses according to relevant statutes
and the rules and procedures of the Civil Service Commission, and the Department of
Technology, Management and Budget, subject to available funding.

H. The Coordinating Committee may accept donations of labor, services, or other
items of value from any public or private agency or person. Any donations shall be expended in
accordance with applicable laws, rules, and procedures.

I. Members of the Coordinating Committee shall refer all legal, legislative, and
media contacts to the Department.

J. A writing prepared, owned, used, in the possession of, or retained by the
Coordinating Committee in the performance of an official function is subject to the Freedom of
Information Act, 1976 PA 442, as amended, MCL 15.231 to 15.246.

IV. MISCELLANEOUS

A. All departments, committees, commissioners, or officers of this state or of any
political subdivision of this state may give to the Coordinating Committee, or to any member or
representative of the Coordinating Committee, any necessary assistance required by the

4
Coordinating Committee, or any member or representative of the Coordinating Committee, in
the performance of the duties of the Coordinating Committee so far as is compatible with its, his
or her duties.

B. Any suit, action, or other proceeding lawfully commenced by, against, or before
any entity affected under this Order shall not abate by reason of the taking effect of this Order.

C. The invalidity of any portion of this Order shall not affect the validity of the
remainder of the Order.

The Executive Order shall become effective upon filing.

Given under my hand and \~~real Seal of
the state of Michigan this day of
January, in the year of our Lord, Two
Thousand Sixteen

BY THE GOVERNOR:

FILED WITH SECRETARY OF STATE

ON J/ II ,hla AT lb :aS AM

5
FLINT & GENESEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Evaluation Form for CEO: Tim Herman
Name of Evaluator: Rating
Date of Evaluation: November, 2016 1-5 (high) Comments
RELATIONSHIP WITH BOARD:
1.      Recruits and retains a high powered Board.
2.      Keeps Board informed.
3.      Offers professional advice to Board.
4.      Interprets/executes the intent of Board policies.
5.      Supports Board policy and actions to public and staff.
6.      Remains impartial to Board, treating all members alike.
7.      Refrains from criticism, individual/group members of the Board.
8.      Bases his position with Board matters upon principle and fact.
9.      Facilitates Operating Board, RLC, and Strategic Board meetings effectively.
10. Maintains consistent and timely flow of communication regarding internal and external FGCC activities to Board.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS:
1. Gains respect and support of community at large regarding FGCC initiatives.
2. Solicits and gives attention to issues raised by area community partners and governing agencies.
3. Develops cooperative relationships with news media.
4. Demonstrates strong Community Leadership in areas of concern to FGCC.
5. Works effectively with public and private agencies at various levels, local and beyond.
6. Engages in leadership activities at regional, State and/or National levels as directed by the Board.
STAFF PERSONNEL RELATIONSHIPS:
1. Reconizes staff for contributions and exhibits ability to assist them in performing their job functions effectively.
2. Orchestrates and coordinates interplay of various functions of FGCC effectively
3. Demonstrates fairness and is non-disciminatory regarding personnel issues.
4. Appears to delegate authority to staff members appropriate to the position each person holds
5. Encourages participation of appropriate staff members and groups in planning, procedures and policy interpretation
6. Presents positive and negative evaluative information to the Operating Board as necessary regarding performance of staff members.
7. Budgets and plans for staff development and retraining in accordance with the needs of the FGCC
PROGRAM AREAS:
1. Seeks data to achieve a comprehensive understanding of issues.
2. Provides effective leadership on major FGCC issues.
3. Leads in the formulation of action plans to address FGCC initiatives.
4. Facilitates an environment whereby staff seem able to reach decisions and solve problems.
5. Provides monthly evaluation of program areas to the Board as outlined in the Stragegic Plan.
BUSINESS AND FINANCE:
1. Supervises operations, ensuring competent and efficient performance.
2. Monitors that budget proposals and expenditures are wise and ensures that adequate control and accounting are maintained.
3. Keeps Board informed of all relevant budgetary concerns.
4. Able to generate new revenues at the major investor level.
PERSONAL QUALITIES:
1. Defends principle and conviction in the face of pressure and partisan influence.
2. Maintains high standards of ethics, honest, and integrity in all personal and professional matters.
3. Earns respect and standing among his professional colleagues.
4. Demonstrates ability to work well with individuals and groups
5. Exercises good judgment.
6. Maintains pose and emotional stability in the full range of his professional activities.
7. Writes clearly and concisely.
8. Speaks well in front of large and small groups, expressing his ideas in a logical and forthright manner.
9. Thinks well on his feet when faced with an unexpected or disturbing turn of events in a large group meeting.
10. Stays current and remains knowlegeable on FGCC related issues including challenges and opportunities..
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT

The following Flint Water Agreement was reached 1/10/18 at Mayor Weaver’s Chambers. The following
individuals affirmed their support for the points listed below:

Mayor Karen Weaver Mr. Stephen Branch
Superintendent Bilal Tawwab Ms. Yvonne Lewis
Dr. Lawrence Reynolds Mr. Scott Hiipakka
Dr. Pam Pugh Mr. Richard Baird
Mr. Gilcreast

1. The State of Michigan (LARA and DEQ) agrees to conduct flushing and testing protocols throughout
the Flint Community Schools (FCS) beginning immediately and culminating after the 3rd testing round.
The State agrees to conduct quarterly testing in FCS through 2018. Members of the Mayor’s Health
Technical Advisory group will collaborate with DEQ on the testing protocols (to be confirmed on January
11) and will be invited to join the testing teams.

2. All parties agreed that the continuous testing protocol begin as soon as possible and commence each
weekend and conclude no later than the weekend of March 17. Each of the 3 testing rounds will comprise
three consecutive weekends in FCS. Superintendent commits to physical access to the schools and
supporting the flushing of facility pipes so as to ensure that the water is moving in the system between
testing periods and through the remainder of 2018 in support the quarterly testing program. The
schedule is as follows:

• Weekend of January 13 (Will try to get a team scheduled but may not be possible due to lateness
of request).
• Weekends of January 20, 27, Feb 3 will constitute Round 1 of Testing and Flushing.
• Weekends of Feb 10, 17 and 24 will constitute Round 2
• Weekends of March 3, 10 and 17 will constitute Round 3

3. The State agrees to keep the community water distribution process in place until the conclusion of the
FCS testing rounds. In the event that the data reflects a water quality that exceeds a 90th percentile
value of 15 PPB based on unfiltered samples, or other issues of water contamination are discovered, the
State agrees to exercise best efforts to assist the School district in remediation of the problem.

In the event that the FCS testing data affirms the water quality, the State and the City of Flint Leadership
will announce the results and the cessation of state provided bottled water and bottled water delivery.
The schools and the medical community will be invited to also be a part of any announcement. Because
FCS procures its water independently through monies received through a third-party coalition, any
decisions regarding cessation of bottled water within the schools, and any financial responsibilities for
procurement and warehousing, remains with FCS.

4. FCS agrees to move forward with the creation of the model School Water Training (Testing,
Monitoring, and Education) Program. Funding for this pilot is $1 million from MI Department of
Education and will create a best practices tutorial for flushing and testing protocols for all Michigan
schools. This includes establishment of an ongoing quarterly water testing program throughout 2018.

5. Supt. Tawwab will be appointed to the FWICC Subcommittee on Water Quality which will examine and
recommend best practices for K-12 water testing and flushing.

Respectfully Submitted,

Mayor Karen Weaver Mr. Richard Baird
City of Flint State of Michigan
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
News Release

January 24, 2017

For More Information:
Tiffany Brown, 517-242-1376, brownt22@michigan.gov
Michael Shore, 517-284-6713, shorem2@michigan.gov

City of Flint's water system now meeting federal Lead and Copper Rule,
action levels comparable to cities with similar size and age of
infrastructure in Michigan and across the U.S.
State remains committed to continuing work in Flint as city and residents recover

FLINT, MICH. The City of Flint’s water system is now testing below action levels of the federal
Lead and Copper Rule and at levels comparable to cities with similar size and age of
infrastructure in Michigan and across the nation. The notification of this finding, based on results
from the most recent 6-month monitoring period, was provided this morning by the Michigan
Department of Environmental Quality to the Mayor of Flint.

“This is good news and the result of many partners on the local, county, state and federal levels
working together to restore the water quality in the City of Flint,” said MDEQ Director Heidi
Grether. “The Flint water system is one of the most monitored systems in the country for lead
and copper, and we remain committed to continuing work in Flint as the city recovers.”

The 90th percentile lead value of samples collected from Tier 1 sites for the 6-month
compliance period between July 1, 2016, and Dec. 31, 2016, was 12 ppb, which is less than the
15 ppb action level for lead. Tier 1 sites are residential sites confirmed as having lead service
lines or copper plumbing with lead solder installed between 1983 and 1988.

Further, the four rounds of sentinel site sampling collected within the same 6-month compliance
period indicate the system continues to recover, with the 90th percentile value of the most recent
round of sentinel site test results at 8 ppb.

“The remarkable improvement in water quality over the past year is a testament to all levels of
government working together and the resilient people of Flint helping us help them through
participation in the flushing programs,” said Gov. Rick Snyder. “There is still more work to do in
Flint, and I remain committed to helping the residents recover and restore their city. Programs
related to providing water filters, funding lead service line replacements, increasing access to
health care, improving educational opportunities, growing Flint’s economy, and more will
continue. It was important to attain a water quality that remains below action levels of the federal
Lead and Copper Rule and is comparable to cities with similar size and age of infrastructure in
Michigan and the U.S. This is not the end of our work in Flint, but it is one more step along the
path toward Flint’s future.”

In its letter, the DEQ laid out a series of actions the city must continue to take to remain in
compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule and the Safe Water Drinking Act as a whole.
The State of Michigan has been providing water credits to help residents pay for water they
could not use because it did not meet state and federal quality standards. The remaining credits
will be available to help pay for water used through the end of February. The state has been
providing water credits for water use dating back to April 2014.

The state also has been paying for the city’s source water from the Great Lakes Water Authority
since October 2015. The state will continue to provide funding for source water through the end
of February.

As a reminder, the state continues its recommendation that residents use filtered water for
drinking and cooking for everyone in their household due to the chance for disruption to pipes
as the city replaces lead service lines. The state will continue to provide filter cartridges because
of the ongoing lead service line replacement.

###
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
News Release

January 24, 2017

For More Information:
Tiffany Brown, 517-242-1376, brownt22@michigan.gov
Michael Shore, 517-284-6713, shorem2@michigan.gov

City of Flint's water system now meeting federal Lead and Copper Rule,
action levels comparable to cities with similar size and age of
infrastructure in Michigan and across the U.S.
State remains committed to continuing work in Flint as city and residents recover

FLINT, MICH. The City of Flint’s water system is now testing below action levels of the federal
Lead and Copper Rule and at levels comparable to cities with similar size and age of
infrastructure in Michigan and across the nation. The notification of this finding, based on results
from the most recent 6-month monitoring period, was provided this morning by the Michigan
Department of Environmental Quality to the Mayor of Flint.

“This is good news and the result of many partners on the local, county, state and federal levels
working together to restore the water quality in the City of Flint,” said MDEQ Director Heidi
Grether. “The Flint water system is one of the most monitored systems in the country for lead
and copper, and we remain committed to continuing work in Flint as the city recovers.”

The 90th percentile lead value of samples collected from Tier 1 sites for the 6-month
compliance period between July 1, 2016, and Dec. 31, 2016, was 12 ppb, which is less than the
15 ppb action level for lead. Tier 1 sites are residential sites confirmed as having lead service
lines or copper plumbing with lead solder installed between 1983 and 1988.

Further, the four rounds of sentinel site sampling collected within the same 6-month compliance
period indicate the system continues to recover, with the 90th percentile value of the most recent
round of sentinel site test results at 8 ppb.

“The remarkable improvement in water quality over the past year is a testament to all levels of
government working together and the resilient people of Flint helping us help them through
participation in the flushing programs,” said Gov. Rick Snyder. “There is still more work to do in
Flint, and I remain committed to helping the residents recover and restore their city. Programs
related to providing water filters, funding lead service line replacements, increasing access to
health care, improving educational opportunities, growing Flint’s economy, and more will
continue. It was important to attain a water quality that remains below action levels of the federal
Lead and Copper Rule and is comparable to cities with similar size and age of infrastructure in
Michigan and the U.S. This is not the end of our work in Flint, but it is one more step along the
path toward Flint’s future.”

In its letter, the DEQ laid out a series of actions the city must continue to take to remain in
compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule and the Safe Water Drinking Act as a whole.
The State of Michigan has been providing water credits to help residents pay for water they
could not use because it did not meet state and federal quality standards. The remaining credits
will be available to help pay for water used through the end of February. The state has been
providing water credits for water use dating back to April 2014.

The state also has been paying for the city’s source water from the Great Lakes Water Authority
since October 2015. The state will continue to provide funding for source water through the end
of February.

As a reminder, the state continues its recommendation that residents use filtered water for
drinking and cooking for everyone in their household due to the chance for disruption to pipes
as the city replaces lead service lines. The state will continue to provide filter cartridges because
of the ongoing lead service line replacement.

###
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE
APRIL 29, 2016, 9:00AM – 10:30AM

I. Introductions (All–3 mins)

II. Opening Remarks (Lt. Gov. Calley – 3 mins)

III. City of Flint Remarks (Mayor Weaver – 3 min)

IV. Genesee County Update (Chairman Curtis – 3 min)

V. KWA Presentation (Wright – 30 mins)
 Historical Perspective
 Q& A

VI. FWATF 44 Recommendations (Hollins/Kelenske – 30 mins)
 Subcommittee Assignments

VII. New Business (Kelenske – 5 mins)
 Lead Copper Rule Resolution
 Letter to Senate Leadership
 24 Hour Notice for Resolutions

VIII. Next Steps/Closing Remarks (Hollins – 3min)
 May 6, 13, 20 Meeting Location
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE
16 DECEMBER 2016 - 9:00AM – 10:30AM

I. Introductions (All– 5 mins)

II. Opening Remarks (Gov. Snyder – 5 mins)

III. City of Flint Update (Mayor Weaver – 5 mins)

IV. Genesee County Update (Valacak - 5 mins)

V. Water Quality Update (Krisztian – 5 mins)

VI. Flint Dashboard Update (Hiipakka – 5 mins)

VII. EOC Update (Kelenske – 15 mins)

VIII. FWICC Subcommittees Update
 Water Rates (Dr. Beecher – 5 mins)
 Policy (Rental Property Water Bills) (Zimmer – 5 mins)

IX. Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board Report (Lt. Gov. Calley – 15 mins)

X. New Business (Hollins – 10 mins)
 Member Concerns
 Next Meeting on 1/20 –
Riverfront Banquet Center Suites A-B

XI. Closing Remarks (Gov. Snyder – 5 mins)
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE
16 DECEMBER 2016 - 9:00AM – 10:30AM

I. Introductions (All– 5 mins)

II. Opening Remarks (Gov. Snyder – 5 mins)

III. City of Flint Update (Mayor Weaver – 5 mins)

IV. Genesee County Update (Valacak - 5 mins)

V. Water Quality Update (Krisztian – 5 mins)

VI. Flint Dashboard Update (Hiipakka – 5 mins)

VII. EOC Update (Kelenske – 15 mins)

VIII. FWICC Subcommittees Update
 Water Infrastructure (Feighner – 5 mins)
 Water Rates (Dr. Beecher – 5 mins)
 Policy (Rental Property Water Bills) (Zimmer – 5 mins)

IX. Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board Report (Lt. Gov. Calley – 15 mins)

X. New Business (Hollins – 10 mins)
 Member Concerns
 Next Meeting on 1/20 –
Riverfront Banquet Center Suites A-B

XI. Closing Remarks (Gov. Snyder – 5 mins)
STATE OF MICHIGAN

RICK SNYDER EXECUTIVE OFFICE BRIAN CALLEY
GOVERNOR LANSING LT. GOVERNOR

EXECUTIVE ORDER
No. 2016-8

AMENDMENT TO EXECUTIVE ORDER 2016-1

FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF STATE POLICE

WHEREAS, Section 1 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 vests the
executive power of the state of Michigan in the Governor; and

WHEREAS, Section 2 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963
empowers the Governor to make changes in the organization of the Executive Branch
or in the assignment of functions among its units that he considers necessary for
efficient administration; and

WHEREAS, municipal water in the City of Flint showed elevated lead levels after
the City of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River; and

WHEREAS, the County of Genesee and the City of Flint have taken actions to
cope with the situation, including but not limited to, switching back to the Detroit water
system on October 16, 2015, declaring local states of emergency, activating the
emergency response and recovery aspects of their emergency operations plan,
marshaling and distributing required resources on a city-wide level, and issuing
emergency public information and bulletins; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force was formed as an independent
advisory task force charged with reviewing actions regarding water use and testing in
Flint; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force has made an interim
recommendation that the state government should coordinate a sustained, public-health
focused response to remedy, to the fullest extent possible, the impacts on the Flint
community; and

WHEREAS, on January 5, 2016, the Governor issued a proclamation declaring a
state of emergency in the County of Genesee and the City of Flint; and

WHEREAS, multiple state departments and local authorities share the
responsibility for ensuring safe drinking water and the coordination of efforts to address

GEORGE W. ROMNEY BUILDING • 111 SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE • LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov
the consequences resulting from the presence of elevated lead levels in drinking water;
and

WHEREAS, ensuring safe drinking water and addressing the consequences of
elevated lead levels in drinking water will require collaboration and communication
between state departments, local governments, and subject matter experts; and

WHEREAS, the establishment of a Flint Water Interagency Coordinating
Committee within the Michigan Department of State Police will facilitate the
collaboration and communication between state departments, local governments, and
subject matter experts necessary to effectively coordinate a response and recovery
effort;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Richard D. Snyder, Governor of the state of Michigan, by
virtue of the power and authority vested in the Governor by the Michigan Constitution of
1963 and Michigan law, order the following:

I. AMENDMENT

A. Section I. B. of Executive Order 2016-1 is amended as follows:

The Coordinating Committee shall be composed of the following eighteen (18)
members who shall serve an initial term expiring on December 31, 2018.

• The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor;
• The Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland
Security within the Michigan Department of State Police;
• The Director of the Department of Environmental Quality, or his or her
designee;
• The Director of the Department of Health and Human Services, or his or
her designee;
• The Director of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, or his
or her designee;
• The State Treasurer, or his or her designee;
• The Superintendent of Public Instruction, or his or her designee;
• The elected Mayor of the City of Flint who shall be appointed to the
Coordinating Committee by the Governor;
• Three (3) additional representatives of the City of Flint who shall be
submitted by the Mayor of the City of Flint and appointed to the
Coordinating Committee by the Governor;
• One (1) additional representative of the City of Flint who shall be
submitted by the Flint City Council and appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) representatives of Genesee County who shall be submitted by
the Genesee County Board of Commissioners and appointed to the
2
Coordinating Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) subject matter experts who shall be appointed to the
Coordinating Committee by the Governor.

After the initial appointments, members of the Coordinating Committee appointed
under this subsection shall serve terms of three years.

II. MISCELLANEOUS

A. All other provisions of Executive Order 2016-1 not specifically amended by
this Order shall remain unchanged.

B. A member of the Coordinating Committee appointed and serving under
section I. B. of Executive Order 2016-1 shall continue under this Order as a member of
the Coordinating Committee.

C. This Order does not invalidate any actions already taken by the
Coordinating Committee created pursuant to Executive Order 2016-1.

The Executive Order shall become effective upon filing.

Given under my hand and the Great
Seal of the state of Michigan this
Q:l~ day of April, in the year of our
Lord, Two Thousand Sixteen

BY THE GOVERNOR:

FILED WITH SECRETARY OF STATE

3
ON 4{z.z.{11o AT f:20 plY)
STATE OF MICHIGAN

RICK SNYDER EXECUTIVE OFFICE BRIAN CALLEY
GOVERNOR LT. GOVERNOR
LANSING

EXECUTIVE ORDER
No. 2016-1

CREATION OF
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF STATE POLICE

WHEREAS, Section 1 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 vests the
executive power of the state of Michigan in the Governor; and

WHEREAS, Section 2 of Article V of the Michigan Constitution of 1963 empowers the
Governor to make changes in the organization of the Executive Branch or in the assignment of
functions among its units that he considers necessary for efficient administration; and

WHEREAS, municipal water in the City of Flint showed elevated lead levels after the
City of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River; and

WHEREAS, the County of Genesee and the City of Flint have taken actions to cope with
the situation, including but not limited to, switching back to the Detroit water system on October
16, 2016, declaring local states of emergency, activating the emergency response and recovery
aspects of their emergency operations plan, marshaling and distributing required resources on a
city-wide level, and issuing emergency public information and bulletins; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force was formed as an independent
advisory task force charged with reviewing actions regarding water use and testing·in Flint; and

WHEREAS, the Flint Water Advisory Task Force has made an interim recommendation
that the state government should coordinate a sustained, public-health focused response to
remedy, to the fullest extent possible, the impacts on the Flint community; and

WHEREAS, on January 5, 2016, the Governor issued a proclamation declaring a state
of emergency in the County of Genesee and the City of Flint; and

WHEREAS, multiple state departments and local authorities share the responsibility for
ensuring safe drinking water and the coordination of efforts to address the consequences
resulting from the presence of elevated lead levels in drinking water; and

WHEREAS, ensuring safe drinking water and addressing the consequences of elevated
lead levels in drinking water will require collaboration and communication between state
departments, local governments, and subject matter experts; and

WHEREAS, the establishment of a Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee
within the Michigan Department of State Police will facilitate the collaboration and

GEORGE W. ROMNEY BUILDING o 111 SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE o LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909
www.michigan.gov
communication between state departments, local governments, and subject matter experts
necessary to effectively coordinate a response and recovery effort;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Richard D. Snyder, Governor of the state of Michigan, by virtue
of the power and authority vested in the Governor by the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and
Michigan law, order the following:

I. CREATION OF THE FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee ("Coordinating Committee")
is created as an advisory body within the Michigan Department of State Police (the
"Department").

B. The Coordinating Committee shall be composed of the following seventeen (17)
members who shall serve an initial term expiring on December 31, 2018.

• The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor;
• The Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security
within the Michigan Department of State Police;
• The Director of the Department of Environmental Quality, or his or her designee;
• The Director of the Department of Health and Human Services, or his or her
designee;
• The Director of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, or his or her
designee;
• The State Treasurer, or his or her designee;
• The Superintendent of Public Instruction, or his or her designee;
• The elected Mayor of the City of Flint who shall be appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor;
• Three (3) additional representatives of the City of Flint who shall be submitted by
the Mayor of the City of Flint and appointed to the Coordinating Committee by the
Governor;
• Three (3) representatives of Genesee County who shall be submitted by the
Genesee County Board of Commissioners and appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor; and
• Three (3) subject matter experts who shall be appointed to the Coordinating
Committee by the Governor.

After the initial appointments, members of the Coordinating Committee appointed under
this subsection shall serve terms of three years.

C. A vacancy on the Coordinating Committee occurring other than by expiration of a
term shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment for the balance of the
unexpired term. A member may continue serving until his or her successor is appointed. A
member may serve successive terms if reappointed.

2
II. CHARGE TO THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Coordinating Committee shall act in an advisory capacity to the Governor
and subject to the Governor's review and approval, shall do all of the following:

1. Create an incident action plan designed to assist state and local authorities in
ensuring safe drinking water for the residents of the City of Flint and addressing
the consequences of elevated lead levels in drinking water.

2. Review recommendations made by the Flint Water Advisory Task Force and
propose statutory, regulatory, or contractual actions necessary for
implementation of such recommendations.

3. Identify staff with competencies in emergency planning, operations, logistics, and
finance as outlined under the National Incident Management System (NIMS) to
work with the Coordinating Committee to track resource requests and document
progress on the incident action plan.

4. Establish a standard process for sharing pertinent information between all
members including use of the NIMS and Unified/Incident Command as
appropriate.

5. Establish routine communications protocols at the local, executive, and
legislative levels as appropriate.

6. Establish a public information protocol to effectively inform the community.

7. Make recommendations for acceptable standards for potable water.

8. Make recommendations regarding the health impacts for the affected population.

9. Assess the status of infrastructure and determine feasible actions to upgrade the
water system.

10. Establish subcommittees among its members to specifically address, at a
minimum, each of the three following topic areas: Water Quality, Community
Health, and Education.

11. Assist the Governor and the Department in implementing appropriate operations
permitted under the Michigan Emergency Management Act or the federal Stafford
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, including local emergency operations
plans and guides.

12. Explore any avenues of funding for response and recovery efforts including
federal grants, legislative appropriations, and private partners.

B. The Coordinating Committee shall provide other information or advice as
requested by the Governor or the Department.

3
Ill. OPERATIONS OF THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE

A. The Coordinating Committee shall be staffed and assisted by personnel from the
Department as directed by the Department Director. Any budgeting, procurement, and related
management functions of the Coordinating Committee shall be performed under the direction
and supervision of the Department Director.

B. The Director of Office of Urban Initiatives within the Executive Office of the
Governor and the Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security shall
together serve as the Statewide Coordinators responsible for the administrative functions of the
Coordinating Committee.

C. The Coordinating Committee may utilize subcommittees and advisory panels
composed of its members to assist in completing the functions of the Coordinating Committee.
The Coordinating Committee may request public participation on advisory panels as the
Coordinating Committee deems necessary.

D. When making recommendations to the Governor, a majority of the serving
members of the Coordinating Committee must concur.

E. The Coordinating Committee shall meet at the call of either of the Statewide
Coordinators and as may be provided in procedures adopted by the Coordinating Committee.

F. The Coordinating Committee may, as appropriate to perform its duties, make
inquiries, conduct studies, consult with outside experts and federal agencies, and receive
comments from the public.

G. Members of the Coordinating Committee shall serve without compensation but
may receive reimbursement for necessary travel and expenses according to relevant statutes
and the rules and procedures of the Civil Service Commission, and the Department of
Technology, Management and Budget, subject to available funding.

H. The Coordinating Committee may accept donations of labor, services, or other
items of value from any public or private agency or person. Any donations shall be expended in
accordance with applicable laws, rules, and procedures.

I. Members of the Coordinating Committee shall refer all legal, legislative, and
media contacts to the Department.

J. A writing prepared, owned, used, in the possession of, or retained by the
Coordinating Committee in the performance of an official function is subject to the Freedom of
Information Act, 1976 PA 442, as amended, MCL 15.231 to 15.246.

IV. MISCELLANEOUS

A. All departments, committees, commissioners, or officers of this state or of any
political subdivision of this state may give to the Coordinating Committee, or to any member or
representative of the Coordinating Committee, any necessary assistance required by the

4
Coordinating Committee, or any member or representative of the Coordinating Committee, in
the performance of the duties of the Coordinating Committee so far as is compatible with its, his
or her duties.

B. Any suit, action, or other proceeding lawfully commenced by, against, or before
any entity affected under this Order shall not abate by reason of the taking effect of this Order.

C. The invalidity of any portion of this Order shall not affect the validity of the
remainder of the Order.

The Executive Order shall become effective upon filing.

Given under my hand and \~~real Seal of
the state of Michigan this day of
January, in the year of our Lord, Two
Thousand Sixteen

BY THE GOVERNOR:

FILED WITH SECRETARY OF STATE

ON J/ II ,hla AT lb :aS AM

5
FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE
RESOLUTION 2016-04

RESOLUTION OF SUPPORT OF THE POLICY SUBCOMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS TO
AMEND THE FEDERAL LEAD COPPER RULES

Whereas, as Michigan has worked to resolve the Flint water crisis, it has become
evident that what happened in Flint is not an isolated occurrence, and the rest of the
nation needs to pay close attention to water quality standards, and

Whereas, on April 15, 2016, the Policy Subcommittee, Lead and Copper Rule Work
Group, presented to the Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee (FWICC), a
comprehensive set of recommendations, and

Whereas, the Policy Subcommittee recommendations would develop a national model
that maximizes consumer protection and ensures transparency and public education
and information at all times – thereby preventing additional water crises, and

Whereas, the Policy Subcommittee recommendations aim to make the Lead and
Copper Rules (LCR) about protecting public health and restoring consumers as
informed participants in the LCR’s shared responsibility model, achieving the stated
purpose of the rule by minimizing lead at consumer taps, removing the underlying
problem, and providing important enforcement mechanisms, and

Whereas, the Policy Subcommittee recommendations include important reforms
deserved by the residents of Flint, the State of Michigan, and the nation including:

● Requiring strong participatory citizen advisory councils.
● Phasing in a reduction in the lead action level from 15 ppb to 10 ppb by 2020.
● Requiring annual lead and copper testing for all schools, day cares, adult foster
care facilities, substance abuse clinics, and public hearing facilities.
● Alerting the public better by requiring notices to all customers as well as public
notices to all schools, community centers, and child care centers when a public
water system exceeds the lead action level.
● Reducing Lead Customer notice requirements from 30 days to 2 business days.
● Reducing community-wide notices (required when LAL is exceeded) from 60
days to 30 days.
● For the first time, establishing a Household Action Level at 40 ppb to provide
heightened notice and information as well as access to blood lead testing.
● Removing gaps in testing and sampling to assure that only high risk homes are
included and that strict and appropriate sampling protocols are followed.
BE IT RESOLVED, that the FLINT WATER INTERAGENCY COORDINATING
COMMITTEE adopts and supports the Lead and Copper Rule suggested improvements
contained in the Policy Subcommittee Work Group recommendations.

Submitted by:

___________________________ _______________________________
Harvey Hollins III Captain Chris Kelenske
FWICC Co-Chair FWICC Co-Chair
STOTEN-22120; No of Pages 15
Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Science of the Total Environment

journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv

Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis:
Another case of sampling bias?
Pierre Goovaerts ⁎
BioMedware Inc., Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA

H I G H L I G H T S G R A P H I C A L A B S T R A C T

• State-controlled monitoring collected
biweekly water samples at 739 sentinel
sites.
• Sentinel sites are not as representative
of Flint housing stock as voluntary sites.
• Unlike sentinel program voluntary sam-
pling indicates increase in lead levels.
• State did not sample houses with lead
service lines in two of the poorest
wards.
• Interior plumbing might contribute
more to lead in Flint water than service
lines.

a r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c t

Article history: The delay in reporting high levels of lead in Flint drinking water, following the city's switch to the Flint River as its
Received 29 November 2016 water supply, was partially caused by the biased selection of sampling sites away from the lead pipe network.
Received in revised form 22 February 2017 Since Flint returned to its pre-crisis source of drinking water, the State has been monitoring water lead levels
Accepted 22 February 2017
(WLL) at selected “sentinel” sites. In a first phase that lasted two months, 739 residences were sampled, most
Available online xxxx
of them bi-weekly, to determine the general health of the distribution system and to track temporal changes
Editor: D. Barcelo in lead levels. During the same period, water samples were also collected through a voluntary program whereby
concerned citizens received free testing kits and conducted sampling on their own. State officials relied on the
Keywords: former data to demonstrate the steady improvement in water quality. A recent analysis of data collected by vol-
Sampling bias untary sampling revealed, however, an opposite trend with lead levels increasing over time. This paper looks at
Blood lead levels potential sampling bias to explain such differences. Although houses with higher WLL were more likely to be
Lead-and-copper rule sampled repeatedly, voluntary sampling turned out to reproduce fairly well the main characteristics (i.e. pres-
Poverty ence of lead service lines (LSL), construction year) of Flint housing stock. State-controlled sampling was less rep-
Lead service lines
resentative; e.g., sentinel sites with LSL were mostly built between 1935 and 1950 in lower poverty areas, which
might hamper our ability to disentangle the effects of LSL and premise plumbing (lead fixtures and pipes present
within old houses) on WLL. Also, there was no sentinel site with LSL in two of the most impoverished wards, in-
cluding where the percentage of children with elevated blood lead levels tripled following the switch in water
supply. Correcting for sampling bias narrowed the gap between sampling programs, yet overall temporal trends
are still opposite.
© 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

⁎ Corresponding author at: BioMedware, Inc., PO Box 1577, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA.
E-mail address: goovaerts@biomedware.com.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
0048-9697/© 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
2 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

1. Introduction sampling of N600 sentinel sites chosen by the EPA and MDEQ (Flint
Safe Drinking Water Task Force, 2016). The initial set of sentinel sites
The drinking water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan was a was selected from a pool of 1951 volunteer sites identified during the
painful reminder that biased monitoring and sampling procedures can door-to-door water distribution; in particular it included all 156 sites
be used to hide the true extent of environmental disasters. The delay with lead or lead combination service lines according to City records
in reporting high lead levels following April 2014s change in water sup- (Sentinel Site Selection, 2016). Other sites were added according to
ply, which resulted in water with high chloride and no corrosion inhib- the following criteria: i) spatial distribution to ensure coverage of all
itor flowing through the aging Flint water distribution system (Flint nine wards, ii) areas predicted to have high blood levels based on
Water Advisory Task Force, 2016), was partially caused by the biased se- Hanna-Attisha et al. (2016), and iii) environmental justice consider-
lection of sampling sites. Flint's water testing from late 2014 missed the ations, specifically lead paint indicators, minority population, and low
bulk of the city's lead pipe network, which along with home plumbing income derived from EPA Environmental Justice Mapping and Screen-
fixtures (e.g., leaded brass and solder), is the primary source of lead ing Tool, known as EJSCREEN (US EPA, 2016b). This initial set evolved
being leached from chlorine-induced corrosion. Instead, according to between sampling rounds as some residents stopped participating
Milman (2016) the sampling targeted properties on the eastern and while others asked to be included in the network (Bryce Feighner, per-
western fringes of the city which, in some cases, were a long way sonal communication, February 2, 2017). Once again, samples were col-
from any apparent source of lead. Even more troubling was the news lected by homeowners although after training by a sentinel team. All
that such sampling practices were being used by other public water sys- water samples collected during the sentinel and voluntary residential
tems throughout the country (Milman and Glenza, 2016). sampling programs were tested for lead and copper by MDEQ Drinking
According to EPA there is no safe level of lead in drinking water as this Water Analysis Laboratory, and in the spirit of transparency, results
toxic metal can be harmful to human health even at low exposure levels. have been posted periodically at http://www.michigan.gov/flintwater.
Yet, the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR, US EPA, 1991, 2002, 2016a) allows a State officials relied on the sentinel data to demonstrate the steady
sizeable number of first-draw 1-L water samples collected from high-risk improvement in water quality since the source water switch. In partic-
homes to exceed the action level of 15 μg/L for lead. Indeed, as long as this ular, the vast majority of the sentinel properties (i.e., well over 90%)
level is exceeded at no more than 10% of sampled residences, the public were found to be at or below the EPA action level (Calley, 2016). A re-
water system is in compliance, with no legal requirement to take action cent analysis of the data collected at non-sentinel sites during the
and notify local populations. High-risk homes are defined as sites where same time period revealed, however, an actual increase in lead levels
elevated levels of lead are likely to be found based on the presence of above 15 μg/L, averaging at some point twice the percentages reported
lead service lines (LSL), lead pipes, or copper pipes soldered with lead by the sentinel program (Goovaerts, 2016). Despite the lack of control
installed after 1982 but before 1985 when solder containing high concen- on the selection of non-sentinel sites, one should expect both sampling
trations of lead was banned. Ideally, water should be sampled from Single programs to share the same objective of characterizing WLL in Flint
Family Residences with half samples collected at LSL sites and half from housing stock in general. A legitimate question is thus: whether sam-
sites with lead pipes or copper pipes with lead solder. pling bias could be the culprit for such opposite trends.
The LCR is statistical in nature as it applies to a sampled set instead of Recent analyses of Flint WLL data alluded to the potential lack of rep-
a single measurement and involves both a percentage threshold (10%) resentativeness of sentinel sites. For example, fewer pre-1940 houses
and a chemical threshold (15 μg/L). Since LCR compliance is controlled were sampled by the sentinel program compared to non-sentinel sites
by how water lead levels (WLL) recorded at a number of sites measure and Flint housing stock, while the reverse trend was observed for LSL
up with respect to an action level, water testing can be manipulated at (Goovaerts, 2016). Another finding was that results of the two sampling
two different levels to mask potential problems. At the residence-level programs differed the most in wards with the greatest percentage of ha-
WLLs can be under-estimated by adopting different tactics known to bitants living below the poverty line, which also turned out to be less
lower the amount of lead in water samples (Milman and Glenza, densely sampled than the least disadvantaged wards. Similarly,
2016). These include running faucets prior to the 6 h. stagnation period Abernethy and Schwartz (2016) found that lower-value homes in
(pre-stagnation flushing), removing or cleaning faucet filters called Flint tend to be those with the lowest rates of water sampling.
“aerators” where lead particles can be trapped, or sampling at unrealis- The main objective of this paper is to compare the housing charac-
tically low flow rates to reduce the amount of lead and other material teristics and geographical distribution of residences sampled by the vol-
that is dislodged from pipes (e.g., use narrow-necked bottles that can- untary and sentinel sampling programs in the aftermath of the Flint
not be filled at normal flow rates). The second type of manipulation drinking water crisis. Unlike the temporal trend analysis described in
can occur at the level of the water system and is achieved through the Goovaerts (2016), the focus is here on a shorter period (2/16/2016–4/
biased selection of sampling sites to ensure that the 10% cutoff is not 15/2016) when the sentinel sampling program aimed to assess the gen-
exceeded. An obvious way is to avoid sampling tier 1 category houses eral health of the distribution system before targeting high-risk areas in
(i.e. single family structures containing copper pipes with lead solder an extended phase (Calley, 2016). Another difference is the study of re-
installed after 1982 or containing lead pipes; and/or are served by a lationships among all putative factors (presence of LSL, construction
lead service line), which can go as far as asking water department em- year, poverty level) and water lead levels through frequency analysis,
ployees to test water safety in their own homes (Milman and Glenza, followed by a ward-level exploration of potential sampling bias with
2016). Another tactic is to “bump out” a test result that found very particular attention to poverty level and percentages of children with el-
high levels of lead by testing more homes (Felton, 2016). evated blood lead levels (EBLL) as reported in Hanna-Attisha et al.
Since Flint returned to its pre-crisis source of drinking water on Oc- (2016). Last, 2010 census tract poverty levels analyzed in Goovaerts
tober 16, 2015, close to 25,000 water samples have been collected and (2016) are replaced by 2015 block group values, as these more recent
tested for lead and copper in N 10,000 residences. Most of these samples and precise estimates were used when designing the sentinel sampling
(80%) were collected through voluntary or homeowner-driven sam- network with the help of EJSCREEN software.
pling whereby concerned citizens received free testing kits from local
water distribution centers and conducted sampling on their own fol- 2. Data sources and methods
lowing instructions provided by MDEQ. This type of crowd sourcing
was supplemented by a State-controlled monitoring, called sentinel 2.1. Datasets
program. In a first phase that lasted two months, this program aimed
to determine the general health of the distribution system and to The database downloaded from http://www.michigan.gov/
track temporal changes in lead concentrations through the biweekly flintwater and described in Goovaerts (2016) was used for studying

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 3

the two sampling designs. The focus of the present analysis was on service line (SL) retrieved from a digital map of Flint's lead water pipe,
residential testing results recorded over the period 2/16/2016–4/ and 2) the year the house was built. For the sentinel network, on-site
15/2016 when the sentinel sampling program took place. This two- data on the composition of service lines were also collected by a plumb-
month period was segmented into five time intervals based on the er during the sentinel team visit. Socio-economic status was assessed
dates for the first and last measurement within each of the five sen- using 2015 ACS (American Community Survey) 5-year estimates of
tinel sampling rounds (S1–S5). Limits of time intervals were adjust- the percentage of the block group population living in households
ed whenever there was a gap of a few days between the end of a where the income is less than or equal to twice the federal “poverty
sentinel sampling round and the beginning of the next one level.” The rationale for using twice the poverty threshold rather than
(Table 1). Data collected at non-sentinel sites were then allocated just the poverty threshold is listed in Appendix B of EJSCREEN technical
to one of the five time intervals to facilitate the comparison of results documentation (US EPA, 2016b); in particular the fact that today's pov-
of both sampling programs. erty thresholds are too low to adequately capture the populations ad-
At 204 non-sentinel sites more than one water sample was collected versely affected by low income levels. These data were downloaded
on the same day; e.g., typically multiple taps are being sampled in hous- from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/download_
es for sale. To avoid allocating too much weight to these replicates each center.xhtml (variable ACS_15_5YR_C17002). The last variable used in
of these observations was assigned a weight equal to one divided by the the study was the ward-level percentage of elevated blood lead levels
number of repeated samples on that day. A similar approach was ap- (i.e., blood level N 5 μg/dL) recorded in children between 1/1/2015
plied to 45 sentinel sites where more than one sample was collected and 9/15/2015, that is after the water source change from Detroit-
within the same sampling round. The final datasets include 3123 and supplied Lake Huron water to the Flint River (Table 2 in Hanna-
4645 WLL data collected at 759 sentinel sites and 4041 non-sentinel Attisha et al., 2016).
sites, respectively.
The set of all 51,045 residential tax parcels located within the City 2.2. Frequency analysis of housing characteristics
of Flint is viewed as the population of interest. Lead in drinking water
mainly comes from lead-based solder and lead-containing plumbing The visualization and comparison of housing characteristics for
fixtures (premise plumbing) in addition to lead service lines bringing the reference population (Flint housing stock) and the two sample
water from street main water breaks to the property (Lee et al., 1989; sets (sentinel and non-sentinel sites) were conducted using frequen-
Cartier et al., 2011; Clark et al., 2015). Plumbing material is usually cy analysis and kernel smoothing. Let N be the number of residences,
related to the installation year of a plumbing system, which can be denoted by their centroid's geographical coordinates uα, within any
approximated by the year of construction. For example, lead service given database, while n(uα) is the number of times a residence α has
lines were mostly installed before the 1930s while most faucets pur- been visited over the two-month study period (n(uα) = 1 for the ref-
chased prior to 1997 were constructed of brass or chrome-plated erence population). The total number of WLL data, denoted N′, is
brass containing up to 8% lead (Rabin, 2008; US EPA, 2006). Poor N
thus ∑∝¼1 nðuα Þ. Each residence is characterized by its built year,
workmanship as well as lack of regular maintenance can also lead BY(uα), the type of service line, SL(uα), and the block group poverty
to more corrosion and leaching, and the presence of lead particu- level, GP(uα).
lates, such as disintegrating brass or detaching pieces of old solder The frequency distribution for the two continuous variables
(Wang et al., 2014). A representative sample would thus be expected (i.e., built year, poverty level) was constructed using a rectangular ker-
to reproduce the main housing characteristics suspected to influence nel of size 11 (i.e., each observation within the window of size 11 re-
WLLs, such as presence of LSL, construction year, or socio-economic ceives the same weight). For example, the sampling frequency of
status of residents. Finally, measurements should be uniformly dis- residences built in year y1 was computed as:
tributed within the city boundaries to account for any other putative
factors likely to be spatially structured (e.g., water travel time be-
tween the treatment plant and home plumbing system). For exam- N 5

ple, during their investigation of the Washington, D.C. drinking f ðBY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ nðuα Þ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ ð1Þ
∝¼1 i¼−5
water crisis, Edwards et al. (2009) found that the relative risk of ex-
posure to high lead in water was a strong function of zip code,
resulting in “hot spots” neighborhoods. The spatial coverage of WLL where iBY(uα; y1 + i) = 1 if BY(uα) = y1 + i and zero otherwise. In other
data was here assessed using the percentage of data collected within words, the number of residences built in 1935 that were sampled was
each of the nine city wards since these geographical units were used calculated as the number of WLL samples collected in houses built be-
in the seminal paper on children EBLL that triggered the emergency tween 1930 and 1940. The choice of the kernel width (11 years) was
response (Hanna-Attisha et al., 2016). somewhat subjective and aimed to strike a balance between a too
The following housing characteristics described in detail in wide window causing information loss and a too narrow window
Goovaerts (2016) were derived for each sampling site: 1) the type of resulting in unreliable estimates. Results based on fewer than 50

Table 1
Datasets available for the comparison of sentinel and voluntary sampling programs of water lead levels in Flint. Statistics for each of the five sampling rounds include the number of data
available including repeated samples, the percentage of WLL above 15 μg/L, and the 90th percentile (P90).

Round Sampling period Sentinel sampling Voluntary sampling

Data (n) %WLL N 15 μg/L P90 (μg/L) Data (n) %WLL N 15 μg/L P90 (μg/L)

S1 2/16/2016–2/24/2016 607 9.51 14.0 1481 9.88 15.0
S2 2/25/2016–3/14/2016 607 8.33 13.0 1337 10.29 17.0
S3 3/15/2016–3/28/2016 652 7.92 12.0 889 11.89 19.0
S4 3/29/2016–4/5/2016 640 7.29 10.0 457 14.02 37.0
S5 4/6/2016–4/15/2016 617 6.51 10.0 481 11.66 19.0
Total 2/16/2016–4/15/2016 3123 7.90 12.0 4645 10.95 18.0

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
4 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Table 2
Percentage of sentinel and non-sentinel sites sampled for the first time in each round and the corresponding percentage of WLL recorded above 15 μg/L. Statistics for all sites and sites that
were sampled previously (repetitions) are also listed.

Sampling round Sentinel sampling Voluntary sampling

% first time sampling %WLL N 15 μg/L % first time sampling %WLL N 15 μg/L

All sites First sampling Repetition All sites First sampling Repetition

S1 100 9.51 9.51 – 100 9.88 9.88 –
S2 14.14 8.33 9.53 8.14 95.6 10.29 10.10 13.93
S3 7.52 7.92 14.59 7.37 90.4 11.89 10.99 20.40
S4 3.80 7.29 8.33 7.25 90.0 14.02 12.53 27.14
S5 1.47 6.51 44.44 5.95 80.3 11.66 9.52 20.26

observations were discarded. A similar formula was used for poverty where Ny1′ is the number of WLL data collected in houses built during
level (width = 11%). Relative frequencies were then derived by dividing the time period [y1 − 5, y1 + 5]. δαk = 1 if residence α was sampled dur-
quantity (1) by 11 × N′. ing k-th round, and zero otherwise. Similar expressions were used to in-
The relationship between any two housing characteristics was ex- vestigate the impact of block group poverty levels on WLL. In all cases,
plored using conditional frequencies. For example, the relative frequen- results based on fewer than 50 observations were discarded.
cy of lead service lines within houses built in year y1 was computed as:
3. Results and discussion
1 N 5
f ðSL ¼ lead j BY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ  iSL ðuα ; leadÞ ð2Þ
Ny1 ∝¼1 i¼−5 3.1. Sampling design

where iSL(uα; lead) = 1 if SL (uα) = lead, and zero otherwise. The de- Fig. 1A shows the location of all residential parcels (759 sentinel sites
nominator Ny1 is computed as: and 4041 non-sentinel sites) that were sampled over the two-month
period. Despite the much smaller number of sentinel sites (15.8%),
N 5
Ny1 ¼ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ ð3Þ their repeated sampling leads to a more balanced proportion of WLL
∝¼1 i¼−5 data relative to non-sentinel sites (41.3%); see Table 1. To visualize the
relative distribution of sentinel versus non-sentinel sites, indicators of
Note that unlike for sampling frequencies (Eq. (1)) each sampled presence/absence of sentinel sites were created for all 4800 sampled lo-
residence is used only once for the computation of conditional frequen- cations before being interpolated using kriging (Goovaerts, 1997). The
cies, i.e., n(uα) = 1 (replicates are not used). Once again, results based map of indicator kriging estimates (Fig. 1B) illustrates the spatial clus-
on fewer than 50 observations were discarded. tering of sentinel sites, in particular along the boundary that Ward 2
shares with wards 3 and 6. On the other hand, much fewer sentinel
2.3. Conditional analysis of water lead levels sites relative to non-sentinel sites are located in wards 1, 3, 4 and 5.
The four variables used to explore any potential sampling bias are
The analysis started with the coding of each WLL data z(uα;Sk), col- mapped in Fig. 1C–F. Information is available at three different geogra-
lected at residence uα during sampling round Sk, into an indicator of phies: 1) tax parcel units for housing characteristics: (composition of
being greater or not than the threshold zc = 15 μg/L: service line, construction year), 2) block groups (BG) for percentages
 of families living below twice the poverty line in 2015, and 3) Flint
1 if zðuα ; Sk ÞNzc wards for percentage of EBLL recorded in children the first 9 months
ik ðuα ; zc Þ ¼ ð4Þ
0 otherwise
of 2015. Visual comparison of these maps already yields some interest-
ing findings (see Section 3.4 for a more quantitative analysis):
To account for temporal changes in lead levels over the two-month
period (Goovaerts, 2016) and their strongly positively skewed distribu- • Ward 5, which includes the largest percentage of children with EBLL
tion, the percentile of each WLL data z(uα; Sk) within the corresponding (15.7%, Table 4) and a large proportion of houses built before 1935
sampling round Skwas also computed as: (82.09%, Table 5), has a very low density of sentinel sites (5.01%).
• According to Hanna-Attisha et al. (2016), the area of intersection be-
pðuα ; Sk Þ ¼ F −1
k ðzðuα ; Sk ÞÞ ð5Þ tween wards 3, 4, and 5 (in the east side of the city) also appeared
to have high EBLL. This area circled in Fig. 1C is characterized by
where Fk (.) is the cumulative distribution function of WLL data for the older homes, higher poverty, and very few sentinel sites.
k-th sampling round. For example, p(uα; Sk) = 0.75 indicates that the • Compared to other poor areas of the city, Ward 1 has houses that are
level measured at residence uα was N75% of WLL data collected during much more recent (i.e., only 13.71% of pre-1935 houses, Table 5).
that sampling round. • Main clusters of sentinel sites appear to be preferentially located in
The impact of housing characteristics on water lead levels was then areas of moderate to lower poverty.
assessed using conditional frequencies similar to the ones described in
Eq. (2). For example, the impact of construction year on the proportion
3.2. Temporal changes
of WLL above zc = 15 μg/L or the relative magnitude of WLL as mea-
sured by percentiles (Eq. (5)) was explored using the following relative
Although none of the four covariates displayed in Fig. 1C–D changed
frequencies:
over the two-month study period, the location of sampling sites did, and
1 N 5 5 the temporal changes in the characteristics of sampled residences is
f ðz Nzc j BY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ  ik ðuα ; zc Þ  δαk ð6Þ summarized in Fig. 2. The time series of percentages of WLL above
N0y1 ∝¼1 k¼1 i¼−5
15 μg/L (see Table 1 for precise numbers) highlight the widening gap
between results of the two sampling programs (Fig. 2A). Not only
1 N 5 5
f ðpj BY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ  pðuα ; Sk Þ  δαk ð7Þ does the voluntary sampling program indicate increasing levels of lead
N0y1 ∝¼1 k¼1 i¼−5 over time, it also reflects the failure to meet the LCR action level of

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 5

Fig. 1. Spatial distribution of sampling sites (A, red dots indicate sentinel sites) and probability of occurrence of sentinel sites mapped by indicator kriging (B). Data layers include:
construction year (C) and composition of service line (D) for each residential tax parcel, block group percentages of families living below twice the poverty line in 2015 (E), and ward-
level percentage of elevated blood lead levels recorded in children during the first 9 months of 2015 (F). The boundaries of 40 census tracts are overlaid on map D, while all other
maps show boundaries of nine Flint wards. Locations of sentinel sites are also overlaid on the poverty map E to illustrate the clustering of sites in areas of lower poverty. (For
interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

10% (horizontal dashed line) at any moment during the two-month pe- their first samples would be prone to acquire additional testing kits
riod. On the other hand, according to the sentinel monitoring program and repeat the sampling within the two month period. In addition,
water quality has been steadily improving and the threshold of 10% of whenever a test result exceeded 15 μg/L, the residential testing proce-
WLL data above 15 μg/L was never exceeded. dure was to offer a follow-up test to see if levels were coming down
Given the lack of control on the voluntary sampling program a legit- and if remediative efforts were working (Testing Plan, Process &
imate concern is that homeowners who found high levels of lead in Protocols, 2016). On the other hand houses with low lead levels

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
6 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

would be less likely to be tested again, leading over time to a biased se- at round S4 is based on 42 houses. Conversely, the sentinel sites visited
lection of houses and an inflated percentage of WLL above 15 μg/L. for the first time in rounds S2-S4 had higher lead levels, which confirms
This potential temporal bias was investigated by identifying for each the targeting of houses at risk as illustrated by the increasing percent-
sampling round the sites that were visited for the first time or sampled ages of sentinel sites with lead service lines (Fig. 2B). Excluding repeat-
repeatedly. As expected, the proportion of first time visits has declined ed measurements at non-sentinel sites narrowed the gap between the
over time, in particular for the sentinel sampling program which aims two times series (Table 2, columns and Fig. 7B), yet it did not alter tem-
to track temporal changes at fixed sites. For example, Table 2 indicates poral trends: the percentage of WLL recorded above 15 μg/L at non-
that 80% of sites sampled voluntarily in round S5 (4/6/2016–4/15/ sentinel sites is still increasing for rounds S1 through S4.
2016) had never been tested in rounds S1-S4, while this was true only Fig. 2B shows that WLL and percentages of sentinel sites with lead
for 1.5% of sentinel sites. Interestingly, WLL exceeded 15 μg/L at a service lines have moved in opposite directions over the five sampling
much lower rate during these first time visits compared to residences rounds. Indeed, the sentinel program has sampled an increasing num-
that had been sampled previously; note, however, that some statistics ber of houses with LSL, a trend that appears even stronger when using
can be unreliable for a small number of homes; e.g. the 27.1% recorded the more accurate on-site data on composition of service lines instead

Fig. 2. Temporal changes in WLLs and characteristics of houses visited by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs during the five rounds (S1–S5) defined in Table 1. The following
statistics were computed from data collected during each sampling round: (A) % WLL data above 15 μg/L, (B) % houses with lead service lines (digital and on-site data are plotted for
sentinel sites), (C, D) % houses built before 1935 or between 1935 and 1950, and (E, F) % houses located in block groups (BG) with lower (b55%) or higher (N75%) percentages of
habitants living below twice the poverty line. Statistics for Flint's 51,045 residential parcels are depicted by horizontal dashed lines.

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 7

of the digital data. As expected the voluntary sampling data more close- Flint housing stock (0.6%). Despite the lack of control on site selection,
ly reproduce the percentage of LSL found in Flint housing stock (7.32%), the voluntary sampling program captures very closely the relationship
which is lower than the results of preferential sampling by the sentinel between construction year and presence of LSL. Plotting these condi-
program. Lead service lines are widely considered the main source of tional frequencies for the sentinel program reveals a very strong sam-
lead in drinking water. The fact that WLLs have exceeded 15 μg/L at pling bias, which could not be detected by looking at individual
fewer and fewer sentinel sites, even though these sites have increasing- statistics for construction year (Fig. 3A) and percentage of LSL
ly included LSL, could thus be viewed as the sign of continuous improve- (Fig. 2B). Indeed, the vast majority of sentinel sites with LSL were built
ment in water quality. Yet, lead levels recorded at non-sentinel sites between 1935 and 1950. Using the more accurate on-site data accentu-
have increased despite the lower sampling frequency of lead service ates the magnitude of the bias.
lines. The bias attached to the sampling of LSL by the sentinel program ex-
Another source of lead in drinking water is lead fixtures and pipes tends to poverty level (Fig. 3D). Because older homes tend to be located
present within old houses (premises plumbing). In comparison to LSL in poorer neighborhoods (Fig. 3E) the percentage of houses with lead
temporal trends in construction year of sampled houses better match service lines tends to increase with poverty level (black solid line).
WLL changes over the five sampling rounds (Fig. 2C,D). The sentinel The sentinel program has over-sampled LSL in the block groups with
program has been sampling fewer and fewer pre-1935 houses, while poverty levels ranging between 40% and 70%, which is consistent with
houses built between 1935 and 1950 became an increasingly large frac- the interpretation of Fig. 3B. Sites sampled by the voluntary program
tion of the sampling pool. Pre-1935 houses have also been under- more closely mimic the characteristic of Flint housing stock, including
sampled by the voluntary program (average = 42.8% in Flint housing the largest percentage of LSL in block groups with poverty levels
stock), yet the sampling deficit has decreased over time. On the other above 90%, a fact that was not captured by the sentinel program.
hand, the share of 1935–1950 houses in Flint housing stock is well The last conditional frequency distribution (Fig. 3E, black solid
reproduced in the voluntary sampling and is half the percentage ob- curve) reflects the larger frequency of older houses (pre-1915 construc-
served in the State-controlled monitoring plan. There is no official rea- tion year) in poorer neighborhoods, as well as the existence of public
son for this sampling bias by the sentinel program as construction housing complexes built post-1970. Results for the sentinel program
year was not one of the selection criteria. Percentage of housing units (lower red dashed curve) confirm the under-sampling of lower income
built before 1960 is, however, used as an indicator of potential exposure block groups, in particular for houses built between 1935 and 1955,
to lead paint in EJSCREEN software (US EPA, 2016b). which overlaps with the sampled housing segment with LSL. The volun-
The last covariate, which might indirectly inform on housing condi- tary program displays a similar sampling bias. Note that the curve for
tion, including quality of premise plumbing, is socio-economic status the sentinel program ends around year 1965 as only 21 sentinel sites
which was here assessed using block group percentages of habitants liv- (2.77%) were post-1965 constructions, while the voluntary sampling
ing below twice the poverty line. According to Fig. 2E,F both sampling pool included 363 homes (8.98%) built after 1965.
programs have over-sampled houses located in the least disadvantaged
block groups (poverty level b 55%), while block groups with poverty 3.4. Impact of housing characteristics on water lead levels
levels above 75% have been under-sampled. These results indicate that
citizens living in the most impoverished areas used fewer testing kits Kernel smoothing was used to explore the potentially non-linear im-
for voluntary sampling. Interestingly, the sentinel sampling program pact of built year and poverty level on the magnitude of water lead
led to very similar statistics despite a very different selection procedure. levels (i.e., sampling round percentile) and likelihood of exceeding
One hypothesis is that as poverty level increased citizens were less like- two thresholds: 1 μg/L and the action level of 15 μg/L. The larger the de-
ly to volunteer to be part of the sentinel monitoring network. viation from the 50th percentile (median), depicted by the horizontal
dashed line in Fig. 4A,B, the greater the average impact of housing char-
3.3. Sampling bias: housing characteristics acteristics. Discrepancies between results of both sampling programs
are the most important for construction year: percentiles and percent-
The relative frequency distributions in Fig. 3A,B illustrate the limita- ages of data above 1 μg/L are larger at voluntarily sampled houses
tions of relying on average statistics on construction year and BG pover- built prior to 1935 and smaller post-1955; see Fig. 4 (left column). The
ty level (e.g., means plotted in Fig. 2) to compare residences within the trend beyond 1975 can be ignored as the voluntary sampling pool in-
Flint housing stock and the two sample sets. In particular, the histogram cludes only 99 homes (2.45%) built after 1975.
for construction year is clearly bimodal. For the reference population Interestingly construction year exerts opposite effects on the per-
(Fig. 3A, black solid line), the two modes are years 1927 and 1955. The centage of WLL above 15 μg/L recorded at the two types of sampling
first mode is well reproduced by both sampling distributions, albeit sites: This percentage displays an expected decline for newer homes
with a slightly smaller frequency. On the other hand, the sentinel sam- that were sampled voluntarily, while it increases at sentinel sites. De-
pling program over-sampled houses built around 1945 (Fig. 3A, red spite the oversampling of LSL at sentinel sites built between 1935 and
dashed line). The second mode for the voluntary program coincides 1955 (Fig. 3C) the percentage of data above 15 μg/L is still smaller
with Flint housing stock value, although at a higher frequency (Fig. 3A, than at non-sentinel sites. These results suggest that higher WLL origi-
green dashed line). nate from lead fixtures and pipes present within old houses (premise
Discrepancies between the three frequency distributions are larger plumbing) as opposed to LSL. This confirms earlier findings that home
for poverty level. Both sentinel and voluntary programs over-sampled lead service lines may not be the largest contributor of lead in Flint,
houses in the least disadvantaged block groups (35–50% poverty and lead contamination may be caused by interior plumbing (Dolan,
level) while block groups with poverty level in the 70–95% range were 2016; Goovaerts, 2016).
under-sampled, a fact already stressed by the time series in Fig. 2E,F. Poverty level appears to have little impact on WLL recorded within
The bias is, however, larger for the sentinel program which appears to the voluntary sampling program: most curves in Fig. 4 (right column,
have sampled uniformly block groups with poverty levels ranging be- green curves) are flat; the steep increase observed for poverty level
tween 40% and 70%; compare black solid line to red dashed line in below 30% (Fig. 4F) can be disregarded as these frequencies are based
Fig. 3B. on only 2.41% of samples (112 observations). The percentile and per-
An important feature controlling water lead levels is the presence of centage curves display larger fluctuations for the sentinel program
lead service lines. Fig. 3C (black solid line) shows that LSL tend to be (Fig. 4, right column, red curves), which is caused by strong disparities
more frequent in older homes; the increase observed for post-2000 in percentage of lead service lines sampled over different classes of pov-
houses can be disregarded as it is based on a very small percentage of erty level (Fig. 3D). In particular the over-sampling of houses with LSL

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
8 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Fig. 3. (A, B) Frequency distributions of construction year and block group poverty level for all residential parcels in Flint, as well as houses visited by the sentinel and voluntary sampling
programs between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016. The same data were used to compute conditional distributions that illustrate the impact of construction year and poverty level on the
presence of lead service lines (C, D), and the relationship between construction year and poverty level (E). All distributions were smoothed using a kernel of size 11, and results based
on b50 observations were discarded. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

for the 55–70% poverty range (Fig. 3B) results in larger values (Fig. 4, (exceedance of WLL threshold) will occur given a particular event
right column). As for construction year, percentile curves that account (e.g. presence of LSL), compared to the odds of the outcome occurring
for the whole range of the data instead of focusing on a specific thresh- in the absence of that event (e.g., service lines composed of unknown
old, in particular 15 μg/L, overlap over mid-range values (i.e. poverty or other than lead material).
from 40 to 60%), indicating that WLLs are not systematically higher at For both sampling programs the impact of housing characteristics
non-sentinel sites. This is confirmed by the fact that WLL exceeds and poverty, as measured by odds ratios, increases for lower thresholds
1 μg/L at more sentinel sites than non-sentinel sites (horizontal dashed (Table 3). For example, the presence of lead service lines doubles and
lines, Fig. 4C,D), while the reverse is true for 15 μg/L (horizontal dashed quadruples the likelihood of measuring WLL above 1 μg/L at voluntary
lines, Fig. 4E,F). (OR = 2.06) and sentinel sites (OR = 3.78), respectively. For the former
This graphical interpretation was supplemented by a regression the impact of construction year is even higher, in particular when com-
analysis to predict the probability of exceeding three thresholds (1, 15, paring pre-1935 houses to post-1950 houses (OR = 3.22). Odds ratios
and 25 μg/L) on the basis of two housing characteristics (type of service are also highly significant for all thresholds (α = 0.01), reflecting the
line, year of construction) and block group poverty level. Because senti- greater influence of construction year relative to LSL. On the other
nel sites in particular have repeated samples, Generalized Estimating hand, the impact of construction year is lower at sentinel sites (OR =
Equations (GEE) regression (Liang and Zeger, 1986) with logit link func- 2.01) and is only significant at α = 0.05 for 1935–1950 houses
tion and exchangeable correlation structure was used to fit this model (OR = 1.39). Since the vast majority of sentinel sites with LSL were
(SAS Institute Inc., 2011). The impact of each covariate was quantified built between 1935 and 1950, the impact of construction year and LSL
using the odds ratio (OR) which represents the odds that the outcome cannot be disentangled and this might explain a lower OR for

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 9

Fig. 4. Conditional frequency distributions illustrating the impact of construction year and block group poverty level on the magnitude of WLLs, measured by their percentile for each
sampling round (A, B), and the percentage of WLL data above 1 μg/L (C, D) and 15 μg/L (E, F). Data were collected by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs between 2/16/
2016 and 4/15/2016. All distributions were smoothed using a kernel of size 11, and results based on b50 observations were discarded. Horizontal dashed lines represent either the
50th percentile (A, B) or the average overall percentage of WLL data above 1 μg/L (C, D) or 15 μg/L (E, F) at both types of sampling sites. (For interpretation of the references to color in
this figure, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

construction year being compensated by a higher OR for LSL. Note that increases for higher thresholds and older construction years, while the
similar results were obtained when using the more accurate LSL on- impact of construction year becomes negative for the percentage of
site records instead of digital data, which invalidates the hypothesis data above 15 μg/L.
that the larger impact of built year vs LSL at non-sentinel sites simply re- According to odds ratios the likelihood of exceeding WLL thresholds
flects the larger accuracy of construction year vs digital data on the pres- at sentinel sites increases with poverty level (OR N 1). Note that ORs are
ence of lead service lines. This is also confirmed by the fact that a the largest for a threshold of 1 μg/L, and results are significant only for
regression model using only LSL as covariate led to higher OR for all the 55–75% poverty category which includes most sentinel sites with
three thresholds (i.e. 2.56 vs 2.06, 1.80 vs 1.53, and 1.34 vs 1.13) relative LSL (Fig. 3D). As already illustrated by frequency curves in Fig. 4 (right
to the case where all covariates were included. column), poverty level has little impact on WLL recorded within the vol-
Discrepancies between the two types of sampling widen as the untary sampling program.
threshold increases. In particular, the predictive power of construction
year decreases substantially at sentinel sites: the odds ratio becomes 3.5. Ward-level analysis
smaller than 1 and non-significant for WLL thresholds of 15 and
25 μg/L (Table 3). This result is consistent with the interpretation of The frequency analysis in Sections 3.2–3.3 was aspatial in that sam-
Fig. 4C,E: The gap between the two conditional frequency curves ple locations were ignored during the interpretation. The description of

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
10 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Table 3 Table 5
Odds ratio for covariates of the GEE regression models fitted separately to the data collect- Characteristics (presence of lead service lines, construction year, poverty level) of houses
ed by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016. visited by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs within each ward in Flint. Statis-
In both cases, three thresholds were considered: 1, 15 and 25 μg/L. Digital data on compo- tics are based on all samples collected between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016, including re-
sition of service lines are used for all datasets to facilitate comparison among regression peated sampling of the same house in different sampling rounds. Reference values were
models. computed for Flint housing stock to detect any sampling bias. Digital data on composition
of service lines are used for all three datasets to facilitate comparison.
Effects Sentinel sampling Voluntary sampling
Statistics Flint ward
1 μg/L 15 μg/L 25 μg/L 1 μg/L 15 μg/L 25 μg/L
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
SL: lead vs others/unknown 3.78⁎⁎ 1.90⁎ 1.35 2.06⁎⁎ 1.53⁎ 1.13
Built year: b1935 vs N1950 2.01⁎⁎ 0.76 0.88 3.22⁎⁎ 2.09⁎⁎ 2.20⁎⁎ % lead service lines
Built year: 1935–1950 vs 1.39⁎ 0.62 0.61 1.48⁎⁎ 1.34⁎ 1.31 Flint housing 3.27 8.34 8.56 5.48 9.95 9.51 6.46 6.88 7.07
N1950 stock
Poverty: 55–75% vs b55% 1.51⁎⁎ 1.36 1.30 1.03 0.91 1.04 Sentinel 0 9.01 3.24 1.74 0 10.56 10.88 5.58 24.06
Poverty: N75% vs b55% 1.05 0.97 0.95 0.80⁎ 0.77 0.87 monitoring
Voluntary 0.93 7.33 10.63 4.55 13.14 8.45 7.82 7.34 8.70
⁎ Significantly different from 1 at α = 0.05.
sampling
⁎⁎ Significantly different from 1 at α = 0.01.
% pre-1935 houses
Flint housing 13.71 28.94 58.40 36.37 82.09 50.69 37.54 35.52 36.99
stock
spatial patterns in Fig. 1 was supplemented by the computation of
Sentinel 18.87 31.45 51.39 32.56 92.86 34.70 29.60 32.09 19.52
ward-level statistics regarding sampling density, water and blood lead monitoring
levels, housing characteristics, and poverty levels (Tables 4 & 5). Voluntary 7.69 16.89 47.51 24.70 74.00 43.86 33.53 27.68 26.28
Each ward represents between 8.76% (Ward 7) and 14.24% (Ward sampling
3) of residential parcels in the city of Flint. This range is much wider Block group (BG) poverty level (mean)
for the sentinel program (5.18–20.35%), which reflects the over- Flint housing 66.33 63.15 74.60 65.04 73.24 67.27 56.66 59.07 64.44
sampling of specific areas in the city despite the initial aim to cover ad- stock
equately all nine wards (Sentinel Site Selection, 2016). The voluntary Sentinel 69.94 63.64 81.36 65.11 80.13 63.79 51.20 53.24 62.45
monitoring
sampling program yields an intermediate range: 6.91% to 15.26%. Inter- Voluntary 62.12 60.43 73.82 61.76 70.99 66.39 52.80 56.93 60.49
estingly, Ward 7, which includes the smallest percentage of residential sampling
parcels in the city, was the most frequently sampled by both programs
% houses in N75% poverty BG
(Table 4). One explanation is that Ward 7 had the largest number (41 Flint housing 39.42 18.81 65.78 22.58 53.38 33.86 23.48 17.35 28.95
out of 148) of sites with lead or lead combination service lines within stock
the initial pool of 1951 prospective sentinel sites. The second largest Sentinel 58.49 7.34 92.13 37.21 68.83 17.24 8.80 9.07 18.45
number of LSL (21 sites) within that pool was recorded for Ward 6 monitoring
Voluntary 34.50 12.22 61.13 20.75 44.00 32.39 15.64 12.54 17.19
which was the third most densely sampled ward (15.11%) by the senti-
sampling
nel program. In addition wards 6 and 7 included, respectively, the sec-
ond and third largest percentages of children with elevated blood lead
levels (Table 4). These sentinel sites tend, however, to be clustered in program (5.01%) despite featuring by far the largest percentage of ele-
the least disadvantaged part of Ward 7, see circled area in Fig. 1E. In vated blood lead levels (15.7%).
fact, there is a general tendency for the sentinel program, and to a lesser This socio-economic bias is not limited to the number of monitoring
extent the voluntary sampling program, to collect more WLL data in sites but extends to the characteristics of these sites. Indeed, Fig. 5B
wards where fewer habitants live below the poverty line (Fig. 5A). shows that relative to Flint housing stock (solid line) the sentinel pro-
The steady decline observed for the voluntary sampling program is par- gram has under-sampled lead service lines in the two wards with pov-
ticularly noteworthy. The trend displayed by both sampling programs erty levels above 70% (red dashed line) while these same wards were
(dashed lines, Fig. 5A) is opposite to what is observed for Flint housing over-sampled in the voluntary sampling program. In particular, the sen-
stock: more residential parcels exist in wards with higher poverty (solid tinel program did not sample any house with LSL in Ward 5, although
line, Fig. 5A). These results indicate that citizens living in the most the percentages of lead service lines (9.95%, Table 5) and elevated
impoverished wards have used fewer testing kits for voluntary sam- blood lead levels (Table 4) were the largest in Flint. One potential culprit
pling, and they might have been less likely to request their inclusion is the fact that 82% of houses in Ward 5 were built before 1935 (Table 5),
in the sentinel sampling program after it started. This could explain whereas the sentinel program has almost exclusively sampled LSL in
why Ward 5, which has the second largest poverty level (73.24%) houses built between 1935 and 1950 (Fig. 3C). The other case is Ward
among all nine wards, was the least densely sampled by the sentinel 3, which has the highest poverty level (74.60%) and 8.56% of houses

Table 4
Number of residential parcels and statistics on water lead levels recorded between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016 by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs within each ward in Flint.
Percentages of elevated blood lead levels recorded in children are from Table 2 in Hanna-Attisha et al. (2016) and correspond to the period 1/1/2015 and 9/15/2015, that is after the water
source change from Detroit-supplied Lake Huron water to the Flint River.

Statistics Flint ward

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Total number of residential parcels 6296 6406 7270 5257 6311 4784 4472 5637 4612
Number of sentinel samples 159 477 216 172 154 464 625 430 374
Number of voluntary samples 429 450 301 506 350 497 665 654 506
% Flint residential tax parcels 12.33 12.55 14.24 10.30 12.36 9.37 8.76 11.04 9.03
% sentinel dataset 5.18 15.53 7.03 5.60 5.01 15.11 20.35 14.00 12.18
% voluntary dataset 9.84 10.33 6.91 11.61 8.03 11.40 15.26 15.01 11.61
% sentinel data N 15 μg/L 1.26 10.17 5.32 4.36 6.49 8.94 11.04 8.02 4.81
% voluntary data N 15 μg/L 6.84 11.65 9.97 7.91 14.05 13.04 10.66 13.08 10.87
% elevated blood lead levels 2.8 1.4 4.5 1.7 15.7 9.3 5.9 1.4 1.6

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 11

Fig. 5. Impact of poverty level (i.e., percentage of habitants living below the poverty line) on statistics computed for each of the 9 wards in Flint: A) relative percentage of residential parcels,
B) percentage of houses with lead service lines, C) percentages of water lead levels above 15 μg/L, and D) relative differences between curves displayed in (C). To facilitate visualization of
trends the nine ward-level statistics are joined by line segments (piecewise linear function). A solid line is used for statistics computed from Flint's 51,045 residential parcels, while dashed
lines correspond to data collected by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016. (E) Locations of sentinel sites overlaid on the construction year
map to illustrate the clustering of sampled LSL (red dots) in neighborhoods with houses built between 1935 and 1950. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend,
the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

with LSL according to digital data. Although the sentinel sampling pro- on Fig. 1C, the majority of houses in this ward were built after 1935
gram targeted the poorest block groups in that ward (92.13% of sentinel (87%) and only 3.27% of houses have LSL.
sites are in block groups with poverty level N 75%), the sampling rate for The largest percentage of existing LSL sampled by the sentinel pro-
LSL was only 3.24% compared to 10.63% for the voluntary program. gram is recorded in Ward 9: 24.06% of sentinel sites there possessed
Ward 1 is the second ward with no LSL sampled by the sentinel program lead service lines, which is close to four times the percentage of houses
while having the 4th largest poverty level (66.33%). However, as noticed with LSL (7.07%) in that ward (Table 5), a number well captured by

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
12 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

voluntary sampling (8.70%). There is no apparent reason for such an over- sampling program since, according to the odds ratio (Table 3), this
sampling as this ward is average for all statistics (i.e. poverty level, per- covariate has a greater influence on WLL. Interestingly, the adjusted
centage of EBLL, and older homes) and had one of the lowest number of percentage of WLLs recorded above 15 μg/L during the first sampling
houses with lead or lead combination service lines (12 out of 148) within round is greater at sentinel sites compared to non-sentinel sites.
the initial pool of 1951 prospective sentinel sites. Sentinel sites with LSL However, the fact that only 6.7% of sentinel sites with LSL were
are, however, clustered in Ward 9 (Fig. 5E, dashed circles), which suggests built before 1935 or after 1950 hampered the reliable estimation of
that practical convenience might have been the culprit for the sampling of WLLs for these strata. In comparison, these strata represent 71.84%
such a large number of lead service lines in that ward. in Flint housing stock: (2277 + 407)/3736 in Fig. 6.
One consequence of such socio-economic sampling bias is the ten- Incorporating BG poverty into the set of confounding factors slightly
dency for the most impoverished wards to report fewer WLL data narrowed the gap between the two time series (Fig. 7D). The impact of
above 15 μg/L at sentinel sites (Fig. 5C), hence, the widening gap be- the socio-economic sampling bias was, however, attenuated by the
tween both sampling programs as the poverty level increases small influence exerted by poverty level on WLL data (see odds ratios
(Fig. 5D). Although Goovaerts (2016) had already noticed the largest ra- in Table 3). After adjusting for all four covariates, the time series for
tios between percentages of WLL data N 15 μg/L recorded at non- the sentinel program displays the largest decrease over the five sam-
sentinel sites vs sentinel sites in impoverished wards 1 and 5, the link pling rounds (Fig. 7E). Although the bias-correction procedure
with the biased sampling of lead service lines (no LSL sampled in both narrowed the gap between results of both sampling programs, the
wards, Table 5) is a new finding. It is noteworthy that for all but one time series still differ during the latest sampling rounds, even after ac-
wards the percentage of WLL data above 15 μg/L is systematically small- counting for the uncertainty attached to these estimates; see 90% confi-
er for the State-controlled sampling program compared to the dence intervals in Fig. 7E
homeowner-driven sampling (Fig. 5C).
4. Conclusions
3.6. Correcting for sampling bias
It is common in environmental studies to rely on sampling to charac-
To correct for the sampling bias detected in Sections 3.1–3.4, the terize populations that are too large to be measured exhaustively; in
time series of percentages of WLL data above 15 μg/L (Fig. 2A) were other words a measurement cannot be collected at every location in
standardized using the procedure described in Goovaerts (2016). Stan- the spatial domain (Myers, 1997). When designing sampling schemes
dardization is a common approach for controlling confounding in pop- one should keep in mind the objectives of the study (i.e., which ques-
ulation studies or data from disease registries (Waller and Gotway, tions are we trying to answer?), as well as the definition of the popula-
2004). It is defined as a weighted average of stratum-specific rates. In tion to be studied. Attention to sampling design is particularly critical
the present case-study, Flint's 51,045 residential parcels and the WLL when analyzing data collected by others and sparsely documented, as
data collected by both sampling programs were stratified on the basis in the case of Flint sentinel monitoring network. The analyst should
of four covariates: 1) presence/absence of lead service lines, 2) construc- thus question whether that sample is representative of the underlying
tion year (3 classes: pre-1935, 1935–1950, and post-1950), 3) block population and explore ways to correct sample statistics whenever bi-
group poverty level (b55%, 55–75%, N75%), and 4) ward. The choice of ased or preferential sampling is suspected.
categories of construction year and poverty level was guided by results The delay in reporting high levels of lead in Flint drinking water and
displayed in Fig. 3C and D regarding the oversampling of some segments the resulting extent of the ensuing environmental crisis and public
of Flint housing stock by the sentinel program. For example, Fig. 6 (top) health threat were partially caused by the biased selection of sampling
shows the stratification of WLL data collected during sampling round sites. Therefore, one could have expected a greater transparency in the
1 at non-sentinel sites on the basis of the first two covariates. The per- selection of sites for monitoring post-crisis water lead levels. For exam-
centage of data above 15 μg/L was computed for each of the six catego- ple, despite the frequent posting of sentinel testing results, addresses of
ries. As expected, fewer observations exceed the action level in houses sentinel sites never included street numbers, vital information that had
without LSL: 9.84% vs 14.5%. Accounting for construction year indicates to be retrieved through data mining (Goovaerts, 2016). This paper pre-
however that the presence of LSL has no impact on results for pre-1935 sented the first detailed analysis of the monitoring network put in place
houses (15.7% in both cases) while only half that percentage (7.23%) ex- by the State in the aftermath of the Flint water drinking crisis. Results of
ceed 15 μg/L in post-1950 houses without LSL. an exploratory spatial data analysis were combined with on-line de-
Residences tested during the first round of voluntary sampling rep- scriptions of the sentinel sampling plan (e.g., Testing Plan, Process &
resent almost perfectly Flint housing stock when it comes to presence Protocols, 2016; Sentinel Site Selection, 2016), and personal communi-
of lead service lines: 7.69% vs 7.32% (Fig. 6). However, as discussed pre- cation from the director of Drinking Water and Municipal Assistance Di-
viously (Fig. 2C), older houses were under-sampled by both sampling vision (DWMAD) at the Michigan Department of Environmental
programs; e.g., for pre-1935 houses: 3.56% vs 4.46% (LSL) and 25.4% vs Quality.
38.38% (no LSL). Similarly, houses built more recently (i.e., post-1950) A key finding of the exploratory data analysis was that the impact of
were over-sampled: 1.55% vs 0.80% (LSL) and 49.3% vs 33.86% (no LSL). lead service lines on water lead levels was mainly investigated for hous-
After correction for this sampling bias, the percentage above 15 μg/L es built between 1935 and 1950 in less disadvantaged areas of the city.
increased from 10.20% to 11.35% (Fig. 6) since the under-sampled older In addition, there was no sentinel site with LSL in two of the most
houses were the ones with the greatest water lead levels while lower impoverished wards, including where the percentage of children with
WLLs were measured in over-sampled post-1950 houses. high blood lead levels tripled following the switch in water supply.
A similar correction was conducted for all five rounds of both Such bias seems surprising as socio-economic status and predicted
sampling programs, using between one and four covariates (Fig. 7). blood lead levels were some of the criteria used during the selection
This correction was applied after adjusting the time series of the vol- of sentinel sites. One must, however, keep in mind that the network in-
untary test results for temporal bias by eliminating repeated mea- cludes only sites where homeowners volunteered to participate in the
surements (Table 2), lowering percentages above 15 μg/L in bi-weekly sampling. Also, the sentinel network evolved between sam-
particular for the last two sampling rounds (Fig. 7A). Adjusting for pling rounds as some residents stopped participating, while others
the presence of lead service lines had a negligible impact (Fig. 7B) asked to be included, which might have created clusters of sentinel
since the percentage of residences with LSL is still small even after sites in areas of higher socio-economic status. Indeed, analysis of the
over-sampling (Fig. 2B). Adding construction year as a covariate voluntary sampling program indicated the tendency of citizens living
caused bigger changes (Fig. 7C), in particular for the voluntary in the most impoverished wards to use fewer testing kits. The over-

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 13

Fig. 6. Stratification of 1431 WLL data collected during the first round of voluntary sampling on the basis of the existence of lead service lines and construction year (3 categories). The
percentage of data above 15 μg/L ranges from 7.23% to 15.7%, depending on the stratum. A similar stratification into six categories was conducted on the 51,045 residential parcels in
Flint. This information was used to adjust the overall percentage of WLL data above 15 μg/L (10.20%), leading to a rate (11.35%) that better represents Flint housing stock.

sampling of lead service lines for houses built between 1935 and 1950 is the type (e.g., household vs individual income) and resolution
more puzzling and is a major drawback as it hampers our ability to dis- (i.e., census tract vs block group) of poverty estimates. It is noteworthy
entangle the effects of LSL and premise plumbing (lead fixtures and that important results for the sentinel sampling program, in particular
pipes present within old houses) on WLL. the lack of sampled lead service lines in two wards, did not change
Despite the lack of sampling strategy, voluntary testing turned out to when using the more accurate on-site LSL data. On the other hand, rely-
capture the main characteristics (i.e., presence of lead service lines, con- ing on more accurate and recent block group poverty estimates, similar
struction year) of Flint housing stock much more closely than the senti- to the ones used by the State when designing the sentinel network,
nel program. A sampling bias was, however, detected as homeowners greatly attenuated the socio-economic bias detected in Goovaerts
who found high levels of lead in their first samples were more likely (2016). Our analysis, however, confirmed earlier findings (Dolan,
to acquire additional testing kits, while houses with low lead levels 2016; Goovaerts, 2016) that home lead service lines may not be the
were less likely to be tested again. Over time this led to an inflated per- largest contributor of lead in Flint, and lead contamination may be
centage of water lead levels that tested 15 μg/L and higher. Correcting caused by interior plumbing. This would explain why water collected
this bias narrowed the gap between results of the sentinel and voluntary in March 2016 in a residence without a lead service line tested at
sampling programs. Yet, even after adjusting for other covariates, such 1000 μg/L (Johnson, 2016). This information is critical as substantial re-
as housing characteristics and socio-economic status, lead levels mea- sources are currently being spent on the replacement of lead service
sured at sentinel sites in sampling rounds 4 and 5 still exceed 15 μg/L lines in Flint (Moore, 2016) and the selection of lead lines targeted for
at a statistically significant lower rate than samples collected voluntari- replacement has been questioned (Ridley, 2016).
ly. Temporal trends also remained drastically different: The percentage
of sentinel data above 15 μg/L decreased steadily over time, while it in- Acknowledgments
creased for data collected on a voluntary basis during most of the two-
month period. The author is grateful to Troy Rosencrants from the Department of
Caveats of the analysis include the uncertainty attached to the digital Earth and Resource Science (University of Michigan – Flint) for provid-
data on composition of service lines and the sensitivity of the results to ing the shape files with tax parcel information and service line data. This

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
14 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Fig. 7. Impact of adjusting for an increasing number of covariates on the time series of the percentage of WLL data recorded above 15 μg/L at non-sentinel (voluntary sampling) and sentinel
sites: (A) resampling (more likely for residences with high WLL); (B) resampling and presence of LSL; (C) resampling, LSL, and construction year; (D) resampling, LSL, construction year,
and poverty level, and (E) resampling, LSL, construction year, poverty level, and ward. (F) Fully adjusted time series with the corresponding 90% confidence interval.

research also greatly benefited from information about Flint and the Cartier, C., Laroche, L., Deshommes, E., Nour, S., Richard, G., Edwards, M., Prévost, M., 2011.
Investigating dissolved lead at the tap using various sampling protocols. J. Am. Water
sentinel sampling program shared by Dr. Rick Sadler from MSU and Works Ass. 103, 55–67.
Mr. Bryce Feighner from MDEQ. The author would like to express his Clark, B.N., Masters, S.V., Edwards, M.A., 2015. Lead release to drinking water from galva-
gratitude to Dr. Colleen Vallo for proof-reading the manuscript. This re- nized steel pipe coatings. Environ. Eng. Sci. 32 (8):713–721. http://dx.doi.org/10.
1089/ees.2015.0073.
search was funded by grant 1R43CA192520-01A1 from the National Dolan, M., 2016, September 8. Study: Flint Lead Contamination Goes Beyond Service
Cancer Institute. The views stated in this publication are those of the au- Pipes. Detroit Free Press Available at:. http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/
thor and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NCI. michigan/flint-water-crisis/2016/09/08/study-flint-lead-contamination-goes-
beyond-service-pipes/89994636/ (Accessed November 23, 2016).
Edwards, M., Triantafyllidou, S., Best, D., 2009. Elevated blood lead levels in young chil-
References dren due to lead-contaminated drinking water: Washington, DC, 2001–2004. Envi-
ron. Sci. Technol. 43 (5), 1618–1623.
Abernethy, J., Schwartz, E., 2016, September 28. Flint Fiasco Calls for Heavy-hitting Data Felton, R., 2016, April 27. Michigan Official Suggested Gaming Water Tests to ‘Bump Out’
Analysis. GreenBiz Retrieved from. https://www.greenbiz.com/article/flint-fiasco- Lead Results. The Guardian Retrieved from. http://www.theguardian.com.
calls-heavy-hitting-data-analysis. Flint Safe Drinking Water Task Force Recommendations on MDEQ's Draft Sentinel Site
Calley, B., 2016. Understanding Recent Flint Water Test Results. Available at. https:// Selection, February 2016Q. Retrieved from. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/
medium.com/@LtGovCalley/understanding-recent-flint-water-test-results- files/2016-02/documents/task_force_recommendations_on_sentinel_site_selection_
fbb69cf4b5d5. 2-16.pdf (on August 20, 2016).

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Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 15

Flint Water Advisory Task Force Report, March 2016. Retrieved from. https://www. Sentinel Site Selection, 2016, February 9. Retrieved from. http://www.michigan.gov/
michigan.gov/documents/snyder/FWATF_FINAL_REPORT_21March2016_517805_7. documents/flintwater/Sentinel_Site_Selection_2-9-2016_Final_525077_7.docx (on
pdf (on June 16, 2016). February 2, 2017).
Goovaerts, P., 1997. Geostatistics for Natural Resources Evaluation. Oxford University Testing Plan, Process & Protocols DRAFT, 2016, January 27. Retrieved from. http://docs.
Press, New-York, NY. house.gov/meetings/IF/IF14/20160413/104765/HHRG-114-IF14-Wstate-CreaghK-
Goovaerts, P., 2016. The drinking water contamination crisis in Flint: modeling temporal 20160413-SD003.pdf (on February 2, 2017).
trends of lead level since returning to Detroit water system. Sci. Total Environ. http:// US Environmental Protection Agency, 1991. Office of Water (1991) Lead and Copper Rule
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.09.207. 40 CFR Part 141 Subpart I.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/dwreginfo/lead-and-
Hanna-Attisha, M., LaChance, J., Sadler, R.C., Champney Schnepp, A., 2016. Elevated blood copper-rule (Accessed July 18, 2016).
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sis of risk and public health response. Am. J. Public Health 106, 283–290. and Reporting Guidance for Public Water Systems.Available at:. https://www.epa.
Johnson, J., 2016, March 11. Removing Lead Pipes May Not Solve Flint's Water gov/dwreginfo/lead-and-copper-rule-compliance-help-public-water-systems
Crisis.Available at:. http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2016/03/removing_ (Accessed August 30, 2016).
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Lee, R.G., William, C.B., David, W.C., 1989. Lead at the tap: sources and control. J. Am. Schools. Revised Technical Guidance.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/sites/
Water Works Ass. 81 (7), 52–62. production/files/2015-09/documents/toolkit_leadschools_guide_3ts_leadschools.pdf
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Milman, O., Glenza, J., 2016, June 2. At Least 33 US Cities Used Water Testing ‘Cheats’ Over Memorandum: Clarification of Recommended Tap Sampling Procedures for Purposes
Lead Concerns. The Guardian Retrieved from. http://www.theguardian.com. of the Lead and Copper Rule.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/dwreginfo/memo-
Milman, O., 2016, June 2. Tests on Flint Water Targeted Homes Far From Network of Lead clarifying-recommended-tap-sampling-procedures-lead-and-copper-rule (Accessed
Pipes. The Guardian Retrieved from. http://www.theguardian.com. August 30, 2016).
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placement Initiative. Press release Available at. https://www.cityofflint.com/2016/ Documentation.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-07/
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initiative/. 2, 2017).
Myers, J.C., 1997. Geostatistical Error Management: Quantifying Uncertainty for Environ- Waller, L.A., Gotway, C.A., 2004. Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data. John
mental Sampling and Mapping. John Wiley & Sons, New-York, NY. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ.
Rabin, R., 2008. The lead industry and lead water pipes “a MODEST CAMPAIGN”. Am. Wang, Z., Devine, H., Zhang, W., Waldroup, K., 2014. Using a GIS and GIS-assisted water
J. Public Health 98, 1584–1592. quality model to analyze the deterministic factors for lead and copper corrosion in
Ridley, G., 2016, July 14. More Than a Third of Flint Homes That Got Pipe Fixes Did Not drinking water distribution systems. J. Environ. Eng. 140 (9), A4014004.
Have High Lead.Available at:. http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2016/07/
lead_lacking_from_some_flint_h.html (Accessed November 27, 2016).
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Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
November 16, 2016

The Honorable Rick Snyder
Governor of Michigan
P.O. Box 30013
Lansing, MI 48909

Dear Governor Snyder,

For the last eight months, we have convened a group of Flint residents, community leaders, and State
of Michigan representatives to explore effective, community-driven solutions for delivering safe
drinking water and resources to every household in Flint.

Early on in the process, we collected data and uncovered a startling revelation: Despite the wealth of
information that had been circulated about the Flint water crisis, community leaders told us there
were still families in Flint who were unaware of the severity of the public health emergency–and they
were still drinking unfiltered tap water.

That is simply unacceptable.

With Lt. Gov Brian Calley, Michigan State Police Capt. Chris Kelenske, and the Michigan National Guard
at the table with Flint residents, we developed a pilot project this summer consisting of a
neighborhood water expo and the creation of a door-to-door water distribution system. This project
intentionally supported a grassroots infrastructure, which is critical in reaching Flint’s most vulnerable
residents: the elderly, disabled, those with behavioral health issues, and those with limited or no
transportation.

Together, we developed strategies that would be effective and sustainable. Neighborhood groups were
empowered to service their community and local leaders shaped their own methods for ongoing
delivery to the residents they serve.

We appreciate the state’s significant efforts to distribute bottled water and filters in Flint. Employing
Flint residents to staff the Points of Distribution (PODs) and other service roles are positive changes
that have led to increased access to water, information, and other resources.

Still, it has become clear to us through this pilot project that there are residents who continue to
struggle with access to safe water and don’t have accurate, up-to-date information on the use of filters
or proper nutrition. This is especially urgent now that winter is approaching and residents’ difficulties
accessing water and other related services will only worsen.
Our top priority is getting all Flint residents the resources they need for the health and vitality of the
entire community, and making sure no one falls through the cracks. Flint residents are still in need of
water resources and information, and establishing an infrastructure to deliver services door-to-door
will help ensure no one is left behind.

In the spirit of collaboration, we have attached a report for your review that outlines the pilot project
and the following recommendations that the state could immediately undertake to address the needs
of Flint residents:

 Assess and catalog neighborhood-based door-to-door distribution efforts (taking into account
the Access and Functional Needs list) and identify ongoing needs and gaps.
 Evaluate the scalability of the What to Know and Do About Water pilot model.
 Develop a plan to support neighborhood groups in each ward of the City as they continue to
serve vulnerable residents who require ongoing door-to-door services.
 Support and facilitate the Flint Water Recovery Neighborhood Connection subcommittee to
serve as the key connector and coordinator of grassroots outreach and service delivery.

It is important to note that these recommendations were developed in concert with Flint residents and
community leaders, and that their inclusion in the decision-making process added practical insight into
the effectiveness of the response and the perceived breaches in trust and communication with
government.

This pilot and the experience working with community residents, local organizations, and state
government in Civic Park could be particularly timely as the state responds to the recent court decision
and develops plans to evolve water and filter distribution in Flint.

We hope you will act on these recommendations to bring safe water, filters, and information to every
household in the City.

Thank you for your consideration of this request.

Sincerely,

Handy L. Lindsey, Jr., President Dr. Susan E. Borrego, Chancellor
Ruth Mott Foundation University of Michigan–Flint

Kathi Horton, President Jamie Gaskin, Chief Executive Officer
Community Foundation of Greater Flint United Way of Genesee County
DRAFT
ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT
PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL
IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN
SOUTHERN DIVISION

CAMERON MCCADDEN, a minor, by his
next friend, CHRYSTAL MCCADDEN
Hon.
Plaintiff,
v. Case No.

CITY OF FLINT, and TERRANCE WALKER,
in his individual capacity
JURY TRIAL DEMANDED
Defendants.
/
John Mark Finnegan (P68050) Susan Mizner*
Heberle & Finnegan Claudia Center*
2580 Craig Road American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
Ann Arbor, MI 48130 39 Drumm Street
(734) 302-3233 San Francisco, CA 94111
jmarkfinnegan@comcast.net (415) 343-0762
center@aclu.org
Michael J. Steinberg (P48085) smizner@aclu.org
Kary L. Moss (P49759)
American Civil Liberties Union
Fund of Michigan Counsel for Plaintiffs
2966 Woodward Ave.
Detroit, MI 48201 *Applications for admission forthcoming
(313) 578-6814
msteinberg@aclumich.org

COMPLAINT
DRAFT
ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT
PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL
INTRODUCTION
1. This is an action for damages and declaratory and injunctive relief to remedy Defendants’

violations of Plaintiff’s rights under the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, Title II of

the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and

Michigan’s Persons with Disabilities Civil Rights Act (“PWDCRA”).

2. Plaintiff Cameron McCadden is an eight-year-old African American boy with a disability

who was handcuffed for nearly one hour by Defendant Terrance Walker, a Flint Police

Department school resource officer, on October 12, 2015.

3. Defendant Flint Police Department (“Flint PD”) has acknowledged that Officer Walker

handcuffed Cameron.

4. The use of handcuffs on children with disabilities is contrary to guidance on the use of

restraint against children with disabilities.

5. At no time did Cameron pose an imminent danger of physical harm to himself or anyone

else that would have justified Officer Walker’s prolonged handcuffing of him.

6. As a result of being subjected to unwarranted and prolonged handcuffing, Cameron has

suffered fear, anxiety, emotional trauma, and an exacerbation of his disability.

7. The Flint PD has the responsibility for establishing and implementing policies, practices,

supervision and training to ensure that school resource officers such as Officer Walker respect

the rights of children with disabilities, particularly when using force and restraint against such

children.

8. In 2009, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) published the results of a

nationwide study documenting hundreds of alleged uses of restraint in schools between 1990 and

2
DRAFT
ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT
PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL
2009, including 20 restraints that resulted in the death of a child.1 Nearly all of the incidents

investigated by the GAO involved children with disabilities. That same year, in testimony before

the U.S. House of Representatives Education and Labor Committee, the GAO presented these

findings and reported on the risks of injury and death associated with the restraint of children.

The GAO explained that even in situations where a child does not sustain any physical injury as

a result of restraint, he is often severely traumatized.2

9. A recent analysis of 2011-12 data by the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil

Rights revealed that although students with disabilities account for only 12% of public school

students, they comprise 75% of students subjected to physical restraint in schools.3 That same

analysis also revealed that while African American students represent only 19% of students with

disabilities, they account for 36% of these students who are subjected to mechanical restraint

such as handcuffs.4

10. The restraint of children with disabilities has generated significant interest among the

public and policymakers in Michigan, particularly given the size of the state’s population of

children with disabilities. According to the Michigan Department of Education’s Center for

Educational Performance and Evaluation, 12.77 percent of students attending public schools in

Michigan have disabilities. In Flint, where Cameron was handcuffed, nearly 15 percent of

students attending Flint Community Schools (“FCS”) have disabilities.

1
Statement of Gregory D. Kutz, Managing Director of Forensic Audits and Special Investigations, U.S. Government
Accountability Office, to Committee on Education and Labor, U.S. House of Representatives 8 (May 2009), at
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09719t.pdf.
2
Id. at 1.
3
U.S. DEP’T OF EDUCATION OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, ISSUE BRIEF NO. 1: SCHOOL DISCIPLINE, RESTRAINT, &
SECLUSION HIGHLIGHTS 9 (Mar. 2014).
4
Id. at 10.

3
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PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL
11. Recognizing the need to promote the safety and dignity of all students, Michigan’s State

Board of Education released its Standards for the Emergency Use of Seclusion and Restraint in

2006. These standards prohibit the use of mechanical restraint “under all circumstances,

including emergency situations.”5 Furthermore, even permissible forms of physical restraint

“should not be used any longer than necessary to allow students to regain control of their

behavior; and generally no longer than ten minutes.”6 Any use of emergency restraint “shall be .

. . documented in a written report . . . and given to the parent or guardian within 24 hours.”7

12. In 2014 and 2015, Michigan Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley held nine town halls

across the state and posted an online survey to solicit input from parents, educators, and

advocates about challenges facing students with disabilities in Michigan. One of the Lieutenant

Governor’s key conclusions following these sessions was a call to end the use of restraint in

schools in all but specific emergency situations. The Lieutenant Governor called restraint

“inhumane and barbaric” and warned that it “results in increasingly dangerous situations for

children and staff.”8

13. In 2014, the Flint PD received a Community Oriented Policing Services grant of $1.1M

from the U.S. Department of Justice to place six school resource officers (“SRO’s”) inside FCS

through 2018. This would add to the six SRO’s already in FCS’s 15 schools. Speaking at the

time, Flint Police Chief James Tolbert said the new SRO’s would be drawn from veteran Flint

5
MICHIGAN DEP’T OF EDUCATION, SUPPORTING STUDENT BEHAVIOR: STANDARDS FOR THE EMERGENCY USE OF
SECLUSION AND RESTRAINT 2, 18 (Dec. 2006).
6
Id. at 15.
7
Id. at 15-16.
8
LT. GOV. BRIAN CALLEY, SPECIAL REPORT TO THE MICHIGAN BOARD OF EDUCATION (Sept. 8, 2015).

4
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PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL
police officers so that the city would not have to wait for new hires and because current officers

would be more experienced.9

14. Despite doubling the number of officers in schools, Defendant Flint PD has not designed

or implemented adequate policies, practices, procedures, or training regarding the use of

mechanical restraints, handcuffs, and other modes of force on young schoolchildren, including

children with disabilities such as Cameron.

15. Cameron seeks permanent injunctive relief that would prohibit Defendants from

authorizing or using unnecessary, excessive, and prolonged restraint and handcuffing on

schoolchildren, including those with disabilities, and to compel Defendant Flint PD to establish

and implement, or to revise its policies, procedures, practice, and trainings to respect the rights of

children with disabilities. Cameron also seeks declaratory relief establishing that Defendants

have violated his Constitutional and civil rights under the Fourth Amendment to the U.S.

Constitution, Title II of the ADA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the PWDCRA.

Finally, Cameron seeks damages for the trauma he suffered as a result of Defendants’

unconstitutional and illegal conduct, as well as reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs incurred in

bringing this action.

JURISDICTION AND VENUE
16. This Court has subject matter jurisdiction over the federal claims raised this action

pursuant to 28 U.S.C. §§ 1331 and 1343. This Court has supplemental subject matter

jurisdiction over Plaintiff’s claim under the PWDCRA pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1367.

9
Dominic Adams, Flint police to add 6 school resource officers thanks to $1.1 million Department of Justice grant,”
MLive, (Jan. 28, 2014), available at
http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2014/01/flint_police_to_add_6_school_r.html

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17. Plaintiff seeks damages and declaratory and injunctive relief to enforce federal rights

under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, Title II of the ADA, 42 U.S.C § 12132 et seq., and Section 504 of the

Rehabilitation Act. Plaintiff also seeks reasonable costs and attorney’s fees under 42 U.S.C. §§

1988 and 12205.

18. This Court has jurisdiction to issue declaratory, injunctive, and other relief under 28

U.S.C. §§ 2201 and 2202.

19. Venue is proper in the Eastern District of Michigan, Southern Division pursuant to 28

U.S.C. § 1391(b) because the events giving rise to this action occurred in the City of Flint,

Genesee County, Michigan.

PARTIES

20. Plaintiff CAMERON MCCADDEN was seven years old and weighed 55 pounds when

he was handcuffed by Defendant Officer Walker on October 12, 2015. At all relevant times,

Cameron was a participant in the YouthQuest Afterschool Program operating within FCS, where

he was and remains enrolled as a student. Cameron has a disability—attention deficit

hyperactivity disorder (“ADHD”)—and is thus a person with a disability under Title II of the

ADA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the PWDCRA. Cameron brings this action

through his mother and next friend, Chrystal McCadden.

21. Defendant CITY OF FLINT is a municipal corporation in Genesee County, Michigan,

subject to the laws and Constitution of the United States. Defendant CITY OF FLINT operates,

manages, and controls the Flint Police Department. Defendant CITY OF FLINT is a public

entity under Title II and a program or activity receiving federal financial assistance for purposes

of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. It is also a “person” under the PWDCRA.

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22. Defendant TERRANCE WALKER is an officer with the Flint Police Department.

Officer Walker is a “person” under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 and the PWDCRA, and an agent of the City

of Flint and Flint Police Department for the purposes of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of

the Rehabilitation Act. At all times relevant to this complaint, Officer Walker was acting under

color of state law. He is sued in his individual capacity.

FACTS
23. In October 2015, Cameron was seven years old and enrolled in the second grade at

Brownell K-2 STEM Academy. He stood just shy of four feet tall and weighed approximately

55 pounds.

24. As documented in his school records, Cameron is a friendly, likeable student in school

who enjoys helping his peers and teachers.

25. Cameron was first diagnosed with ADHD, an impairment, in 2012. Cameron’s ADHD

makes it difficult for him to focus, maintain attention, control his behavior, follow directions, and

stay seated. It also substantially limits him in one or more major life activities, including

learning, concentrating, and neurological/brain functions.

26. In November 2012, FCS developed an individualized education plan (“IEP”) to ensure

that Cameron receives educational services and supports to address his disability-related

challenges, including behavioral challenges. This IEP and its subsequent renewals include the

implementation of positive behavioral interventions and supports to assist Cameron with

managing his disability-related behaviors.

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PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL
27. In September 2015, recognizing that Cameron’s disability was making it difficult for him

to progress in school, FCS developed a behavioral intervention plan to help him stay focused and

de-escalate his disability-related behaviors.

28. Cameron has attended the YouthQuest Afterschool Program, which is held at Brownell

STEM Academy, since September 2014.

29. Upon enrolling Cameron in YouthQuest, Cameron’s mother informed program staff—

including YouthQuest’s Site Team Leader for Brownell, Ashley Liddell-Ruffin—of Cameron’s

ADHD diagnosis, his IEP, his medication, and his disability-related behavioral challenges.

30. Over the course of the 13 months in which Cameron participated in Youth Quest, Ms.

McCadden and Ms. Liddell-Ruffin had several conversations concerning Cameron’s ADHD and

strategies for assisting him with controlling his disability-related behavior.

31. Sometime between 2:49 PM and 4:42 PM on October 12, 2015, Cameron experienced

disability-related behavioral challenges—which manifested in him kicking a supply cart in the

lobby of the Brownell STEM Academy—while participating in YouthQuest activities.

32. Following Cameron’s disability-related behavior, Ms. Liddell-Ruffin radioed for a SRO.

33. At approximately 4:42 PM, Ms. Liddell-Ruffin called Cameron’s mother. She told Ms.

McCadden that Cameron was running around on the bleachers. This behavior was consistent

with Cameron’s disability.

34. Ms. McCadden told Ms. Liddell-Ruffin she would pick Cameron up immediately.

35. Before hanging up, Ms. Liddell-Ruffin told Ms. McCadden that Cameron had been

handcuffed.

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36. When Ms. McCadden arrived at the school less than 10 minutes later, she met Officer

Walker outside the school. Officer Walker was wearing his SRO uniform from Academy West,

an alternative high school located in Flint.

37. Ms. McCadden had not seen Officer Walker at YouthQuest in the past. He was not one

of the three police officers to whom YouthQuest parents were introduced at an orientation in

2013.

38. Officer Walker confirmed for Ms. McCadden that her son was in handcuffs.

39. Moments later, Ms. McCadden reached the lobby of the school and saw Cameron with

his hands handcuffed behind his back.

40. She immediately asked Officer Walker to remove the handcuffs.

41. Officer Walker responded that the key was in a lockbox and he was waiting for a police

cruiser to bring it to the school.

42. By this point, school and YouthQuest staff began to congregate around the scene in the

lobby. Brownell and YouthQuest parents were also passing by, creating a humiliating scene for

Cameron, his sister, and his mother.

43. A Flint PD cruiser arrived at the school with the handcuffs key at approximately 5:36

PM, meaning that Cameron was handcuffed behind his back for approximately one hour.

44. Cameron was never taken into custody, or arrested or charged with any crime.

45. Cameron’s mother has never been informed that Cameron violated any rule of the

YouthQuest program. She never received any explanation of why her son was handcuffed.

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46. Cameron experienced significant emotional suffering, psychological injury, and trauma

during and after the October 12 handcuffing. He continues to experience fear, distrust, and

anxiety regarding law enforcement officers.

CLAIMS FOR RELIEF
COUNT I – UNREASONABLE SEIZURE AND EXCESSIVE FORCE IN VIOLATION
OF THE FOURTH AND FOURTEENTH AMENDMENTS TO THE U.S.
CONSTITUTION AND 42 U.S.C. § 1983
(Against the City of Flint and Officer Walker)

47. The preceding paragraphs are incorporated by reference.

48. Plaintiff brings this action pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983 alleging unreasonable seizure

and excessive force in violation of the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments.

49. The actions of the Defendants were taken under color of state law.

50. The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution protected Cameron from unreasonable

seizure and excessive force. The Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution extends the

Fourth Amendment’s protections to the states.

51. Whether a seizure is unreasonable and thus unconstitutional depends on the totality of the

circumstances.

52. Officer Walker’s seizure of Cameron was unreasonable and thus unconstitutional in light

of the totality of the following circumstances, including but not limited to:

a. Cameron’s age, size, and disability, including his limited ability to impose

physical harm on others and his limited ability to form criminal intent;

b. that Cameron was experiencing behavior problems related to his disability while

participating in his afterschool program;

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c. the failure of the officer to use appropriate strategies for interacting with a child of

Cameron’s age, size, and disability;

d. the lack of any necessity for the handcuffing;

e. that the handcuffing violated the Michigan Board of Education’s Standards for

the Emergency Use of Seclusion and Restraint;

f. the prolonged period of time during which Cameron was handcuffed; and

g. the trauma imposed by the handcuffing.

53. By engaging in the foregoing conduct, Officer Walker, acting under color of law and with

deliberate indifference, violated Cameron’s right under the Fourth Amendment to the U.S.

Constitution to be free from unreasonable seizure and excessive force.

54. Cameron’s right to be free from unreasonable search and excessive force as described

herein was clearly established at the time Officer Walker handcuffed him.

55. Officer Walker acted intentionally, maliciously, and in reckless disregard of Cameron’s

rights.

56. Further, based on information and belief, Defendant City of Flint has maintained and

continues to maintain, with deliberate indifference, an unlawful policy or custom of imposing

unreasonable seizures and excessive force on children, including the seizure and excessive force

described herein. Defendant City of Flint has also, based on information and belief, failed to

implement adequate policies, practices, procedures, training, and supervision to prevent such

unlawful mechanical restraint of children.

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57. As a proximate result of Defendants’ actions and inactions, Cameron suffered and

continues to suffer emotional suffering, psychological injury, and trauma. Cameron continues to

experience fear, distrust, and anxiety regarding law enforcement officers.

58. Cameron is entitled to injunctive relief, declaratory relief, compensatory damages,

punitive damages, and reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs.

COUNT II – DISABILITY-BASED DISCRIMINATION IN VIOLATION OF TITLE II
OF THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, 42 U.S.C. § 12132, 28 C.F.R. §
35.130(b)(3)
(Against the City of Flint)

59. The preceding paragraphs are incorporated by reference.

60. Title II of the ADA requires that public entities refrain from discriminating against

individuals on the basis of disability. 42 U.S.C. § 12132. The regulations implementing Title II

of the ADA require that public entities avoid unnecessary policies, practices, criteria or methods

of administration that have the effect or tendency of excluding or discriminating against persons

with disabilities. 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(b)(3).

61. Children with disabilities, and particularly children such as Cameron, whose disabilities

manifest as behavioral challenges, are disproportionately vulnerable to and injured by the

unnecessary use of restraints such as handcuffs on the basis of their disabilities. The effects on

these children with disabilities include substantial and disproportionate physical and emotional

injuries, and disruptive exclusions from educational programming.

62. Based on information and belief, Defendant City of Flint has maintained and continues to

maintain, with deliberate indifference, a policy and practice of imposing unnecessary mechanical

restraints such as handcuffs on children with disabilities, including Cameron. This policy and

practice violates and continues to violate Title II of the ADA.

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63. As a proximate result of Defendant’s actions and inactions, Cameron suffered and

continues to suffer emotional suffering, psychological injury, and trauma. Cameron continues to

experience fear, distrust, and anxiety regarding law enforcement officers.

64. As a result of Defendant City of Flint’s violations of Title II of the ADA, Cameron is

entitled to compensatory damages, injunctive and declaratory relief, and reasonable attorneys’

fees and costs.

COUNT III – DISABILITY-BASED DISCRIMINATION AND FAILURE TO
ACCOMMODATE IN VIOLATION OF TITLE II OF THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, 42 U.S.C. § 12132, 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(b)(7)
(Against the City of Flint)

65. The preceding paragraphs are incorporated by reference.

66. Title II of the ADA requires that public entities do not discriminate against individuals on

the basis of disability. 42 U.S.C. § 12132. Under the Act’s regulations, public entities must

provide reasonable modifications to their policies, practices, or procedures in order to avoid

discrimination on the basis of disability. 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(b)(7).

67. Reasonable modifications include positive behavioral interventions and supports,

redirection, de-escalation, crisis intervention, patience, and waiting.

68. Under these provisions, law enforcement agencies and officers—including SROs like

Officer Walker—may not discriminate on the basis of disability, and must provide reasonable

modifications as needed during when interacting with persons with disabilities.

69. Children with disabilities, and particularly children such as Cameron, whose disabilities

manifest as behavioral challenges, are disproportionately vulnerable to and injured by the

unnecessary use of restraints such as handcuffs on the basis of their disabilities. The effects on

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these children with disabilities include substantial and disproportionate physical and emotional

injuries, and disruptive exclusions from educational programming.

70. Instead of the unnecessary use of mechanical restraints, including handcuffs, children

with disabilities require and are entitled to reasonable modifications to a public entity’s policies,

practices, or procedures. Such modifications include positive behavioral interventions and

supports, redirection, de-escalation, crisis intervention, patience, and waiting.

71. Based on the all of the circumstances, Officer Walker knew or should have known that

Cameron is a child with a disability who requires reasonable modifications under Title II if the

ADA on account of his disability.

72. Instead of providing Cameron with the reasonable modifications to which he was entitled

under law—including, for example, positive behavioral interventions and supports, redirection,

de-escalation, crisis intervention, patience, and waiting—Officer Walker escalated his interaction

with Cameron by unnecessarily handcuffing him behind his back for nearly an hour.

73. Further, based on information and belief, Defendant City of Flint failed to implement the

nondiscrimination and reasonable modification requirements of Title II of the ADA through

adequate policies, practices, procedures, training, or supervision, and instead authorized SROs,

including Officer Walker, to discriminate against children with disabilities such as Cameron on

the basis of disability.

74. Through its failure to adopt an adequate policy and practice of providing reasonable

modifications to children with disabilities, including Cameron, such as positive behavioral

interventions and supports, redirection, de-escalation, crisis intervention, patience, and waiting,

Defendant City of Flint has violated and continues to violate Title II of the ADA.

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75. As a proximate result of Defendant City of Flint’s actions and inactions, Cameron

suffered and continues to suffer emotional suffering, psychological injury, and trauma. Cameron

continues to experience fear, distrust, and anxiety regarding law enforcement officers.

76. As a result of Defendant City of Flint’s violations of Title II of the ADA, Cameron is

entitled to compensatory damages, injunctive and declaratory relief, and reasonable attorneys’

fees and costs.

COUNT IV – DISABILITY-BASED DISCRIMINATION IN VIOLATION OF SECTION
504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT, 29 U.S.C. § 794, 34 C.F.R. § 104.4(b)(1).
(Against the City of Flint)

77. The preceding paragraphs are incorporated by reference.

78. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act requires programs or activities that receive federal

financial assistance to refrain from discriminating against individuals on the basis of disability.

29 U.S.C. § 794. The regulations implementing Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act require

that entities receiving federal financial assistance avoid unnecessary policies, practices, criteria

or methods of administration that have the effect of discriminating against persons with

disabilities. 28 C.F.R. § 41.51(b)(3)(i).

79. Children with disabilities, and particularly children with disabilities that manifest as

behavioral challenges, including Cameron, are particularly vulnerable to and injured by the

unnecessary use of restraints, including handcuffs, on the basis of their disabilities. The effects

on these children with disabilities include substantial and disproportionate physical and

emotional injuries, and disruptive exclusions from educational programming.

80. Based on information and belief, Defendant City of Flint has maintained and continues to

maintain a policy and practice of imposing unnecessary mechanical restraints such as handcuffs

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on children with disabilities, including Cameron. This policy and practice violates and continues

to violate Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

81. As a proximate result of Defendant’s actions and inactions, Cameron suffered and

continues to suffer emotional suffering, psychological injury, and trauma. Cameron continues to

experience fear, distrust, and anxiety regarding law enforcement officers.

82. As a result of Defendant City of Flint’s violations of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation

Act, Cameron is entitled to compensatory damages, injunctive and declaratory relief, and

reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs.

COUNT V – DISABILITY-BASED DISCRIMINATION IN VIOLATION OF
MICHIGAN’S PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES CIVIL RIGHTS ACT, MICH. COMP.
LAWS § 37.1101 et seq
(Against Defendants City of Flint and Officer Walker)

83. The preceding paragraphs are incorporated by reference.

84. The PWDCRA requires persons such as Defendants to accommodate persons with

disabilities for purposes of public accommodation, public service, and education. Mich. Comp.

Laws § 37.1102. It also prohibits persons such as Defendants from denying persons with

disabilities to full and equal enjoyment of services, privileges, and advantages of places of public

accommodation and public services on the basis of disability. Mich. Comp. Laws § 37.1302.

85. Children with disabilities, and particularly children with disabilities that manifest as

behavioral challenges, including Cameron, are particularly vulnerable to and injured by the

unnecessary use of restraints, including handcuffs, on the basis of their disabilities. The effects

on these children with disabilities include substantial and disproportionate physical and

emotional injuries, and disruptive exclusions from educational programming.

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86. By handcuffing Cameron, Officer Walker failed to provide him with a reasonable

accommodation for the purposes of education and public service.

87. In handcuffing Cameron, Officer Walker further denied him full and equal enjoyment of

educational and recreational services at Brownell STEM Academy, a public school, on the basis

of his disability.

88. By engaging in the foregoing conduct, Officer Walker, violated Cameron’s right under

the PWDRCA to be free from discrimination on the basis of disability.

89. Based on information and belief, Defendant City of Flint has maintained and continues to

maintain a policy and practice of imposing unnecessary mechanical restraints such as handcuffs

on children with disabilities, including Cameron. This policy and practice violates and continues

to violate the PWDRCA.

90. As a proximate result of Defendants’ actions and inactions, Cameron suffered and

continues to suffer emotional suffering, psychological injury, and trauma. Cameron continues to

experience fear, distrust, and anxiety regarding law enforcement officers.

91. As a result of Defendants City of Flint and Officer Walker’s violations of the PWDRCA,

Cameron is entitled to compensatory damages, injunctive and declaratory relief, and reasonable

attorneys’ fees and costs.

DEMAND FOR RELIEF
Plaintiff requests that this Court:

a. assert jurisdiction over this matter;

b. enter judgment in favor of Plaintiff and against Defendants;

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c. enter judgment declaring that the actions and inactions described herein

violated the rights of Plaintiff under the U.S. Constitution, Title II of the

Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and

Michigan’s Persons with Disabilities Civil Rights Act;

d. issue an order enjoining the Defendants from engaging in the unlawful

conduct described herein;

e. award Plaintiff compensatory and punitive damages;

f. award costs and attorneys’ fees pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1988 and 12205; and

g. grant other appropriate relief.

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Respectfully submitted,

/s/ John Mark Finnegan
John Mark Finnegan (P68050)
Heberle & Finnegan
2580 Craig Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48130
(734) 302-3233
jmarkfinnegan@comcast.net

/s/ Michael J. Steinberg
Michael J. Steinberg (P48085)
Kary L. Moss (P49759)
American Civil Liberties Union
Fund of Michigan
2966 Woodward Ave.
Detroit, MI 48201
(313) 578-6814
msteinberg@aclumich.org

/s/ Claudia Center
Susan Mizner*
Claudia Center*
American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
39 Drumm Street
San Francisco, CA 94111
(415) 343-0762
center@aclu.org
smizner@aclu.org

*Applications for admission forthcoming

Counsel for Plaintiffs

Dated: _________________

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JURY DEMAND

Plaintiff demands a jury on all issues so triable.

Respectfully submitted,

/s/ John Mark Finnegan
John Mark Finnegan (P68050)
Heberle & Finnegan
2580 Craig Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48130
(734) 302-3233
jmarkfinnegan@comcast.net

/s/ Michael J. Steinberg
Michael J. Steinberg (P48085)
Kary L. Moss (P49759)
American Civil Liberties Union
Fund of Michigan
2966 Woodward Ave.
Detroit, MI 48201
(313) 578-6814
msteinberg@aclumich.org

/s/ Claudia Center
Susan Mizner*
Claudia Center*
American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
39 Drumm Street
San Francisco, CA 94111
(415) 343-0762
center@aclu.org
smizner@aclu.org

*Applications for admission forthcoming

Counsel for Plaintiffs

Dated: _________________

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DECLARATION

I, Chrystal McCadden, declare under the penalty of perjury that the allegations in the
foregoing Verified Complaint are true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Dated: ____________________ _________________________
Chrystal McCadden

21
MDEQ/LARA sampling of tap water in Flint Community Schools in late 2015 identified
locations within each building where Pb levels greatly exceeded 5 ppb. (Note that 5 ppb is
the medical community’s recommendation for maximum level of Pb in schools; bottled
water is said to contain no more than 5 ppb lead). On the suspicion that lead-bearing
fixtures were responsible for high lead levels, the MDEQ replaced fixtures at all drinking
water locations throughout the schools. High levels of lead were still detected following
this replacement program (see Table 1).

Table 1 High Lead levels measured at each Flint school following fixture replacement. Sampling
occured in October-November, 2016,

School Highest Pb level post fixture replacement
Brownell 412 ppb
Doyle-Rider 1515 ppb
DTM 614 ppb
Eisenhower 1582 ppb
Holmes 2027 ppb

While Pb levels at some faucets dropped following fixture replacement, water from a high
percentage of faucets continued to carry high Pb levels. Tables 2-6 provide the number of
fountains/faucets with Pb levels exceeding 5 ppb before and after fixture replacement. The
effect of fixture replacement was better for some schools than others (note that 74% of
faucets are still above 5 ppb at Brownell, as opposed to 23% at Eisenhower.

Table 2 PPB Lead before and after fixture replacement at BROWNELL STEM. 23 faucets sampled.

5 ppb Lead or more 5 ppb Lead or more
(#) (%)
PRE FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 23 100%

POST FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 17 74%

Table 3. PPB Lead before and after fixture replacement at DOYLE-RIDER. 56 faucets sampled.

5 ppb Lead or more 5 ppb Lead or more
(#) (%)
PRE FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 43 77%
POST FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 33 59%
Table 4 PPB Lead before and after fixture replacement at DTM. 55 faucets sampled.

5 ppb Lead or more 5 ppb Lead or more
(#) (%)
PRE FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 42 79%

POST FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 25 47%

Table 5 PPB Lead before and after fixture replacement at Eisenhower. 44 faucets sampled

5 ppb Lead or more 5 ppb Lead or more
(#) (%)
42 95%
PRE FIXTURE REPLACEMENT
POST FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 10 23%

Table 6 PPB Lead before and after fixture replacement at Holmes. 43 faucets tested

5 ppb Lead or more 5 ppb Lead or more
(#) (%)
29 67%
PRE FIXTURE REPLACEMENT
POST FIXTURE REPLACEMENT 25 58%

For the parents of Flint school children, simply knowing whether or not Pb is present at a
particular time, at a particular faucet, does not build confidence in the overall quality of
water in a school building. A reasonable person would likely expect an attempt to identify
the source of high lead contamination in particular faucets; if no attempt is evident, trust
in leadership – at the state, city, and school levels, is further eroded. While fixture
replacement has reduced lead levels to below 5 ppb at some taps, there are still more than
20% of drinking water faucets (of those tested) that still carry water in excess of 5 ppb.

A program that looks specifically at those faucets with persistently high Pb levels in an
attempt to identify the source (likely solder upstream) could result in eliminating some
sources of particulate lead. (See recommendation #1 below).

The MDEQ suggestions for deep flushing prior to testing seems to be based upon a theory
that such a process would reduce Pb levels in school drinking water. A pilot study at
Freeman Elementary indicated that following a deep flush, Pb levels were low at many
fixtures. But there has been no evidence provided by the state that such a process will
resulted in low Pb levels throughout a school day. It is likely that such evidence is
impossible to attain, according to numerous research studies conducted in the past few
years. Just this week, Indeed, there are now numerous published research studies that
show that the presence of particulate lead tends to be completely unpredictable. While
flushing a water line is useful in bringing fresh water into the plumbing system and is
likely to raise disinfectant levels that may have dropped in stagnant water, there is no
evidence that flushing will reliably lower Pb levels in school drinking water.

Note here that a growing number of experts recommend the use of filters on school water
faucets. Discuss the implications of announcing filters for school water faucets in Flint.
Include caution for using filters in a system without stable and sufficient levels of Chlorine.

Water testing protocol referred to as “sequential sampling,” where samples are taken that
would come from specific points in the distribution system, address point can be useful in
identifying the source of Pb in drinking water. The MDEQ/LARA approach to gathering
four samples from each drinking water faucet at schools is similar to a protocol for
residential water sampling. This protocol has typically been to:
1. Leave the premise plumbing untouched for at least 6 hours.
2. Collect a small volume of water from the faucet in container #1. This captures
water that has been closest to the fixture prior to sampling.
3. Collect a second small volume of water in container #2. In a residence, this captures
water that has been in premise plumbing
4. Allow water to run from the faucet for 30 seconds. In a residence, the volume that
runs through the faucet during this time would ideally correspond to the volume of
water in the internal plumbing between the faucet and the service line. This would
likely NOT be true for plumbing in a school building.
5. Collect 500 mL to 1 L in container #3. (Again, this volume could come from within
the same hallway in a school building, or perhaps the same building, or, perhaps a
service line into the building. It would be necessary to know the layout of the
building water line to determine where this water is coming from. )
6. Allow water to run from the faucet for 2 minutes. In a residence, the volume that
runs through the faucet during this time would correspond to the water in the
service line and into the main. This would definitely not be true for plumbing in a
school.
7. Collect a final 500 mL to 1 L container #4.

At issue here is not the flushing that occurs during steps 3 and 5, and potential
flushing of Pb during these steps that would mask the presence of Pb. The concern is
that these flush times were established for residential plumbing, and have less value
in school buildings. It is important to conduct sequential samples so that the source of
lead in school drinking water can be identified. Test protocol should be designed using
the lengths (and volumes) of pipes that supply water to faucets. Developing sequential
sampling protocol with building maintenance and classroom teaching staff can
further allow for trust-building in school water quality.

We recommend the following:

1. At each school, IDENTIFY building maintenance and classroom teaching staff
who will serve on a SCHOOL WATER BOARD. Each school will select its own
Water Board, whose members will represent building maintenance and classroom
teaching staff. Where appropriate, student leaders will also be selected to
participate in this Board. Each Water Board will be provided with education and
training in water quality maintenance and monitoring.

Project
Identify Water Board members and complete
Week
training program
beginning
Jan 15 Brownell, Holmes
Jan 22 Doyle-Ryder, DTM
Jan 29 Eisenhower, Freeman
Feb 5 Cummings, Neithercut
Feb 12 New Standard Academy, Pierce
Feb 19 Potter
Feb 26 Southwestern
Mar 5 Northwestern

2. DEVELOP WATER DISTRIBUTION MAPS in the vicinity of Pb “hot spots,” and
CREATE SEQUENTIAL SAMPLING PROTOCOL for each faucet school water
faucet. On a building-by-building basis, develop water distribution maps that allow
for sequential sampling protocol to determine where Pb is coming from. Results
from MDEQ testing in the fall of 2015 and spring of 2016 can assist in identifying
target areas within each building where Pb has been persistent. As a start, a list of
some of the rooms where Pb levels remained elevated after fixture replacement is
provided in this proposal. Building maintenance staff and licensed plumbers from
the Flint area will prepare maps of plumbing (length, diameter) between building
entry and faucets with consistently high Pb levels. Each school’s Water Board will
participate in reviewing these maps, so that staff insight can be captured and used
in developing appropriate solutions. Based upon the distribution maps, a 4-5-part
sequential sampling protocol will be developed for each faucet. Oversight expertise
in this phase will be independent of Flint Community Schools and the State of
Michigan. The City of Flint Technical Advisory Committee (COFTAC) will supply
recommendations for this oversight.

Project Develop Water Distribution Map and Create
Week Sequential Sampling Protocol
Jan 22 Brownell
Jan 29 Holmes
Feb 5 Doyle-Ryder
Feb 12 DTM
Feb 19 Eisenhower
Feb 26 Freeman
Mar 5 Cummings
Mar 12 Neithercut
Mar 19 New Standard Academy
Mar 26 Pierce
Apr 2 Potter
Apr 9 Southwestern
Apr 16 Northwestern

3. As water distribution maps and sequential sampling protocol are developed for
each school, BEGIN WATER SAMPLING. Repeat at 3 month increments. The
protocol would not include any pre-flushing. Each school’s Water Board will be
provided education and training in water test techniques, and together with MDEQ,
will participate in water sampling according to sequential sampling protocol
developed in step 2. Testing for residual chlorine throughout each school building
will be included for subsequent consideration. (See phase 5 below).

Project
Water Sampling Repeat at 12 week increments
Week
Jan 29 Brownell Project weeks 16, 32, 49
Feb 5 Holmes Project weeks 17, 33, 50
Feb 12 Doyle-Ryder Project weeks 18, 34, 51
Feb 19 DTM Project weeks 20, 36, 53
Feb 26 Cummings Project weeks 21, 37, 54
Mar 5 Eisenhower Project weeks 22, 38, 55
Mar 12 Freeman Project weeks 24, 40, 56
Mar 19 Neithercut Project weeks 25, 41, 57
Mar 26 New Standard Academy Project weeks 26, 42, 58
Apr 2 Pierce Project weeks 28, 44, 60
Apr 9 Potter Project weeks 29, 45, 61
Apr 16 Southwestern Project weeks 30, 46, 62
Apr 23 Northwestern Project weeks 31 48 , 63

4. Use results of sequential sampling and discussions with school maintenance staff
and Water Board to DETERMINE HOW BEST TO REMEDIATE SOURCES OF LEAD.
With assistance of licensed plumbers from the Flint area, conduct remediation via
bypass or shutoff.

Project Week Lead Remediation
Feb 12 – Feb 25 Brownell
Feb 26 – Mar 11 Holmes
Mar 12 – Mar 25 Doyle-Ryder
Mar 26 – Apr 8 DTM
Apr 9 – Apr 22 Cummings
Apr 23 – May 6 Eisenhower
May 7 – May 20 Freeman
May 21 – Jun 3 Neithercut
Jun 4 – Jun 17 New Standard Academy
Jun 18 – Jul 1 Pierce
Jul 2 – Jul 15 Potter
Jul 16 – Jul 29 Southwestern
Jul 30 – Aug 12 Northwestern

5. ASSESS REMEDIATION EFFORTS by repeating sampling protocol (round two of
sampling). Also, evaluate the extent of particulate lead release at all sites. If Pb
levels in excess of 5 ppb continue, each school’s Water Board to contemplate the
utility of point of use filters.

Project Assess remediation (round two water sampling,
Week conducted 12 weeks after initial round)
April 30 Brownell
May 7 Holmes
May 14 Doyle-Ryder
May 28 DTM
June 4 Cummings
June 11 Eisenhower
June 25 Freeman
July 2 Neithercut
July 9 New Standard Academy
July 23 Pierce
July 30 Potter
August 6 Southwestern
August 13 Northwestern

6. Should point-of-use filters be necessary in any building in order to keep Pb levels to
less than 5 ppb, create a model of residual chlorine levels in each building as a
function of season. Empower and assist each school Water Board to study the effect
of flushing on residual chlorine. This phase should continue for at least one
calendar year, to study the appropriate seasonal use of flushing to maintain
acceptable disinfection in school buildings.
TIMELINE:

Phase Task Begin Complete
1. Water Board creation and training January 16, March 11,
2018 2018
2. Building water distribution mapping January 22, April 22, 2018
and sequential sampling protocol 2018
3. Water Sampling January 29, April 29, 2018
2018
4. Lead remediation February 12, August 5, 2018
2918
5. Assess remediation and evaluate April 30, August 19,
random particulate lead release 2018 2018
6. Consideration of secondary May 7, 2018 August 26,
precautions for point-of-use filters 2018

BUDGET:

Phase 1. This task will require communication with staff at each school and
coordination of training and education in water quality maintenance and
monitoring. School staff (8) who are selected to serve on a Water Board will be
given a $200 honorarium each year.
Curriculum development and workshop facilitation $3000
Annual Water Board honoraria ($2000 per school) $20800.
TOTAL $23800.

Phase 2. This task will require the time (estimated 30 hours per school building)
and assistance of school building staff and licensed plumbers. Oversight should be
provided by an independent source, selected by the COFTAC. Each school’s Water
Board should assist with oversight. A tentative list locations at five schools is
provided in Table 8 (at then end of this document).

Building Staff time ($1500 per school) $15000.
Licensed plumber time $25000.
Oversight $15000.
TOTAL $55000

Phase 3. This task will require the time (estimated 16 hours per school building
for a total of 208 hours per season) and assistance of school building staff and
licensed plumbers. Oversight should be provided by an independent source,
selected by the COFTAC.

Water Board sample collection
$800 per school x 13 schools x 4 sample events = $41600
Oversight $1000 x 4 sample events = $4000
Materials and supplies $10000
Sample analysis $200000.
TOTAL $255600

Phase 4 . It’s impossible to know the cost of bypassing or capping plumbing lines
to eliminate sources of Pb. A fund of $13000 ($1000 per building) is recommended
for potential repair/replacement costs .

Phase 5. This cost is included with phase 3 costs above.

Table 7 Tentative list of taps to study for sources of Pb, at Brownell, Doyle-Rider, DTM, and
Eisenhower

School Room/Area Pre-fixture Post-
Pb Fixture Pb
56 25
Room 17
31 19
Hall across from room 26 46 19
23 150
Brownell 7 15
Room 1
11 412
Room 2 13 34
Next to room 6 38 178
Room 6 11 350
Room 152 13 69
Room 251 11 75
Room 252 11 107
Doyle- Room 259 7 135
Rider 341 520
Room 260
85 407
340 1515
Room 262
44 521
Room 39 5 442
Room 75 608 75
First floor hall, between rooms 78,79 49 56
16 95
DTM First floor hall, across from ramp
27 614
First floor hall, across from room 13 14 134
First floor hall, right of room 19 10 328
First floor hall, across from room 25 8 126
16 20
Hall, between pool and gym
12 26
Room 106 10 1582
Eisenhower Room 206 10 37
Room 208 19 59
Boy’s locker room 17 2027
Girl’s locker room 18 615
Cafeteria 22 227
Room B102 2 203
Holmes Near community room 12 118
Main Office 15 2084
Yellow Hall Girl’s Restroom 11 59
Red Hall Boy’s Restroom 15 69
Green Hall 24 391
RICK SNYDER
I
STATE OF MICHIGAN
EXECUTIVE OFFICE BRIAN CALLEY
GOVERNOR LANSING LT. GOVERNOR

February 7, 2017

Mr. David Sabuda, Chief Financial Officer
City of Flint

Dear David,
As you are aware, the results from the latest round of testing of Flint’s water completed a full 6-month cycle and the
outcomes reflect results below the federal action level for the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR). The 6-month LCR
testing results showed 12 ppb. In addition, the latest round (November 2016) of testing from extended sentinel sites
in Flint demonstrated that Flint’s water had a 90th percentile value of 8 ppb.
Due to these new levels being achieved, the payment of water credits on Flint’s active water customer accounts
which have covered water usage since April, 2014 will continue for water used through the end of February. Also,
funding for the source water from the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) which has been covered by the State
since October, 2015 will continue through the end of February. No water credits should be applied to meter
readings conducted after February 28th. This date recognizes that those customers billed in cycles 1105-1236
were the first readings to receive the credits and therefore should be the first to have the credits discontinued.
Please advise water customers accordingly.
Please note the following:
• The city will need to continue its efforts to remain in compliance with the LCR, and the state remains
committed to Flint as it relates to removing all the lead service lines, providing filters, replacement
cartridges, and continuing education and outreach to the residents of Flint
• There is no change at present regarding availability or delivery of bottled water.
• Due to the ongoing lead service line replacement projects this year, filters and filter cartridges will remain
available. Further, filters and cartridges will remain available for residents during the estimated three years
it will take to remove the remaining lead and galvanized iron service lines.
Although we have had several conversations regarding the circumstances under which these subsidies would end, I
wanted to formally advise the City of Flint with this correspondence. We will continue to work closely with you to
address other areas of support and also the GLWA credit that is currently on record for the State.
Please call me if you have any questions.

Sinci

Richard Baird, Senior Advisor
Office of the Governor
Cc: Mayor Karen Weaver
Heidi Grether
Keith Creagh
Scott HHpakka
Larry Steckelberg

GEORGEW. ROMNEY BUILDING • Ill SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE • LANsING, MICHIGAN 48909
www. michigan. gov
2016 Self Evaluation Form
Completed By Tim Herman
FLINT & GENESEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Evaluation Form for CEO: Tim Herman
Name of Evaluator: Rating
Date of Evaluation: November, 2016 1-5 (high)

RELATIONSHIP WITH BOARD:
1.      Recruits and retains a high powered Board. 5
2.      Keeps Board informed. 5
3.      Offers professional advice to Board. 4
4.      Interprets/executes the intent of Board policies. 4
5.      Supports Board policy and actions to public and staff. 5
6.      Remains impartial to Board, treating all members alike. 5
7.      Refrains from criticism, individual/group members of the Board. 4
8.      Bases his position with Board matters upon principle and fact. 5
9.      Facilitates Operating Board, RLC, and Strategic Board meetings effectively. 4
10. Maintains consistent and timely flow of communication regarding internal and external FGCC activities to Board. 5

COMMUNITY RELATIONS:
1. Gains respect and support of community at large regarding FGCC initiatives. 5
2. Solicits and gives attention to issues raised by area community partners and governing agencies. 5
3. Develops cooperative relationships with news media. 4
4. Demonstrates strong Community Leadership in areas of concern to FGCC. 5
5. Works effectively with public and private agencies at various levels, local and beyond. 5
6. Engages in leadership activities at regional, State and/or National levels as directed by the Board. 5

STAFF PERSONNEL RELATIONSHIPS:
1. Reconizes staff for contributions and exhibits ability to assist them in performing their job functions effectively. 4
2. Orchestrates and coordinates interplay of various functions of FGCC effectively 5
3. Demonstrates fairness and is non-disciminatory regarding personnel issues. 4
4. Appears to delegate authority to staff members appropriate to the position each person holds 5
5. Encourages participation of appropriate staff members and groups in planning, procedures and policy interpretation 5
6. Presents positive and negative evaluative information to the Operating Board as necessary regarding performance of staff members. 5
7. Budgets and plans for staff development and retraining in accordance with the needs of the FGCC 5

PROGRAM AREAS:
1. Seeks data to achieve a comprehensive understanding of issues. 5
2. Provides effective leadership on major FGCC issues. 5
3. Leads in the formulation of action plans to address FGCC initiatives. 4
4. Facilitates an environment whereby staff seem able to reach decisions and solve problems. 5
5. Provides monthly evaluation of program areas to the Board as outlined in the Stragegic Plan. 5

BUSINESS AND FINANCE:
1. Supervises operations, ensuring competent and efficient performance. 5
2. Monitors that budget proposals and expenditures are wise and ensures that adequate control and accounting are maintained. 5
3. Keeps Board informed of all relevant budgetary concerns. 5
4. Able to generate new revenues at the major investor level. 5

PERSONAL QUALITIES:
1. Defends principle and conviction in the face of pressure and partisan influence. 5
2. Maintains high standards of ethics, honest, and integrity in all personal and professional matters. 5
3. Earns respect and standing among his professional colleagues. 5
4. Demonstrates ability to work well with individuals and groups 5
5. Exercises good judgment. 5
6. Maintains pose and emotional stability in the full range of his professional activities. 5
7. Writes clearly and concisely. 4
8. Speaks well in front of large and small groups, expressing his ideas in a logical and forthright manner. 4
9. Thinks well on his feet when faced with an unexpected or disturbing turn of events in a large group meeting. 4
10. Stays current and remains knowlegeable on FGCC related issues including challenges and opportunities.. 5
FINAL REPORT
What to Know and Do About Water Pilot Project

In response to concerns that some Flint, Michigan, residents were still drinking tap water
potentially contaminated with lead, community partners developed a pilot project designed
to bring safe water, resources, and critical information to hard-to-reach residents.

Ruth Mott Foundation • Community Foundation of Greater Flint
United Way of Genesee County • University of Michigan—Flint
Table of Contents

Project Narrative Pages 2-6
Conclusion and Recommendations Page 7
Appendices Pages 8-12

1
What to Know and Do About Water Project
Civic Park Neighborhood – Flint, Michigan
Final Report – Tryphena Clarke

What is the What to Know and Do About Water Pilot Project?
In response to concerns that some Flint residents were still using potentially contaminated
water, the Ruth Mott Foundation committed in May 2016 to funding the “What to Know and Do
About Water” pilot project to create a neighborhood-level water resource expo and to conduct
door-to-door water distribution for residents in the Civic Park Neighborhood in north Flint. The
objective was to design a template for an event and distribution that could be replicated in other
Flint neighborhoods where residents are in need of water resources as well as accurate, reliable,
and trustworthy information about the water crisis.

The Civic Park Neighborhood on
Flint’s northwest side was selected
since community leaders said
residents were in need of water and
information about the water crisis.
The boundaries for the neighborhood
are Dupont Street to the east,
Brownell Boulevard to the west,
Pasadena Avenue to the north, and
Welch Boulevard to the south. At
that time, many residents in Flint
were reporting that their homes had
not been tested for lead. The results
of a Target Insight/MIRS News poll
conducted May 23-25 found that 48%
of Flint residents, out of 400 polled
participants, said their home water
supplies had not been tested for lead.
The poll also found that 19% of the
polled residents were using water
filters, 13% were using bottled water,
55% were using both filters and
bottled water, and 13% were using
neither filters nor bottled water. A
process for directly reaching
residents, including children and
vulnerable adults who were possibly
continuing to use dangerous, lead-contaminated water, was critical to giving the citizens of Flint
a fighting chance at recovery.

Understanding Local Residents and Who They Trust
Beginning in March, the Ruth Mott Foundation along with the Community Foundation of Greater
Flint, United Way of Genesee County, and University of Michigan-Flint surveyed a group of Flint
residents who are trusted leaders in their communities about the Flint water crisis. There was
2
concern among these residents that some in Flint were still drinking unfiltered water and not
receiving important water resources, services, and communications at the neighborhood level
related to the ongoing crisis. At the Ruth Mott Foundation’s request, these residents agreed to
meet with other nonprofits as well as state government officials involved in coordinating water
information, and shared with us potential recommendations and suggested next steps.
Representatives from state government included Lt. Gov. Brian Calley (who attended in April),
Michigan State Police Capt. Chris Kelenske (who attended in April and May), and members of the
Michigan National Guard.
As a result of these meetings, the Ruth Mott
Foundation (RMF) and the United Way of Genesee
County funded the Flint Grassroots Initiative (FGI)
located at Joy Tabernacle Church to create a water
resource expo and door-to-door water distribution
system within the Civic Park community. The goal
was to develop a model of serving residents who
were not currently being reached. A critical
component of the pilot project relied on “places of
trust” within the immediate neighborhood. Joy
Tabernacle Church had previously been a site for ongoing water distribution, health screenings,
and other community engagement efforts, which made it an ideal site for the project.
Community leaders from Civic Park and the surrounding area who have a solid, trustworthy
presence in the vicinity, were asked to be a part of the neighborhood planning committee. The
planning committee included representatives from Christ Enrichment Center, Civic Park
Neighborhood Association, Flint Grassroots Initiative, Urban Renaissance Center, Veterans of
Now, and residents from the neighborhood. They worked together guiding the process of
creating a template for the water expo event as well as a distribution system that could be
replicated in other neighborhoods where residents are in need. The group also sought the
expertise of other agencies and nonprofit organizations (Michigan State Police Emergency
Operations Center, Red Cross, Michigan Works!, Michigan Faith in Action, United Way, and
University of Michigan-Flint) to ensure that reliable and pertinent information would be shared.

One Model of Doing Business Differently
The pilot project was supported by RMF from July 10 to September 3 (Appendix 1). The project
goals were to ensure residents had safe drinking water as well as accurate and up-to-date
information about the crisis. FGI hired four individuals and partnered with the Flint WaterWorks
Initiative for placement of eight additional workers to assist with the water expo, canvassing, and
weekly door-to-door water delivery. Staff hired for the project had work experience that ranged
from no previous work experience to over 30 years of experience. RMF’s community
engagement officer and learning officer worked together to create a training process that
provided hands-on experience, role play scenarios, a review of household assessment questions,
data collection techniques, spreadsheet work, and practicing safe water lifting. FGI staff were
also referred to FlintCares.com to review instructional water filter replacement videos provided
by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and to get accurate up-to-date information
about the water crisis to be passed on to residents. The Flint Cares website was created out of
the community Flint Water Recovery Group as a way to “provide Flint residents with the most
accurate, up-to-date and trustworthy information regarding the water crisis. The Flint Water
Recovery Group, also known as the Community Partners Group, is a partnership of the more
than 120 non-profits, churches, grass-root organizations, individuals and residents that are
3
working together to create short, intermediate, and long term solutions related to the crisis. The
partnership consists of five work-groups: Behavioral Health (also known as the Flint Resiliency),
Physical Health, Communications, Education and Recovery Resources.” (FlintCares.com)

The workers completed a week of training and went out into the neighborhood the following
week (one week before the water expo) to put into practice what they had learned. Canvassers
checked with residents to see if they needed water, water filters or replacement cartridges,
asked adult residents to complete a short survey, and informed residents about the water expo
to be held on Saturday, July 23.

What to Know and Do About Water Expo
The What to Know and Do About Water Expo on July 23 at Joy Tabernacle Church created a one-
stop location for fellowship, fun, and much-needed water resources. There were bounce houses
for children and musical entertainment. Dawson’s Catering of Flint fed 294 individuals a hot meal
while agency vendors and volunteers provided 153 households with food, bottled water, water
resources, and information to assist families with enrollment in early head start programs,
Medicaid Expansion, and Double-Up Food Bucks benefits. About 60 residents participated in a
panel discussion with representatives from the EPA, Michigan Department of Health and Human
Services, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and the Governor’s Office. The panel
provided answers to questions about water quality and testing, medical benefits, and resources
available to families impacted by the water crisis. There was also a giveaway of four hand-held
tablets that residents won for participating in the panel discussion.

Door-to-Door Canvassing
During the 10-week pilot project,
canvassers visited 735 occupied
houses and 172 households
completed a household
assessment. Twenty-two Civic
Park residents, including seven
children, were living in
households that reported using
unfiltered tap water at the time of the survey.

At the start of the neighborhood water pilot project there were several barriers for residents to
accessing water, water resources, and accurate up-to-date information as it pertains to the
water crisis. The nearest
Community Point of
Distribution (CPOD) site at
the time was approximately
2.6 miles away and residents
who were having difficulty
accessing water were not
aware of or did not want to
be added to the state’s
Access and Functional Needs
(AFN) list. The AFN list
provides the State of
4
Michigan with addresses of residents who have a disability, no transportation, or other
limitations to accessing a CPOD. The state provides water delivery to residents on the AFN list.
Many residents received limited information regarding the water crisis. RMF’s community
engagement officer worked with FGI staff to establish working relationships with the Michigan
State Police Emergency Operations Center, United Way, and the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan.
These partnerships ensured that food, water filters, filter replacement cartridges, water testing
kits, diaper wipes, and other needed commodities would be available to those in need. RMF’s
community engagement officer also worked with FGI staff to obtain laminated Quick Water
Reference Guides (which contained filter replacement instructions and water information) and
updated information from FlintCares.com to hand out during the door-to-door canvassing.

FGI continued providing biweekly water distribution onsite at Joy Tabernacle Church as staff
canvassed the neighborhood daily and provided weekly water deliveries to those who identified
as having difficulty getting water. During the project, 110 households received delivery services:
 22 households received filters only.
 84 households were on the FGI water delivery list. Of those, 31 households were on the
list because they were limited in the amount of water they are able to pick up for their
household (at work during CPOD hours of operation or have small vehicles). And, 53 of
those households were on the list for weekly water delivery because they need assistance
carrying water into their homes.
 4 households were referred and added to the AFN list.

Lessons Learned from Canvassing and Water Delivery
The What to Know and Do About Water project was piloted to create a neighborhood-level
water resource expo and to conduct door-to-door water distribution for residents in the Civic
Park Neighborhood. FGI staff were able to gather important information about how residents
obtained their water resources and received information pertaining to the water crisis, but they
faced many challenges in executing their work flow. FGI learned that in order for any group to
consistently meet the needs of residents at a neighborhood level, and for this model to be
implemented effectively, the group/organization must:
 Know their limits. An organization should carefully assess the feasibility of their proposed
goals and not overpromise. An organization may not have the capacity to implement the
above model by themselves, so it’s important to partner when it makes sense.
 Plan with structure and strong leadership to back it up, and develop a system of
accountability for that leadership. The group must establish internal processes on how
things will get done and create checklists that staff can use to hold each other
accountable (for example, neighborhood canvassing lists, resident and partner follow-
up, and weekly water delivery checklists). Leadership must be able to make last-minute
adjustments to get the job done.
 Understand the starting point of the people you are bringing aboard. Knowing the staff’s
work skills will allow the group/organization to tailor staff training and provide support
for day-to-day activities.
 Be willing to partner with others to coordinate resources to get the job done. Mobilizing
people for action requires substantial time and effort. Making the calls and personal
contacts to obtain resources and then getting resources out into the community cannot
be done solely by volunteers. Without salaries for a supervisor and/or team leaders,
follow-through on planned actions is rare.
 Document efforts to help show what is actually achieved and to tell the story about the
need for the work. It is important to identify what needs are being met, the number of
5
people assisted, number of resources provided, gaps in services, and project challenges
and lessons learned.

Lessons Learned from the Expo
FGI staff learned that they:
 Should be prepared for all types of weather.
 Should not assume that people will come inside the building to eat and throw away trash.
They should have trash cans and recycle bins inside and outside at each station.
 Should have clear signage that states the location of vendors, the panel and any rules that
guests need to abide by, such as “no food or drinks in the sanctuary.”
 Should assist the moderator during the panel discussion by keeping track of the order
residents raise their hands to ask questions and by stopping people from talking out of
turn.

Changes in Local and State Water Crisis Response
Since the pilot project started, the State of Michigan EOC has made several changes to the way it
is managing its response to the Flint water crisis. The state received $15 million in March in
federal funding to assist with the City of Flint’s workforce needs. The EOC and Michigan Works!
began transitioning the Water Response Teams from volunteers to paid positions for city
residents. The National Dislocated Worker Grant funding from the Department of Labor created
approximately 400 temporary jobs for eligible residents to be water delivery workers, water filter
education liaisons, and Water Resource Site workers. With the hiring of local residents to fill
service roles for the EOC the following activities have taken place:
 Community Water Distribution Sites are open in all nine wards.
 Over 1200 residents on the AFN list have received delivery of water and commodities to their
homes.
 Two Help Centers (behavioral health services, lead testing, and referrals to primary care
providers) have been funded to provide additional supports to families.

These changes, along with 30-plus faith-based and non-profit organizations receiving water
provided by the state for distribution, have increased access to water and water-related
resources in the community.

6
Conclusion & Recommendations

Despite the available resources, access and service gaps still exist within neighborhoods in the
City of Flint. The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s “A Whole Community Approach to
Emergency Management: Principles, Themes, and Pathways for Action” states, “Recognition that
government at all levels cannot manage disasters alone means that communities need the
opportunity to draw on their full potential to operate effectively. Empowering local action
requires allowing members of the communities to lead—not follow—in identifying priorities,
organizing support, implementing programs, and evaluating outcomes.” (FEMA, 2011)

The What to Know and Do About Water pilot project and a subcommittee of the Flint Water
Recovery Group, known as Neighborhood Connections (connected with 37 neighborhood
groups), have identified residents who don’t have access to water, nutritional foods to mitigate
the effects of lead, behavioral health services, and other water resource needs. Funding streams
or in-kind support for grassroots groups to address these needs vary. While some have tapped
into support from local churches, out-of-state donors, Michigan Works!, Mott Community
College Opportunity Youth Program, State of Michigan EOC, and the United Way, others are
working with no pecuniary backing. Even organizations with grant funding because of the crisis
may not have a way forward to sustain their efforts. Moving forward, a plan to support
neighborhood groups as they continue to serve vulnerable community members needs to be
developed and synthesized to undergird these groups who have played a critical role in the water
response.

The United Way has funded several door-to-door water projects in some neighborhoods through
November 30, but ongoing support and a distribution infrastructure will be needed until the
water crisis is over. There will continue to be vulnerable individuals in the community who are
not willing to transition to the AFN list to access water and water resources due to their lack of
trust in all governmental entities. RMF staff and a consultant have developed an index using data
geocoded for Flint to map and identify potential areas for interventions or additional
neighborhood support (Appendix 2). As neighborhood data is gathered, the information can be
used by grassroots groups, organizational and community leaders, as well as government officials
to create a shared understanding of the needs of the neighborhood. This will help all the
recovery partners determine the best ways to strengthen neighborhood assets, capacities, and
interests. To that end, we offer the following recommendations to ensure residents are receiving
the water and services they need amid Flint’s recovery:

 Assess and catalog neighborhood-based door-to-door distribution efforts (taking into
account the AFN list) and identify ongoing needs and gaps.
 Evaluate the scalability of the What to Know and Do About Water pilot model.
 Develop a plan to support neighborhood groups in each ward of the City as they continue
to serve vulnerable residents who require ongoing door-to-door services.
 Support and facilitate the Flint Water Recovery Neighborhood Connection subcommittee
to serve as the key connector and coordinator of grassroots outreach and service
delivery.

7
Appendices

1. What to Know and Do About Water Project Budgets

2. Potential Areas for Intervention

8
Appendix 1
What to Know and Do About Water
Project Budgets

Budget Summary: July 10 – September 3
Flint Grassroots Initiative Project: What to Know and Do About Water
Project Cost: Explanation Amount Amount Total
Approved Approved Project
Ruth Mott Other Budget
Foundation
4 PT Team Leaders
8 PT Canvassers/Water
Wages Staff $14,000 $16,800 $30,800
Truck rental, Gas &
Transportation maintenance $1,000 $11,483 $12,483
Supplies $2,867 $2,867
Office
Equipment
Laptop
Printer

$1,000 $1,000
Staff Training $146 $146
Liability
Insurance $1,000 $1,000
Water Expo
Water Expo Hot dogs, hamburgers
meal & chips for 300 people $1,500 $600 $2,100
Food Truck of
EM Partner Fees $600 $600
Entertainment
Equipment
Rental $1,200 $1,200
Space Rental $750 $750
Raffle Prizes $230 $230 $460
Printing $145 $145
Total Cost $18,821 $34,730 $53,551

9
Budget Summary: September 16 – November 31

Flint Grassroots Initiative Project: What to Know and Do About Water
Project Cost: Explanation Amount Amount Total
Approved Approved Project
United Mott Budget
Way Community
College
2 PT Drivers
4 PT Water Delivery
Wages Staff $6,600 $8,150 $14,750
Transportation $6,047 $6,047
Supplies $500 $500
Total Cost $13,147 $8,150 $21,297

10
Appendix 2

The indicators used in the index are listed below. All data was obtained from the 2014 five-year
estimates from the American Community Survey and were mapped at the census tract
geography.

 Percentage of households without vehicles.
 Percentage of residents living below the federal poverty level.
 Percentage of residents over 65.
 Percentage of residents under 18.
 Average household size.
(continued on next page)
11
Once the data were mapped, all indicators were assigned to a scale. For most, the indicators
were broken into five categories, with the highest number representing the most vulnerable
population for that indicator. The average household size did not have much variation, so it was
divided into three categories. Once each census tract was assigned a number between one and
five (or, in the case of the average household size, one and three), the assigned values for each
census tract from each scale were added to make an indexed number. The higher the number,
the higher the potential risk for difficulty getting water.
It is important to note, because there is little research specific to the Flint water crisis, these
indicators were chosen by listening to individuals and providers explain what makes it difficult
for families to get enough water for their household. Please see the table below for the
rationales for using each indicator.
Indicator Rationale

Percentage of households without vehicles Those without vehicles are unable to drive to the
PODS to get water or filters.

Percentage of residents living below the federal These families may not have gas money to drive
poverty level. to the PODS, even if they have a car.

Percentage of residents over 65 Many of the elderly population may not be able
to lift the heavy water packages, even if they
drive their car to the PODS to get water. Many
cannot carry the water into their homes.

Percentage of residents under 18 Families with children are already a high risk
population, because they need to be very careful
to keep the children away from ingesting the
lead. Those with very young children were
cautioned to continue to use bottled water for
children, even for bathing. This requires families
to use much more water.

Average household size Larger households consume more water,
requiring more visits to the PODS.

The highest score a census tract could receive was 23. However, the highest score received was
19. The areas of the map in orange fell in the highest categories. Civic Park, the site of the door-
to-door survey, actually fell in the middle category (13-14) on the index, with many census tracts
scoring higher on the index.
Once the index was created, a layer of resources was added. Partners discussed adding
additional layers specific to data collected on lead service lines, water lead levels, and blood lead
levels. However, up-to-date and complete data on blood lead levels and lead service lines are still
being compiled.

12
Subject: Sampling Bias in lead testing in Flint
From: Laura Sullivan <lsulliva@kettering.edu>
Date: 1/29/2018 3:08 PM
To: Yvonn Lewis <eyvonlewis@gmail.com>, Lawrence Reynolds <lrey52@gmail.com>, Pamela Pugh
<Ppugh@cityofflint.com>, "Henry, James" <jhenry@gchd.us>, John McKellar <jmckellar@gchd.us>, Kay Doerr
<doerrkay@gmail.com>, Laura Carravallah <lcarrav1@yahoo.com>, Peter Levine <plevine@gcms.org>, Nancy Love
<nglove@umich.edu>, Shawn Patrick McElmurry <s.mcelmurry@wayne.edu>, Artina Sadler <ASadler@cfgf.org>,
James Gaskin <jgaskin@unitedwaygenesee.org>, Jamie-Lee Venable <jvenable@unitedwaygenesee.org>, Kent Key
<kent.key@hc.msu.edu>, Kirk Smith <ksmith@flint.org>, Jameca Patrick-Singleton <jpatrick-
singleton@cityofflint.com>, Mark Adas <madas@cityofflint.com>, Robert Bincsik <rbincsik@cityofflint.com>

I've mentioned this before - this author discusses sampling bias in the sentinel and subsequent residential lead testing.
Perhaps this justifies some contention regarding the conclusions by MDEQ that Flint water now meets LCR regulations.

Attachments/Goovaerts_2017_Sample bias in lead monitoring in Flint.pdf
STOTEN-22120; No of Pages 15
Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Science of the Total Environment

journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv

Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis:
Another case of sampling bias?
Pierre Goovaerts ⁎
BioMedware Inc., Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA

H I G H L I G H T S G R A P H I C A L A B S T R A C T

• State-controlled monitoring collected
biweekly water samples at 739 sentinel
sites.
• Sentinel sites are not as representative
of Flint housing stock as voluntary sites.
• Unlike sentinel program voluntary sam-
pling indicates increase in lead levels.
• State did not sample houses with lead
service lines in two of the poorest
wards.
• Interior plumbing might contribute
more to lead in Flint water than service
lines.

a r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c t

Article history: The delay in reporting high levels of lead in Flint drinking water, following the city's switch to the Flint River as its
Received 29 November 2016 water supply, was partially caused by the biased selection of sampling sites away from the lead pipe network.
Received in revised form 22 February 2017 Since Flint returned to its pre-crisis source of drinking water, the State has been monitoring water lead levels
Accepted 22 February 2017
(WLL) at selected “sentinel” sites. In a first phase that lasted two months, 739 residences were sampled, most
Available online xxxx
of them bi-weekly, to determine the general health of the distribution system and to track temporal changes
Editor: D. Barcelo in lead levels. During the same period, water samples were also collected through a voluntary program whereby
concerned citizens received free testing kits and conducted sampling on their own. State officials relied on the
Keywords: former data to demonstrate the steady improvement in water quality. A recent analysis of data collected by vol-
Sampling bias untary sampling revealed, however, an opposite trend with lead levels increasing over time. This paper looks at
Blood lead levels potential sampling bias to explain such differences. Although houses with higher WLL were more likely to be
Lead-and-copper rule sampled repeatedly, voluntary sampling turned out to reproduce fairly well the main characteristics (i.e. pres-
Poverty ence of lead service lines (LSL), construction year) of Flint housing stock. State-controlled sampling was less rep-
Lead service lines
resentative; e.g., sentinel sites with LSL were mostly built between 1935 and 1950 in lower poverty areas, which
might hamper our ability to disentangle the effects of LSL and premise plumbing (lead fixtures and pipes present
within old houses) on WLL. Also, there was no sentinel site with LSL in two of the most impoverished wards, in-
cluding where the percentage of children with elevated blood lead levels tripled following the switch in water
supply. Correcting for sampling bias narrowed the gap between sampling programs, yet overall temporal trends
are still opposite.
© 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

⁎ Corresponding author at: BioMedware, Inc., PO Box 1577, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA.
E-mail address: goovaerts@biomedware.com.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
0048-9697/© 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
2 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

1. Introduction sampling of N600 sentinel sites chosen by the EPA and MDEQ (Flint
Safe Drinking Water Task Force, 2016). The initial set of sentinel sites
The drinking water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan was a was selected from a pool of 1951 volunteer sites identified during the
painful reminder that biased monitoring and sampling procedures can door-to-door water distribution; in particular it included all 156 sites
be used to hide the true extent of environmental disasters. The delay with lead or lead combination service lines according to City records
in reporting high lead levels following April 2014s change in water sup- (Sentinel Site Selection, 2016). Other sites were added according to
ply, which resulted in water with high chloride and no corrosion inhib- the following criteria: i) spatial distribution to ensure coverage of all
itor flowing through the aging Flint water distribution system (Flint nine wards, ii) areas predicted to have high blood levels based on
Water Advisory Task Force, 2016), was partially caused by the biased se- Hanna-Attisha et al. (2016), and iii) environmental justice consider-
lection of sampling sites. Flint's water testing from late 2014 missed the ations, specifically lead paint indicators, minority population, and low
bulk of the city's lead pipe network, which along with home plumbing income derived from EPA Environmental Justice Mapping and Screen-
fixtures (e.g., leaded brass and solder), is the primary source of lead ing Tool, known as EJSCREEN (US EPA, 2016b). This initial set evolved
being leached from chlorine-induced corrosion. Instead, according to between sampling rounds as some residents stopped participating
Milman (2016) the sampling targeted properties on the eastern and while others asked to be included in the network (Bryce Feighner, per-
western fringes of the city which, in some cases, were a long way sonal communication, February 2, 2017). Once again, samples were col-
from any apparent source of lead. Even more troubling was the news lected by homeowners although after training by a sentinel team. All
that such sampling practices were being used by other public water sys- water samples collected during the sentinel and voluntary residential
tems throughout the country (Milman and Glenza, 2016). sampling programs were tested for lead and copper by MDEQ Drinking
According to EPA there is no safe level of lead in drinking water as this Water Analysis Laboratory, and in the spirit of transparency, results
toxic metal can be harmful to human health even at low exposure levels. have been posted periodically at http://www.michigan.gov/flintwater.
Yet, the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR, US EPA, 1991, 2002, 2016a) allows a State officials relied on the sentinel data to demonstrate the steady
sizeable number of first-draw 1-L water samples collected from high-risk improvement in water quality since the source water switch. In partic-
homes to exceed the action level of 15 μg/L for lead. Indeed, as long as this ular, the vast majority of the sentinel properties (i.e., well over 90%)
level is exceeded at no more than 10% of sampled residences, the public were found to be at or below the EPA action level (Calley, 2016). A re-
water system is in compliance, with no legal requirement to take action cent analysis of the data collected at non-sentinel sites during the
and notify local populations. High-risk homes are defined as sites where same time period revealed, however, an actual increase in lead levels
elevated levels of lead are likely to be found based on the presence of above 15 μg/L, averaging at some point twice the percentages reported
lead service lines (LSL), lead pipes, or copper pipes soldered with lead by the sentinel program (Goovaerts, 2016). Despite the lack of control
installed after 1982 but before 1985 when solder containing high concen- on the selection of non-sentinel sites, one should expect both sampling
trations of lead was banned. Ideally, water should be sampled from Single programs to share the same objective of characterizing WLL in Flint
Family Residences with half samples collected at LSL sites and half from housing stock in general. A legitimate question is thus: whether sam-
sites with lead pipes or copper pipes with lead solder. pling bias could be the culprit for such opposite trends.
The LCR is statistical in nature as it applies to a sampled set instead of Recent analyses of Flint WLL data alluded to the potential lack of rep-
a single measurement and involves both a percentage threshold (10%) resentativeness of sentinel sites. For example, fewer pre-1940 houses
and a chemical threshold (15 μg/L). Since LCR compliance is controlled were sampled by the sentinel program compared to non-sentinel sites
by how water lead levels (WLL) recorded at a number of sites measure and Flint housing stock, while the reverse trend was observed for LSL
up with respect to an action level, water testing can be manipulated at (Goovaerts, 2016). Another finding was that results of the two sampling
two different levels to mask potential problems. At the residence-level programs differed the most in wards with the greatest percentage of ha-
WLLs can be under-estimated by adopting different tactics known to bitants living below the poverty line, which also turned out to be less
lower the amount of lead in water samples (Milman and Glenza, densely sampled than the least disadvantaged wards. Similarly,
2016). These include running faucets prior to the 6 h. stagnation period Abernethy and Schwartz (2016) found that lower-value homes in
(pre-stagnation flushing), removing or cleaning faucet filters called Flint tend to be those with the lowest rates of water sampling.
“aerators” where lead particles can be trapped, or sampling at unrealis- The main objective of this paper is to compare the housing charac-
tically low flow rates to reduce the amount of lead and other material teristics and geographical distribution of residences sampled by the vol-
that is dislodged from pipes (e.g., use narrow-necked bottles that can- untary and sentinel sampling programs in the aftermath of the Flint
not be filled at normal flow rates). The second type of manipulation drinking water crisis. Unlike the temporal trend analysis described in
can occur at the level of the water system and is achieved through the Goovaerts (2016), the focus is here on a shorter period (2/16/2016–4/
biased selection of sampling sites to ensure that the 10% cutoff is not 15/2016) when the sentinel sampling program aimed to assess the gen-
exceeded. An obvious way is to avoid sampling tier 1 category houses eral health of the distribution system before targeting high-risk areas in
(i.e. single family structures containing copper pipes with lead solder an extended phase (Calley, 2016). Another difference is the study of re-
installed after 1982 or containing lead pipes; and/or are served by a lationships among all putative factors (presence of LSL, construction
lead service line), which can go as far as asking water department em- year, poverty level) and water lead levels through frequency analysis,
ployees to test water safety in their own homes (Milman and Glenza, followed by a ward-level exploration of potential sampling bias with
2016). Another tactic is to “bump out” a test result that found very particular attention to poverty level and percentages of children with el-
high levels of lead by testing more homes (Felton, 2016). evated blood lead levels (EBLL) as reported in Hanna-Attisha et al.
Since Flint returned to its pre-crisis source of drinking water on Oc- (2016). Last, 2010 census tract poverty levels analyzed in Goovaerts
tober 16, 2015, close to 25,000 water samples have been collected and (2016) are replaced by 2015 block group values, as these more recent
tested for lead and copper in N 10,000 residences. Most of these samples and precise estimates were used when designing the sentinel sampling
(80%) were collected through voluntary or homeowner-driven sam- network with the help of EJSCREEN software.
pling whereby concerned citizens received free testing kits from local
water distribution centers and conducted sampling on their own fol- 2. Data sources and methods
lowing instructions provided by MDEQ. This type of crowd sourcing
was supplemented by a State-controlled monitoring, called sentinel 2.1. Datasets
program. In a first phase that lasted two months, this program aimed
to determine the general health of the distribution system and to The database downloaded from http://www.michigan.gov/
track temporal changes in lead concentrations through the biweekly flintwater and described in Goovaerts (2016) was used for studying

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 3

the two sampling designs. The focus of the present analysis was on service line (SL) retrieved from a digital map of Flint's lead water pipe,
residential testing results recorded over the period 2/16/2016–4/ and 2) the year the house was built. For the sentinel network, on-site
15/2016 when the sentinel sampling program took place. This two- data on the composition of service lines were also collected by a plumb-
month period was segmented into five time intervals based on the er during the sentinel team visit. Socio-economic status was assessed
dates for the first and last measurement within each of the five sen- using 2015 ACS (American Community Survey) 5-year estimates of
tinel sampling rounds (S1–S5). Limits of time intervals were adjust- the percentage of the block group population living in households
ed whenever there was a gap of a few days between the end of a where the income is less than or equal to twice the federal “poverty
sentinel sampling round and the beginning of the next one level.” The rationale for using twice the poverty threshold rather than
(Table 1). Data collected at non-sentinel sites were then allocated just the poverty threshold is listed in Appendix B of EJSCREEN technical
to one of the five time intervals to facilitate the comparison of results documentation (US EPA, 2016b); in particular the fact that today's pov-
of both sampling programs. erty thresholds are too low to adequately capture the populations ad-
At 204 non-sentinel sites more than one water sample was collected versely affected by low income levels. These data were downloaded
on the same day; e.g., typically multiple taps are being sampled in hous- from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/download_
es for sale. To avoid allocating too much weight to these replicates each center.xhtml (variable ACS_15_5YR_C17002). The last variable used in
of these observations was assigned a weight equal to one divided by the the study was the ward-level percentage of elevated blood lead levels
number of repeated samples on that day. A similar approach was ap- (i.e., blood level N 5 μg/dL) recorded in children between 1/1/2015
plied to 45 sentinel sites where more than one sample was collected and 9/15/2015, that is after the water source change from Detroit-
within the same sampling round. The final datasets include 3123 and supplied Lake Huron water to the Flint River (Table 2 in Hanna-
4645 WLL data collected at 759 sentinel sites and 4041 non-sentinel Attisha et al., 2016).
sites, respectively.
The set of all 51,045 residential tax parcels located within the City 2.2. Frequency analysis of housing characteristics
of Flint is viewed as the population of interest. Lead in drinking water
mainly comes from lead-based solder and lead-containing plumbing The visualization and comparison of housing characteristics for
fixtures (premise plumbing) in addition to lead service lines bringing the reference population (Flint housing stock) and the two sample
water from street main water breaks to the property (Lee et al., 1989; sets (sentinel and non-sentinel sites) were conducted using frequen-
Cartier et al., 2011; Clark et al., 2015). Plumbing material is usually cy analysis and kernel smoothing. Let N be the number of residences,
related to the installation year of a plumbing system, which can be denoted by their centroid's geographical coordinates uα, within any
approximated by the year of construction. For example, lead service given database, while n(uα) is the number of times a residence α has
lines were mostly installed before the 1930s while most faucets pur- been visited over the two-month study period (n(uα) = 1 for the ref-
chased prior to 1997 were constructed of brass or chrome-plated erence population). The total number of WLL data, denoted N′, is
brass containing up to 8% lead (Rabin, 2008; US EPA, 2006). Poor N
thus ∑∝¼1 nðuα Þ. Each residence is characterized by its built year,
workmanship as well as lack of regular maintenance can also lead BY(uα), the type of service line, SL(uα), and the block group poverty
to more corrosion and leaching, and the presence of lead particu- level, GP(uα).
lates, such as disintegrating brass or detaching pieces of old solder The frequency distribution for the two continuous variables
(Wang et al., 2014). A representative sample would thus be expected (i.e., built year, poverty level) was constructed using a rectangular ker-
to reproduce the main housing characteristics suspected to influence nel of size 11 (i.e., each observation within the window of size 11 re-
WLLs, such as presence of LSL, construction year, or socio-economic ceives the same weight). For example, the sampling frequency of
status of residents. Finally, measurements should be uniformly dis- residences built in year y1 was computed as:
tributed within the city boundaries to account for any other putative
factors likely to be spatially structured (e.g., water travel time be-
tween the treatment plant and home plumbing system). For exam- N 5

ple, during their investigation of the Washington, D.C. drinking f ðBY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ nðuα Þ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ ð1Þ
∝¼1 i¼−5
water crisis, Edwards et al. (2009) found that the relative risk of ex-
posure to high lead in water was a strong function of zip code,
resulting in “hot spots” neighborhoods. The spatial coverage of WLL where iBY(uα; y1 + i) = 1 if BY(uα) = y1 + i and zero otherwise. In other
data was here assessed using the percentage of data collected within words, the number of residences built in 1935 that were sampled was
each of the nine city wards since these geographical units were used calculated as the number of WLL samples collected in houses built be-
in the seminal paper on children EBLL that triggered the emergency tween 1930 and 1940. The choice of the kernel width (11 years) was
response (Hanna-Attisha et al., 2016). somewhat subjective and aimed to strike a balance between a too
The following housing characteristics described in detail in wide window causing information loss and a too narrow window
Goovaerts (2016) were derived for each sampling site: 1) the type of resulting in unreliable estimates. Results based on fewer than 50

Table 1
Datasets available for the comparison of sentinel and voluntary sampling programs of water lead levels in Flint. Statistics for each of the five sampling rounds include the number of data
available including repeated samples, the percentage of WLL above 15 μg/L, and the 90th percentile (P90).

Round Sampling period Sentinel sampling Voluntary sampling

Data (n) %WLL N 15 μg/L P90 (μg/L) Data (n) %WLL N 15 μg/L P90 (μg/L)

S1 2/16/2016–2/24/2016 607 9.51 14.0 1481 9.88 15.0
S2 2/25/2016–3/14/2016 607 8.33 13.0 1337 10.29 17.0
S3 3/15/2016–3/28/2016 652 7.92 12.0 889 11.89 19.0
S4 3/29/2016–4/5/2016 640 7.29 10.0 457 14.02 37.0
S5 4/6/2016–4/15/2016 617 6.51 10.0 481 11.66 19.0
Total 2/16/2016–4/15/2016 3123 7.90 12.0 4645 10.95 18.0

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
4 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Table 2
Percentage of sentinel and non-sentinel sites sampled for the first time in each round and the corresponding percentage of WLL recorded above 15 μg/L. Statistics for all sites and sites that
were sampled previously (repetitions) are also listed.

Sampling round Sentinel sampling Voluntary sampling

% first time sampling %WLL N 15 μg/L % first time sampling %WLL N 15 μg/L

All sites First sampling Repetition All sites First sampling Repetition

S1 100 9.51 9.51 – 100 9.88 9.88 –
S2 14.14 8.33 9.53 8.14 95.6 10.29 10.10 13.93
S3 7.52 7.92 14.59 7.37 90.4 11.89 10.99 20.40
S4 3.80 7.29 8.33 7.25 90.0 14.02 12.53 27.14
S5 1.47 6.51 44.44 5.95 80.3 11.66 9.52 20.26

observations were discarded. A similar formula was used for poverty where Ny1′ is the number of WLL data collected in houses built during
level (width = 11%). Relative frequencies were then derived by dividing the time period [y1 − 5, y1 + 5]. δαk = 1 if residence α was sampled dur-
quantity (1) by 11 × N′. ing k-th round, and zero otherwise. Similar expressions were used to in-
The relationship between any two housing characteristics was ex- vestigate the impact of block group poverty levels on WLL. In all cases,
plored using conditional frequencies. For example, the relative frequen- results based on fewer than 50 observations were discarded.
cy of lead service lines within houses built in year y1 was computed as:
3. Results and discussion
1 N 5
f ðSL ¼ lead j BY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ  iSL ðuα ; leadÞ ð2Þ
Ny1 ∝¼1 i¼−5 3.1. Sampling design

where iSL(uα; lead) = 1 if SL (uα) = lead, and zero otherwise. The de- Fig. 1A shows the location of all residential parcels (759 sentinel sites
nominator Ny1 is computed as: and 4041 non-sentinel sites) that were sampled over the two-month
period. Despite the much smaller number of sentinel sites (15.8%),
N 5
Ny1 ¼ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ ð3Þ their repeated sampling leads to a more balanced proportion of WLL
∝¼1 i¼−5 data relative to non-sentinel sites (41.3%); see Table 1. To visualize the
relative distribution of sentinel versus non-sentinel sites, indicators of
Note that unlike for sampling frequencies (Eq. (1)) each sampled presence/absence of sentinel sites were created for all 4800 sampled lo-
residence is used only once for the computation of conditional frequen- cations before being interpolated using kriging (Goovaerts, 1997). The
cies, i.e., n(uα) = 1 (replicates are not used). Once again, results based map of indicator kriging estimates (Fig. 1B) illustrates the spatial clus-
on fewer than 50 observations were discarded. tering of sentinel sites, in particular along the boundary that Ward 2
shares with wards 3 and 6. On the other hand, much fewer sentinel
2.3. Conditional analysis of water lead levels sites relative to non-sentinel sites are located in wards 1, 3, 4 and 5.
The four variables used to explore any potential sampling bias are
The analysis started with the coding of each WLL data z(uα;Sk), col- mapped in Fig. 1C–F. Information is available at three different geogra-
lected at residence uα during sampling round Sk, into an indicator of phies: 1) tax parcel units for housing characteristics: (composition of
being greater or not than the threshold zc = 15 μg/L: service line, construction year), 2) block groups (BG) for percentages
 of families living below twice the poverty line in 2015, and 3) Flint
1 if zðuα ; Sk ÞNzc wards for percentage of EBLL recorded in children the first 9 months
ik ðuα ; zc Þ ¼ ð4Þ
0 otherwise
of 2015. Visual comparison of these maps already yields some interest-
ing findings (see Section 3.4 for a more quantitative analysis):
To account for temporal changes in lead levels over the two-month
period (Goovaerts, 2016) and their strongly positively skewed distribu- • Ward 5, which includes the largest percentage of children with EBLL
tion, the percentile of each WLL data z(uα; Sk) within the corresponding (15.7%, Table 4) and a large proportion of houses built before 1935
sampling round Skwas also computed as: (82.09%, Table 5), has a very low density of sentinel sites (5.01%).
• According to Hanna-Attisha et al. (2016), the area of intersection be-
pðuα ; Sk Þ ¼ F −1
k ðzðuα ; Sk ÞÞ ð5Þ tween wards 3, 4, and 5 (in the east side of the city) also appeared
to have high EBLL. This area circled in Fig. 1C is characterized by
where Fk (.) is the cumulative distribution function of WLL data for the older homes, higher poverty, and very few sentinel sites.
k-th sampling round. For example, p(uα; Sk) = 0.75 indicates that the • Compared to other poor areas of the city, Ward 1 has houses that are
level measured at residence uα was N75% of WLL data collected during much more recent (i.e., only 13.71% of pre-1935 houses, Table 5).
that sampling round. • Main clusters of sentinel sites appear to be preferentially located in
The impact of housing characteristics on water lead levels was then areas of moderate to lower poverty.
assessed using conditional frequencies similar to the ones described in
Eq. (2). For example, the impact of construction year on the proportion
3.2. Temporal changes
of WLL above zc = 15 μg/L or the relative magnitude of WLL as mea-
sured by percentiles (Eq. (5)) was explored using the following relative
Although none of the four covariates displayed in Fig. 1C–D changed
frequencies:
over the two-month study period, the location of sampling sites did, and
1 N 5 5 the temporal changes in the characteristics of sampled residences is
f ðz Nzc j BY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ  ik ðuα ; zc Þ  δαk ð6Þ summarized in Fig. 2. The time series of percentages of WLL above
N0y1 ∝¼1 k¼1 i¼−5
15 μg/L (see Table 1 for precise numbers) highlight the widening gap
between results of the two sampling programs (Fig. 2A). Not only
1 N 5 5
f ðpj BY ¼ y1 Þ ¼ ∑ ∑ ∑ iBY ðuα ; y1 þ iÞ  pðuα ; Sk Þ  δαk ð7Þ does the voluntary sampling program indicate increasing levels of lead
N0y1 ∝¼1 k¼1 i¼−5 over time, it also reflects the failure to meet the LCR action level of

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 5

Fig. 1. Spatial distribution of sampling sites (A, red dots indicate sentinel sites) and probability of occurrence of sentinel sites mapped by indicator kriging (B). Data layers include:
construction year (C) and composition of service line (D) for each residential tax parcel, block group percentages of families living below twice the poverty line in 2015 (E), and ward-
level percentage of elevated blood lead levels recorded in children during the first 9 months of 2015 (F). The boundaries of 40 census tracts are overlaid on map D, while all other
maps show boundaries of nine Flint wards. Locations of sentinel sites are also overlaid on the poverty map E to illustrate the clustering of sites in areas of lower poverty. (For
interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

10% (horizontal dashed line) at any moment during the two-month pe- their first samples would be prone to acquire additional testing kits
riod. On the other hand, according to the sentinel monitoring program and repeat the sampling within the two month period. In addition,
water quality has been steadily improving and the threshold of 10% of whenever a test result exceeded 15 μg/L, the residential testing proce-
WLL data above 15 μg/L was never exceeded. dure was to offer a follow-up test to see if levels were coming down
Given the lack of control on the voluntary sampling program a legit- and if remediative efforts were working (Testing Plan, Process &
imate concern is that homeowners who found high levels of lead in Protocols, 2016). On the other hand houses with low lead levels

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
6 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

would be less likely to be tested again, leading over time to a biased se- at round S4 is based on 42 houses. Conversely, the sentinel sites visited
lection of houses and an inflated percentage of WLL above 15 μg/L. for the first time in rounds S2-S4 had higher lead levels, which confirms
This potential temporal bias was investigated by identifying for each the targeting of houses at risk as illustrated by the increasing percent-
sampling round the sites that were visited for the first time or sampled ages of sentinel sites with lead service lines (Fig. 2B). Excluding repeat-
repeatedly. As expected, the proportion of first time visits has declined ed measurements at non-sentinel sites narrowed the gap between the
over time, in particular for the sentinel sampling program which aims two times series (Table 2, columns and Fig. 7B), yet it did not alter tem-
to track temporal changes at fixed sites. For example, Table 2 indicates poral trends: the percentage of WLL recorded above 15 μg/L at non-
that 80% of sites sampled voluntarily in round S5 (4/6/2016–4/15/ sentinel sites is still increasing for rounds S1 through S4.
2016) had never been tested in rounds S1-S4, while this was true only Fig. 2B shows that WLL and percentages of sentinel sites with lead
for 1.5% of sentinel sites. Interestingly, WLL exceeded 15 μg/L at a service lines have moved in opposite directions over the five sampling
much lower rate during these first time visits compared to residences rounds. Indeed, the sentinel program has sampled an increasing num-
that had been sampled previously; note, however, that some statistics ber of houses with LSL, a trend that appears even stronger when using
can be unreliable for a small number of homes; e.g. the 27.1% recorded the more accurate on-site data on composition of service lines instead

Fig. 2. Temporal changes in WLLs and characteristics of houses visited by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs during the five rounds (S1–S5) defined in Table 1. The following
statistics were computed from data collected during each sampling round: (A) % WLL data above 15 μg/L, (B) % houses with lead service lines (digital and on-site data are plotted for
sentinel sites), (C, D) % houses built before 1935 or between 1935 and 1950, and (E, F) % houses located in block groups (BG) with lower (b55%) or higher (N75%) percentages of
habitants living below twice the poverty line. Statistics for Flint's 51,045 residential parcels are depicted by horizontal dashed lines.

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 7

of the digital data. As expected the voluntary sampling data more close- Flint housing stock (0.6%). Despite the lack of control on site selection,
ly reproduce the percentage of LSL found in Flint housing stock (7.32%), the voluntary sampling program captures very closely the relationship
which is lower than the results of preferential sampling by the sentinel between construction year and presence of LSL. Plotting these condi-
program. Lead service lines are widely considered the main source of tional frequencies for the sentinel program reveals a very strong sam-
lead in drinking water. The fact that WLLs have exceeded 15 μg/L at pling bias, which could not be detected by looking at individual
fewer and fewer sentinel sites, even though these sites have increasing- statistics for construction year (Fig. 3A) and percentage of LSL
ly included LSL, could thus be viewed as the sign of continuous improve- (Fig. 2B). Indeed, the vast majority of sentinel sites with LSL were built
ment in water quality. Yet, lead levels recorded at non-sentinel sites between 1935 and 1950. Using the more accurate on-site data accentu-
have increased despite the lower sampling frequency of lead service ates the magnitude of the bias.
lines. The bias attached to the sampling of LSL by the sentinel program ex-
Another source of lead in drinking water is lead fixtures and pipes tends to poverty level (Fig. 3D). Because older homes tend to be located
present within old houses (premises plumbing). In comparison to LSL in poorer neighborhoods (Fig. 3E) the percentage of houses with lead
temporal trends in construction year of sampled houses better match service lines tends to increase with poverty level (black solid line).
WLL changes over the five sampling rounds (Fig. 2C,D). The sentinel The sentinel program has over-sampled LSL in the block groups with
program has been sampling fewer and fewer pre-1935 houses, while poverty levels ranging between 40% and 70%, which is consistent with
houses built between 1935 and 1950 became an increasingly large frac- the interpretation of Fig. 3B. Sites sampled by the voluntary program
tion of the sampling pool. Pre-1935 houses have also been under- more closely mimic the characteristic of Flint housing stock, including
sampled by the voluntary program (average = 42.8% in Flint housing the largest percentage of LSL in block groups with poverty levels
stock), yet the sampling deficit has decreased over time. On the other above 90%, a fact that was not captured by the sentinel program.
hand, the share of 1935–1950 houses in Flint housing stock is well The last conditional frequency distribution (Fig. 3E, black solid
reproduced in the voluntary sampling and is half the percentage ob- curve) reflects the larger frequency of older houses (pre-1915 construc-
served in the State-controlled monitoring plan. There is no official rea- tion year) in poorer neighborhoods, as well as the existence of public
son for this sampling bias by the sentinel program as construction housing complexes built post-1970. Results for the sentinel program
year was not one of the selection criteria. Percentage of housing units (lower red dashed curve) confirm the under-sampling of lower income
built before 1960 is, however, used as an indicator of potential exposure block groups, in particular for houses built between 1935 and 1955,
to lead paint in EJSCREEN software (US EPA, 2016b). which overlaps with the sampled housing segment with LSL. The volun-
The last covariate, which might indirectly inform on housing condi- tary program displays a similar sampling bias. Note that the curve for
tion, including quality of premise plumbing, is socio-economic status the sentinel program ends around year 1965 as only 21 sentinel sites
which was here assessed using block group percentages of habitants liv- (2.77%) were post-1965 constructions, while the voluntary sampling
ing below twice the poverty line. According to Fig. 2E,F both sampling pool included 363 homes (8.98%) built after 1965.
programs have over-sampled houses located in the least disadvantaged
block groups (poverty level b 55%), while block groups with poverty 3.4. Impact of housing characteristics on water lead levels
levels above 75% have been under-sampled. These results indicate that
citizens living in the most impoverished areas used fewer testing kits Kernel smoothing was used to explore the potentially non-linear im-
for voluntary sampling. Interestingly, the sentinel sampling program pact of built year and poverty level on the magnitude of water lead
led to very similar statistics despite a very different selection procedure. levels (i.e., sampling round percentile) and likelihood of exceeding
One hypothesis is that as poverty level increased citizens were less like- two thresholds: 1 μg/L and the action level of 15 μg/L. The larger the de-
ly to volunteer to be part of the sentinel monitoring network. viation from the 50th percentile (median), depicted by the horizontal
dashed line in Fig. 4A,B, the greater the average impact of housing char-
3.3. Sampling bias: housing characteristics acteristics. Discrepancies between results of both sampling programs
are the most important for construction year: percentiles and percent-
The relative frequency distributions in Fig. 3A,B illustrate the limita- ages of data above 1 μg/L are larger at voluntarily sampled houses
tions of relying on average statistics on construction year and BG pover- built prior to 1935 and smaller post-1955; see Fig. 4 (left column). The
ty level (e.g., means plotted in Fig. 2) to compare residences within the trend beyond 1975 can be ignored as the voluntary sampling pool in-
Flint housing stock and the two sample sets. In particular, the histogram cludes only 99 homes (2.45%) built after 1975.
for construction year is clearly bimodal. For the reference population Interestingly construction year exerts opposite effects on the per-
(Fig. 3A, black solid line), the two modes are years 1927 and 1955. The centage of WLL above 15 μg/L recorded at the two types of sampling
first mode is well reproduced by both sampling distributions, albeit sites: This percentage displays an expected decline for newer homes
with a slightly smaller frequency. On the other hand, the sentinel sam- that were sampled voluntarily, while it increases at sentinel sites. De-
pling program over-sampled houses built around 1945 (Fig. 3A, red spite the oversampling of LSL at sentinel sites built between 1935 and
dashed line). The second mode for the voluntary program coincides 1955 (Fig. 3C) the percentage of data above 15 μg/L is still smaller
with Flint housing stock value, although at a higher frequency (Fig. 3A, than at non-sentinel sites. These results suggest that higher WLL origi-
green dashed line). nate from lead fixtures and pipes present within old houses (premise
Discrepancies between the three frequency distributions are larger plumbing) as opposed to LSL. This confirms earlier findings that home
for poverty level. Both sentinel and voluntary programs over-sampled lead service lines may not be the largest contributor of lead in Flint,
houses in the least disadvantaged block groups (35–50% poverty and lead contamination may be caused by interior plumbing (Dolan,
level) while block groups with poverty level in the 70–95% range were 2016; Goovaerts, 2016).
under-sampled, a fact already stressed by the time series in Fig. 2E,F. Poverty level appears to have little impact on WLL recorded within
The bias is, however, larger for the sentinel program which appears to the voluntary sampling program: most curves in Fig. 4 (right column,
have sampled uniformly block groups with poverty levels ranging be- green curves) are flat; the steep increase observed for poverty level
tween 40% and 70%; compare black solid line to red dashed line in below 30% (Fig. 4F) can be disregarded as these frequencies are based
Fig. 3B. on only 2.41% of samples (112 observations). The percentile and per-
An important feature controlling water lead levels is the presence of centage curves display larger fluctuations for the sentinel program
lead service lines. Fig. 3C (black solid line) shows that LSL tend to be (Fig. 4, right column, red curves), which is caused by strong disparities
more frequent in older homes; the increase observed for post-2000 in percentage of lead service lines sampled over different classes of pov-
houses can be disregarded as it is based on a very small percentage of erty level (Fig. 3D). In particular the over-sampling of houses with LSL

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
8 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Fig. 3. (A, B) Frequency distributions of construction year and block group poverty level for all residential parcels in Flint, as well as houses visited by the sentinel and voluntary sampling
programs between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016. The same data were used to compute conditional distributions that illustrate the impact of construction year and poverty level on the
presence of lead service lines (C, D), and the relationship between construction year and poverty level (E). All distributions were smoothed using a kernel of size 11, and results based
on b50 observations were discarded. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

for the 55–70% poverty range (Fig. 3B) results in larger values (Fig. 4, (exceedance of WLL threshold) will occur given a particular event
right column). As for construction year, percentile curves that account (e.g. presence of LSL), compared to the odds of the outcome occurring
for the whole range of the data instead of focusing on a specific thresh- in the absence of that event (e.g., service lines composed of unknown
old, in particular 15 μg/L, overlap over mid-range values (i.e. poverty or other than lead material).
from 40 to 60%), indicating that WLLs are not systematically higher at For both sampling programs the impact of housing characteristics
non-sentinel sites. This is confirmed by the fact that WLL exceeds and poverty, as measured by odds ratios, increases for lower thresholds
1 μg/L at more sentinel sites than non-sentinel sites (horizontal dashed (Table 3). For example, the presence of lead service lines doubles and
lines, Fig. 4C,D), while the reverse is true for 15 μg/L (horizontal dashed quadruples the likelihood of measuring WLL above 1 μg/L at voluntary
lines, Fig. 4E,F). (OR = 2.06) and sentinel sites (OR = 3.78), respectively. For the former
This graphical interpretation was supplemented by a regression the impact of construction year is even higher, in particular when com-
analysis to predict the probability of exceeding three thresholds (1, 15, paring pre-1935 houses to post-1950 houses (OR = 3.22). Odds ratios
and 25 μg/L) on the basis of two housing characteristics (type of service are also highly significant for all thresholds (α = 0.01), reflecting the
line, year of construction) and block group poverty level. Because senti- greater influence of construction year relative to LSL. On the other
nel sites in particular have repeated samples, Generalized Estimating hand, the impact of construction year is lower at sentinel sites (OR =
Equations (GEE) regression (Liang and Zeger, 1986) with logit link func- 2.01) and is only significant at α = 0.05 for 1935–1950 houses
tion and exchangeable correlation structure was used to fit this model (OR = 1.39). Since the vast majority of sentinel sites with LSL were
(SAS Institute Inc., 2011). The impact of each covariate was quantified built between 1935 and 1950, the impact of construction year and LSL
using the odds ratio (OR) which represents the odds that the outcome cannot be disentangled and this might explain a lower OR for

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
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P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 9

Fig. 4. Conditional frequency distributions illustrating the impact of construction year and block group poverty level on the magnitude of WLLs, measured by their percentile for each
sampling round (A, B), and the percentage of WLL data above 1 μg/L (C, D) and 15 μg/L (E, F). Data were collected by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs between 2/16/
2016 and 4/15/2016. All distributions were smoothed using a kernel of size 11, and results based on b50 observations were discarded. Horizontal dashed lines represent either the
50th percentile (A, B) or the average overall percentage of WLL data above 1 μg/L (C, D) or 15 μg/L (E, F) at both types of sampling sites. (For interpretation of the references to color in
this figure, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

construction year being compensated by a higher OR for LSL. Note that increases for higher thresholds and older construction years, while the
similar results were obtained when using the more accurate LSL on- impact of construction year becomes negative for the percentage of
site records instead of digital data, which invalidates the hypothesis data above 15 μg/L.
that the larger impact of built year vs LSL at non-sentinel sites simply re- According to odds ratios the likelihood of exceeding WLL thresholds
flects the larger accuracy of construction year vs digital data on the pres- at sentinel sites increases with poverty level (OR N 1). Note that ORs are
ence of lead service lines. This is also confirmed by the fact that a the largest for a threshold of 1 μg/L, and results are significant only for
regression model using only LSL as covariate led to higher OR for all the 55–75% poverty category which includes most sentinel sites with
three thresholds (i.e. 2.56 vs 2.06, 1.80 vs 1.53, and 1.34 vs 1.13) relative LSL (Fig. 3D). As already illustrated by frequency curves in Fig. 4 (right
to the case where all covariates were included. column), poverty level has little impact on WLL recorded within the vol-
Discrepancies between the two types of sampling widen as the untary sampling program.
threshold increases. In particular, the predictive power of construction
year decreases substantially at sentinel sites: the odds ratio becomes 3.5. Ward-level analysis
smaller than 1 and non-significant for WLL thresholds of 15 and
25 μg/L (Table 3). This result is consistent with the interpretation of The frequency analysis in Sections 3.2–3.3 was aspatial in that sam-
Fig. 4C,E: The gap between the two conditional frequency curves ple locations were ignored during the interpretation. The description of

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
10 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Table 3 Table 5
Odds ratio for covariates of the GEE regression models fitted separately to the data collect- Characteristics (presence of lead service lines, construction year, poverty level) of houses
ed by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016. visited by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs within each ward in Flint. Statis-
In both cases, three thresholds were considered: 1, 15 and 25 μg/L. Digital data on compo- tics are based on all samples collected between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016, including re-
sition of service lines are used for all datasets to facilitate comparison among regression peated sampling of the same house in different sampling rounds. Reference values were
models. computed for Flint housing stock to detect any sampling bias. Digital data on composition
of service lines are used for all three datasets to facilitate comparison.
Effects Sentinel sampling Voluntary sampling
Statistics Flint ward
1 μg/L 15 μg/L 25 μg/L 1 μg/L 15 μg/L 25 μg/L
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
SL: lead vs others/unknown 3.78⁎⁎ 1.90⁎ 1.35 2.06⁎⁎ 1.53⁎ 1.13
Built year: b1935 vs N1950 2.01⁎⁎ 0.76 0.88 3.22⁎⁎ 2.09⁎⁎ 2.20⁎⁎ % lead service lines
Built year: 1935–1950 vs 1.39⁎ 0.62 0.61 1.48⁎⁎ 1.34⁎ 1.31 Flint housing 3.27 8.34 8.56 5.48 9.95 9.51 6.46 6.88 7.07
N1950 stock
Poverty: 55–75% vs b55% 1.51⁎⁎ 1.36 1.30 1.03 0.91 1.04 Sentinel 0 9.01 3.24 1.74 0 10.56 10.88 5.58 24.06
Poverty: N75% vs b55% 1.05 0.97 0.95 0.80⁎ 0.77 0.87 monitoring
Voluntary 0.93 7.33 10.63 4.55 13.14 8.45 7.82 7.34 8.70
⁎ Significantly different from 1 at α = 0.05.
sampling
⁎⁎ Significantly different from 1 at α = 0.01.
% pre-1935 houses
Flint housing 13.71 28.94 58.40 36.37 82.09 50.69 37.54 35.52 36.99
stock
spatial patterns in Fig. 1 was supplemented by the computation of
Sentinel 18.87 31.45 51.39 32.56 92.86 34.70 29.60 32.09 19.52
ward-level statistics regarding sampling density, water and blood lead monitoring
levels, housing characteristics, and poverty levels (Tables 4 & 5). Voluntary 7.69 16.89 47.51 24.70 74.00 43.86 33.53 27.68 26.28
Each ward represents between 8.76% (Ward 7) and 14.24% (Ward sampling
3) of residential parcels in the city of Flint. This range is much wider Block group (BG) poverty level (mean)
for the sentinel program (5.18–20.35%), which reflects the over- Flint housing 66.33 63.15 74.60 65.04 73.24 67.27 56.66 59.07 64.44
sampling of specific areas in the city despite the initial aim to cover ad- stock
equately all nine wards (Sentinel Site Selection, 2016). The voluntary Sentinel 69.94 63.64 81.36 65.11 80.13 63.79 51.20 53.24 62.45
monitoring
sampling program yields an intermediate range: 6.91% to 15.26%. Inter- Voluntary 62.12 60.43 73.82 61.76 70.99 66.39 52.80 56.93 60.49
estingly, Ward 7, which includes the smallest percentage of residential sampling
parcels in the city, was the most frequently sampled by both programs
% houses in N75% poverty BG
(Table 4). One explanation is that Ward 7 had the largest number (41 Flint housing 39.42 18.81 65.78 22.58 53.38 33.86 23.48 17.35 28.95
out of 148) of sites with lead or lead combination service lines within stock
the initial pool of 1951 prospective sentinel sites. The second largest Sentinel 58.49 7.34 92.13 37.21 68.83 17.24 8.80 9.07 18.45
number of LSL (21 sites) within that pool was recorded for Ward 6 monitoring
Voluntary 34.50 12.22 61.13 20.75 44.00 32.39 15.64 12.54 17.19
which was the third most densely sampled ward (15.11%) by the senti-
sampling
nel program. In addition wards 6 and 7 included, respectively, the sec-
ond and third largest percentages of children with elevated blood lead
levels (Table 4). These sentinel sites tend, however, to be clustered in program (5.01%) despite featuring by far the largest percentage of ele-
the least disadvantaged part of Ward 7, see circled area in Fig. 1E. In vated blood lead levels (15.7%).
fact, there is a general tendency for the sentinel program, and to a lesser This socio-economic bias is not limited to the number of monitoring
extent the voluntary sampling program, to collect more WLL data in sites but extends to the characteristics of these sites. Indeed, Fig. 5B
wards where fewer habitants live below the poverty line (Fig. 5A). shows that relative to Flint housing stock (solid line) the sentinel pro-
The steady decline observed for the voluntary sampling program is par- gram has under-sampled lead service lines in the two wards with pov-
ticularly noteworthy. The trend displayed by both sampling programs erty levels above 70% (red dashed line) while these same wards were
(dashed lines, Fig. 5A) is opposite to what is observed for Flint housing over-sampled in the voluntary sampling program. In particular, the sen-
stock: more residential parcels exist in wards with higher poverty (solid tinel program did not sample any house with LSL in Ward 5, although
line, Fig. 5A). These results indicate that citizens living in the most the percentages of lead service lines (9.95%, Table 5) and elevated
impoverished wards have used fewer testing kits for voluntary sam- blood lead levels (Table 4) were the largest in Flint. One potential culprit
pling, and they might have been less likely to request their inclusion is the fact that 82% of houses in Ward 5 were built before 1935 (Table 5),
in the sentinel sampling program after it started. This could explain whereas the sentinel program has almost exclusively sampled LSL in
why Ward 5, which has the second largest poverty level (73.24%) houses built between 1935 and 1950 (Fig. 3C). The other case is Ward
among all nine wards, was the least densely sampled by the sentinel 3, which has the highest poverty level (74.60%) and 8.56% of houses

Table 4
Number of residential parcels and statistics on water lead levels recorded between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016 by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs within each ward in Flint.
Percentages of elevated blood lead levels recorded in children are from Table 2 in Hanna-Attisha et al. (2016) and correspond to the period 1/1/2015 and 9/15/2015, that is after the water
source change from Detroit-supplied Lake Huron water to the Flint River.

Statistics Flint ward

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Total number of residential parcels 6296 6406 7270 5257 6311 4784 4472 5637 4612
Number of sentinel samples 159 477 216 172 154 464 625 430 374
Number of voluntary samples 429 450 301 506 350 497 665 654 506
% Flint residential tax parcels 12.33 12.55 14.24 10.30 12.36 9.37 8.76 11.04 9.03
% sentinel dataset 5.18 15.53 7.03 5.60 5.01 15.11 20.35 14.00 12.18
% voluntary dataset 9.84 10.33 6.91 11.61 8.03 11.40 15.26 15.01 11.61
% sentinel data N 15 μg/L 1.26 10.17 5.32 4.36 6.49 8.94 11.04 8.02 4.81
% voluntary data N 15 μg/L 6.84 11.65 9.97 7.91 14.05 13.04 10.66 13.08 10.87
% elevated blood lead levels 2.8 1.4 4.5 1.7 15.7 9.3 5.9 1.4 1.6

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 11

Fig. 5. Impact of poverty level (i.e., percentage of habitants living below the poverty line) on statistics computed for each of the 9 wards in Flint: A) relative percentage of residential parcels,
B) percentage of houses with lead service lines, C) percentages of water lead levels above 15 μg/L, and D) relative differences between curves displayed in (C). To facilitate visualization of
trends the nine ward-level statistics are joined by line segments (piecewise linear function). A solid line is used for statistics computed from Flint's 51,045 residential parcels, while dashed
lines correspond to data collected by the sentinel and voluntary sampling programs between 2/16/2016 and 4/15/2016. (E) Locations of sentinel sites overlaid on the construction year
map to illustrate the clustering of sampled LSL (red dots) in neighborhoods with houses built between 1935 and 1950. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend,
the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

with LSL according to digital data. Although the sentinel sampling pro- on Fig. 1C, the majority of houses in this ward were built after 1935
gram targeted the poorest block groups in that ward (92.13% of sentinel (87%) and only 3.27% of houses have LSL.
sites are in block groups with poverty level N 75%), the sampling rate for The largest percentage of existing LSL sampled by the sentinel pro-
LSL was only 3.24% compared to 10.63% for the voluntary program. gram is recorded in Ward 9: 24.06% of sentinel sites there possessed
Ward 1 is the second ward with no LSL sampled by the sentinel program lead service lines, which is close to four times the percentage of houses
while having the 4th largest poverty level (66.33%). However, as noticed with LSL (7.07%) in that ward (Table 5), a number well captured by

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
12 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

voluntary sampling (8.70%). There is no apparent reason for such an over- sampling program since, according to the odds ratio (Table 3), this
sampling as this ward is average for all statistics (i.e. poverty level, per- covariate has a greater influence on WLL. Interestingly, the adjusted
centage of EBLL, and older homes) and had one of the lowest number of percentage of WLLs recorded above 15 μg/L during the first sampling
houses with lead or lead combination service lines (12 out of 148) within round is greater at sentinel sites compared to non-sentinel sites.
the initial pool of 1951 prospective sentinel sites. Sentinel sites with LSL However, the fact that only 6.7% of sentinel sites with LSL were
are, however, clustered in Ward 9 (Fig. 5E, dashed circles), which suggests built before 1935 or after 1950 hampered the reliable estimation of
that practical convenience might have been the culprit for the sampling of WLLs for these strata. In comparison, these strata represent 71.84%
such a large number of lead service lines in that ward. in Flint housing stock: (2277 + 407)/3736 in Fig. 6.
One consequence of such socio-economic sampling bias is the ten- Incorporating BG poverty into the set of confounding factors slightly
dency for the most impoverished wards to report fewer WLL data narrowed the gap between the two time series (Fig. 7D). The impact of
above 15 μg/L at sentinel sites (Fig. 5C), hence, the widening gap be- the socio-economic sampling bias was, however, attenuated by the
tween both sampling programs as the poverty level increases small influence exerted by poverty level on WLL data (see odds ratios
(Fig. 5D). Although Goovaerts (2016) had already noticed the largest ra- in Table 3). After adjusting for all four covariates, the time series for
tios between percentages of WLL data N 15 μg/L recorded at non- the sentinel program displays the largest decrease over the five sam-
sentinel sites vs sentinel sites in impoverished wards 1 and 5, the link pling rounds (Fig. 7E). Although the bias-correction procedure
with the biased sampling of lead service lines (no LSL sampled in both narrowed the gap between results of both sampling programs, the
wards, Table 5) is a new finding. It is noteworthy that for all but one time series still differ during the latest sampling rounds, even after ac-
wards the percentage of WLL data above 15 μg/L is systematically small- counting for the uncertainty attached to these estimates; see 90% confi-
er for the State-controlled sampling program compared to the dence intervals in Fig. 7E
homeowner-driven sampling (Fig. 5C).
4. Conclusions
3.6. Correcting for sampling bias
It is common in environmental studies to rely on sampling to charac-
To correct for the sampling bias detected in Sections 3.1–3.4, the terize populations that are too large to be measured exhaustively; in
time series of percentages of WLL data above 15 μg/L (Fig. 2A) were other words a measurement cannot be collected at every location in
standardized using the procedure described in Goovaerts (2016). Stan- the spatial domain (Myers, 1997). When designing sampling schemes
dardization is a common approach for controlling confounding in pop- one should keep in mind the objectives of the study (i.e., which ques-
ulation studies or data from disease registries (Waller and Gotway, tions are we trying to answer?), as well as the definition of the popula-
2004). It is defined as a weighted average of stratum-specific rates. In tion to be studied. Attention to sampling design is particularly critical
the present case-study, Flint's 51,045 residential parcels and the WLL when analyzing data collected by others and sparsely documented, as
data collected by both sampling programs were stratified on the basis in the case of Flint sentinel monitoring network. The analyst should
of four covariates: 1) presence/absence of lead service lines, 2) construc- thus question whether that sample is representative of the underlying
tion year (3 classes: pre-1935, 1935–1950, and post-1950), 3) block population and explore ways to correct sample statistics whenever bi-
group poverty level (b55%, 55–75%, N75%), and 4) ward. The choice of ased or preferential sampling is suspected.
categories of construction year and poverty level was guided by results The delay in reporting high levels of lead in Flint drinking water and
displayed in Fig. 3C and D regarding the oversampling of some segments the resulting extent of the ensuing environmental crisis and public
of Flint housing stock by the sentinel program. For example, Fig. 6 (top) health threat were partially caused by the biased selection of sampling
shows the stratification of WLL data collected during sampling round sites. Therefore, one could have expected a greater transparency in the
1 at non-sentinel sites on the basis of the first two covariates. The per- selection of sites for monitoring post-crisis water lead levels. For exam-
centage of data above 15 μg/L was computed for each of the six catego- ple, despite the frequent posting of sentinel testing results, addresses of
ries. As expected, fewer observations exceed the action level in houses sentinel sites never included street numbers, vital information that had
without LSL: 9.84% vs 14.5%. Accounting for construction year indicates to be retrieved through data mining (Goovaerts, 2016). This paper pre-
however that the presence of LSL has no impact on results for pre-1935 sented the first detailed analysis of the monitoring network put in place
houses (15.7% in both cases) while only half that percentage (7.23%) ex- by the State in the aftermath of the Flint water drinking crisis. Results of
ceed 15 μg/L in post-1950 houses without LSL. an exploratory spatial data analysis were combined with on-line de-
Residences tested during the first round of voluntary sampling rep- scriptions of the sentinel sampling plan (e.g., Testing Plan, Process &
resent almost perfectly Flint housing stock when it comes to presence Protocols, 2016; Sentinel Site Selection, 2016), and personal communi-
of lead service lines: 7.69% vs 7.32% (Fig. 6). However, as discussed pre- cation from the director of Drinking Water and Municipal Assistance Di-
viously (Fig. 2C), older houses were under-sampled by both sampling vision (DWMAD) at the Michigan Department of Environmental
programs; e.g., for pre-1935 houses: 3.56% vs 4.46% (LSL) and 25.4% vs Quality.
38.38% (no LSL). Similarly, houses built more recently (i.e., post-1950) A key finding of the exploratory data analysis was that the impact of
were over-sampled: 1.55% vs 0.80% (LSL) and 49.3% vs 33.86% (no LSL). lead service lines on water lead levels was mainly investigated for hous-
After correction for this sampling bias, the percentage above 15 μg/L es built between 1935 and 1950 in less disadvantaged areas of the city.
increased from 10.20% to 11.35% (Fig. 6) since the under-sampled older In addition, there was no sentinel site with LSL in two of the most
houses were the ones with the greatest water lead levels while lower impoverished wards, including where the percentage of children with
WLLs were measured in over-sampled post-1950 houses. high blood lead levels tripled following the switch in water supply.
A similar correction was conducted for all five rounds of both Such bias seems surprising as socio-economic status and predicted
sampling programs, using between one and four covariates (Fig. 7). blood lead levels were some of the criteria used during the selection
This correction was applied after adjusting the time series of the vol- of sentinel sites. One must, however, keep in mind that the network in-
untary test results for temporal bias by eliminating repeated mea- cludes only sites where homeowners volunteered to participate in the
surements (Table 2), lowering percentages above 15 μg/L in bi-weekly sampling. Also, the sentinel network evolved between sam-
particular for the last two sampling rounds (Fig. 7A). Adjusting for pling rounds as some residents stopped participating, while others
the presence of lead service lines had a negligible impact (Fig. 7B) asked to be included, which might have created clusters of sentinel
since the percentage of residences with LSL is still small even after sites in areas of higher socio-economic status. Indeed, analysis of the
over-sampling (Fig. 2B). Adding construction year as a covariate voluntary sampling program indicated the tendency of citizens living
caused bigger changes (Fig. 7C), in particular for the voluntary in the most impoverished wards to use fewer testing kits. The over-

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 13

Fig. 6. Stratification of 1431 WLL data collected during the first round of voluntary sampling on the basis of the existence of lead service lines and construction year (3 categories). The
percentage of data above 15 μg/L ranges from 7.23% to 15.7%, depending on the stratum. A similar stratification into six categories was conducted on the 51,045 residential parcels in
Flint. This information was used to adjust the overall percentage of WLL data above 15 μg/L (10.20%), leading to a rate (11.35%) that better represents Flint housing stock.

sampling of lead service lines for houses built between 1935 and 1950 is the type (e.g., household vs individual income) and resolution
more puzzling and is a major drawback as it hampers our ability to dis- (i.e., census tract vs block group) of poverty estimates. It is noteworthy
entangle the effects of LSL and premise plumbing (lead fixtures and that important results for the sentinel sampling program, in particular
pipes present within old houses) on WLL. the lack of sampled lead service lines in two wards, did not change
Despite the lack of sampling strategy, voluntary testing turned out to when using the more accurate on-site LSL data. On the other hand, rely-
capture the main characteristics (i.e., presence of lead service lines, con- ing on more accurate and recent block group poverty estimates, similar
struction year) of Flint housing stock much more closely than the senti- to the ones used by the State when designing the sentinel network,
nel program. A sampling bias was, however, detected as homeowners greatly attenuated the socio-economic bias detected in Goovaerts
who found high levels of lead in their first samples were more likely (2016). Our analysis, however, confirmed earlier findings (Dolan,
to acquire additional testing kits, while houses with low lead levels 2016; Goovaerts, 2016) that home lead service lines may not be the
were less likely to be tested again. Over time this led to an inflated per- largest contributor of lead in Flint, and lead contamination may be
centage of water lead levels that tested 15 μg/L and higher. Correcting caused by interior plumbing. This would explain why water collected
this bias narrowed the gap between results of the sentinel and voluntary in March 2016 in a residence without a lead service line tested at
sampling programs. Yet, even after adjusting for other covariates, such 1000 μg/L (Johnson, 2016). This information is critical as substantial re-
as housing characteristics and socio-economic status, lead levels mea- sources are currently being spent on the replacement of lead service
sured at sentinel sites in sampling rounds 4 and 5 still exceed 15 μg/L lines in Flint (Moore, 2016) and the selection of lead lines targeted for
at a statistically significant lower rate than samples collected voluntari- replacement has been questioned (Ridley, 2016).
ly. Temporal trends also remained drastically different: The percentage
of sentinel data above 15 μg/L decreased steadily over time, while it in- Acknowledgments
creased for data collected on a voluntary basis during most of the two-
month period. The author is grateful to Troy Rosencrants from the Department of
Caveats of the analysis include the uncertainty attached to the digital Earth and Resource Science (University of Michigan – Flint) for provid-
data on composition of service lines and the sensitivity of the results to ing the shape files with tax parcel information and service line data. This

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
14 P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx

Fig. 7. Impact of adjusting for an increasing number of covariates on the time series of the percentage of WLL data recorded above 15 μg/L at non-sentinel (voluntary sampling) and sentinel
sites: (A) resampling (more likely for residences with high WLL); (B) resampling and presence of LSL; (C) resampling, LSL, and construction year; (D) resampling, LSL, construction year,
and poverty level, and (E) resampling, LSL, construction year, poverty level, and ward. (F) Fully adjusted time series with the corresponding 90% confidence interval.

research also greatly benefited from information about Flint and the Cartier, C., Laroche, L., Deshommes, E., Nour, S., Richard, G., Edwards, M., Prévost, M., 2011.
Investigating dissolved lead at the tap using various sampling protocols. J. Am. Water
sentinel sampling program shared by Dr. Rick Sadler from MSU and Works Ass. 103, 55–67.
Mr. Bryce Feighner from MDEQ. The author would like to express his Clark, B.N., Masters, S.V., Edwards, M.A., 2015. Lead release to drinking water from galva-
gratitude to Dr. Colleen Vallo for proof-reading the manuscript. This re- nized steel pipe coatings. Environ. Eng. Sci. 32 (8):713–721. http://dx.doi.org/10.
1089/ees.2015.0073.
search was funded by grant 1R43CA192520-01A1 from the National Dolan, M., 2016, September 8. Study: Flint Lead Contamination Goes Beyond Service
Cancer Institute. The views stated in this publication are those of the au- Pipes. Detroit Free Press Available at:. http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/
thor and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NCI. michigan/flint-water-crisis/2016/09/08/study-flint-lead-contamination-goes-
beyond-service-pipes/89994636/ (Accessed November 23, 2016).
Edwards, M., Triantafyllidou, S., Best, D., 2009. Elevated blood lead levels in young chil-
References dren due to lead-contaminated drinking water: Washington, DC, 2001–2004. Envi-
ron. Sci. Technol. 43 (5), 1618–1623.
Abernethy, J., Schwartz, E., 2016, September 28. Flint Fiasco Calls for Heavy-hitting Data Felton, R., 2016, April 27. Michigan Official Suggested Gaming Water Tests to ‘Bump Out’
Analysis. GreenBiz Retrieved from. https://www.greenbiz.com/article/flint-fiasco- Lead Results. The Guardian Retrieved from. http://www.theguardian.com.
calls-heavy-hitting-data-analysis. Flint Safe Drinking Water Task Force Recommendations on MDEQ's Draft Sentinel Site
Calley, B., 2016. Understanding Recent Flint Water Test Results. Available at. https:// Selection, February 2016Q. Retrieved from. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/
medium.com/@LtGovCalley/understanding-recent-flint-water-test-results- files/2016-02/documents/task_force_recommendations_on_sentinel_site_selection_
fbb69cf4b5d5. 2-16.pdf (on August 20, 2016).

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
P. Goovaerts / Science of the Total Environment xxx (2017) xxx–xxx 15

Flint Water Advisory Task Force Report, March 2016. Retrieved from. https://www. Sentinel Site Selection, 2016, February 9. Retrieved from. http://www.michigan.gov/
michigan.gov/documents/snyder/FWATF_FINAL_REPORT_21March2016_517805_7. documents/flintwater/Sentinel_Site_Selection_2-9-2016_Final_525077_7.docx (on
pdf (on June 16, 2016). February 2, 2017).
Goovaerts, P., 1997. Geostatistics for Natural Resources Evaluation. Oxford University Testing Plan, Process & Protocols DRAFT, 2016, January 27. Retrieved from. http://docs.
Press, New-York, NY. house.gov/meetings/IF/IF14/20160413/104765/HHRG-114-IF14-Wstate-CreaghK-
Goovaerts, P., 2016. The drinking water contamination crisis in Flint: modeling temporal 20160413-SD003.pdf (on February 2, 2017).
trends of lead level since returning to Detroit water system. Sci. Total Environ. http:// US Environmental Protection Agency, 1991. Office of Water (1991) Lead and Copper Rule
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.09.207. 40 CFR Part 141 Subpart I.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/dwreginfo/lead-and-
Hanna-Attisha, M., LaChance, J., Sadler, R.C., Champney Schnepp, A., 2016. Elevated blood copper-rule (Accessed July 18, 2016).
lead levels in children associated with the Flint drinking water crisis: a spatial analy- US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, 2002. Lead and Copper Monitoring
sis of risk and public health response. Am. J. Public Health 106, 283–290. and Reporting Guidance for Public Water Systems.Available at:. https://www.epa.
Johnson, J., 2016, March 11. Removing Lead Pipes May Not Solve Flint's Water gov/dwreginfo/lead-and-copper-rule-compliance-help-public-water-systems
Crisis.Available at:. http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2016/03/removing_ (Accessed August 30, 2016).
lead_pipes_wont_solve.html (Accessed November 27, 2016). US Environmental Protection Agency, 2006. 3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water in
Lee, R.G., William, C.B., David, W.C., 1989. Lead at the tap: sources and control. J. Am. Schools. Revised Technical Guidance.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/sites/
Water Works Ass. 81 (7), 52–62. production/files/2015-09/documents/toolkit_leadschools_guide_3ts_leadschools.pdf
Liang, K.Y., Zeger, S.L., 1986. Longitudinal data analysis using generalized linear models. (Accessed November 23, 2016).
Biometrika 73, 13–22. US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water, 2016r.
Milman, O., Glenza, J., 2016, June 2. At Least 33 US Cities Used Water Testing ‘Cheats’ Over Memorandum: Clarification of Recommended Tap Sampling Procedures for Purposes
Lead Concerns. The Guardian Retrieved from. http://www.theguardian.com. of the Lead and Copper Rule.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/dwreginfo/memo-
Milman, O., 2016, June 2. Tests on Flint Water Targeted Homes Far From Network of Lead clarifying-recommended-tap-sampling-procedures-lead-and-copper-rule (Accessed
Pipes. The Guardian Retrieved from. http://www.theguardian.com. August 30, 2016).
Moore, K., 2016, October 31. Mayor Weaver Kicks Off Third Phase of FAST Start Pipe Re- US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Policy, 2016b. EJSCREEN Technical
placement Initiative. Press release Available at. https://www.cityofflint.com/2016/ Documentation.Available at:. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-07/
10/31/mayor-weaver-kicks-off-third-phase-of-fast-start-pipe-replacement- documents/ejscreen_technical_document_20160704_draft.pdf (Accessed February
initiative/. 2, 2017).
Myers, J.C., 1997. Geostatistical Error Management: Quantifying Uncertainty for Environ- Waller, L.A., Gotway, C.A., 2004. Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data. John
mental Sampling and Mapping. John Wiley & Sons, New-York, NY. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ.
Rabin, R., 2008. The lead industry and lead water pipes “a MODEST CAMPAIGN”. Am. Wang, Z., Devine, H., Zhang, W., Waldroup, K., 2014. Using a GIS and GIS-assisted water
J. Public Health 98, 1584–1592. quality model to analyze the deterministic factors for lead and copper corrosion in
Ridley, G., 2016, July 14. More Than a Third of Flint Homes That Got Pipe Fixes Did Not drinking water distribution systems. J. Environ. Eng. 140 (9), A4014004.
Have High Lead.Available at:. http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2016/07/
lead_lacking_from_some_flint_h.html (Accessed November 27, 2016).
SAS Institute Inc., 2011. SAS/STAT 9.3 User's Guide. SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC.

Please cite this article as: Goovaerts, P., Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?, Sci
Total Environ (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.183
AmeriCorps 20th Anniversary Celebration
September 12, 2014 * 12:00–4:00pm

LANSING SERVICE PROJECT INFORMATION
The Lansing service project is being held in partnership with the Power of We Consortium
and Ingham County Land Bank Garden Program from 12:00-4:00pm. Lunch and a t-shirt
will be provided for all service project participants. Please plan to change into your t-shirt
prior to the start of the celebration at 10:30am.

Service project participants will be assigned to one of eight teams (team number
assignments will be provided at registration that morning). After the 20th Anniversary
Celebration at Dart Auditorium, service project participants will meet out front of Dart
Auditorium to find their assigned team (team leaders will be holding up large team signs).
Participants will then be transported to their assigned project site by bus. Individual
vehicles can be left at Lansing Community College. Buses will pick up service project
participants from their service sites by 4:00pm and return to Dart Auditorium.

Below is a list of things for service project participants to bring in order to make it an
enjoyable and rewarding experience. If you have any questions, please contact
Jocelyn Davis at (517) 241-3606 or davisj31@michigan.gov.

CLOTHING – You WILL get dirty!
You will be serving outside most of the time (weather permitting) so you will want to dress
accordingly (layers are always good in case it is cool out).
On top…
o 20th Anniversary AmeriCorps t-shirt (distributed at registration). The AmeriCorps
shirt should be worn at all times during the project so we can get lots of great
photos. Please also wear or bring a long-sleeve t-shirt or sweatshirt to wear
UNDER the t-shirt, as some of the project sites may require long sleeves.
On the bottom…
o Long pants that can get dirty. Pants (not shorts) are necessary for protection
and safety.
o Boots, tennis shoes/sneakers, or other heavy shoes – do NOT wear sandals or
open-toed shoes!
Members may also want to bring a change of clothes for the ride home.

OPTIONAL
A water bottle to use during the project – bottles of water will also be available onsite,
but we would like to minimize the use of disposable water bottles as much as possible.
Your own safety goggles and/or work gloves to use for the service project. Necessary
items will be provided if you do not have them.
Bug spray
Sunscreen/Hat/Sunglasses

*The MCSC is not responsible for any lost or stolen items.
The Disability Network

The Disability Network and Genesee Health System
Invite you to join us for a PICNIC and AWARENESS DAY
th
to celebrate the 25 Anniversary of the
“AMERICANS with DISABILITIES ACT”

 Information on the ADA
Know your rights
 Register to Vote
 Free Food and Beverage
 Music and Dancing
 Bingo, Games and Prizes
 Soccer Tournament
 Balloons
 Face Painting
Call for information
 Accessible Bicycles
TDN 810-742-1800
GHS 810-257-3705  And Much More!!

Friday, July 24, 2015
11:00 am – 2:00 pm Powers High School Lawn
Corner of Court Street and Miller Rd.
Bring your lawn chairs and blankets.

Thank You
Sponsors
Subject: Fwd: MEDC Daily: HIROTEC to build new Auburn Hills plant, add 140 jobs
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 7/11/2014 12:14 PM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michigan Economic Development Corporation <reply@info.michiganbusiness.org>
Date: Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 12:01 PM
Subject: MEDC Daily: HIROTEC to build new Auburn Hills plant, add 140 jobs
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. | Bookmark and Share
MEDC
MICHIGANBUSINESS.ORG Linked In facebook twitter Michigan Advantage Blog

Growth Opportunities


HIROTEC to build new Auburn Hills plant, add 140 jobs
Detroit Free Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Menards breaks ground on home improvement store near Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor News, The – 07/11/2014

Read Story



$5 Million Grant Supports STEM Education Initiative
Morning Sun – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Food Truck Fridays to draw start-up restaurant entrepreneurs to the Central Michigan University Research
Corporation
Morning Sun – 07/11/2014

Read Story


MGM's big rebound reverses Detroit casinos' revenue losing streak
Detroit Free Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Hudsonville Ice Cream looking for a winter Pure Michigan flavor
Grand Rapids Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


'Potential developer' given go-ahead to start work on historic Metropolitan Building
Detroit News – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Detroit's rising with investment
Detroit News – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Downtown Detroit revival has rocker ready to roll out
Detroit News – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Whirlpool buys big stake in Italy's Indesit
Associated Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


New Yorkers buy Old Wayne County Building
Detroit Free Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Furniture dealer launches construction management division
Grand Rapids Business Journal – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Grand Haven Main Street Downtown Development Authority now offering assistance program for business
owners
Muskegon Chronicle – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Whirlpool to buy $1B stake in Italian appliance maker
Crain's Detroit Business – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Auburn Hills supplier Hirotec gets $1 million for expansion
Crain's Detroit Business – 07/11/2014

Read Story



Hirotec America expanding in Auburn Hills, adding 140 new jobs
Oakland Press, The – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Magna auto supplier investing millions, adding jobs in Michigan
MLive.com – 07/10/2014

Read Story

Talent


Schlissel strives to keep U of M accessible and affordable
Detroit News – 07/11/2014

Read Story

MEDC in the News


Lt. Gov. Brian Calley visits Jackson to discuss improving Michigan's business climate
Jackson Citizen Patriot, The – 07/11/2014

Read Story

Beyond Michigan


The Post-Post-Apocalyptic Detroit
The New York Times Magazine – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Inventor pushes solar panels for roads, highways
Associated Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Obama asking companies to pay suppliers faster
Associated Press – 07/11/2014

Read Story


Slurpees: Keeping cool with pop culture since 1965
USA Today – 07/11/2014

Read Story

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respond to this email.
This email was sent to mayor@cityofflint.com , on behalf of: Michigan Economic Development Corporation ·
300 N. Washington Sq. · Lansing, MI 48913 · 888-522-0103
Subject: Fwd: Confirmation of AmeriCorps 20th Anniversary Celebration
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 9/10/2014 1:30 PM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Davis, Jocelyn (DHS) <DavisJ31@michigan.gov>
Date: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 11:22 AM
Subject: Confirmation of AmeriCorps 20th Anniversary Celebration
To: "Davis, Jocelyn (DHS)" <DavisJ31@michigan.gov>
Cc: "Sargent, Megan (DHS)" <SargentM1@michigan.gov>, "Holmes, Virginia (DHS)"
<HolmesV@michigan.gov>

We’re looking forward to seeing you at the Michigan’s AmeriCorps 20th Anniversary Celebration this Friday,
September 12th! The event will be held at the Lansing Community College Dart Auditorium in downtown
Lansing. The agenda is attached for your review and additional details are included below:

REGISTRATION/CEREMONY:

Registration and a continental breakfast/networking reception will take place from 9:45–10:15 a.m. The
ceremony will take place from 10:30am-12:00pm. We have a fantastic line-up of speakers and entertainment
planned for the day! We also plan to live stream part of the national event hosted by the Corporation for
National and Community Service featuring President Obama and George H.W. Bush.

PARKING:

Free parking is available across from Dart Auditorium in Lot 505 (505 N. Capitol Ave., Lansing, MI, 48933). A
campus map is attached.

DRESS:

Dress is casual, but please wear your AmeriCorps gear (i.e., t-shirts, sweatshirts, or anything else with a
prominent AmeriCorps logo)!

*For those who are participating in the service project, please see the attached document for clothing
instructions.

SERVICE PROJECT (optional):

The Lansing service project is being held in partnership with the Power of We Consortium and Ingham
County Land Bank Garden Program from 12:00-4:00pm. Lunch and a t-shirt will be provided for all service
project participants. Please review the attached “9-12 Service Project Information” document for additional
details, including what to wear and bring.
If you have any questions, please contact Jocelyn Davis at davisj31@michigan.gov or (517) 241-3606. See
you Friday!

Attachments-1/9-12 Service Project Information - Lansing.pdf
Attachments-1/LCC-Campus-Map-3D-2013.pdf
Attachments-1/MI AC 20th Anniversary Lansing Agenda.pdf
Subject: Fwd: Confirmation of Michigan's AmeriCorps Anniversary Luncheon and Celebration
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 9/10/2014 1:29 PM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Davis, Jocelyn (DHS) <DavisJ31@michigan.gov>
Date: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 9:45 AM
Subject: Confirmation of Michigan's AmeriCorps Anniversary Luncheon and Celebration
To: "Davis, Jocelyn (DHS)" <DavisJ31@michigan.gov>
Cc: "Sargent, Megan (DHS)" <SargentM1@michigan.gov>, "Holmes, Virginia (DHS)" <HolmesV@michigan.gov>,
"Adler, Jessi (DHS)" <AdlerJ@michigan.gov>

Hello!

This message serves as confirmation for the AmeriCorps’ 20th Anniversary luncheon, which will take place this
Friday, September 12 from 12:00-1:30pm (following the Michigan’s AmeriCorps 20th Anniversary Celebration at
LCC).

The luncheon will be held at the Christman Building, which is just a short walk from Dart Auditorium (you’re
welcome to leave your vehicle at LCC in Lot 505). The building is located one block northeast of the Michigan Capitol,
on the east side of Capitol Avenue, between Ionia Street and Ottawa Street. The address for the Christman Building is
208 N. Capitol Ave, Lansing, MI 48933 (more detailed directions are attached if needed). We will be meeting in the
Christman University Room, which is down one level from the main floor.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at the information below. We look forward to seeing you Friday!

Attachments/MI AC 20th Anniversary Agenda - KS.pdf
Attachments/LCC-Campus-Map-3D-2013.pdf
Attachments/Christman Building.pdf
Subject: Fwd: Michigan International Speedway, MEDC Pure Michigan 400 partnership gets the green flag
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 10/23/2014 8:59 AM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michelle Grinnell <grinnellm@michigan.org>
Date: Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 4:50 PM
Subject: Michigan International Speedway, MEDC Pure Michigan 400 partnership gets the green flag
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 21, 2014

Michigan International Speedway, MEDC Pure Michigan 400 Partnership Gets the Green Flag

LANSING – Two of Michigan’s best-known brands – Michigan International Speedway and Pure Michigan –
are extending their partnership to host the Pure Michigan 400 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race on Sunday,
August 16, 2015.

“MIS is a premier Michigan destination with a strong tradition of promoting the tremendous assets our state
has to offer businesses, residents and visitors alike,” said Lt. Governor Brian Calley. “We have seen great
success with the Pure Michigan 400 in the past four years, and look forward to this next chapter in the
partnership.”

Since 2011, the Pure Michigan 400 has proved to be an effective way to bring the Pure Michigan message to
75 million NASCAR fans nationwide. Further brand exposure has resulted from working with nationally
recognized grand marshals, including Desmond Howard, Kid Rock, Carter Oosterhouse and Amy Smart and
Olympic gold medalists Charlie White and Meryl Davis. Additionally, MEDC has been able to use the event to
host business leaders and national site selectors to showcase the quality of life Michigan has to offer.

“The Pure Michigan 400 is an opportunity to showcase all Michigan has to offer – from car culture and
outdoor recreation to top destinations like MIS,” said Michael A. Finney, President and CEO of the MEDC.
“Race day at MIS helps build on the sense of place that is Michigan and we are excited to be joining efforts
to highlight Pure Michigan at the track and beyond for another year.”

Each year about 385,000 people visit MIS, generating an economic impact of more than $414 million. Nearly
60 percent of the guests on race weekends come from outside Michigan, making MIS the largest welcome
center in the state.

The partnership joining these two brands, both focused on attracting new visitors to Michigan, continues
what is believed to be the first time a state’s branding agency has sponsored NASCAR’s premier stock car
series. The partnership includes title sponsorship of the August 16, 2015 Sprint Cup race with the option to
extend the contract for two additional one-year periods.

In addition to its pair of race weekends, the track also hosts events as an innovative and diverse business,
hospitality and entertainment venue, bringing several new events to Michigan in the past year.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership for the Pure Michigan 400 race in August,” MIS President Roger
Curtis said. “The key to successful partnerships is finding organizations which have similar goals. Michigan
International Speedway and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation want people to come to this
state and see all the wonderful things it has to offer – beautiful landscapes, fun activities year-round and
awesome NASCAR racing.”
Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan, a town of about 1,200, is one of only 23 facilities in
the world to hold such an event. The racetrack seats more than 72,000 people in its grandstands, with tens
of thousands of others in the infield, suites and campgrounds that will all be introduced to the Pure Michigan
brand in August.

Pure Michigan is a brand representing business, talent and tourism initiatives across Michigan. These efforts
are driven by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, which serves as the state’s marketing arm
and lead advocate for business growth, jobs and opportunity with a focus on helping grow Michigan’s
economy.

For more on the MEDC and its initiatives, visit: michiganbusiness.org. For Michigan travel news, updates and
information, visit michigan.org.

Nestled in the lush Irish Hills of Southeastern Michigan, Michigan International Speedway is NASCAR’s fastest
track and the Great Escape, a venerable NASCAR national park where fans can get away and enjoy the very
best in racing and camaraderie. It’s the love of racing and the thrill of a great time for race fans and drivers
alike.

Keep up with Michigan International Speedway via Twitter @MISpeedway or on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/MISpeedway. Android and iPhone can now download Discover MIS, the official app of
MIS, on Google Play and iTunes.

Join our Mobile Fan Club by texting MISCLUB on a Sprint Handheld or other mobile device to 69050.
Standard text message rates may apply.

2015 Michigan International Speedway Schedule:

Saturday, May 9 Michigan Wine and Beer Fest presented by Experience Jackson

Friday, June 12 ARCA Racing Series presented by Menards Corrigan Oil 200 and Sprint Cup
Qualifying

Saturday, June 13 NASCAR XFINITY Series

Sunday, June 14 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Quicken Loans 400

July 17-19 Faster Horses Festival

Friday, Aug. 14 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Practice and Qualifying

Saturday, Aug. 15 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Careers for Veterans 200 presented by The
Cooper Standard Foundation & Brad Keselowski’s Checkered Flag Foundation

Sunday, Aug. 16 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Pure Michigan 400

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Brad Kuhbander, manager of Media Relations, 517-592-1204, bkuhbander@MISpeedway.com
Michelle Grinnell, MEDC public relations manager, 517-241-0251, grinnellm@michigan.org

If you would rather not receive future communications from Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
let us know by clicking here.
Michigan Economic Development Corporation, 300 N. Washington Square 3rd Floor, Lansing, MI 48913
United States

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling
Subject: Fwd: Tax Foundation Recognizes Gov. Snyder for Outstanding Achievement in State Tax Reform
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 10/23/2014 8:59 AM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michigan Economic Development Corporation <DoNotReply@info.michiganbusiness.org>
Date: Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 3:54 PM
Subject: Tax Foundation Recognizes Gov. Snyder for Outstanding Achievement in State Tax Reform
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.
Pure Michigan (R) Michigan Economic Development Program THIS JUST IN
MichiganBusiness.org
Linked In facebook twitter Michigan Advantage Blog


Tax Foundation Recognizes Gov. Snyder for Outstanding Achievement in State Tax Reform

The Tax Foundation has recognized Gov. Rick Snyder and the State of Michigan for Outstanding
Achievement in State Tax Reform in 2014. This is the second year in a row Michigan has received this honor.

Snyder was selected due to his extraordinary efforts to advance the cause of simpler, smarter tax policy in
the previous year.

Tax Foundation photo

From left to right, Gov. Rick Snyder is joined by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Tax Foundation economist Elizabeth
Malm, Tax Foundation Vice President of Legal & State Projects Joseph Henchman, Tax Foundation economist
Scott Drenkard, and Michigan Economic Development Corp. President and CEO Mike Finney.

“Working for better tax policy is not easy, and I know a small glass award hardly compares to the efforts the
recipients put into what they helped achieve,” said Tax Foundation Vice President of State Projects Joseph
Henchman. “We believe, however, that it’s important to do something to recognize their impressive
achievements for the taxpayers of their states.”

“Many legislators and activists from both sides of the aisle recognized the need for smarter, more principled
tax policy in 2014 and we are honored to present these awards in recognition of their efforts and successes,”
added Henchman.

In July, Michigan was named the Most Improved State for 2014 in the American Economic Development
Institute/Pollina Corporate Real Estate, Inc. annual Top 10 Pro-Business States report. Overall, Michigan
ranked no. 3 among the nation’s top 10 most populous states and no. 2 among the eight Great Lakes states.

Michigan was named Most Improved State for 2014 because of its 21-position climb in rank from 2011 to
2013. In its announcement, AEDI/Pollina Corporate said, “Certainly, two of the state’s boldest moves were to
pass Right to Work legislation and repeal of the maligned MBT business tax.”

To learn more about the Pollina recognition, watch this video.

Bookmark and Share


Do not respond to this email. To contact MEDC, visit our website at http://www.michigan.org,
http://www.MichiganBusiness.org or http://www.MiTalent.org.

This communication was sent to you because you requested email communications from the MEDC.
To ensure that you receive future emails, please add DoNotReply@info.michiganbusiness.org to your safe
senders list.

To unsubscribe or to update your subscriptions, modify your password or email address at any time visit
your Subscriber Preferences Page. You will need to use your email address to log in. If you have questions or
problems with the subscription service, please contact subscriberhelp.govdelivery.com.

This service is provided to you at no charge by Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Do not
respond to this email.
This email was sent to mayor@cityofflint.com , on behalf of: Michigan Economic Development Corporation ·
300 N. Washington Sq. · Lansing, MI 48913 · 888-522-0103

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling
Subject: Fwd: MEDIA ADVISORY: Lt. Gov., MEDC to detail new materials innovation center Jan. 13 at NAIAS
in Detroit
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 1/12/2015 5:38 PM
To: Flint Mayor <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kathy Fagan <fagank@michigan.org>
Date: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 at 3:11 PM
Subject: MEDIA ADVISORY: Lt. Gov., MEDC to detail new materials innovation center Jan. 13 at NAIAS in
Detroit
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kathy Fagan
JAN. 12, 2015 517-335-4590

fagank@michigan.org

MEDIA ADVISORY:
Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, MEDC to announce details of new composites manufacturing innovation center to be
established in Detroit

LANSING, Mich. – Media representatives are invited to attend a news conference announcing the details of
the $70 million U. S. Department of Energy grant awarded to the Institute for Advanced Composites
Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI) to establish a presence in Detroit. The news conference will take place
Tuesday, Jan. 13 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley and Kevin Kerrigan, senior vice president of automotive at the Michigan Economic
Development Corporation, will discuss details of the new innovation center and Michigan’s successful efforts
to locate IACMI in Detroit. The new IACMI facility, announced last Friday by President Obama, will focus on
the development of advanced fiber-enforced polymer composites that will yield automotive materials that are
lighter and stronger than steel.

An announcement will also be made about a new organization for cross-industry industrial design. Other
speakers will include:

Dr. Craig Blue, Director, Advanced Manufacturing Program, Director, Manufacturing Demonstration
Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, IACMI Director
Dr. Mark Johnson, Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office, US Department of Energy
Jeff DeBoer, Vice President, Sundberg-Ferar, Inc.

EVENT: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley-MEDC news conference

DATE: Tuesday, Jan. 13

TIME: 2 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.

LOCATION: MEDC Booth, Hall E
North American International Auto Show
Cobo Center, Detroit

Pure Michigan is a brand representing business, talent and tourism initiatives across Michigan. These efforts
are driven by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, which serves as the state’s marketing arm
and lead advocate for business growth, jobs and opportunity with a focus on helping grow Michigan’s
economy.

For more on the MEDC and its initiatives, visit michiganbusiness.org. For Michigan travel news, updates and
information, visit michigan.org.

###

If you would rather not receive future communications from Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
let us know by clicking here.
Michigan Economic Development Corporation, 300 N. Washington Square 3rd Floor, Lansing, MI 48913
United States

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling
Subject: Fwd: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, MEDC highlight automotive, talent initiatives at NAIAS
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 1/13/2015 5:26 PM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kathy Fagan <fagank@michigan.org>
Date: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 at 4:28 PM
Subject: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, MEDC highlight automotive, talent initiatives at NAIAS
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kathy Fagan
JAN. 13, 2015 517-335-4590

fagank@michigan.org

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, MEDC highlight automotive, talent initiatives at NAIAS
New composites innovation center, cross-industry design council to be established in Michigan

LANSING, Mich. – Lt. Gov. Brian Calley and Kevin Kerrigan, senior vice president of automotive at the
Michigan Economic Development Corporation, today detailed two major initiatives that will bolster Michigan’s
preeminent role as a global automotive leader. The announcements took place at the North American
International Auto Show in Detroit.

The first initiative is the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI) that will be
established in Detroit through a $70 million U. S. Department of Energy grant. The second, the Michigan
Design Council, is a cross-industry design coalition that will focus on strengthening the design talent base in
Michigan.

Together, these initiatives address the ongoing need for manufacturing innovation and capitalize on
Michigan’s leadership in engineering and design talent.

“With our strong manufacturing base and strength in research and development with auto materials, we are
a natural fit for the IACMI grant and its implications on the future of lightweight materials,” Calley said. “The
Michigan Design Council will focus on finding ways to attract and retain design talent, a vital component of
our overall economic development strategy.”

The new IACMI facility, announced last Friday by President Obama, will focus on the development of
advanced fiber-enforced polymer composites that will yield automotive materials that are lighter and
stronger than steel.

IACMI, based in a lab in Oakridge, Tennessee, will be using additional lab space in Detroit. IACMI’s
technology development and demonstration programs will be driven by major industry participation with a
focus on reducing technical risk and developing a robust supply chain to support a growing advanced
composites industry.

The center will allow the auto industry to test and develop the equipment needed to process new materials
for vehicles. While larger auto manufacturers are exploring some of these material technologies on their
own, the grant will help smaller companies that need access to the technology or a place to test innovative
ideas.

Last year the American Lightweight Materials Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Detroit received a
separate grant from the Department of Defense. ALMMII is a public-private partnership developing and
deploying advanced lightweight materials manufacturing technologies, and implementing education and
training programs to prepare the workforce. ALMMII is one of the founding institutes in the National Network
for Manufacturing Innovation, a federal initiative to create regional hubs to accelerate the development and
adoption of cutting-edge manufacturing technologies.

The institute will receive $70 million in federal funding over five years, matched by another $78 million from
consortium partners. This funding, along with the IACMI grant, makes Michigan a unique location where
multi-materials for vehicles will be collaborated in the same area.

The Michigan Design Council, a new organization for cross-industry design aimed at strengthening the design
talent base in Michigan, was also announced today.

A coalition of private, state and local partners, the Michigan Design Council is led by industrial design
company Sundberg-Ferar. The goal of the Michigan Design Council is to establish Michigan as the premier
destination for individuals in the industrial design and related design professions, attract and retain design
professionals, and have a positive economic impact for the state and its industries.

The council will work to grow Michigan pool of design professionals, work with Michigan business to use
design more effectively, host events such as design competitions aimed at attracting creative talent, create
design sharing space, and educate residents and businesses on the importance of a design community.

Calley added that the industry wanting to create the Michigan Design Council is a welcome partnership in
state's focus on talent development.

“While we are proud of the fact that we make things in Michigan, our depth goes far beyond that. We
design and make things – cars, furniture, appliances, clothes – items that affect everyone's life each and
every day,” Calley said. “The Michigan Design Council will help Michigan address the talent development
focus of its economic development strategy and become the national leader in developing a talented
workforce.”

The Council will hold its first design competition, Design Michigan Week, in 2016. More details will be
announced in the coming months.

Pure Michigan is a brand representing business, talent and tourism initiatives across Michigan. These efforts
are driven by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, which serves as the state’s marketing arm
and lead advocate for business growth, jobs and opportunity with a focus on helping grow Michigan’s
economy.

For more on the MEDC and its initiatives, visit michiganbusiness.org. For Michigan travel news, updates and
information, visit michigan.org. Michigan residents interested in seeking employment with any of Michigan’s
growing companies should check mitalent.org, where more than 73,000 jobs are currently available in a
variety of industries.

###

If you would rather not receive future communications from Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
let us know by clicking here.
Michigan Economic Development Corporation, 300 N. Washington Square 3rd Floor, Lansing, MI 48913
United States

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling
Subject: Fwd: Lt. Governor Joining Capital Conference!
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/5/2015 11:05 AM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michigan Municipal League <jmoore@mml.org>
Date: Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 9:48 AM
Subject: Lt. Governor Joining Capital Conference!
To: "Hon. Dayne Walling" <mayor@cityofflint.com>

Web version of email Send to a friend Share: Facebook Twitter
loop

Feb. 5, 2015

2015 Capital Conference
March 24-25 | Lansing

The League is pleased to announce that Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley will be joining us for the Capital Conference
welcome session on Tuesday afternoon. He'll discuss the administration's support of the upcoming roads ballot proposal,
its positive impact on the state, and how local communities can get involved in supporting the issue. Get the details and
register now.

gray bar

Upcoming Webinars

Feb. 17 - Funding Asset Management at Affordable Rates

Feb. 18 - Changes to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Feb. 23 - New Regulations on Employer Mandate from Health Care Reform

gray bar

Elected Officials Academy
Feb. 20-21, 2015 | Frankenmuth

EOA Core Weekender - Offers the most critical information in legal framework; leadership roles and responsibilities;
financial management; and planning and zoning.
EOA Advanced Weekender - Provides more in-depth knowledge of municipal issues, such as advanced planning and
zoning; financial modeling; and intergovernmental cooperation.

webinaras

gray bar

Training Opportunities
Feb. 25 - Priority-Based Budgeting, Lansing. A holistic approach that provides you with a "new lens" through which to
frame better-informed financial and budgeting decisions.

March 6 - Trench Safety & Underground Construction for DPW Personnel, Mason. Learn the basics of trench safety, an
overview of OSHA and MIOSHA standards for excavations, and best practices for safe installation or repair of
underground utilities.

battle creek

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calendar bar2

Changes Coming to CEA Program

Since 2007, the Community Excellence Award (CEA) has been the League's most prestigious community award. To
keep the program fresh and relevant, our Board of Trustees requested some changes for 2015. The new CEA process
will be more exciting and inclusive for our communities. Stay tuned for details!

bar2

New League Book

"The Economics of Place: The Art of Building Great Communities" goes beyond placemaking as a concept to offer real-
world examples of economic drivers and agents of social and cultural change. Order here.

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Email management: The Michigan Municipal League respects your right to privacy.
Click here to unsubscribe
Click here to manage your Michigan Municipal League email subscription preferences.
If you no longer wish to receive any type of email notice from the Michigan Municipal League, click here.
Michigan Municipal League, 1675 Green Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling
Subject: Fwd: personal invitation to the TDN 25th ADA anniversary event
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 7/22/2015 8:24 AM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: <Mikezelley@aol.com>
Date: Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 6:55 PM
Subject: personal invitation to the TDN 25th ADA anniversary event
To: mayor@cityofflint.com
Cc: mikezelley@aol.com, vickis@disnetwork.org, lukez@disnetwork.org

Mayor Walling, Please consider this a personal invitation to attend our 25th anniversary celebration of the Americans
with Disabilities Act. The event will take place at Powers High School on Friday, July 24th from 11 to 2 pm. Attached
is the event flyer.

There is also a VIP event for sponsors to meet with Lieutenant Governor Calley and newly elected Justice Richard
Bernstein, who will be speaking at the event. The VIP get together will be in the Powers media room (second floor -
main entrance area) starting at 10:30 am.

You are personally invited to this gathering. Please let us know if you are able to attend. Mike

Mike Zelley, President
The Disability Network
3600 S Dort Hwy, Suite 54
Flint, MI 48507
810-742-1800 voice
810-742-7647 TDD
www.disnetwork.org

~ ~Vote as if your life depended on it, because it does.~ ~
Justin Dart

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments-2/2015 ADA Picnic flyer S.pdf
Subject: Fwd: November 2015 Executive Committee Monthly Report
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 11/2/2015 5:06 PM
To: Dayne Walling <dwalling@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Lavonne Blonde (MEDC) <blondel1@michigan.org>
Date: Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 4:45 PM
Subject: November 2015 Executive Committee Monthly Report
To: Anmar Sarafa <asarafa@stewardcapital.com>, Chris MacInnes <cmacinnes@crystalmountain.com>,
Chris Rizik <chrisr@renvcf.com>, Cindy Larsen <clarsen@muskegon.org>, David Armstrong
<David.Armstrong@greenstonefcs.com>, David Meador <meadord@dteenergy.com>, David Sowerby
<dsowerby@loomissayles.com>, "David Washburn, MBA, CLP" <davewash@msu.edu>, Dayne Walling
<mayor@cityofflint.com>, "Doug Rothwell (dougrothwell@businessleadersformichigan.com)"
<dougrothwell@businessleadersformichigan.com>, Fritz Erickson <ferickso@nmu.edu>, Gerald Poisson
<poissong@oakgov.com>, Greg Northrup <greg.northrup@spart-llc.com>, Jeff Metts
<jmetts@dowdingindustries.com>, Jeff Noel <d.jeffrey.noel@whirlpool.com>, John Brown
<john.brown@stryker.com>, Lizabeth Ardisana <lardisana@asgren.com>, Robert Collier
<rcollier@michiganfoundations.org>, "Scott Newman-Bale (scott@shortsbrewing.com)"
<scott@shortsbrewing.com>, Tom Moran <tmoran40@hotmail.com>
Cc: Bonnie Lewis <Bonnie.L.Lewis@whirlpool.com>, Cheryl Motz <cheryl.motz@greenstonefcs.com>, Dana
Smith <dsmith@msu.edu>, Donna Salive <donnas@businessleadersformichigan.com>, Doreen Pagel
<pageld@oakgov.com>, Judi Joubert <judi.joubert@stryker.com>, Kathy Johnson <mkjohnson@kvcc.edu>,
Katrina Bettie <bettiek@dteenergy.com>, Kelli Hepler <khepler@muskegon.org>, Leah King
<lking@stewardcapital.com>, Marilyn Kapp Moran <Marilyn@moraniron.com>, Maxine Murray
<mmurray@cityofflint.com>, Patty Banukevich <pbanukevich@loomissayles.com>, Rebecca Roberts
<rroberts@dowdingindustries.com>, Sarah <smoir@shortsbrewing.com>, Sue Cuddington
<Scuddington@michiganfoundations.org>, Sue Osinski <sueo@renvcf.com>

Good afternoon,

First, I’d like to e-introduce myself. I am Jen Nelson’s executive assistant and I will be a point of contact for
you along with Jen, Steve Arwood and Amiee Evans. I have included Outlook contact cards for both Jen and
myself with all of our contact information.

Attached is the executive committee report that will be provided on a monthly basis. If you have any
questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Have a great day.

Lavonne Blonde
Executive Assistant to

Jennifer Nelson, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

Michigan Economic Development Corporation
300 N. Washington Square | Lansing, MI 48913
Office: 517.241.2992 | Mobile: 517.242.9119
blondel1@michigan.org

This message contains information which may be confidential and privileged. Unless you are the intended
recipient (or authorized to receive this message for the intended recipient), you may not use, copy,
disseminate or disclose to anyone the message or any information contained in the message. If you have
received the message in error, please advise the sender by reply e-mail, and delete the message. Thank you
very much.

--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Jennifer Nelson.vcf 

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X�J�'!����U@-A�0�LD�0M�‫ם‬u�d��~x�M5dCCT 

Lavonne Blonde.vcf 

A�5P�D3�8R P�D5DE"7}LDM6�w^�Y�r�jz+�ӓy�Dc �$�P��

Steve Arwood.vcf 

A�5P�D3�8R P�D5DE"7}(u+^��LDM6�Š�Y�r�jz+�ӓy�D`�8"�I#���IT�
�L��My�]6Omv瞼�FD45B

Amiee Evans.vcf 

A�5P�D3�8R P�D5DE"7} ��D�z������b���NLC�"�I#���,�<�X�J�^��]v�t�-6
B��^ `ӏ<�ovDEU
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Attachments-3/Jennifer Nelson.vcf
Attachments-3/Lavonne Blonde.vcf
Attachments-3/Steve Arwood.vcf
Attachments-3/Amiee Evans.vcf
Attachments-3/November 2015 Executive Committee Report Packet.pdf
Subject: Fwd: Aquaçai Bottled Water for Flint Citizens and Agencies, as well as, Businesses
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 4/25/2016 8:31 AM
To: Derrick Jones <djones@cityofflint.com>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Manuel Caballero <manuel.caballero30@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, Apr 23, 2016 at 12:49 AM
Subject: Aquaçai Bottled Water for Flint Citizens and Agencies, as well as, Businesses
To: "mayor@cityofflint.com" <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Cc: brian.calley@michigan.gov, biehll@michigan.gov

Honorable Mayor Karen Weaver,

My name is Manuel M. Caballero and I am the owner of Latin Marketing Solutions in Denver, Colorado. My
company is the distributor of Aquaçai which is Artesian water untouched by human hands from Panama,
Republic of Panama.

I would like to be able to provide you with this product at a below cost price in order to help the people of
Flint at this time. This is a premium water comparable to Fiji or Voss water but I am offering this water at
least $10.00 less per case than the other two waters I just mentioned.

I can have it delivered to Flint at no extra price, just the price per case that I will explained next:

I will like to give you all of the information you need to make your choice on this product that can help your
city.

This is not Spring Water like Zepher Hills or Deer Park, nor Purified Water like Dasani or Aquafina. The only
comparable waters to Aquaçai right now are Fiji and Voss water, and these two waters are at least $10.00
more expensive per case than Aquaçai. This is the Best product at the Best price.

Remember that Aquaçai is a Premium Natural Artesian water from the Rain Forest of Panama, never touched
by human hands. The whole process is automated and done without anybody touching it at all.

I am attaching a sheet that explain the sizes, amount of bottles per case, how many cases per pallets, and
how many pallets per container, as well as, videos for you to view our process of extraction and our facilities,
proposed year and a half contract, and a proposed invoice for ordering.

Just for general knowledge, there is a minimum of one container per order, and all orders must be prepaid,
and in order to make it easier on your part we are register with the state of Michigan as a vendor at
https://mainfacsp.dmb.state.mi.us/payee/servlet/us.mi.state.eft.WelcomeServlet under "Latin Marketing
Solutions" payee #2454348772. Also, I am attaching all certifications including the FDAs, Halal Certificate,
Kosher Certificate, U.S. Arm Forces letter, IBWA, and a NSF Report together with more information on this
product.

The prices are as follow:

24 Bottles /11.97 oz = $14.36 per case = ¢.60 per bottle.

24 Bottles / 20 oz = $15.36 per case = ¢.64 per bottle.

12 Bottles / 1 Litter = $11.64 per case = ¢.97 per bottle.

Please get back to me as soon as you can, to find out on if you would be interested on any of the other sizes
and/or/if you would want different quantities. I included a proposed contract and invoiced using the
suggested bottle sized for your area and needs.

I have tried the governor's office and the FEMA office of Ms Zimmerman, but hat no replied. I am register in
the state website under my business and myself in order to be able to expedite any order to present to me,
and depending on the amount you request it could take two weeks to a month to get you the water at Flint.

I would like to thank you in advance and look forward to a quick reply.

Respectfully,

Manuel M. Caballero
President/CEO
Latin Marketing Solutions
100 Fillmore Street
Denver, Colorado 80206
www. LatinMarketingSolutions.com
(303) 5257841

--
Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com

Aquacai Sizes.jpg

FDA 2015.jpg

New Aquacai Brochure Draft Back June 2011.jpg

New Aquacai Brochure Draft Front June 2011.jpg

Attachments-4/Aquacai Sizes.jpg
Attachments-4/FDA 2015.jpg
Attachments-4/New Aquacai Brochure Draft Back June 2011.jpg
Attachments-4/New Aquacai Brochure Draft Front June 2011.jpg
Attachments-4/Aquacai Corp video _Short Ver_.mp4
Attachments-4/Aquacai state of art.mp4
Attachments-4/Aquacai Water-Quality-Report.pdf
Attachments-4/Halal Certificate_2015-2016.pdf
Attachments-4/IBWA_2015.pdf
Attachments-4/KOSHER Certificate 2015-2016.pdf
Attachments-4/NSF 2015_Finished_Product_J-00165147-C0044856.pdf
Attachments-4/US Armed Forces Vendor Letter.pdf
Attachments-4/LMS - Aquacai Order Form 2016 Sheet1.pdf
Attachments-4/Michigan Contract.docx
Subject: Fwd: Water Credit
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 12/15/2016 3:39 PM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Office Desktop <Office@grace247.org>
Date: Thu, Dec 15, 2016 at 3:14 PM
Subject: Water Credit
To: MissionFlint@michigan.gov
Cc: brian.calley@michigan.gov, mayor@cityofflint.com, Pastor Gary <garyc@grace247.org>

Dear Rich Baird,

As a Community Leader and Pastor of a church in Flint, I have received several notices about the progress at
what is being done about the water crisis – I would like to share just one area where this effort is failing.

As resident of Flint, we received a water credit but my understanding was that people who lived in Flint
during the water credit refund would also get theirs, even if they no longer live in Flint. What is NOT shared
clearly is HOW to get that credit. When this was first all discussed, I contacted the water department and
was told the credit our account would receive – but the water bill was initially in my mother’s name for part
of that time, even though we paid the bill.

I was told –

· When explaining the situation that it was in Rovena Nitz’s name but we paid the bill, “We have no way
to tell who paid the bill”

· How does she get her refund? “People who are currently residents would get the refund first then
people who have moved”

· “We can’t cut checks for the State, the State will have to refund those who have moved”

What was NOT communicated was that there was an application process on the FLINT website that those
outside of Flint would have to go through (I found out several months after the initial contacting about the
refund) to even start the provess.
On that application, it states that “you will be contacted within four weeks to provide additional information.”
My mother is 85 and sometimes things are forgotten so I have to remind her to look out for the request for
additional information. After the four weeks (around the 4th of November) I called back to the City to ask
about progress and was told that they were only at the beginning of August in regards to applications.
Reminding the person what the website said, I am sure they have changed it. But here is what is damaging
to this “effort”….the customer service representative told me “There is only one gal working on this and she
has additional duties and can only get to it when she can.” Frankly, I find that outrageous. That tells me a
lot about the priority of this effort and getting to people what is their rightful refund – in my mother’s case,
$911!! Not a gracious way to treat a 85 year old LIFE LONG citizen of Flint & Flint Township.

I sincerely you look into this…any of you.

Regards,

Gary Cech

3111 Westwood Pkwy

Flint, MI 48503

GaryC@Grace247.org
Subject: Fwd: Inspiring the next generation of tech innovators: CS First at MSU's Breslin Center on Tues.,
Feb. 28
From: Flint Mayor <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 2/24/2017 8:31 AM
To: Karen Weaver <kweaver@cityofflint.com>

Dr. Karen W. Weaver, Mayor
City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw Street
Flint, Michigan 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Frank Provenzano <provenzanof@michigan.org>
Date: Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 5:34 PM
Subject: Inspiring the next generation of tech innovators: CS First at MSU's Breslin Center on Tues., Feb. 28
To: mayor@cityofflint.com

Michigan Economic Development Corporation
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Frank Provenzano
February 23, 2017 517-335-4590

For all recent stories and announcements, please visit MEDC NEWSROOM

provenzanof@michigan.org

Inspiring the next generation of tech innovators
Students, teachers from around state gather at Tuesday’s second annual ‘CS First’ interactive event at MSU’s
Breslin Center

MEDIA ADVISORY: Michigan Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Rob Biederman (Google), and Jenell Leonard (MFDMO)
will be available for media interviews.

LANSING, Mich. – For most middle-school students, the major life decision about their career path probably
hasn’t quite come into focus. Michigan Film & Digital Media Office (MFDMO) and Google, however, have a
straight-forward entreaty to career-minded 4th-8th grade students: Your professional future starts now.

On Tuesday, Feb. 28, MFDMO and Google will host “Computer Science First” (CS First) at the Jack Breslin
Student Events Center on Michigan State University campus in East Lansing. The CS First event will offer
compelling online demonstrations, and hands-on experiences with robotics, drones and other tech devices to
help students learn that studying computer science isn’t merely an academic exercise.

The interactive stations at CS First are provided by Google, MSU, Master of Art in Education Technology
(MAET), ITEC of Lansing, Square One, Strength in Numbers, and Pixo Group.

“The purpose of the ‘CS First’ event is to elevate computer science education and expose middle school
students to this high-tech, high-wage industry,” said MFDMO Commissioner Jenell Leonard. “It’s important to
teach students about the opportunities in the commuter science field early in their education so that they
can help fill the talent pipeline of this ever-growing industry.”
By 2020, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts there will be 1 million more computer science jobs than
graduating students who qualify for the jobs. Growth for computer science positions in Michigan is increasing
at three-and-a-half times the average compared to other industries.

“Google has made it possible for middle school students to gain access to computer science education
regardless of where they go to school,” said Leonard. “This has the potential to provide the foundation for
learning that leads students into productive careers and jobs in science, computer programing and the
creative services.”

While Google provides the curriculum (available through a website to classrooms) to schools around the
U.S., the introduction of “CS First” in Michigan marks the first time a state agency has been the primary
coordinator of the program.

"We have a responsibility to inspire the next generation of tech innovators,” said Rob Biederman, Google's
head of Midwest public affairs. “Teaching middle-school students about computer science can lead to some
of the most rewarding jobs in the world. Kids from all neighborhoods and all backgrounds should be
encouraged to be creators – not just consumers – of technology."

Students and teachers from the following schools will participate in Tuesday’s event: Advanced Technology
Academy, Dearborn; Christa McAuliffe Middle School, and Washington Elementary School, Bay City; Ferndale
Middle School, Ferndale; J.O. Strong Middle School, Melvindale; and, Sashabaw Middle School, Clarkston.

About CS First

“CS First” is an online-based curriculum (offered at no cost) designed for students in grades 4th-8th. Nearly
5,000 students from around the state are enrolled in the CS First program this school year. The goal is to
offer an affordable, highly accessible path to help increase proficiency in a discipline where mastery is a
highly marketable skill to current and future job prospects.

“CS First” includes support for computer science clubs run by teachers and/or volunteers; flexible program
design that fits in class or after class requirements; and, several focus areas, including game design, art,
storytelling, fashion/design, music/sound, social media and sports.

# # #

“CS First” AGENDA

10:00 a.m. – Introduction, short computer science video and welcome video by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley

10:05 a.m. – Welcome: Jenell Leonard, commissioner, Michigan Film & Digital Media Office

10:10 a.m. – Rob Biederman, head of Midwest public affairs, Google

10:15 a.m. – Overview of interactive station process and student activities

10:30 a.m. – Lt. Gov. Calley arrives

10:45 a.m. –Lt. Gov. Calley tours interactive stations

12 p.m. – Event concludes. Participants depart.

# # #

LIST OF PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS IN “Computer Science First” program (statewide):

ALLEGAN COUNTY: Bentheim Elementary School, Hamilton; Hamilton Middle School, Hamilton.
BAY COUNTY: McAlear-Sawden Elementary School, Bay City; Washington Elementary School, Bay City.

BERRIEN COUNTY: Benton Harbor Area Schools, Benton Harbor; Countryside Academy, Benton Harbor;
Berrien Springs Middle School, Berrien Springs; Lincoln Elementary School, St. Joseph.

CALHOUN COUNTY: Lillian Fletcher Elementary School, Homer.

CHIPPEWA COUNTY: Ojibwe Charter School, Brimley.

CLARE COUNTY: Clare Middle School, Clare; Harrison Middle School, Harrison.

CLINTON COUNTY: Gateway North Elementary, St. Johns; Pewamo-Westphalia Community School,
Westphali.

DICKINSON COUNTY: Holy Spirit Catholic School, Norway.

GENESEE COUNTY: Atherton Elementary, Burton.

GLADWIN COUNTY: Gladwin Intermediate Schools, Gladwin.

GRATIOT COUNTY: Ithaca North Elementary, Ithaca.

HURON COUNTY: Laker Elementary School, Pigeon.

INGHAM COUNTY: JW Sexton School (grades 7-8), Lansing.

KALAMAZOO COUNTY: Gull Lake Middle School, Richland; Vicksburg Middle School, Vicksburg.

KENT COUNTY: Grand Rapids Public Museum School, Grand Rapids; Our Savior Lutheran School, Grand
Rapids.

LENAWEE COUNTY: Clinton Elementary School, Clinton; Ruth McGregor Elementary, Sand Creek.

MACOMB COUNTY: Chesterfield Township Library, Chesterfield Township; Mt. Clemens Montessori Academy.

MUSKEGON COUNTY: Holton Middle School, Holton; Oehrli elementary, Ontague.

OAKLAND COUNTY: Greenfield Elementary, Beverly Hills; Bloomfield Township Public Library, Bloomfield
Hills; Madison Elementary School, Madison Heights; Muir Middle School, Milford; Novi high School, Novi; Oak
Park Preparatory Academy, Oak Park; Addams Elementary, Royal Oak; Northwood elementary School, Royal
Oak; Oakland Elementary School, Royal Oak; Pembroke Elementary, Troy; JIA-PTO, Waterford.

OTTAWA COUNTY: Blue Star Elementary School; Sandyview Elementary School, Holland; Our Homeschool,
Zeeland.

SAGINAW COUNTY: Saginaw Arts & Sciences Academy, Saginaw; Swan valley School District, Saginaw.

ST. CLAIR COUNTY: Marine City Middle School, Cottreville Township.

SHIAWASSE COUNTY: New Lothrop Elementary School, New Lothrup.

TUSCULOA COUNTY: Millington Junior High School, Millington.

VAN BUREN COUNTY: Hartford Middle School, Hartford; North Shore Elementary School, South Haven.

WASHTENAW COUNTY: Manchester Middle School, Manchester; Heritage Elementary School, Saline.
WAYNE COUNTY: Brownstown Middle School, Brownstown Township; Durfee Middle School, Detroit; Summit
Academy, Flat Rock; Grandview Elementary, Livonia; Trombly Elementary School, Grosse Pointe Park;
Universal Learning Academy, Westland.

About Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC)

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation is the state’s marketing arm and lead advocate for
business development, job awareness and community and talent development with the focus on growing
Michigan’s economy. For more information on the MEDC and our initiatives, visit www.MichiganBusiness.org.
For Pure Michigan® tourism information, your trip begins at www.michigan.org. Visit Pure Michigan Talent
Connect at www.mitalent.org for more information on Michigan’s online marketplace for connecting job
seekers and employers. Join the conversation on: Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

###

If you would rather not receive future communications from Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
let us know by clicking here.
Michigan Economic Development Corporation, 300 N. Washington Square 3rd Floor, Lansing, MI 48913
United States
AQUAÇAI BOTTLED WATER QUALITY REPORT

EUROFUSION, S.A.
SECTOR LA VALDEZA, CAPIRA
PANAMA 0832-01235, PANAMA
1-888-944 AQUA
+507-269-2782

Introduction

AQUAÇAI is natural artesian water bottled at source and extracted from an aquifer deep
below the forest surface, located at La Valdeza de Capira in the Republic of Panama. This
water naturally absorbs minerals by slowly filtering through volcanic rocks and it is bottled
without direct human contact.

AQUAÇAI meets all local, federal, state and international bottled water regulations and
our company Eurofusion, S.A. is registered with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
(FDA). These extremely high standards of quality are a warranty for the safety of our
water provided to the consumer.

AQUAÇAI TYPICAL MINERAL ANALYSIS REPORT:
Report Date: 30-March-2015 Sampling Period: 15-January-2015

Typical Mineral Analysis AQUAÇAI Water
Bicarbonate 150 mg/L
Calcium 32 mg/L
Chloride 8 mg/L
Fluoride 0.4 mg/L
Magnesium 3.9 mg/L
Sodium 26 mg/L
Silica 29 mg/L
Sulfate 24 mg/L
Potassium 0.9 mg/L
Nitrate ND
pH 6.77
Total Dissolved Solids 200 mg/L
Total Alkalinity as CaCO3 120 mg/L
Sodium per 8 oz Serving 6.1 mg
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA REQUIRES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION TO BE
PROVIDED TO BOTTLED WATER CONSUMERS, UPON REQUEST

EUROFUSION, S.A.
SECTOR LA VALDEZA, CAPIRA
PANAMA 0832-01235, PANAMA
+507-269-2782

Terminology:
“Statement of quality” (SOQ) – The standard (statement) of quality for bottled water is the
highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in a container of bottled water, as
established by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the California
Department of Public Health. The standards can be no less protective of public health than
the standards for public drinking water, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) or the California Department of Public Health.

“Public health goal (PHG)” – The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California Environmental
Protection Agency.

“Maximum contaminant level (MCL)” – The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in
drinking water, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or the
California Department of Public Health. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs as is
economically and technologically feasible.

“Primary drinking water standard” – MCLs for contaminants established by the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or the California Department of Public Health that
affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment
requirements.

FDA and State of California Standards

AQUAÇAI meets all FDA and CDPH water quality standards.

Our product has been thoroughly tested in accordance with federal and California
law. Our bottled water is a food product and can not be sold unless it meets the
standards established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the California
Department of Public Health. The following statements are required under California
law:

"Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least
small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily
indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential
health effects can be obtained by calling the United States Food and Drug Administration,
Food and Cosmetic Hotline (1-888-723-3366).”

"Some persons may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons, including, but not limited to, persons
with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ
transplants, persons with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly
persons, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These persons should seek
advice about drinking water from their health care providers. The United States
Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and
other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-
426-4791)."

"The sources of bottled water include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs,
and wells. As water naturally travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it
can pick up naturally occurring substances as well as substances that are present due to
animal and human activity.
Substances that may be present in the source water include any of the following:

1. Inorganic substances, including, but not limited to, salts and metals, that can be
naturally occurring or result from farming, urban storm water runoff, industrial or
domestic wastewater discharges, or oil and gas production.
2. Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources, including, but
not limited to, agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
3. Organic substances that are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum
production and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff,
agricultural application, and septic systems.
4. Microbial organisms that may come from wildlife, agricultural livestock operations,
sewage treatment plants, and septic systems.
5. Substances with radioactive properties that can be naturally occurring or be the
result of oil and gas production and mining activities."

“In order to ensure that bottled water is safe to drink, the United States Food and Drug
Administration (FDA), and the California State Department of Public Health (CDPH),
prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by
bottled water companies.”

California law requires a reference to FDA’s website for recalls:
http://www.fda.gov/opacom/7alerts.html
AQUAÇAI PRODUCT ANALYSISIS (All results reported in mg/L except as noted)
Report Date: 30-March-2015 Sampling Period: 15-January-2015
Product Aquaçai FDA SOQ
Inorganic Chemicals (IOCs)
Antimony ND 0.006
Arsenic ND 0.01
Barium 0.10 2
Beryllium ND 0.004
Bromate ND 0.010
Cadmium ND 0.005
Chlorine ND 4.0
Chloramine ND 4.0
Chlorine dioxide ND 0.8
Chlorite ND 1.0
Chromium ND 0.1
Cyanide ND 0.2
Fluoride 0.4 2.4
Lead ND 0.005
Mercury ND 0.002
Nickel ND 0.1
Nitrate-N ND 10
Nitrite-N ND 1
Total Nitrate + Nitrite ND 10
Selenium ND 0.05
Thallium ND 0.002
Secondary Inorganic Parameters
Aluminum ND 0.2
Chloride 8 250
Copper ND 1
Iron ND 0.3
Manganese ND 0.05
Silver ND 0.1
Sulfate 24 No standard
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) 200 500
Zinc ND 5
Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs)
1,1,1-Trichloroethane ND 0.2
1,1,2-Trichloroethane ND 0.005
1,1-Dichloroethylene ND 0.007
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene ND 0.07
1,2-Dichloroethane ND 0.005
1,2-Dichloropropane ND 0.005
Benzene ND 0.005
Carbon tetrachloride ND 0.005
cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene ND 0.07
trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene ND 0.1
Ethylbenzene ND 0.7
Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) ND 0.005
Monochlorobenzene ND 0.1
o-Dichlorobenzene ND 0.6
p-Dichlorobenzene ND 0.075
Product Aquaçai FDA SOQ
Volatile Organic Chemicals (Cont’d.)
Haloacetic acids, total (HAA5) ND 0.06
Styrene ND 0.1
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane ND No standard
Tetrachloroethylene ND 0.005
Toluene ND 1
Trichloroethylene ND 0.005
Vinyl chloride ND 0.002
Xylenes (total) ND 10
Bromodichloromethane ND No standard
Chlorodibromomethane ND No standard
Chloroform ND No standard
Bromoform 0.0027 No standard
Total Trihalomethanes 0.0027 0.08
Semivolatile Organic Chemicals (SVOCs)
Benzo(a)pyrene ND 0.0002
Di(2-ethyhexyl)adipate ND 0.4
Di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate ND 0.006
Hexachlorobenzene ND 0.001
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene ND 0.05
Total Recoverable Phenolics ND 0.001
Synthetic Organic Chemicals (SOCs)
2,4,5-TP (Silvex) ND 0.05
2,4-D (Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid) ND 0.07
Alachlor ND 0.002
Aldicarb ND No standard
Aldicarb sulfone ND No standard
Aldicarb sulfoxide ND No standard
Atrazine ND 0.003
Carbofuran ND 0.04
Chlordane ND 0.002
Dalapon ND 0.2
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) ND 0.0002
Dinoseb ND 0.007
-8
Dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) ND 3x10
Diquat ND 0.02
Endothall ND 0.1
Endrin ND 0.002
Ethylene dibromide (EDB) ND 0.00005
Glyphosate ND 0.7
Heptachlor ND 0.0004
Heptachlor epoxide ND 0.0002
Lindane ND 0.0002
Methoxychlor ND 0.04
Oxamyl (vydate) ND 0.2
Pentachlorophenol ND 0.001
Picloram ND 0.5
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ND 0.0005
Simazine ND 0.004
Toxaphene ND 0.003
ND = Not Detected
Product Aquaçai FDA SOQ
Water Properties
Color ND 15 Units
Turbidity 0.1 5 NTU
pH 6.77 No standard
Odor 1 3 TON

Radiological Contaminants
Gross alpha particle activity (pCi/L) ND 15 pCi/L
Gross beta particle and photon activity (pCi/L) ND 50 pCi/L
Total Radium (pCi/L) ND 5 pCi/L
Uranium ND 0.030

Microbiological Contaminants
Total Coliform Absent Not detected
Heterotrophic Plate Count < 1 cfu/ml No standard

Additional Regulated Contaminants
Perchlorate ND 0.002
Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ND No standard
Naphthalene ND No standard

Other Parameter
Total Alkalinity as CaCO3 120 No standard
Bicarbonate 150 No standard
Calcium 32 No standard
Magnesium 3.9 No standard
Sodium 26 No standard
Potassium 0.9 No standard
Specific Conductance umhos/cm) 320 No standard
ND = Not Detected
Below are general directions, including information
on the nearest parking option (City of Lansing N.

The Christman Building Capitol Avenue Parking Ramp).

There are also other parking options available, including nearby meters (90 min.
max.). For more information on downtown Lansing parking options, please see the
City of Lansing’s downtown parking map located at http://www.cityoflansingmi.
The Christman Company com/Lansing/pnd/parking/docs/downtown_map.pdf
The Christman Building
208 N. Capitol Avenue
Lansing, MI 48933-1357 FROM THE EAST
Ph. 517-482-1488
n Take I-96 W toward Lansing
Fax 517-482-3520 n Merge onto I-496 W via Exit 106B toward Downtown Lansing
n Take Exit 7A toward Grand Avenue/Downtown
LOCATION n Take the Grand Avenue exit ramp toward Downtown
The Christman Building is located in downtown Lansing, n Turn Right onto S. Grand Avenue
approximately one block northeast of the Michigan Capitol,
on the east side of Capitol Avenue, between Ionia Street
n Turn Left onto Shiawassee Street, turn Left onto Capitol Avenue
and Ottawa Street. Traffic is one-way going south on Capitol n Turn Left into the parking structure at the corner of Ionia Street
Avenue. and Capitol Avenue
n Proceed toward The Christman Building at 208 N. Capitol Avenue
GENERAL BUILDING INFORMATION
Christman’s reception area is located on the 4th floor, and
is accessible by elevator or stair. Elevator access via the N. FROM THE WEST
Capitol Avenue entrance requires going down a half-story stair
n Take I-96 W toward Lansing.
to the elevator lobby; a barrier-free, grade level entrance is n Merge onto I-496 E via Exit 95 toward Downtown Lansing
located at the rear of the building. It is accessible via the alley n Take Exit 6 toward Pine-Walnut Streets – Downtown
immediately south of the building. n Stay straight to go onto W. Main Street
n Turn Left onto S. Walnut Street
Christman office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. There is a call box located on the
n Turn Right onto Shiawassee Street, turn Right onto Capitol Avenue
front and rear entrances for visitor use after hours or during n Turn Left into the parking structure at the corner of Ionia Street
office hours to gain access to the rear building entrance for and Capitol Avenue
deliveries. n Proceed toward The Christman Building at 208 N. Capitol Avenue
VISITOR PARKING
Visitor parking is via nearby meters, in the City of Lansing FROM THE NORTH
North Capitol Parking Structure located one block north of
n From US-127 S, merge onto I-496 W toward Downtown Lansing
the building, or in the City of Lansing parking lot at the corner n Take Exit 7A toward Grand Avenue/Downtown
of Seymour Street and Shiawassee Street, approximately one n Take the Grand Avenue exit ramp toward Downtown
block northwest of the building. Handicap accessible parking is n Turn Right onto S. Grand Avenue
in the rear of the building. n Turn Left onto Shiawassee Street, turn Left onto Capitol Avenue
DELIVERIES
n Turn Left into the parking structure at the corner of Ionia Street
Small hand deliveries may be made using the front (N. and Capitol Avenue
Capitol Avenue) entrance; larger deliveries (those requiring n Proceed toward The Christman Building at 208 N. Capitol Avenue
a two-wheel dolly or pushcart of any type) must be made by
accessing the rear grade entrance of the building through the FROM THE SOUTH
alley immediately south of the building. (The grade entrance
elevator will take you to the lower level, where you may
n From US-127 N, take I-496 toward Downtown Lansing
transfer to the main elevator to gain access to our fourth
n Take Exit 7A toward Grand Avenue/Downtown.
floor reception area) n Take the Grand Avenue exit ramp toward Downtown
n Turn Right onto S. Grand Avenue
n Turn Left onto Shiawassee Street, turn Left onto Capitol Avenue
n Turn Left into the parking structure at the corner of Ionia Street
and Capitol Avenue
n Proceed toward The Christman Building at 208 N. Capitol Avenue
WILLOW ST.

GRAND RIVER AVE.

LARCH ST.
CAPITOL AVE.

CEDAR ST.
OAKLAND AVE.

WASHINGTON AVE.
CHESTNUT ST.

SEYMOUR ST.
WALNUT ST.
PINE ST.

SAGINAW ST.
43
CAPITOL AVE.
SEYMOUR ST.

GRAND RIVER
LAPEER ST.

City of Lansing
GRAND AVE.

L A R C H S T.
CEDAR ST.
GENESEE ST.
N. Capitol Avenue
SHIAWASSEE ST.
SHIAWASSEE ST. Parking Ramp
IONIA ST.

THE CHRISTMAN BUILDING
PINE ST.

OTTAWA ST.
MICHIGAN AVE.

ALLEGAN ST.
D R.
M U SEU M
G R A ND AV E.
C A PI TO L AV E.

CEDA R ST.
TOWNSEND ST.

WASHTENAW ST.
L A R C H S T.
WA S H I N G T O N A V E .

KALAMAZOO ST.

LENAWEE ST.
WALNUT ST.
PINE ST.

EXIT 7
ST. JOSEPH HWY.

496
MAIN ST.
EXIT 6
GM GRAND RIVER
ASSEMBLY PLANT
RED
CED
AR
RIV
ER

Map courtesy of the Greater Lansing Convention and Visitors Bureau
Certificate of Membership
THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT

Eurofusion, S.A.
IS A MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL BOTTLED WATER ASSOCIATION
IN THE I NT ’L B OTTLER CATEGORY
AND IS ENTITLED TO ALL RESPECTIVE MEMBERSHIP SERVICES
DURING THE YEAR 2015

11518
MEMBERSHIP
IDENTIFICATION NUMBER

CHAIRMAN, IBWA PRESIDENT, IBWA
SUPREME RABINATE OF THE ORTHODOX COMMUNITY OF MONTERREY N.L. MEXICO

Rabbi Moshe Kaiman Chief Rabbi O.B.M. Tevet 27, 5772
Rabbi Z. L. Libersohn Communitary Rabbi

Mexico, July 1st 2015
Tamuz 14, 5775

KASHRUT CERTIFICATION

To whom it may concern:

This is to certify that the following product:

NATURAL ARTESIAN WATER AQUACAI

Produced, bottled and distributed by EUROFUSION S.A. in their plant at Capira, Panama, C. A.; using
AQUACAI or any other brand name are Kosher-Pareve for year round including Pessach, Since
no any additive neither mineral or salt is added during any time by the process in several weights and
presentations are under our full and absolute supervision.

This certificate allows legally and according the Jewish religious laws to bear our Kashrut seal as shown
below on each packing unit.

Valid until June 30th 2016 and will be renewed in that time, if the Kashrut conditions will be continuing.

KOSHER
Respectfully
PAREVE

PESSACH

RABBI Z.L. LIBERSOHN
KASHRUT MANAGER

Obs.: Original hand signed Kashrut Certificate must be required for official purposes.

Canadá 207, Col. V. Hermosa, Monterrey N. L., México C.P.64620
Tel. Fax: (Intl .52) (81) 8346-1728 Off. Dir. - 8348-8876
Nextel . (55) 10-40-72-06 ID. 52*150359*1
libersohnkosher@hotmail.com libersohnkosher@prodigy.net.mx
libersohnkosher@yahoo.com.mx www.monterreykosher.com
SUPREME RABINATE OF THE ORTHODOX COMMUNITY OF MONTERREY N.L. MEXICO

Rabbi Moshe Kaiman Chief Rabbi O.B.M. Tevet 27, 5772
Rabbi Z. L. Libersohn Communitary Rabbi

Obs.: Original hand signed Kashrut Certificate must be required for official purposes.

Canadá 207, Col. V. Hermosa, Monterrey N. L., México C.P.64620
Tel. Fax: (Intl .52) (81) 8346-1728 Off. Dir. - 8348-8876
Nextel . (55) 10-40-72-06 ID. 52*150359*1
libersohnkosher@hotmail.com libersohnkosher@prodigy.net.mx
libersohnkosher@yahoo.com.mx www.monterreykosher.com
This document was created with Win2PDF available at http://www.win2pdf.com.
The unregistered version of Win2PDF is for evaluation or non-commercial use only.
Lansing 1
Paula D. Cunningham
Administration
Building (ADM)
Community 2 LCC Board Room

College 3 Early Learning Children’s
Community (ELCC)

Downtown 4 Health and Human
Services Building (HHS)

Campus
LCC Parking Ramp
5 (StarCard and Cash)
Rogers-Carrier
6 House (RCH)
Herrmann Conference
7 Center Complex (HCC)
8 Dart Auditorium (DRT)
9 Gannon Building (GB)
Mackinaw
10 Building (MB)
Abel B. Sykes, Jr.
11 Technology and
Learning Center (TLC)
Arts and
12 Sciences (A&S)
3 blocks west:
corner of Chestnut Continental
and Saginaw Streets 13 Building (CB)
LCC Outside
14 Amphitheater
15 University Center (UC)
North Capitol Ramp
16 (StarCard and Cash)
Academic and
17 Office Facility (AOF)
Washington Court
18 Place (WCP)
Shigematsu
19 Memorial Garden
Michigan Veteran’s
20 Memorial

A, B, G, H, J, L, M, W
Employee Parking Lots
C Child Care Parking Only
D Special Permit Parking Lot
E Accessible Parking Lot
U,F Student Parking Lots
Student Employee
I Parking Lot
Special Permit/
Z Accessible Parking Lot
Lansing 1
Paula D. Cunningham
Administration
Building (ADM)
Community 2 LCC Board Room

College 3 Early Learning Children’s
Community (ELCC)

Downtown 4 Health and Human
Services Building (HHS)

Campus
LCC Parking Ramp
5 (StarCard and Cash)
Rogers-Carrier
6 House (RCH)
Herrmann Conference
7 Center Complex (HCC)
8 Dart Auditorium (DRT)
9 Gannon Building (GB)
Mackinaw
10 Building (MB)
Abel B. Sykes, Jr.
11 Technology and
Learning Center (TLC)
Arts and
12 Sciences (A&S)
3 blocks west:
corner of Chestnut Continental
and Saginaw Streets 13 Building (CB)
LCC Outside
14 Amphitheater
15 University Center (UC)
North Capitol Ramp
16 (StarCard and Cash)
Academic and
17 Office Facility (AOF)
Washington Court
18 Place (WCP)
Shigematsu
19 Memorial Garden
Michigan Veteran’s
20 Memorial

A, B, G, H, J, L, M, W
Employee Parking Lots
C Child Care Parking Only
D Special Permit Parking Lot
E Accessible Parking Lot
U,F Student Parking Lots
Student Employee
I Parking Lot
Special Permit/
Z Accessible Parking Lot
Latin  Marketing  Solutions  Purchase  Order  

Latin  Marketing  Solutions
100  Fillmore  Street
3rd  Floor
Denver,  CO  80206

Customer  Name   State  of  Michigan
Billing  Address 1101  Sanginaw  Street  #101
Flint,  MI  48502

Shipping  Address   2712  N  Saginaw  Street
Flint,  MI  48505

Purchasing  Phone  # (810)  766.7346
Shipping  Phone  # (810)  235.5555

Purchase  Order  # 7778827
Date  of  Order 4/20/16
Date  for  Delivery 5/31/16

       60,000,000  Units  will  be  deliver  to  New  Jersey  and  then  transported  from  New  Jersey  to  the  Final    Destination  -­‐  Michigan
Delivery  of  exact  amount  will  take  place  wirth  Buyers  approval  every  30  calendar  days  as  needed
All  Sales  are  Final  -­‐  Pre-­‐Payment  is  Necessary  -­‐  Payment  shall  be  received  through  Michigan's  Vendors  Portal

PRODUCT   #  of  Cases Price  per  Case Price    Extended  
Aquacai  24/11.97  oz  354  ml 0 14.36 0
Aquacai  24/20  oz  591  ml 0 15.36 0
Aquacai  12/33  oz  1L 5000000 11.64 58200000

Purchase  Order  Total   58200000
2014 MICHIGAN’S AMERICORPS
20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 * LANSING, MI

AGENDA
9:45-10:15am Registration at Lansing Community College Dart Auditorium
*Free parking is available across from Dart Auditorium in Lot 505
(505 N. Capitol Ave., Lansing, MI, 48933)

9:45-10:30am Continental Breakfast / Networking Reception
*Join AmeriCorps members, alums, and friends of AmeriCorps for this
informal networking opportunity to learn more about how members are
“getting things done” in communities throughout Michigan.

10:30am 20th Anniversary Program
*Featuring Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley & Flint Mayor Dayne Walling

11:30am Simultaneous Swearing-In Ceremony (Dart Auditorium)

11:45am Program Concludes

12:00-1:30pm Key Stakeholder Luncheon
(Christman Building, 208 N. Capitol Ave, Lansing, MI 48933)
*Join MCSC Commissioners, nonprofit organizational leaders,
AmeriCorps Alums, and other key stakeholders to share a meal and
celebrate the many accomplishments of AmeriCorps members past
and present.

For questions, please contact Jocelyn Davis at davisj31@michigan.gov or (517) 241-3606.
2014 MICHIGAN’S AMERICORPS
20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 * 10:30AM-12:00PM
LCC DART AUDITORIUM

PROGRAM AGENDA
9:45-10:15am Registration at Lansing Community College Dart Auditorium
*Free parking is available across from Dart Auditorium in Lot 505
(505 S. Capitol Ave., Lansing, MI, 48933)

9:45-10:30am Continental Breakfast / Networking Reception

10:30am 20th Anniversary Program
*Featuring Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley & Flint Mayor Dayne Walling

11:30am Simultaneous Swearing-In Ceremony

12:00pm Program Concludes

SERVICE PROJECT AGENDA (OPTIONAL)
Project in partnership with the MCSC, Power of We Consortium, & the Ingham Co. Land Bank Garden Program

12:00pm Divide into project teams / Travel to project sites
*Project participants will meet in front of Dart Auditorium and board buses
on Capitol Ave. All projects will take place in Lansing.

Upon Arrival at Site Lunch / Overview of Host Site / Instructions for Service

1:00-3:45pm Service at various project sites throughout Lansing

3:45pm Wrap Up / Clean Up / Reflection at Service Site

4:00pm Members will be transported back to Lansing Community College

4:15pm Depart for Home

For questions, please contact Jocelyn Davis at davisj31@michigan.gov or (517) 241-3606.
Aquaçai Artesian Bottled Water
Order and Delivery Contract
This contract date April 22th, 2016 is by and between Latin Marketing Solutions with
the following address 100 Fillmore Street; Denver, Colorado 80206; and The City of
Flint-Michigan 1101 S Saginaw Street; Flint, Michigan 48502. This contract is for and
in consideration of the mutual covenants and agreements contained herein, the receipt
and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the parties hereto, intending to be
legally bound, agree as follows:

1. Effective -­‐ Dates: 5/30/16 – 11/30/2017

2. Services: Latin Marketing Solutions will provide the following:

a. Latin Marketing Solutions will provide Sixty Million (60,000,000) units of
Aquaçai Artesian Panamanian 33oz or 1 Litter bottle Water thirty days after
payment is received. Cargo will be delivered to 2712 N Sanginaw Street; Flint
MI 48505. Delivery of future orders can take place with buyer’s approval every
thirty-calendar days as needed.

b. Latin Marketing Solutions will oversee transportation and delivery to its
final destination in Michigan.

c. Latin Marketing Solutions’ Director of Operations and the President/CEO
will oversee all aspects of the operation personally, in order to provide personal
attention to The City of Flint-Michigan.

d. All certifications including the FDA, Halal Certificate, Kosher Certificate,
U.S. Arm Forces letter, IBWA, and a NSF Report together with more
information on this product, are been provided as separate documents to this
contract.

e. Products are available in the following sizes, as well as, prices for each
product:

1. 24 Bottles /11.97oz = $14.36 per case = ¢ .60 per bottle.

2. 24 Bottles / 20oz = $15.36 per case = ¢ .64 per bottle

3. 12 Bottles / 33oz 1 Litter = $11.64 per case = ¢ .97 per bottle.

f. Latin Marketing Solutions offer this product with a minimum order of Thirty
Million (30,000,000) units on any future sub-contract.

1
g. Latin Marketing Solutions will be available to The City of Flint-Michigan via
phone, email and in person when necessary, in order to address any and all of
The City of Flint-Michigan’s reasonable requests or issues with Latin
Marketing Solutions’ Staff or the service provided to The City of Flint-
Michigan as needed. Our goal is to assist The City of Flint-Michigan;
therefore, we will accommodate all reasonable requests as promptly as
possible.

h. Latin Marketing Solutions performs this contract as an independent
contractor, not as an employee(s) of The City of Flint-Michigan.

3. Financial Settlement & Other Requirements:

a. The City of Flint-Michigan will pay the amount of Fifty Eight Million Two
hundred Thousand Dollars ($58,200,000.00) this first shipment that
represents the total amount due for Sixty Million (60,000,000) units of
Aquaçai Artesian Panamanian 33oz or 1 Litter bottle Water, that will be
delivered thirty days after payment is made and will reach its final
destination identified as 2712 N Sanginaw Street; Flint MI 48505.

b. A sub-contract will be generated for any further order and shipment, which
will be ruled by all requirements and clauses of this contract.

c. This contract in between Latin Marketing Solutions and The City of Flint-
Michigan must be signed and payment must submitted no later than Monday
May 9th, 2016 in order to generate the product and start the delivery process.
If an extension is required, please contact Latin Marketing Solutions
A.S.A.P. at info@latinmarketingsolutions.com or call (303) 525.7841 at your
convenience. All orders must be prepaid, and in order to make it easier on
your part we are register with The City of Flint-Michigan as a vendor
at https://mainfacsp.dmb.state.mi.us/payee/servlet/us.mi.state.eft.WelcomeSe
rvlet under "Latin Marketing Solutions" payee #2454348772.

4. Representations, Warranties and Covenants:

a. Latin Marketing Solutions hereby represents and warrants that it has full
power and authority to enter into this Agreement and to engage in the
transaction, and that this Agreement is a valid obligation of Latin Marketing
Solutions and is binding upon Latin Marketing Solutions.

b. The City of Flint-Michigan hereby represents and warrants that it has full
power and authority to enter into this Agreement and to engage in the
transaction, and that this Agreement is a valid obligation of The City of Flint-
Michigan and is binding upon The City of Flint-Michigan.

2
c. During the term of the Agreement, The City of Flint-Michigan will obey and
comply with all present ordinances, rules and regulations of all governmental
authorities in connection with our services.

5. Miscellaneous:

1. Third Party Beneficiaries: This Agreement does not confer any Rights or
Benefits upon any persons or entities other than Latin Marketing Solutions and
The City of Flint-Michigan and their permitted, respective successors and
assigns. There are no third party beneficiaries.

2. Relationship of the Parties: Nothing contained in this Agreement will be
deemed to constitute Latin Marketing Solutions and The City of Flint-Michigan
as partners or joint ventures with each other. Each party acknowledges and
agrees that it neither has nor will give the appearance or impression of having
any legal authority to bind or commit the other party in any way.

3. Entire Agreement and Modification: No prior or contemporaneous oral or
written promises or representations will be binding on the parties hereto. This
Agreement will not be amended or changed except by written agreement signed
by both parties thereto.

4. Assignment: Neither this Agreement nor any part hereof shall be transferred,
conveyed or assigned by The City of Flint-Michigan or Latin Marketing
Solutions without the prior mutual written consent of each party.

5. Applicable Law: This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in
accordance with the laws of the State of Colorado.

6. Force Majeure: The failure of any party hereto to comply with the terms and
conditions hereof because of a “Force Majeure Occurrence” shall not be
deemed a breach of this Agreement. “Force Majeure Occurrence” shall be
defined to include, without limitation an act of God, strike, labor disputes, war,
fire, earthquake, acts of public enemies, acts of terrorism, epidemic, action of
federal, state or local governmental authorities or an event or reason beyond the
reasonable control of a party. In the event of a cancellation or delay of the
Merchandising Services for any period of time due to a Force Majeure
Occurrence, each party shall be relieved of its obligations hereunder with
respect to the services so prevented. Meaning that The City of Flint-Michigan
will not pay Latin Marketing Solutions for the time the Merchandising Services
were interrupted, and Latin Marketing Solutions’ Agreement with The City of
Flint-Michigan will not be terminated.

3
7. No Waiver of Rights: If either party fails to enforce any of the provisions of
this Agreement or any rights or fails to exercise any election provided in the
Agreement, it will not be considered to be a waiver of those provisions, rights
or elections or in any way affect the validity of this Agreement. The failure of
either party to exercise any of these provisions, rights or elections will not
preclude or prejudice such party from later enforcing or exercising the same or
any other provision, right or election which it may have under this Agreement.
8. Invalidity: If any term, provision, covenant or condition of the Agreement is
held by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, void or unenforceable,
the remainder of this agreement will remain in full force and effect and will in
no way be affected, impaired or invalidated.
9. Notices: All notices given hereunder shall be in writing and shall be deemed to
have been duly given if delivered personally with receipt acknowledged or sent
by registered or certified mail or equivalent, if available, return receipt
requested, or by facsimile, or by nationally recognized overnight courier for
next day delivery, addressed or sent to the parties at the addresses set forth
herein with a copy to Latin Marketing Solutions 100 Fillmore Street; Denver,
Colorado 80206; Attn: Legal Department.

ACCEPTED AND AGREED as of the date and year first written bellow:

Latin Marketing Solutions EIN# 45-4348372
Name: Manuel M. Caballero
Title: President/CEO
Email: Info@latinMarketingSolutions.com
Tel: (303) 525.7841

Signature:
Date:

The City of Flint-Michigan
Name:
Title:
Email:
Tel:
Signature:

Date:

4
Executive Report
November, 2015

CEO Update
Steve Arwood

The new program and fiscal year has started. With the New Year, we are going to provide this report on a monthly
basis. The purpose is to give you quick hits on our core program activities as well as legislative updates. Your
comments and suggestions on content are always welcome.

Attached is the final 2016 MEDC focus. We are off to a good start and I am proud of our team and the way they
handled and finished 2015. It was a strong year for economic development in Michigan. At our next Executive
Committee meeting we will cover 2015 results and talk about what was strong and where we can get stronger.

Thank you for your continued support.

COO Update
Jen Nelson, Lynne Feldpausch, Amanda Bright McClanahan

Operations:
• The MEDC and MSHDA community development teams are working on a proposal to ensure more integrated
customer service. For over the past 15 years, both the MEDC and MSHDA have been working in the
community development space. Both agencies provide similar technical assistance and funding that has often
created confusion for our customers. Strides have been made for better alignment of funding sources but
ultimately the best way to serve the customer is to have one point of contact, one application process, and to
work with a single entity. For the most effective and efficient delivery of services in support of vibrant
communities and in keeping with the Governor’s charge to reinvent our government and restore our cities, the
teams are proposing to realign all community development services into one unit called TED Community
Development. The launch is expected in January 2016.
• Reduced suite space at Cadillac Place as of October 31, 2015 (estimated savings in excess of $110000/year); staff
redirected to partner locations or home based.
• Transition of web services to DTMB (estimated savings approximately $700000/year in administrative cost);
ongoing content and contract management services absorbed into remaining staff. RFP for Travel Michigan
site forthcoming.
• MEDC corporate benefit renewal for 2016: health increased by 6.9% (2% of which is ADA associated
fees). This will be an approximate even impact with recent reductions; no benefit changes recommended. All
other employer paid benefits remained the same.
Budget:
• The Budget and Finance Administration team is currently working to close the 2015 books for the
MEDC. Preliminary estimates indicate that the remaining reserve funds will likely exceed the $20 million
requirement currently budgeted, allowing for some contingency to support anticipated revenue losses in 2016
associated with the “free play wager” issue. However, final numbers will not be available until the end of
November.
Legislative Report
Jeremy Hendges

• Road Funding Update. Road funding debate continues in the state legislature. The week of October 19, 2015
the House passed a roads funding proposal that directs $1.2 billion towards roads from a combination of $600
million in new revenue generated from increases to registration fees and gas tax and another $600 million
coming from dedicating current general fund dollars towards road funding. There were no cuts identified to
address where the $600 million in general fund would come from, it would be determined in the budget
process. Legislative leadership and the Governor’s office continue to discuss how to establish a proposal that
can be mutually agreed upon. I would anticipate if there is to be a solution in the near future it would be
somewhere between the House passed proposal and the previously discussions of creating a funding proposal
generating $800 million new revenue and the dedication of $400 million in general fund dollars.
• Fiscal Year 2017 Budget. The MEDC is participating within the TED family as part of the budget process for
FY 17. As part of this process we are working diligently to ensure that the state funding for the MSF remains
stable for FY 17. We are also looking to rebalance the organizational funding so that staff needed to operate
general fund programs are supported by general fund dollars. Additionally, we are aggressively looking to
eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting requirements that have been part of the budget process
previously.
• Michigan Investment Program (SB 200). Sen. Booher introduced legislation earlier this spring that would
create a new program to be operated by the MSF/MEDC. This program would involve the MSF/MEDC in the
backing of investment portfolios in local stock market exchanges that were recently created by the legislature.
Additionally, this legislation would authorize the MSF/MEDC to support the creation of local exchanges.
There are a number of concerns that we have with this legislation that have been communicated to the
Senator. Those concerns include lack of identified funding to pay for this program, lack of current expertise at
the MEDC to administer such programs and investments, and the legality of the state both regulating these
local exchanges and having a vested interest on items being traded on these exchanges.
• Michigan Early Stage Investment Act (HB 4195, 4196 & 4365). Though the MEDC does not administer this
program, we are the lead agency on these bills. The legislation would end any new venture capital
investments through the Michigan Early Stage Investment Act. The first $140 million in returns would be
directed towards repaying the general fund for the dollars used to support this program. If there are any
returns beyond the $140 million they would flow to the 21st Century Jobs Trust Fund. These bills are moving
through the Senate currently and expected to be on the Governor’s desk soon. The MEDC has taken a
supportive position on this legislation.
• Procurement and Technical Assistance Centers (PTACs). The MSF budget for 2016 included a 50% reduction
of funding for the support of local PTACs across the state and included a RFP process to establish a fair and
unbiased process to determine how the limited dollars could most efficiently be delivered. The RFP process
resulted in the recommendation of awarding five PTACs the remaining dollars. Seven previously existing
PTACs would not receive state funding beyond Oct. 31, 2015 as a result of this decision. Significant legislative
concern was raised as a result of this decision and we have continued to work with legislators to address their
concerns. We are currently working through this issue with legislators and have identified additional dollars
that we could use a short-term solution to keep the PTACs who were not awarded funding through the RFP
additional time to keep the doors open while we discuss a longer term plan for this program.
Projects of Note
Katharine Czarnecki/Community Development

Gateway Project/East Lansing

From left: Tom Kuschinski, president, DTN; Katharine Czarnecki, director of community development for the MEDC; Colin Cronin, vice-president, DTN; Marilyn Crowley,
team specialist in community development, MEDC; East Lansing Mayor Nathan Triplett; East Lansing City Manager George Lahanas.

Groundbreaking event for Gateway project in East Lansing, MI. Representatives of Lansing-based DTN Management,
the MEDC and the City of East Lansing gathered recently for a groundbreaking at the 300 Grand project at 300 W.
Grand River. The building, to include 6,500 square feet of retail and 39 two-bedroom apartments, will open for
residents in the fall of 2016. Total capital investment for Phase III is approximately $8.5 million.

City of Eaton Rapids

The MEDC and Michigan State Housing Development Authority announced today the first hope-to-be-funded joint
project under the FY16 Public Spaces Community Places initiative. For FY16, MSHDA and MEDC jointly contributed
to the pool of funds to be used to support public space projects around the State. Katharine Czarnecki, pictured,
kicked-off the first water-related project with the Quiet Water Society along with the City of Eaton Rapids. The
campaign will support the project to replace the top half of the existing West Low-Head Dam in Eaton Rapids on the
Grand River with a step pool fish ramp and canoe/kayak river rapids element at suitable river flows.
Projects of Note
Vince Nystrom and Tony Vernaci/Business Development

• PMBC Collaboration with MEDC Business Attraction in India: The MEDC Global Business Development Team
partnered with Pure Michigan Business Connect (PMBC) teams to organize an investment mission to India the
week of October 4th, 2015. A strategic decision was made to approach Indian firms with turnkey services for
traditional FDI as well as US market entry or growth through joint venture partnerships -- the primary avenue
taken by Indian firms entering global markets. PMBC’s ability to offer custom joint venture partner searches is
game-changing for the overall Indian investment strategy by bringing a product to Indian firms that responds
exactly to their needs. This approach absolutely sets Michigan apart from other regional US and global
competitors. Overall, the trip generated a total of 41 new FDI, joint venture, and R&D project leads representing
about $50M in new direct investment potential. Since returning on 10/12, PMBC has engaged in 13 joint venture
and procurement searches and 256 Michigan company referrals. (Full briefing attached)

October 2015 Retention & Growth Hot Projects

Private Job % to
Company/Project Opportunity Name Investment Creation Win Region
Harvest Group, LLC -
Project Blue Sky -
Project Blue Sky FY2016 $34,900,000 140 50% West Michigan Region
SalesPad LLC -
Salespad LLC Expansion - FY2016 $3,850,000 100 65% West Michigan Region
Sport Truck USA, Sport Truck USA Inc. -
Inc. Expansion - FY2016 $4,000,000 95 45% Southwest Region
Duncan Aviation -
Duncan Aviation Expansion - FY2016 $6,500,000 150 65% Southwest Region

Leading Edge Aviation
Services - New
Leading Edge Development (Double
Aviation Services Hangar) - FY2016 $35,000,000 275 50% Northwest Region

ABB (Project Gateway)
ABB Flexible - Centralize Global Detroit Metro
Automation, Inc. Logistics - FY2016 $4,305,000 65 80% (Wayne/Detroit)
Lipari Foods, Inc. - Detroit Metro
Lipari Foods, Inc. Expansion - FY2016 $36,000,000 337 70% (Macomb/Warren)

SoFi - New to MI Detroit Metro
SoFi Expansion - FY2016 $2,000,000 348 80% (Wayne/Detroit)

Cargill Inc.- New East Michigan
Cargill Development - FY2016 $15,000,000 TBD 75% (Shiawassee)
Notable News
Emily Guerrant and David Lorenz

• Governor’s Economic and Education Summit: Save-the-dates are going out soon for the event, which will be
March 14-15 at the DeVos Place in Grand Rapids. The tentative agenda has been approved the Governor and
planning for the event is ongoing. This will be the second year that the traditional Governor’s Education
Summit and Governor’s Economic Summit are combined to one event to better focus on the talent
development discussion with both the business and education communities.
• Brainpower Campaign: The auto-focused talent campaign, We Run on Brainpower, has been successfully
launched through a series of events in August and September with the MEDC Auto Office and Governor
Snyder. We have received great feedback from the auto industry on the initiative, which is designed as an
awareness campaign to promote the high-tech nature of jobs and careers in the industry. MEDC is leading
efforts to get auto companies involved more directly through sponsorship
opportunities. www.brainpower.org
• Skilled Trades Campaign: The Governor and Stephanie Comai will have a news conference on Nov. 9 in
Grand Rapids as the kick-off to a series of media events coordinated between MEDC, Talent Investment
Agency, Michigan Department of Education and the Governor’s office to promote the skilled trades campaign
– an awareness effort targeting Michigan students on the need for skilled trades workers in Michigan, and the
high-paying, rewarding jobs associated with skilled trades careers. More media events will be scheduled for
December – March, leading up to another public discussion at the Governor’s Education and Economic
Summit. www.mitalent.org/skilled-trades
• Travel: Dave Lorenz is currently on sales missions in Germany (10/24-10/31) and the UK (11/1-11/7), including
attending World Trade Market in London. U.S. Ambassador Matthew Barzun, Sir Charles Montgomery,
Director-General of the UK Border Force, and Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske, US Customs and Border
Protection, will be stopping by the Great Lakes USA booth at the show and will have an opportunity to speak
with Dave. Dave also assisted with an event at the Detroit Lions game played at Wembly Stadium in London
on November 1. Additionally, in November, Travel Michigan will continue to hold a number of strategic
planning sessions with the state tourism industry, particularly around the roll-out of the passions platforms in
2016. Creative assets for Travel Michigan will begin to switch to winter imagery beginning in early November
with Take a Snow Day being the overarching message for the winter season. The Michigan Travel
Commission will meet Friday, November 13 in Battle Creek. Commissioners will tour Firekeepers casino prior
to the meeting.
STRATEGIC FOCUS
2016

MISSION VISION CUSTOMER FOCUSED
We market Michigan’s opportunity Michigan is a top 10 state for low We are committed to delivering
and provide the tools to assist job unemployment, GDP growth, per exceptional service and satisfaction
creation and investment. capita income, and talent retention as we engage with: businesses,
and growth. entrepreneurs, communities, and
local partners.

BUSINESS INVESTMENT: COMMUNITY VITALITY:
CORE FOCUS CORE FOCUS
1. Retain and grow Michigan businesses 1. Community developments that are catalytic
2. Maintain and strengthen our global automotive 2. Critical infrastructure creating job growth and
leadership sustainability
3. Grow value-added agriculture and natural resource 3. Expanding assistance to rural and small communities
economy 4. Technical economic development assistance for
4. Accelerate manufacturing innovation communities
5. Grow Michigan exports
6. Deliver key entrepreneurial and economic gardening
services
7. Aggressive national and international business
attraction
8. Protect and grow our defense-related industries

IMAGE
Improve Michigan’s image as a business location and travel destination by:
1. Further advance the 2. Extend the Pure 3. Strengthen talent’s
Pure Michigan brand Michigan brand across perception of the
to attract national and business, community, automotive and skilled
international visitors and partner marketing trades occupations
initiatives through the Brainpower
and Skilled Trades
attraction campaigns

KEY MEASURES
PRIVATE CUSTOMER
JOBS WAGES
INVESTMENT SATISFACTION

3266-150421
India/Michigan Trade and Investment Mission - October 5-9, 2015
MEDC Executive Committee Briefing (DRAFT 10-22-15)

The MEDC Global Business Development Team partnered with the MEDC Export and Pure
Michigan Business Connect (PMBC) teams to organize and execute a trade and investment
mission to India the week of October 4th, 2015

A strategic decision was made to approach Indian firms with turnkey services for traditional FDI
as well as US market entry or growth through joint venture partnerships -- the primary avenue
taken by Indian firms entering global markets. PMBC’s ability to offer custom JV partner
searches is game-changing for the overall Indian investment strategy by bringing a product to
Indian firms that responds exactly to their needs. This approach absolutely sets Michigan apart
from other regional US and global competitors.

Lt. Governor Calley accompanied the MEDC Team on the multi-city mission which included
stops in Mumbai, Pune and New Delhi. The cornerstone of the trip included an inaugural Global
Business Summit co-hosted by the MEDC, the State of Maharashtra Industrial Development
Corporation (MIDC) and the Confederation of Indian Industry in Mumbai on October 5th.

More than 75 attendees from 40 Indian companies attended the one-day summit designed to
support direct investment and trade opportunities between the two states. Experts in finance,
legal, real estate, taxation, and supply chain were on hand to participate in a series of panel
discussions, informational sessions and matchmaking opportunities designed to help Indian
companies establish a Michigan presence and develop strategic partnerships. Leaders from
Michigan companies participating in the concurrent MEDC-supported trade delegation also
joined the event to network and explore export and strategic partnership opportunities.

Highlights of the event included a panel discussion with India-based firms with significant
operations in Michigan. Key leaders form Mahindra, DiFacto Robotics and SMR (Motherson
Sumi) discussed their experience with establishing successful operations in Michigan’s asset-
rich automotive and manufacturing ecosystem. JP Morgan-Chase CEO also sat on a panel
discussing options for financing overseas expansion projects.

As part of the Summit, Mahindra brought 10 of their top suppliers to engage in a roundtable
discussion during a private lunch with Lt. Governor Calley. Mahindra’s Chief Purchase Officer,
Mr. Hemant Sikka, agreed to lead a delegation of these 10 suppliers to Michigan in March 2016
as part of the PMBC Pure Michigan Automotive Summit. These suppliers are all actively
evaluating US market expansion activity and a small group are considering co-locating together
in Michigan to be close to Mahindra.

The Global Business Development Summit was the first undertaken by the MEDC team. Budget
permitting, the team plans similar summits in other strategic international and domestic
markets to drive investment and more and better jobs to Michigan.
Following the Global Business Summit, the team was also hosted by General Motors India and
American Axle & Manufacturing (AAM) India. Both MI-headquartered firms organized a
roundtable discussion with 7-10 of their leading Tier-1 Indian suppliers positioned for US
market entry or growth projects.

The India Mission also included 10 individual meetings with new and existing prospects in
Mumbai, Pune and New Delhi. Among them; Hindalco, Bharat Forge, High-Tech Gears and
divisions of Tata.

Overall, the trip generated a total of 41 new FDI, joint venture, and R&D project leads
representing about $50M in new direct investment potential and 100 new jobs although some
FDI opportunities are not yet defined in terms of capital or employment. The team also met
with six pre-existing leads representing about $100M in potential near-term direct investment
and 200 new jobs. These new and existing values exclude any capital investment and job
growth associated with successful joint venture market entry projects. PMBC has engaged in
13 joint venture and procurement searches and 256 Michigan company referrals representing
at least $10M+ in new opportunities for Michigan companies.

These joint venture searches can be characterized as either “market-seeking” in which Indian
firms are seeking capability expansion to accelerate their US market growth or “technology-
seeking” in which Indian firms are seeking US partners that can bring capability expansion for
the Indian domestic or wider Asian markets. Market-seeking JVs will result in both new capital
and employment either within the MI-based partner or a newly created entity. Technology-
seeking JVs will create new overseas business for the MI-based partner much like an export
contract.

The above estimates also do not capture the potential R&D spending that may be directed
through LIFT, IACMI, or other direct industry partnerships. This approach to connect new R&D
projects to assets in Michigan was a topic in nearly every discussion and of strategic importance
to several Indian MNCs, especially global Aluminum leader, Hindalco. Hindalco’s subsidiary,
GA-based Novelis makes aluminum body components for the Aluminum F-150 out of its plant in
NY. Although they are not yet seeking to expand manufacturing capacity they have a great
interest in running new R&D projects through LIFT. This asset allows a deeper connection to MI
such that when they do need to expand manufacturing capacity, MI will be a more competitive
location.

MEDC will be tracking the ultimate economic activity generated through joint venture
connections or R&D projects in addition to traditional FDI in order to assess the impact of these
approaches. The market response to this approach clearly demonstrated a need for assistance
in navigating US market opportunities outside of only traditional FDI.
India General Economic Data:
• One of the fastest growing economies in the world (2014-2015: approximately 7.5
percent).
• India’s average GDP growth rate for the last five years: greater than 7 percent.
• Third largest investor base in the world.
• Second largest pool of certified professionals and highest number of qualified engineers
in the world.

Indian Foreign Direct Investment to Michigan (Inbound FDI):
• There are 66 Indian companies in Michigan, including:
o Mahindra and Mahindra Limited
o SMR Automotive (Motherson)
o Sakthi Automotive Group
o Tata Technologies
o HCL Group
• These companies employ more than 3,596 Michiganders in 69 locations.
• Between 2010 and 2014, Indian FDI into Michigan accounted for 14 new projects with
total capital investment of $231 million that created 3,036 jobs.

Recent Indian Investment in Michigan
• In 2012, Sakthi Automotive Group USA, Inc. announced plans to establish its first North
American manufacturing operation in Detroit; in April 2015, it announced plans to
expand that facility, investing $31.8 million and creating 350 new jobs.
• In May 2014, Mahindra North American Technical Center, Inc., whose parent is Mumbai-
based Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd., announced plans to open a new technical center in
Troy. The project was expected to generate nearly $2 million and create 112 new
professional and engineering services-related jobs.
• In May 2012, HCL America, a wholly-owned subsidiary of HCL Technologies
headquartered in India, announced plans to expand its existing Michigan operations by
establishing a new facility in the city of Jackson. The project was expected to generate a
total investment of $3.35 million and create 300 jobs.

Michigan Investment in India
Between 2010 and 2014, 10 Michigan companies invested in 38 FDI projects in India. These
projects represent a total capital investment of $2.4 billion and created 18,621 jobs.

Exports to India
• In 2014, Michigan companies exported $296.7 million in goods and materials to India.
• Between 2011 and 2014, Michigan exports to India increased by 38 percent, as
compared to 9 percent globally.
• Michigan is the 18th state in the U.S. for exports to India.
• Key Michigan exports to India include chemicals, machinery, computer and electronic
products and transportation equipment.
(SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce International Trade Administration)

Top Michigan export products to India
Chemicals $78.1 million 26.3% of total MI exports to India
Machinery, Except Electrical $77.8 million 26.2% “
Computer and Electronic Products $18.5 million 12.8% “
Transportation Equipment $84.4 million 6.2% “

Imports from India
• In 2014, Michigan imported $997 million in goods from India.
• Between 2011 and 2014, Michigan imports from India increased by 43 percent, as
compared to 17 percent globally.
• India ranks ninth in top import origin markets to Michigan.
NSF International

TM
789 N. Dixboro Rd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA
1-800.NSF.MARK | +1-734.769.8010 | www.nsf.org TEST REPORT
Live Safer

Send To: C0044855 Facility: C0044856
Mr. Michael Horth Eurofusion, S.A.
Eurofusion, S.A. La Valdeza, Capira
Aquilino de la Guardia Ave. & 47th Panama, Rep. of Panama
Ocean Business Plaza Panama
P.O. Box 0832-01235, Ste 16221 Panama
Panama

Result PASS Report Date 24-MAR-2015

Customer Name Eurofusion, S.A.
Tested To USFDA CFR Title 21 Part 165.110
Description Natural Artesian Water
Test Type Annual Collection
Job Number J-00165147
Project Number 9993108 (CLAA, MLAA)
Project Manager Anna Ciechanowski

Thank you for having your product tested by NSF International.

Please contact your Project Manager if you have any questions or concerns pertaining to this report.

Report Authorization Date 24-MAR-2015
Kerri Levanseler - Director, Chemistry Laboratory

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 1 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
General Information
Standard: USFDA CFR Title 21 Part 165.110
Lot Number: 101PA01551436
Product Description: Natural Artesian Water

Sample Id: S-0001123477
Description: Natural Artesian Water - 101PA01551436
Sampled Date: 02/09/2015
Received Date: 02/06/2015
Testing Parameter Reporting Limit Result FDA SOQ Units P/F

Physical Quality
Alkalinity as CaCO3 5 120 mg/LCaCO3
Color 5 ND 15 Color Unit Pass
Specific Conductance 10 320 umhos/cm
Corrosivity 0 -1
Hardness, Total 2 95 mg/LCaCO3
Odor, Threshold 1 1 3 TON Pass
Solids Total Dissolved 5 200 500 mg/L Pass
Turbidity 0.1 0.1 5 NTU Pass
pH 0.01 6.77
Temperature 0 21 deg. C
Bicarbonate 5 150 mg/L HCO3
Disinfection Residuals/Disinfection By-Products
Bromate 5 ND 10 ug/L Pass
Chloramine, Total 0.05 ND 4 mg/L Pass
Dichloramine 0.05 ND mg/L
Monochloramine 0.05 ND mg/L
Nitrogen trichloride 0.05 ND mg/L
Chlorite 10 ND 1000 ug/L Pass
Chlorine Dioxide 0.1 ND 0.8 mg/L Pass
Bromochloroacetic Acid 1 ND ug/L
Dibromoacetic Acid 1 ND ug/L
Dichloroacetic Acid 1 ND ug/L
Monobromoacetic Acid 1 ND ug/L
Monochloroacetic Acid 2 ND ug/L
Total Haloacetic Acid 1 ND 60 ug/L Pass
Trichloroacetic Acid 1 ND ug/L
Chlorine, Total Residual 0.05 ND 4 mg/L Pass
Radiologicals
Radium-226 1 ND pCi/L
Radium-226, Radium-228 Combined 1 ND 5 pCi/L Pass
Radium-228 1 ND pCi/L
Uranium 0.001 ND 0.03 mg/L Pass
P1 Gross Alpha 3 ND 15 pCi/L Pass
P1 Gross Beta 4 ND 50 pCi/L Pass
Inorganic Chemicals
Aluminum 0.01 ND 0.2 mg/L Pass
Antimony 0.0005 ND 0.006 mg/L Pass
Arsenic 0.002 ND 0.01 mg/L Pass
* Asbestos in Water (Ref: EPA 600/4-83/043,100.1)-Bureau Veritas
Amphibole Fibers 0.2 ND MFL
Chrysotile Fibers 0.2 ND MFL

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 2 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Sample Id: S-0001123477
Testing Parameter Reporting Limit Result FDA SOQ Units P/F

Inorganic Chemicals
Single Fiber Detection Limit 0.2 ND MFL
Barium 0.001 0.10 2 mg/L Pass
Beryllium 0.0005 ND 0.004 mg/L Pass
Bromide 10 29 ug/L
Cadmium 0.0002 ND 0.005 mg/L Pass
Calcium 0.02 32 mg/L
Chloride 2 8 250 mg/L Pass
Chromium (includes Hexavalent Chromium) 0.001 ND 0.1 mg/L Pass
Copper 0.001 ND 1 mg/L Pass
Cyanide, Total 0.01 ND 0.2 mg/L Pass
Fluoride 0.1 0.4 2.4 mg/L Pass
Iron 0.02 ND 0.3 mg/L Pass
Lead 0.001 ND 0.005 mg/L Pass
Magnesium 0.02 3.9 mg/L
Manganese 0.001 ND 0.05 mg/L Pass
Mercury 0.0002 ND 0.002 mg/L Pass
Nickel 0.001 ND 0.1 mg/L Pass
Nitrogen, Nitrate 0.05 ND 10 mg/L N Pass
Nitrogen, Nitrite 0.025 ND 1 mg/L N Pass
Total Nitrate + Nitrite-Nitrogen 0.02 ND 10 mg/L Pass
Potassium 0.5 0.9 mg/L
Selenium 0.002 ND 0.05 mg/L Pass
Silver 0.001 ND 0.1 mg/L Pass
Sodium 0.5 26 mg/L
Sulfate as SO4 0.5 24 mg/L
Surfactants (MBAS) 0.2 ND mg/L
Thallium 0.0002 ND 0.002 mg/L Pass
Phenolics 0.001 ND 0.001 mg/L Pass
Zinc 0.01 ND 5 mg/L Pass
Organic Chemicals
Diquat (Ref: EPA 549.2)
Diquat 0.4 ND 20 ug/L Pass
Endothall (Ref. EPA 548.1) - (ug/L)
Endothall 9 ND 100 ug/L Pass
Glyphosate (Ref: EPA 547)
Glyphosate 6 ND 700 ug/L Pass
Perchlorate (Ref: EPA 314.0)
Perchlorate 1 ND ug/L
2,3,7,8-TCDD (Ref: EPA 1613B)
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 10 ND 30 pg/L Pass
Carbamate Pesticides (Ref: 531.2)
3-Hydroxycarbofuran 1 ND ug/L
Aldicarb 1 ND ug/L
Aldicarb sulfone 1 ND ug/L
Aldicarb sulfoxide 1 ND ug/L
Carbaryl 1 ND ug/L
Carbofuran 1 ND 40 ug/L Pass
Methomyl 1 ND ug/L
Oxamyl 1 ND 200 ug/L Pass

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 3 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Sample Id: S-0001123477
Testing Parameter Reporting Limit Result FDA SOQ Units P/F

Organic Chemicals
Herbicides (Ref: EPA 515.3)
2,4,5-TP 0.2 ND 50 ug/L Pass
2,4-D 0.1 ND 70 ug/L Pass
Bentazon 0.2 ND ug/L
Dalapon 1 ND 200 ug/L Pass
DCPA Acid Metabolites 0.2 ND ug/L
Dicamba 0.1 ND ug/L
Dinoseb 0.2 ND 7 ug/L Pass
Pentachlorophenol 0.04 ND 1 ug/L Pass
Picloram 0.1 ND 500 ug/L Pass
Semivolatile Organic Compounds (Ref: EPA 525.2)
2,4 Dinitrotoluene 0.5 ND ug/L
2,6-Dinitrotoluene 0.5 ND ug/L
Alachlor 0.1 ND 2 ug/L Pass
Aldrin 0.1 ND ug/L
Atrazine 0.2 ND 3 ug/L Pass
Benzo(a)Pyrene 0.1 ND 0.2 ug/L Pass
bis(2-Ethylhexyl)adipate 2 ND 400 ug/L Pass
bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) 2 ND 6 ug/L Pass
Butachlor 0.2 ND ug/L
Butylbenzylphthalate 2 ND ug/L
Di-n-butylphthalate 2 ND ug/L
Dieldrin 0.5 ND ug/L
Diethylphthalate 2 ND ug/L
Dimethylphthalate 2 ND ug/L
Endrin 0.1 ND 2 ug/L Pass
EPTC 0.5 ND ug/L
Heptachlor 0.1 ND 0.4 ug/L Pass
Heptachlor Epoxide 0.1 ND 0.2 ug/L Pass
Hexachlorobenzene 0.1 ND 1 ug/L Pass
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 0.1 ND 50 ug/L Pass
Lindane 0.1 ND 0.2 ug/L Pass
Methoxychlor 0.1 ND 40 ug/L Pass
Metolachlor 0.1 ND ug/L
Metribuzin 0.1 ND ug/L
Molinate 0.1 ND ug/L
p,p'-DDE (4,4'-DDE) 0.5 ND ug/L
Propachlor 0.1 ND ug/L
Simazine 0.2 ND 4 ug/L Pass
Terbacil 0.5 ND ug/L
Volatiles: EDB and DBCP (Ref: EPA 504.1)
1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane (DBCP) 0.01 ND 0.2 ug/L Pass
Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) 0.01 ND 0.05 ug/L Pass
Volatiles: Regulated and Monitoring VOC's (Ref: EPA 524.2)
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane 0.5 ND ug/L
1,1,1-Trichloroethane 0.5 ND 200 ug/L Pass
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 0.5 ND ug/L
1,1,2-Trichloroethane 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
1,1-Dichloroethane 0.5 ND ug/L

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 4 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Sample Id: S-0001123477
Testing Parameter Reporting Limit Result FDA SOQ Units P/F

Organic Chemicals
1,1-Dichloroethylene 0.5 ND 7 ug/L Pass
1,1-Dichloropropene 0.5 ND ug/L
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
1,2,3-Trichloropropane 0.5 ND ug/L
1,2,3-Trimethylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 0.5 ND 70 ug/L Pass
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
1,2-Dichlorobenzene 0.5 ND 600 ug/L Pass
1,2-Dichloroethane 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
1,2-Dichloropropane 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
1,3-Dichlorobenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
1,3-Dichloropropane 0.5 ND ug/L
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 0.5 ND 75 ug/L Pass
2,2-Dichloropropane 0.5 ND ug/L
2-Chlorotoluene 0.5 ND ug/L
4-Chlorotoluene 0.5 ND ug/L
Benzene 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
Bromobenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
Bromochloromethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Bromodichloromethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Bromoform 0.5 2.7 ug/L
Bromomethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Carbon Tetrachloride 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
Chlorobenzene 0.5 ND 100 ug/L Pass
Chlorodibromomethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Chloroethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Chloroform 0.5 ND ug/L
Chloromethane 0.5 ND ug/L
cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 0.5 ND 70 ug/L Pass
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene 0.5 ND ug/L
Dibromomethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Dichlorodifluoromethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Ethyl Benzene 0.5 ND 700 ug/L Pass
Hexachlorobutadiene 0.5 ND ug/L
Isopropylbenzene (Cumene) 0.5 ND ug/L
m+p-Xylenes 1 ND ug/L
Methyl Ethyl Ketone 5 ND ug/L
Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) 0.5 ND ug/L
Methylene Chloride 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
n-Butylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
n-Propylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
Naphthalene 0.5 ND ug/L
o-Xylene 0.5 ND ug/L
p-Isopropyltoluene (Cymene) 0.5 ND ug/L
sec-Butylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
Styrene 0.5 ND 100 ug/L Pass
tert-Butylbenzene 0.5 ND ug/L
Tetrachloroethylene 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 5 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Sample Id: S-0001123477
Testing Parameter Reporting Limit Result FDA SOQ Units P/F

Organic Chemicals
Toluene 0.5 ND 1000 ug/L Pass
Total Trihalomethanes 0.5 2.7 80 ug/L Pass
Total Xylenes 0.5 ND 10000 ug/L Pass
trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene 0.5 ND 100 ug/L Pass
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene 0.5 ND ug/L
Trichloroethylene 0.5 ND 5 ug/L Pass
Trichlorofluoromethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 0.5 ND ug/L
Vinyl Chloride 0.5 ND 2 ug/L Pass
Chlorinated Pesticides and Organohalides by EPA 508.1
Chlordane 0.1 ND 2 ug/L Pass
Endrin 0.01 ND 2 ug/L Pass
PCB 1016 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
PCB 1221 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
PCB 1232 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
PCB 1242 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
PCB 1248 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
PCB 1254 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
PCB 1260 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
Total PCBs 0.1 ND 0.5 ug/L Pass
Toxaphene 0.1 ND 3 ug/L Pass
Miscellaneous
Tritium 700 ND pCi/L
Sr-89/90 2 ND pCi/L
Radon 200 ND pCi/L
Total Organic Carbon 0.1 0.1 mg/L
Silica as SiO2 0.2 29 mg/L

Sample Id: S-0001130751
Description: Natural Artestian Water - 101PA01551436
Sampled Date: 03/05/2015
Received Date: 03/04/2015
Testing Parameter Reporting Limit Result FDA SOQ Units P/F

Microbiological Quality
Heterotrophic Plate Count- 35C, 48 hours 0 <1 CFU/mL
Heterotrophic Plate Count- 35C, 72 hours 0 <1 CFU/mL
Coliform in Water/100 mL Absent Pass
E. Coli in Water/100 mL Absent Pass

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 6 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
<<Additional Information>>
Sample Id: S-0001123477

Test Parameter Date Analyzed Time Analyzed Date Prepared/ Processed
Physical Quality

Alkalinity (Ref: SM 2320-B) 9-FEB-2015

Color (Ref: SM 2120-B) 9-FEB-2015 10:30

Specific Conductance (Ref: EPA 120.1) 9-FEB-2015

Corrosivity (Ref: SM 2330-B)

Hardness, Total (Ref: EPA 200.7)

Odor, Threshold Number (Ref: EPA 140.1) 09-FEB-2015

Solids, Total Dissolved (Ref: SM 2540-C) 9-FEB-2015

Turbidity (Ref: EPA 180.1) 9-FEB-2015 13:15:00

pH (Ref: SM4500-HB) 9-FEB-2015 10:29:12

Bicarbonate (Ref: SM 2320-B)

Disinfection Residuals/Disinfection By-Products

Bromate (Ref: EPA 300.1) 12-FEB-2015

Chloramines (Ref: SM 4500-Cl-G) 9-FEB-2015 11:28:00

Chlorite (Ref: EPA 300.1) 12-FEB-2015

Chlorine Dioxide (Ref: SM 4500-ClO2-D) 9-FEB-2015 11:28:00

Haloacetic Acids (Ref: EPA 552.2) 11-FEB-2015 9-FEB-2015

Chlorine, Total Residual (ref. SM 4500CL-G) 9-FEB-2015 11:28:00

Radiologicals

Total Radium-226, Radium-228 Combined Activity 18-FEB-2015

Uranium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Gross Alpha and Beta Radioactivity in Drinking Water (Ref: EPA 900.0) 16-FEB-2015

Inorganic Chemicals

Aluminum (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Antimony in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Arsenic in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

# * Asbestos in Water (Ref: EPA 600/4-83/043,100.1)-Bureau Veritas 17-FEB-2015 12:39

Barium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Beryllium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Bromide (Ref: EPA 300.1) 12-FEB-2015

Cadmium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Calcium in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7) 10-FEB-2015

Chloride (Ref: EPA 300.0) 9-FEB-2015

Chromium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Copper in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 7 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
<<Additional Information>>
Sample Id: S-0001123477

Test Parameter Date Analyzed Time Analyzed Date Prepared/ Processed
Inorganic Chemicals

Cyanide, Total (Ref: EPA 335.4) 10-FEB-2015

Fluoride (Ref: SM 4500-F-C) 10-FEB-2015

Iron in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7) 10-FEB-2015

Lead in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Magnesium in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7) 10-FEB-2015

Manganese in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Mercury in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Nickel in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Nitrogen, Nitrate (Ref: EPA 300.0) 9-FEB-2015 17:34:00

Nitrogen, Nitrite (Ref: EPA 300.0) 9-FEB-2015 17:34:00

Total Nitrite + Nitrate-Nitrogen (Ref: EPA 300.0)

Potassium by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7) 10-FEB-2015

Selenium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Silver in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Sodium in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7) 10-FEB-2015

Sulfate as SO4 (Ref: EPA 300.0) 12-FEB-2015

Surfactants, Methylene Blue Active Substances (Ref: SM 5540-C) 9-FEB-2015 10:27:00

Thallium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

* Phenolics, Total Recoverable (Based on EPA 420.2) 12-FEB-2015

Zinc in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8) 10-FEB-2015

Organic Chemicals

Diquat (Ref: EPA 549.2) 12-FEB-2015 11-FEB-2015

Endothall (Ref. EPA 548.1) - (ug/L) 16-FEB-2015 16-FEB-2015

Glyphosate (Ref: EPA 547) 9-FEB-2015

Perchlorate (Ref: EPA 314.0) 19-FEB-2015

2,3,7,8-TCDD (Ref: EPA 1613B) 16-FEB-2015 13-FEB-2015

Carbamate Pesticides (Ref: 531.2) 14-FEB-2015

Herbicides (Ref: EPA 515.3) 12-FEB-2015 11-FEB-2015

Semivolatile Organic Compounds (Ref: EPA 525.2) 18-FEB-2015 17-FEB-2015

Volatiles: EDB and DBCP (Ref: EPA 504.1) 11-FEB-2015

Volatiles: Regulated and Monitoring VOC's (Ref: EPA 524.2) 9-FEB-2015

Chlorinated Pesticides and Organohalides by EPA 508.1 19-FEB-2015

Miscellaneous

* Silica, Total Recoverable by ICP

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 8 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
<<Additional Information>>
Sample Id: S-0001123477

Test Parameter Date Analyzed Time Analyzed Date Prepared/ Processed
Miscellaneous

# * Tritium in Drinking Water, EPA 600/2-87/082, AppB 13-FEB-2015

Carbon, Total Organic, SM 5310C, in Water 11-FEB-2015

Radon in Water (ref: SM 7500-Rn-B) 10-FEB-2015

# Strontium 89 & 90

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 9 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
<<Additional Information>>
Sample Id: S-0001130751

Test Parameter Date Analyzed Time Analyzed Date Prepared/ Processed
Microbiological Quality

Heterotrophic Plate Count (Ref: SM 9215B) - 48 hours 11-MAR-2015 10:29 9-MAR-2015 12:05
Test Notes
Sample processed in the lab past the 8 hour hold time.
Heterotrophic Plate Count (Ref: SM 9215B) - 72 hours 12-MAR-2015 10:00 9-MAR-2015 12:05
Test Notes
Sample processed in the lab past the 8 hour hold time.
Coliforms and E. coli (Ref: SM 9223) 6-MAR-2015 12:20 5-MAR-2015 11:43

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 10 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Job Notes:
This report replaces previously issued report with serial# FI20150304120524. This report is being
re-issued due to additional testing being performed.

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 11 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Testing Laboratories:
Flag Id Address
----------------------- -------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
All work performed at: NSF_AA NSF International
(Unless otherwise specified) 789 N. Dixboro Road
Ann Arbor MI 48105

# GENENG GEL Laboratories LLC
2040 Savage Road
Charleston, SC 29407
NELAP PA certificate number 68-000485
Arizona License #AZ0668
# GENENG GEL Laboratories LLC
2040 Savage Road
Charleston, SC 29407
NELAP PA certificate number 68-000485
Arizona License #AZ0668
# BVNA Bureau Veritas North America
3380 Chastain Meadows Pkwy 300
Kennesaw, GA 30144
Arizona License #AZ0675

References to Testing Procedures:
NSF Reference Parameter / Test Description
---------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C0052 * Tritium in Drinking Water, EPA 600/2-87/082, AppB
C0535 Strontium 89 & 90
C0842 Gross Alpha and Beta Radioactivity in Drinking Water (Ref: EPA 900.0)
C0980 Total Radium-226, Radium-228 Combined Activity
C1010 Odor, Threshold Number (Ref: EPA 140.1)
C2015 2,3,7,8-TCDD (Ref: EPA 1613B)
C2051 Radon in Water (ref: SM 7500-Rn-B)
C3012 * Asbestos in Water (Ref: EPA 600/4-83/043,100.1)-Bureau Veritas
C3013 Chloride (Ref: EPA 300.0)
C3014 Bromide (Ref: EPA 300.1)
C3015 Bromate (Ref: EPA 300.1)
C3016 Nitrogen, Nitrate (Ref: EPA 300.0)
C3017 Nitrogen, Nitrite (Ref: EPA 300.0)
C3018 Sulfate as SO4 (Ref: EPA 300.0)
C3019 Cyanide, Total (Ref: EPA 335.4)
C3021 * Phenolics, Total Recoverable (Based on EPA 420.2)
C3025 Chlorite (Ref: EPA 300.1)
C3033 Aluminum (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3036 Arsenic in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3039 Barium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3042 Beryllium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3044 Calcium in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7)
C3047 Cadmium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3053 Chromium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3059 Copper in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3064 Iron in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7)
C3072 Mercury in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3079 Potassium by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7)
C3085 Magnesium in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7)
C3086 Manganese in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3091 Sodium in Drinking Water by ICPAES (Ref: EPA 200.7)
C3094 Nickel in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 12 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
References to Testing Procedures: ( Cont'd )
NSF Reference Parameter / Test Description
---------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C3101 Lead in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3114 Antimony in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3116 Selenium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3128 Thallium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3136 Zinc in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3144 Solids, Total Dissolved (Ref: SM 2540-C)
C3145 Turbidity (Ref: EPA 180.1)
C3155 Surfactants, Methylene Blue Active Substances (Ref: SM 5540-C)
C3157 Color (Ref: SM 2120-B)
C3158 Specific Conductance (Ref: EPA 120.1)
C3159 pH (Ref: SM4500-HB)
C3161 Hardness, Total (Ref: EPA 200.7)
C3165 Carbon, Total Organic, SM 5310C, in Water
C3166 Bicarbonate (Ref: SM 2320-B)
C3168 Chlorine Dioxide (Ref: SM 4500-ClO2-D)
C3169 Chloramines (Ref: SM 4500-Cl-G)
C3170 Fluoride (Ref: SM 4500-F-C)
C3174 Alkalinity (Ref: SM 2320-B)
C3175 * Silica, Total Recoverable by ICP
C3188 Silver in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C3210 Corrosivity (Ref: SM 2330-B)
C3342 Total Nitrite + Nitrate-Nitrogen (Ref: EPA 300.0)
C3393 Chlorine, Total Residual (ref. SM 4500CL-G)
C4076 Carbamate Pesticides (Ref: 531.2)
C4145 Diquat (Ref: EPA 549.2)
C4154 Endothall (Ref. EPA 548.1) - (ug/L)
C4193 Glyphosate (Ref: EPA 547)
C4198 Haloacetic Acids (Ref: EPA 552.2)
C4202 Herbicides (Ref: EPA 515.3)
C4343 Semivolatile Organic Compounds (Ref: EPA 525.2)
C4411 Volatiles: EDB and DBCP (Ref: EPA 504.1)
C4496 Uranium in Drinking Water by ICPMS (Ref: EPA 200.8)
C4497 Perchlorate (Ref: EPA 314.0)
C4661 Volatiles: Regulated and Monitoring VOC's (Ref: EPA 524.2)
C4669 Chlorinated Pesticides and Organohalides by EPA 508.1
M0094 Heterotrophic Plate Count (Ref: SM 9215B)
M0115 Coliforms and E. coli (Ref: SM 9223)

Certifications:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Arizona ( # AZ0655 ) California ( # 03214 CA ) Connecticut ( # PH-0625 )

Florida ( # E-87752 FL ) Hawaii Indiana

Maryland ( # 201 ) Michigan ( # 0048 ) North Carolina (# 26701)

New Jersey ( # MI770 ) Nevada ( # MI000302010A ) New York (# 11206 )

Pennslyvania ( # 68-00312 ) South Carolina ( # 81005 ) Virginia ( # 00045 )

Vermont ( # VT 11206 )

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Test descriptions preceded by an asterisk “*” indicate that testing has been performed per NSF International requirements but is not within its
scope of accreditation.

The reported result for Odor, Phenolics, Potassium, Specific Conductance and Total Residual Chlorine cannot be used for compliance purposes

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 13 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
within the State of Arizona. Incubation times for HPC vary by state.

Notes:
1) Bottled water sold in the United States shall not contain Fluoride in excess of the levels published by the USFDA
in 21 CFR Part 165.110. These levels are based on the annual average of maximum daily air temperatures at the location
where the bottled water is sold at retail. Please refer to the most current edition of the regulation
to determine the Fluoride maximum level that pertains to your product.
2) A blank on the FDA SOQ column indicates that no maximum level has been established by the FDA for that contaminant.
3) An ND result means that the contaminant was not detected at or above the reporting limit.

For a list of NSF International Method Detection Limits refer to
http://www.nsf.org/media/enews/documents/minimum_detection_level_spreadsheet.pdf.

FI20150324131838 J-00165147 Page 14 of 14
This report shall not be reproduced, except in its entirety, without the written approval of NSF. This report does not represent NSF Certification or authorization to
use the NSF Mark. Authorization to use the NSF Mark is limited to products appearing in the Company’s Official NSF Listing (www.nsf.org). The results relate only
to those items tested, in the condition received at the laboratory.
Audit Results Letter Page 1 of 1

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
PUBLIC HEALTH COMMAND REGION-SOUTH
ATTN: MCHB-RS
2899 SCHOFIELD ROAD, SUITE 2639
FORT SAM HOUSTON, TX 78234

REPLY TO March 4, 2015
ATTENTION
OF

Public Health Command Region-South

VC# PM-0014
Eurofusion S.A.
ATTN Michael North PTY642
2250 NW 114th Avenue Unit 1P
Miami, Florida 33172-3652

Dear Mr. Roger Rivera:

On January 16, 2015, I conducted an initial sanitation audit of your establishment in accordance with MIL-STD 3006C. Your
establishment has received an acceptable rating and has been recommended for approval and listing in the Directory of Sanitarily
Approved Food Establishments for Armed Forces Procurement for delivery of water (bottled). A copy of the Sanitation Audit Report is
enclosed.

You may contact us at the address indicated at the top of this letter or I can be reached by telephone at 210-295-6856 or Email:
julio.c.montero.mil@mail.mil.

Sincerely,

Julio Montero
Lieutenant Colonel, US Army
Auditor In Charge

https://vet1.amedd.army.mil/86257B8D004A70F7/vw_lkup_docid/E41537C5F7D448C986... 3/4/2015
Subject: "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" in Flint, MI on September 4: Important Updates, New Start Time,
and Reminders
From: Dayne Walling <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 8/26/2013 11:08 AM
To: mbrown@cityofflint.com
CC: Overmeyer.patricia@epa.gov, matt.ward@strategiesdc.com, catherine.sims@emsus.com,
chris.rossomando@emsus.com, abraham.parker@emsus.com
Reply-to: Catherine.Sims@emsus.com

Ladies and Gentlemen:

This is a reminder that you are invited to be part of a select group of manufacturing and community revitalization
leaders at the "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" on September 4 at the Riverfront Banquet Center in Flint, MI. I
am writing with some important updates and reminders for you (see below). An updated draft agenda is attached. Please
note that the program will start promptly at 9:15 am. Registration will be open at 8:30 and coffee will be served.

The Manufacturing Community Roundtable will convene key stakeholders from a number of sectors to promote the re-
emergence of manufacturing in communities like Flint and beyond. A great group of leaders from local, state and
federal government, the private sector, and key business and community organizations have confirmed that they will be
part of this exciting Roundtable, including:

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
The Michigan Economic Development Corporation, the Governor's Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, the
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and other key Michigan state agencies
Senator Debbie Stabenow
Congressman Dan Kildee
Mayors from a number of Michigan communities
Private sector CEOs and trade association officials
Federal agency leaders who are promoting manufacturing revitalization, including officials from the Economic
Development Administration, the Department of Labor, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of
Energy, the Office of Recovery for Auto Communities and Workers, and other key officials.

Important Reminders

Please RSVP to Catherine Sims at Catherine.Sims@emsus.com by Tuesday, August 27, if you have not already done so.
Also, it is important that you let Catherine know if you plan to join us for the optional Bus/Walking Tour of Priority
Flint Manufacturing /Revitalization Sites and/or the dutch dinner on September 3, so that we can make arrangements.

A hotel room block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express at the government rate of $77 per night. If you have
not yet done so, please make hotel reservations by TOMORROW, August 27, and say that you are with the
"Manufacturing Community Roundtable to receive the rate. After August 27, the group rate may no longer be available.
To reserve a room please call the Holiday Inn at 810-238-7744. For additional hotel room block or travel information,
please see the attached logistics sheet.
Please take time to review the White House "Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership" (IMCP)
Questions for Roundtable Participants (attached), which will guide our discussions.

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please respond to this email or call
Catherine Sims at 301-589-5318 and we will be happy to assist you.

We are excited to see you at the Roundtable in Flint, and thank you for your consideration.

Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint
--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments-1/Flint-Roundtable-DRAFT-Agenda_0826.docx
Attachments-1/Flint-Roundtable-Logistics-Sheet-8.13.docx
Attachments-1/WHITE-HOUSE-IMCP-questions.doc
Subject: "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" in Flint, MI on September 4: Important Updates, New Start Time,
and Reminders
From: Dayne Walling <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 8/26/2013 11:08 AM
To: mbrown@cityofflint.com
CC: Overmeyer.patricia@epa.gov, matt.ward@strategiesdc.com, catherine.sims@emsus.com,
chris.rossomando@emsus.com, abraham.parker@emsus.com
Reply-to: Catherine.Sims@emsus.com

Ladies and Gentlemen:

This is a reminder that you are invited to be part of a select group of manufacturing and community revitalization
leaders at the "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" on September 4 at the Riverfront Banquet Center in Flint, MI. I
am writing with some important updates and reminders for you (see below). An updated draft agenda is attached. Please
note that the program will start promptly at 9:15 am. Registration will be open at 8:30 and coffee will be served.

The Manufacturing Community Roundtable will convene key stakeholders from a number of sectors to promote the re-
emergence of manufacturing in communities like Flint and beyond. A great group of leaders from local, state and
federal government, the private sector, and key business and community organizations have confirmed that they will be
part of this exciting Roundtable, including:

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
The Michigan Economic Development Corporation, the Governor's Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, the
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and other key Michigan state agencies
Senator Debbie Stabenow
Congressman Dan Kildee
Mayors from a number of Michigan communities
Private sector CEOs and trade association officials
Federal agency leaders who are promoting manufacturing revitalization, including officials from the Economic
Development Administration, the Department of Labor, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of
Energy, the Office of Recovery for Auto Communities and Workers, and other key officials.

Important Reminders

Please RSVP to Catherine Sims at Catherine.Sims@emsus.com by Tuesday, August 27, if you have not already done so.
Also, it is important that you let Catherine know if you plan to join us for the optional Bus/Walking Tour of Priority
Flint Manufacturing /Revitalization Sites and/or the dutch dinner on September 3, so that we can make arrangements.

A hotel room block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express at the government rate of $77 per night. If you have
not yet done so, please make hotel reservations by TOMORROW, August 27, and say that you are with the
"Manufacturing Community Roundtable to receive the rate. After August 27, the group rate may no longer be available.
To reserve a room please call the Holiday Inn at 810-238-7744. For additional hotel room block or travel information,
please see the attached logistics sheet.
Please take time to review the White House "Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership" (IMCP)
Questions for Roundtable Participants (attached), which will guide our discussions.

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please respond to this email or call
Catherine Sims at 301-589-5318 and we will be happy to assist you.

We are excited to see you at the Roundtable in Flint, and thank you for your consideration.

Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint
--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments/Flint-Roundtable-DRAFT-Agenda_0826.docx
Attachments/Flint-Roundtable-Logistics-Sheet-8.13.docx
Attachments/WHITE-HOUSE-IMCP-questions.doc
MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 IN FLINT, MI

DRAFT AGENDA
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

3PM Bus/Walking Tour of Priority Flint Manufacturing / Revitalization Sites
 Meeting in front of Charles Stewart Mott Foundation at 503 South Saginaw Street
5:30PM Dutch Dinner at “501 Grill” on 501 South Saginaw Street

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 - Riverfront Banquet Center, 1 Riverfront Center West, Flint, MI

Morning Session
8:30AM Registration / Coffee

9:15AM Welcome from Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint

9:30AM Remarks on Community Revitalization from U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
(including public release of new Roadmap for Auto Community Revitalization)

9:45AM Remarks on Manufacturing Communities by Jay Williams, Executive Director,
Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers

10:00AM Keynote Speaker, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling)

10:30AM Break

10:45AM Community Presentations on Opportunities & Challenges for Manufacturing.

A medley of local government voices on how they seek to boost manufacturing in their
communities, and their call to federal, state, private sector and other partners to invest and
support this endeavor

• Team from Flint
• Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero, Chairman of the Advanced Manufacturing Task
Force, U.S. Conference of Mayors
• Wixom Mayor Kevin Hinkley
• Hamtramck Mayor Karen Majewski
• Fenton Mayor Sue Osborn
• Sterling Heights Mayor Richard Notte
• Auburn Hills City Manager Pete Auger
• Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje and Paul Krutko, President &CEO of Ann Arbor
SPARK and Chairman of the International Economic Development Council

12:15PM Lunch with Special Guest Speaker, Congressman Dan Kildee
Afternoon Session
1:00PM Voice of Manufacturers
A panel of manufacturing leaders discusses the critical role of partnership with local, state &
federal government.

Moderated by Janice Karcher, Vice President for Economic Development, Flint & Genesee
Chamber of Commerce

• Jim Huff, President, TMI Climate Solutions
• Frank Ervin, Government Affairs Manager, Magna International (invited)
• Chris Goetz, Chief Operating Officer, WGS Global Services
• Phil Shaltz, President & CEO, Shaltz Automation
• Amy Farmer, Complex Manager, General Motors Manufacturing Operations, Flint
• Chuck Hadden, President & CEO, Michigan Manufacturers Association
• Representative from the Suppliers Partnership for the Environment

2:00PM Break

2:15PM Federal-State Roundtable on Manufacturing Strategies, Tools and Progress.
Moderated by Mayor Dayne Walling

State Officials:
• Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
Vice President for Strategic Accounts Vince Nystrom
• Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Senior Policy Advisor Anne Couture
• State of Michigan Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, Director Harvey Hollins

Federal Officials:
• U.S. EPA, Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
• U.S. Economic Development Administration, Deputy Administrator Tom Guevara
• U.S. EPA, Senior Policy Counsel and E3 Initiative Coordinator Matt Bogoshian
• U.S. Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers, Executive Director Jay Williams
• U.S. Department of Energy, Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative, Director Libby Wayman
• U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Chicago Regional
Administrator Byron Zuidema

3:45PM Closing Keynote by Michigan Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
Introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling

4:15PM Key Action Steps
Recap of key next action steps that can continue a robust public-private partnership to
boost manufacturing in Flint, the State of Michigan, and beyond

4:30PM Adjourn

Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste &
Emergency Response in partnership with the Department of Labor Office of Recovery for
Auto Communities & Workers, the Federal Manufacturing Task Force, the State of
Michigan, the City of Flint, and the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce
MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 IN FLINT, MI

DRAFT AGENDA
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

3PM Bus/Walking Tour of Priority Flint Manufacturing / Revitalization Sites
 Meeting in front of Charles Stewart Mott Foundation at 503 South Saginaw Street
5:30PM Dutch Dinner at “501 Grill” on 501 South Saginaw Street

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 - Riverfront Banquet Center, 1 Riverfront Center West, Flint, MI

Morning Session
8:30AM Registration / Coffee

9:15AM Welcome from Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint

9:30AM Remarks on Community Revitalization from U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
(including public release of new Roadmap for Auto Community Revitalization)

9:45AM Remarks on Manufacturing Communities by Jay Williams, Executive Director,
Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers

10:00AM Keynote Speaker, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling)

10:30AM Break

10:45AM Community Presentations on Opportunities & Challenges for Manufacturing.

A medley of local government voices on how they seek to boost manufacturing in their
communities, and their call to federal, state, private sector and other partners to invest and
support this endeavor

• Team from Flint
• Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero, Chairman of the Advanced Manufacturing Task
Force, U.S. Conference of Mayors
• Wixom Mayor Kevin Hinkley
• Hamtramck Mayor Karen Majewski
• Fenton Mayor Sue Osborn
• Sterling Heights Mayor Richard Notte
• Auburn Hills City Manager Pete Auger
• Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje and Paul Krutko, President &CEO of Ann Arbor
SPARK and Chairman of the International Economic Development Council

12:15PM Lunch with Special Guest Speaker, Congressman Dan Kildee
Afternoon Session
1:00PM Voice of Manufacturers
A panel of manufacturing leaders discusses the critical role of partnership with local, state &
federal government.

Moderated by Janice Karcher, Vice President for Economic Development, Flint & Genesee
Chamber of Commerce

• Jim Huff, President, TMI Climate Solutions
• Frank Ervin, Government Affairs Manager, Magna International (invited)
• Chris Goetz, Chief Operating Officer, WGS Global Services
• Phil Shaltz, President & CEO, Shaltz Automation
• Amy Farmer, Complex Manager, General Motors Manufacturing Operations, Flint
• Chuck Hadden, President & CEO, Michigan Manufacturers Association
• Representative from the Suppliers Partnership for the Environment

2:00PM Break

2:15PM Federal-State Roundtable on Manufacturing Strategies, Tools and Progress.
Moderated by Mayor Dayne Walling

State Officials:
• Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
Vice President for Strategic Accounts Vince Nystrom
• Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Senior Policy Advisor Anne Couture
• State of Michigan Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, Director Harvey Hollins

Federal Officials:
• U.S. EPA, Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
• U.S. Economic Development Administration, Deputy Administrator Tom Guevara
• U.S. EPA, Senior Policy Counsel and E3 Initiative Coordinator Matt Bogoshian
• U.S. Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers, Executive Director Jay Williams
• U.S. Department of Energy, Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative, Director Libby Wayman
• U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Chicago Regional
Administrator Byron Zuidema

3:45PM Closing Keynote by Michigan Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
Introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling

4:15PM Key Action Steps
Recap of key next action steps that can continue a robust public-private partnership to
boost manufacturing in Flint, the State of Michigan, and beyond

4:30PM Adjourn

Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste &
Emergency Response in partnership with the Department of Labor Office of Recovery for
Auto Communities & Workers, the Federal Manufacturing Task Force, the State of
Michigan, the City of Flint, and the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce
LOGISTICS SHEET FOR MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
FLINT, MI
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013
(Site tour on September 3rd)

Meeting Information:
The Manufacturing Community Roundtable is being held at:
Riverfront Banquet Center
1 Riverfront Center West
Flint, MI 48502

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please contact Catherine
Sims at Catherine.sims@epa.gov.

Hotel Information:
A hotel block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express located at:
1150 Robert T. Logway Boulevard
Flint, MI 48503
810-238-7744

Rooms are being held at $77 a night (plus tax), which is the government rate, for the nights of September
3rd and 4th. YOU MUST RESERVE BY August 27th to receive this special rate. To reserve a room call
(810) 238-7744. To receive the government rate you must mention that you are with the Manufacturing
Community Roundtable. You must cancel your hotel room 24-hours prior to arrival or charges equal to
one night’s stay plus tax will be charged to your credit card.

The hotel is located about a mile from the Banquet Center and is about a 15 minute walk away. The hotel
offers a free shuttle to and from Bishop International Airport, free wireless internet, and a free Express
Start Breakfast Bar.

For more information on the Holiday Inn Express, please visit their website at:
www.ihg.com/holidayinnexpress/hotels/us/en/flint/fntno/hoteldetail

Walking Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
The Banquet Center can be reached via the Flint River Trail, which goes through the University of
Michigan – Flint campus. To access the trail, head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard towards 5th
Avenue. The trail will be on your left at the intersection of E Boulevard and Robert T Longway Boulevard.
Take the trail 0.5 miles and take a left turn onto Union Street. Stay straight on Union until you reach
Saginaw Street. The Banquet Center will be directly ahead of you.

Driving Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
Head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard. Take the first left onto 5th Avenue. After 0.1 miles, turn
right onto Chavez Drive. Continue on Chavez Drive and turn right onto E Kearsley Street. Take a right on
S Saginaw Street and the Banquet Center will be on the left.

Airport Information:
From Detroit Metropolitan/Wayne County Airport (DTW) in Detroit to Holiday Inn Express:
The Detroit airport is an hour and fifteen-minute drive (80 miles) from the Holiday Inn Express. However, it
offers the most flight options and may be the least expensive option. For additional airport information,
please visit: http://www.metroairport.com/ For detailed driving directions from the airport to the Holiday
Inn Express, please use the following link: http://goo.gl/maps/TKOh2

Bishop International Airport (FNT) to Holiday Inn Express:
The Flint airport is 8 miles from the Holiday Inn Express. For additional airport information, please visit:
http://www.bishopairport.org/ The hotel offers a complimentary shuttle from the airport to the hotel. To
schedule a pickup, please call the hotel once you have gathered your baggage, using either the
complimentary phone located in the baggage claim area, or by calling the hotel at (810) 233-7744.

September 3rd Site Tour:
There will be a tour of manufacturing sites in the Fling area on Tuesday, September 3. A more detailed
logistics sheet will be distributed prior to the meeting. Transportation will be provided.
LOGISTICS SHEET FOR MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
FLINT, MI
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013
(Site tour on September 3rd)

Meeting Information:
The Manufacturing Community Roundtable is being held at:
Riverfront Banquet Center
1 Riverfront Center West
Flint, MI 48502

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please contact Catherine
Sims at Catherine.sims@epa.gov.

Hotel Information:
A hotel block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express located at:
1150 Robert T. Logway Boulevard
Flint, MI 48503
810-238-7744

Rooms are being held at $77 a night (plus tax), which is the government rate, for the nights of September
3rd and 4th. YOU MUST RESERVE BY August 27th to receive this special rate. To reserve a room call
(810) 238-7744. To receive the government rate you must mention that you are with the Manufacturing
Community Roundtable. You must cancel your hotel room 24-hours prior to arrival or charges equal to
one night’s stay plus tax will be charged to your credit card.

The hotel is located about a mile from the Banquet Center and is about a 15 minute walk away. The hotel
offers a free shuttle to and from Bishop International Airport, free wireless internet, and a free Express
Start Breakfast Bar.

For more information on the Holiday Inn Express, please visit their website at:
www.ihg.com/holidayinnexpress/hotels/us/en/flint/fntno/hoteldetail

Walking Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
The Banquet Center can be reached via the Flint River Trail, which goes through the University of
Michigan – Flint campus. To access the trail, head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard towards 5th
Avenue. The trail will be on your left at the intersection of E Boulevard and Robert T Longway Boulevard.
Take the trail 0.5 miles and take a left turn onto Union Street. Stay straight on Union until you reach
Saginaw Street. The Banquet Center will be directly ahead of you.

Driving Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
Head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard. Take the first left onto 5th Avenue. After 0.1 miles, turn
right onto Chavez Drive. Continue on Chavez Drive and turn right onto E Kearsley Street. Take a right on
S Saginaw Street and the Banquet Center will be on the left.

Airport Information:
From Detroit Metropolitan/Wayne County Airport (DTW) in Detroit to Holiday Inn Express:
The Detroit airport is an hour and fifteen-minute drive (80 miles) from the Holiday Inn Express. However, it
offers the most flight options and may be the least expensive option. For additional airport information,
please visit: http://www.metroairport.com/ For detailed driving directions from the airport to the Holiday
Inn Express, please use the following link: http://goo.gl/maps/TKOh2

Bishop International Airport (FNT) to Holiday Inn Express:
The Flint airport is 8 miles from the Holiday Inn Express. For additional airport information, please visit:
http://www.bishopairport.org/ The hotel offers a complimentary shuttle from the airport to the hotel. To
schedule a pickup, please call the hotel once you have gathered your baggage, using either the
complimentary phone located in the baggage claim area, or by calling the hotel at (810) 233-7744.

September 3rd Site Tour:
There will be a tour of manufacturing sites in the Fling area on Tuesday, September 3. A more detailed
logistics sheet will be distributed prior to the meeting. Transportation will be provided.
WHITE HOUSE “INVESTING IN MANUFACTURING COMMUNITIES
PARTNERSHIP” (IMCP) Questions for Roundtable Participants

Manufacturing Community Roundtable
Flint, Michigan
September 4, 2013

• What are examples of effective partnerships that support manufacturing in your
region? How have various federal agencies participated in them? What can we
learn from them and how can we build on existing partnerships?

• What is the optimum federal role in providing technical assistance to promote
manufacturing activities? What is the most effective way to carry out that
role? How can we ensure that all qualifying communities have fair access to
available technical assistance? What is the best way to start it, and maintain it?

• What are the gaps in federal, state, and/or local program support that need to be
addressed to support manufacturing and its related needs, such as workforce
development, site preparation, and infrastructure?

• How can brownfields or area-wide planning projects promote a local climate
that is more suited to attract private manufacturing activity and investment?
How can government efforts be streamlined and better coordinated? What
supportive institutions need to be in place?

• We know that the process for applying for federal grants can be challenging.
We also know that many communities are hamstrung because of staff shortages,
expertise gaps, and other capacity challenges. How can we streamline and
improve that process to ensure that all eligible applicants are given a fair chance
when competing for grants?

• How can we attract an optimal amount of co-investment from non-government
partners in seeding a local site reuse/redevelopment strategy? How can
capacity-challenged communities be best positioned and supported in those
efforts? What would be the appropriate federal role?

• Overall – how can the IMCP best be shaped to accelerate the resurgence of
manufacturing, and attract needed investment in manufacturing?
WHITE HOUSE “INVESTING IN MANUFACTURING COMMUNITIES
PARTNERSHIP” (IMCP) Questions for Roundtable Participants

Manufacturing Community Roundtable
Flint, Michigan
September 4, 2013

• What are examples of effective partnerships that support manufacturing in your
region? How have various federal agencies participated in them? What can we
learn from them and how can we build on existing partnerships?

• What is the optimum federal role in providing technical assistance to promote
manufacturing activities? What is the most effective way to carry out that
role? How can we ensure that all qualifying communities have fair access to
available technical assistance? What is the best way to start it, and maintain it?

• What are the gaps in federal, state, and/or local program support that need to be
addressed to support manufacturing and its related needs, such as workforce
development, site preparation, and infrastructure?

• How can brownfields or area-wide planning projects promote a local climate
that is more suited to attract private manufacturing activity and investment?
How can government efforts be streamlined and better coordinated? What
supportive institutions need to be in place?

• We know that the process for applying for federal grants can be challenging.
We also know that many communities are hamstrung because of staff shortages,
expertise gaps, and other capacity challenges. How can we streamline and
improve that process to ensure that all eligible applicants are given a fair chance
when competing for grants?

• How can we attract an optimal amount of co-investment from non-government
partners in seeding a local site reuse/redevelopment strategy? How can
capacity-challenged communities be best positioned and supported in those
efforts? What would be the appropriate federal role?

• Overall – how can the IMCP best be shaped to accelerate the resurgence of
manufacturing, and attract needed investment in manufacturing?
Subject: "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" in Flint, MI on September 4: Important Updates, New Start Time,
and Reminders
From: Dayne Walling <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 8/26/2013 11:06 AM
To: mhunter@cityofflint.com
CC: Overmeyer.patricia@epa.gov, matt.ward@strategiesdc.com, catherine.sims@emsus.com,
chris.rossomando@emsus.com, abraham.parker@emsus.com
Reply-to: Catherine.Sims@emsus.com

Ladies and Gentlemen:

This is a reminder that you are invited to be part of a select group of manufacturing and community revitalization
leaders at the "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" on September 4 at the Riverfront Banquet Center in Flint, MI. I
am writing with some important updates and reminders for you (see below). An updated draft agenda is attached. Please
note that the program will start promptly at 9:15 am. Registration will be open at 8:30 and coffee will be served.

The Manufacturing Community Roundtable will convene key stakeholders from a number of sectors to promote the re-
emergence of manufacturing in communities like Flint and beyond. A great group of leaders from local, state and
federal government, the private sector, and key business and community organizations have confirmed that they will be
part of this exciting Roundtable, including:

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
The Michigan Economic Development Corporation, the Governor's Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, the
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and other key Michigan state agencies
Senator Debbie Stabenow
Congressman Dan Kildee
Mayors from a number of Michigan communities
Private sector CEOs and trade association officials
Federal agency leaders who are promoting manufacturing revitalization, including officials from the Economic
Development Administration, the Department of Labor, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of
Energy, the Office of Recovery for Auto Communities and Workers, and other key officials.

Important Reminders

Please RSVP to Catherine Sims at Catherine.Sims@emsus.com by Tuesday, August 27, if you have not already done so.
Also, it is important that you let Catherine know if you plan to join us for the optional Bus/Walking Tour of Priority
Flint Manufacturing /Revitalization Sites and/or the dutch dinner on September 3, so that we can make arrangements.

A hotel room block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express at the government rate of $77 per night. If you have
not yet done so, please make hotel reservations by TOMORROW, August 27, and say that you are with the
"Manufacturing Community Roundtable to receive the rate. After August 27, the group rate may no longer be available.
To reserve a room please call the Holiday Inn at 810-238-7744. For additional hotel room block or travel information,
please see the attached logistics sheet.
Please take time to review the White House "Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership" (IMCP)
Questions for Roundtable Participants (attached), which will guide our discussions.

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please respond to this email or call
Catherine Sims at 301-589-5318 and we will be happy to assist you.

We are excited to see you at the Roundtable in Flint, and thank you for your consideration.

Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint
--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments-1/Flint-Roundtable-DRAFT-Agenda_0826.docx
Attachments-1/Flint-Roundtable-Logistics-Sheet-8.13.docx
Attachments-1/WHITE-HOUSE-IMCP-questions.doc
Subject: "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" in Flint, MI on September 4: Important Updates, New Start Time,
and Reminders
From: Dayne Walling <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 8/26/2013 11:05 AM
To: mhunter@cityofflint.com
CC: Overmeyer.patricia@epa.gov, matt.ward@strategiesdc.com, catherine.sims@emsus.com,
chris.rossomando@emsus.com, abraham.parker@emsus.com
Reply-to: Catherine.Sims@emsus.com

Ladies and Gentlemen:

This is a reminder that you are invited to be part of a select group of manufacturing and community revitalization
leaders at the "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" on September 4 at the Riverfront Banquet Center in Flint, MI. I
am writing with some important updates and reminders for you (see below). An updated draft agenda is attached. Please
note that the program will start promptly at 9:15 am. Registration will be open at 8:30 and coffee will be served.

The Manufacturing Community Roundtable will convene key stakeholders from a number of sectors to promote the re-
emergence of manufacturing in communities like Flint and beyond. A great group of leaders from local, state and
federal government, the private sector, and key business and community organizations have confirmed that they will be
part of this exciting Roundtable, including:

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
The Michigan Economic Development Corporation, the Governor's Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, the
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and other key Michigan state agencies
Senator Debbie Stabenow
Congressman Dan Kildee
Mayors from a number of Michigan communities
Private sector CEOs and trade association officials
Federal agency leaders who are promoting manufacturing revitalization, including officials from the Economic
Development Administration, the Department of Labor, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of
Energy, the Office of Recovery for Auto Communities and Workers, and other key officials.

Important Reminders

Please RSVP to Catherine Sims at Catherine.Sims@emsus.com by Tuesday, August 27, if you have not already done so.
Also, it is important that you let Catherine know if you plan to join us for the optional Bus/Walking Tour of Priority
Flint Manufacturing /Revitalization Sites and/or the dutch dinner on September 3, so that we can make arrangements.

A hotel room block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express at the government rate of $77 per night. If you have
not yet done so, please make hotel reservations by TOMORROW, August 27, and say that you are with the
"Manufacturing Community Roundtable to receive the rate. After August 27, the group rate may no longer be available.
To reserve a room please call the Holiday Inn at 810-238-7744. For additional hotel room block or travel information,
please see the attached logistics sheet.
Please take time to review the White House "Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership" (IMCP)
Questions for Roundtable Participants (attached), which will guide our discussions.

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please respond to this email or call
Catherine Sims at 301-589-5318 and we will be happy to assist you.

We are excited to see you at the Roundtable in Flint, and thank you for your consideration.

Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint
--
Dayne Walling
Mayor, City of Flint
City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw St.
Flint, MI 48502
810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com
www.cityofflint.com
follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments/Flint-Roundtable-DRAFT-Agenda_0826.docx
Attachments/Flint-Roundtable-Logistics-Sheet-8.13.docx
Attachments/WHITE-HOUSE-IMCP-questions.doc
MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 IN FLINT, MI

DRAFT AGENDA
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

3PM Bus/Walking Tour of Priority Flint Manufacturing / Revitalization Sites
 Meeting in front of Charles Stewart Mott Foundation at 503 South Saginaw Street
5:30PM Dutch Dinner at “501 Grill” on 501 South Saginaw Street

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 - Riverfront Banquet Center, 1 Riverfront Center West, Flint, MI

Morning Session
8:30AM Registration / Coffee

9:15AM Welcome from Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint

9:30AM Remarks on Community Revitalization from U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
(including public release of new Roadmap for Auto Community Revitalization)

9:45AM Remarks on Manufacturing Communities by Jay Williams, Executive Director,
Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers

10:00AM Keynote Speaker, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling)

10:30AM Break

10:45AM Community Presentations on Opportunities & Challenges for Manufacturing.

A medley of local government voices on how they seek to boost manufacturing in their
communities, and their call to federal, state, private sector and other partners to invest and
support this endeavor

• Team from Flint
• Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero, Chairman of the Advanced Manufacturing Task
Force, U.S. Conference of Mayors
• Wixom Mayor Kevin Hinkley
• Hamtramck Mayor Karen Majewski
• Fenton Mayor Sue Osborn
• Sterling Heights Mayor Richard Notte
• Auburn Hills City Manager Pete Auger
• Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje and Paul Krutko, President &CEO of Ann Arbor
SPARK and Chairman of the International Economic Development Council

12:15PM Lunch with Special Guest Speaker, Congressman Dan Kildee
Afternoon Session
1:00PM Voice of Manufacturers
A panel of manufacturing leaders discusses the critical role of partnership with local, state &
federal government.

Moderated by Janice Karcher, Vice President for Economic Development, Flint & Genesee
Chamber of Commerce

• Jim Huff, President, TMI Climate Solutions
• Frank Ervin, Government Affairs Manager, Magna International (invited)
• Chris Goetz, Chief Operating Officer, WGS Global Services
• Phil Shaltz, President & CEO, Shaltz Automation
• Amy Farmer, Complex Manager, General Motors Manufacturing Operations, Flint
• Chuck Hadden, President & CEO, Michigan Manufacturers Association
• Representative from the Suppliers Partnership for the Environment

2:00PM Break

2:15PM Federal-State Roundtable on Manufacturing Strategies, Tools and Progress.
Moderated by Mayor Dayne Walling

State Officials:
• Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
Vice President for Strategic Accounts Vince Nystrom
• Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Senior Policy Advisor Anne Couture
• State of Michigan Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, Director Harvey Hollins

Federal Officials:
• U.S. EPA, Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
• U.S. Economic Development Administration, Deputy Administrator Tom Guevara
• U.S. EPA, Senior Policy Counsel and E3 Initiative Coordinator Matt Bogoshian
• U.S. Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers, Executive Director Jay Williams
• U.S. Department of Energy, Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative, Director Libby Wayman
• U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Chicago Regional
Administrator Byron Zuidema

3:45PM Closing Keynote by Michigan Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
Introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling

4:15PM Key Action Steps
Recap of key next action steps that can continue a robust public-private partnership to
boost manufacturing in Flint, the State of Michigan, and beyond

4:30PM Adjourn

Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste &
Emergency Response in partnership with the Department of Labor Office of Recovery for
Auto Communities & Workers, the Federal Manufacturing Task Force, the State of
Michigan, the City of Flint, and the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce
MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 IN FLINT, MI

DRAFT AGENDA
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

3PM Bus/Walking Tour of Priority Flint Manufacturing / Revitalization Sites
 Meeting in front of Charles Stewart Mott Foundation at 503 South Saginaw Street
5:30PM Dutch Dinner at “501 Grill” on 501 South Saginaw Street

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 - Riverfront Banquet Center, 1 Riverfront Center West, Flint, MI

Morning Session
8:30AM Registration / Coffee

9:15AM Welcome from Mayor Dayne Walling, City of Flint

9:30AM Remarks on Community Revitalization from U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
(including public release of new Roadmap for Auto Community Revitalization)

9:45AM Remarks on Manufacturing Communities by Jay Williams, Executive Director,
Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers

10:00AM Keynote Speaker, U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling)

10:30AM Break

10:45AM Community Presentations on Opportunities & Challenges for Manufacturing.

A medley of local government voices on how they seek to boost manufacturing in their
communities, and their call to federal, state, private sector and other partners to invest and
support this endeavor

• Team from Flint
• Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero, Chairman of the Advanced Manufacturing Task
Force, U.S. Conference of Mayors
• Wixom Mayor Kevin Hinkley
• Hamtramck Mayor Karen Majewski
• Fenton Mayor Sue Osborn
• Sterling Heights Mayor Richard Notte
• Auburn Hills City Manager Pete Auger
• Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje and Paul Krutko, President &CEO of Ann Arbor
SPARK and Chairman of the International Economic Development Council

12:15PM Lunch with Special Guest Speaker, Congressman Dan Kildee
Afternoon Session
1:00PM Voice of Manufacturers
A panel of manufacturing leaders discusses the critical role of partnership with local, state &
federal government.

Moderated by Janice Karcher, Vice President for Economic Development, Flint & Genesee
Chamber of Commerce

• Jim Huff, President, TMI Climate Solutions
• Frank Ervin, Government Affairs Manager, Magna International (invited)
• Chris Goetz, Chief Operating Officer, WGS Global Services
• Phil Shaltz, President & CEO, Shaltz Automation
• Amy Farmer, Complex Manager, General Motors Manufacturing Operations, Flint
• Chuck Hadden, President & CEO, Michigan Manufacturers Association
• Representative from the Suppliers Partnership for the Environment

2:00PM Break

2:15PM Federal-State Roundtable on Manufacturing Strategies, Tools and Progress.
Moderated by Mayor Dayne Walling

State Officials:
• Michigan Economic Development Corporation,
Vice President for Strategic Accounts Vince Nystrom
• Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Senior Policy Advisor Anne Couture
• State of Michigan Office of Urban & Metropolitan Initiatives, Director Harvey Hollins

Federal Officials:
• U.S. EPA, Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus
• U.S. Economic Development Administration, Deputy Administrator Tom Guevara
• U.S. EPA, Senior Policy Counsel and E3 Initiative Coordinator Matt Bogoshian
• U.S. Office of Recovery for Auto Communities & Workers, Executive Director Jay Williams
• U.S. Department of Energy, Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative, Director Libby Wayman
• U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Chicago Regional
Administrator Byron Zuidema

3:45PM Closing Keynote by Michigan Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
Introduced by Mayor Dayne Walling

4:15PM Key Action Steps
Recap of key next action steps that can continue a robust public-private partnership to
boost manufacturing in Flint, the State of Michigan, and beyond

4:30PM Adjourn

Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste &
Emergency Response in partnership with the Department of Labor Office of Recovery for
Auto Communities & Workers, the Federal Manufacturing Task Force, the State of
Michigan, the City of Flint, and the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce
LOGISTICS SHEET FOR MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
FLINT, MI
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013
(Site tour on September 3rd)

Meeting Information:
The Manufacturing Community Roundtable is being held at:
Riverfront Banquet Center
1 Riverfront Center West
Flint, MI 48502

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please contact Catherine
Sims at Catherine.sims@epa.gov.

Hotel Information:
A hotel block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express located at:
1150 Robert T. Logway Boulevard
Flint, MI 48503
810-238-7744

Rooms are being held at $77 a night (plus tax), which is the government rate, for the nights of September
3rd and 4th. YOU MUST RESERVE BY August 27th to receive this special rate. To reserve a room call
(810) 238-7744. To receive the government rate you must mention that you are with the Manufacturing
Community Roundtable. You must cancel your hotel room 24-hours prior to arrival or charges equal to
one night’s stay plus tax will be charged to your credit card.

The hotel is located about a mile from the Banquet Center and is about a 15 minute walk away. The hotel
offers a free shuttle to and from Bishop International Airport, free wireless internet, and a free Express
Start Breakfast Bar.

For more information on the Holiday Inn Express, please visit their website at:
www.ihg.com/holidayinnexpress/hotels/us/en/flint/fntno/hoteldetail

Walking Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
The Banquet Center can be reached via the Flint River Trail, which goes through the University of
Michigan – Flint campus. To access the trail, head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard towards 5th
Avenue. The trail will be on your left at the intersection of E Boulevard and Robert T Longway Boulevard.
Take the trail 0.5 miles and take a left turn onto Union Street. Stay straight on Union until you reach
Saginaw Street. The Banquet Center will be directly ahead of you.

Driving Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
Head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard. Take the first left onto 5th Avenue. After 0.1 miles, turn
right onto Chavez Drive. Continue on Chavez Drive and turn right onto E Kearsley Street. Take a right on
S Saginaw Street and the Banquet Center will be on the left.

Airport Information:
From Detroit Metropolitan/Wayne County Airport (DTW) in Detroit to Holiday Inn Express:
The Detroit airport is an hour and fifteen-minute drive (80 miles) from the Holiday Inn Express. However, it
offers the most flight options and may be the least expensive option. For additional airport information,
please visit: http://www.metroairport.com/ For detailed driving directions from the airport to the Holiday
Inn Express, please use the following link: http://goo.gl/maps/TKOh2

Bishop International Airport (FNT) to Holiday Inn Express:
The Flint airport is 8 miles from the Holiday Inn Express. For additional airport information, please visit:
http://www.bishopairport.org/ The hotel offers a complimentary shuttle from the airport to the hotel. To
schedule a pickup, please call the hotel once you have gathered your baggage, using either the
complimentary phone located in the baggage claim area, or by calling the hotel at (810) 233-7744.

September 3rd Site Tour:
There will be a tour of manufacturing sites in the Fling area on Tuesday, September 3. A more detailed
logistics sheet will be distributed prior to the meeting. Transportation will be provided.
LOGISTICS SHEET FOR MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ROUNDTABLE
FLINT, MI
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013
(Site tour on September 3rd)

Meeting Information:
The Manufacturing Community Roundtable is being held at:
Riverfront Banquet Center
1 Riverfront Center West
Flint, MI 48502

If you require special needs or accommodations while attending the meeting, please contact Catherine
Sims at Catherine.sims@epa.gov.

Hotel Information:
A hotel block has been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express located at:
1150 Robert T. Logway Boulevard
Flint, MI 48503
810-238-7744

Rooms are being held at $77 a night (plus tax), which is the government rate, for the nights of September
3rd and 4th. YOU MUST RESERVE BY August 27th to receive this special rate. To reserve a room call
(810) 238-7744. To receive the government rate you must mention that you are with the Manufacturing
Community Roundtable. You must cancel your hotel room 24-hours prior to arrival or charges equal to
one night’s stay plus tax will be charged to your credit card.

The hotel is located about a mile from the Banquet Center and is about a 15 minute walk away. The hotel
offers a free shuttle to and from Bishop International Airport, free wireless internet, and a free Express
Start Breakfast Bar.

For more information on the Holiday Inn Express, please visit their website at:
www.ihg.com/holidayinnexpress/hotels/us/en/flint/fntno/hoteldetail

Walking Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
The Banquet Center can be reached via the Flint River Trail, which goes through the University of
Michigan – Flint campus. To access the trail, head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard towards 5th
Avenue. The trail will be on your left at the intersection of E Boulevard and Robert T Longway Boulevard.
Take the trail 0.5 miles and take a left turn onto Union Street. Stay straight on Union until you reach
Saginaw Street. The Banquet Center will be directly ahead of you.

Driving Directions from the Holiday Inn Express to the Banquet Center:
Head southwest on Robert T Longway Boulevard. Take the first left onto 5th Avenue. After 0.1 miles, turn
right onto Chavez Drive. Continue on Chavez Drive and turn right onto E Kearsley Street. Take a right on
S Saginaw Street and the Banquet Center will be on the left.

Airport Information:
From Detroit Metropolitan/Wayne County Airport (DTW) in Detroit to Holiday Inn Express:
The Detroit airport is an hour and fifteen-minute drive (80 miles) from the Holiday Inn Express. However, it
offers the most flight options and may be the least expensive option. For additional airport information,
please visit: http://www.metroairport.com/ For detailed driving directions from the airport to the Holiday
Inn Express, please use the following link: http://goo.gl/maps/TKOh2

Bishop International Airport (FNT) to Holiday Inn Express:
The Flint airport is 8 miles from the Holiday Inn Express. For additional airport information, please visit:
http://www.bishopairport.org/ The hotel offers a complimentary shuttle from the airport to the hotel. To
schedule a pickup, please call the hotel once you have gathered your baggage, using either the
complimentary phone located in the baggage claim area, or by calling the hotel at (810) 233-7744.

September 3rd Site Tour:
There will be a tour of manufacturing sites in the Fling area on Tuesday, September 3. A more detailed
logistics sheet will be distributed prior to the meeting. Transportation will be provided.
WHITE HOUSE “INVESTING IN MANUFACTURING COMMUNITIES
PARTNERSHIP” (IMCP) Questions for Roundtable Participants

Manufacturing Community Roundtable
Flint, Michigan
September 4, 2013

• What are examples of effective partnerships that support manufacturing in your
region? How have various federal agencies participated in them? What can we
learn from them and how can we build on existing partnerships?

• What is the optimum federal role in providing technical assistance to promote
manufacturing activities? What is the most effective way to carry out that
role? How can we ensure that all qualifying communities have fair access to
available technical assistance? What is the best way to start it, and maintain it?

• What are the gaps in federal, state, and/or local program support that need to be
addressed to support manufacturing and its related needs, such as workforce
development, site preparation, and infrastructure?

• How can brownfields or area-wide planning projects promote a local climate
that is more suited to attract private manufacturing activity and investment?
How can government efforts be streamlined and better coordinated? What
supportive institutions need to be in place?

• We know that the process for applying for federal grants can be challenging.
We also know that many communities are hamstrung because of staff shortages,
expertise gaps, and other capacity challenges. How can we streamline and
improve that process to ensure that all eligible applicants are given a fair chance
when competing for grants?

• How can we attract an optimal amount of co-investment from non-government
partners in seeding a local site reuse/redevelopment strategy? How can
capacity-challenged communities be best positioned and supported in those
efforts? What would be the appropriate federal role?

• Overall – how can the IMCP best be shaped to accelerate the resurgence of
manufacturing, and attract needed investment in manufacturing?
WHITE HOUSE “INVESTING IN MANUFACTURING COMMUNITIES
PARTNERSHIP” (IMCP) Questions for Roundtable Participants

Manufacturing Community Roundtable
Flint, Michigan
September 4, 2013

• What are examples of effective partnerships that support manufacturing in your
region? How have various federal agencies participated in them? What can we
learn from them and how can we build on existing partnerships?

• What is the optimum federal role in providing technical assistance to promote
manufacturing activities? What is the most effective way to carry out that
role? How can we ensure that all qualifying communities have fair access to
available technical assistance? What is the best way to start it, and maintain it?

• What are the gaps in federal, state, and/or local program support that need to be
addressed to support manufacturing and its related needs, such as workforce
development, site preparation, and infrastructure?

• How can brownfields or area-wide planning projects promote a local climate
that is more suited to attract private manufacturing activity and investment?
How can government efforts be streamlined and better coordinated? What
supportive institutions need to be in place?

• We know that the process for applying for federal grants can be challenging.
We also know that many communities are hamstrung because of staff shortages,
expertise gaps, and other capacity challenges. How can we streamline and
improve that process to ensure that all eligible applicants are given a fair chance
when competing for grants?

• How can we attract an optimal amount of co-investment from non-government
partners in seeding a local site reuse/redevelopment strategy? How can
capacity-challenged communities be best positioned and supported in those
efforts? What would be the appropriate federal role?

• Overall – how can the IMCP best be shaped to accelerate the resurgence of
manufacturing, and attract needed investment in manufacturing?
Subject: Fwd: This Just In: Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition (Fwd:)
From: "Mayor's Email" <Mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 10/24/2011 9:27 AM
To: <mmurray@cityofflint.com.test-google-a.com>

ForwardedMessage.eml
Subject:
This Just In: Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition
From:
Michigan Economic Development Corporation <reply@info.michiganadvantage.org>
Date:
10/24/2011 9:27 AM
To:
mayor@cityofflint.com

This Just In: Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.
Pure Michigan (R) Michigan Economic Development Program THIS JUST IN
ICHIGANADVANTAGE.ORG Linked In acebook witter ichigan Advantage Blog

Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition

Registration is open for the second annual Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition, November 15-17, 2011. Event
highlights include two and a half days of experiencing innovative Description: accelerate michigan.jpgcompany pitches,
exciting student ideas, keynotes from leading entrepreneurs and investors as well as multiple receptions and networking
opportunities.

Fifty-three mid- to late-stage start-up businesses have been chosen as semifinalists for the $1 million competition. The
53 semifinalist companies will deliver their business pitches to investors on November 15-17 at the Ann Arbor-
Ypsilanti Marriott at Eagle Crest for the chance to win a grand prize of $500,000 as well as other cash and prizes.

More than 35 venture capital investors are confirmed to participate onsite. Confirmed speakers include Lieutenant
Governor Brian Calley, University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman; New Economy Initiative of Southeast
Michigan Executive Director Dave Egner; Michigan Economic Development Corporation President and CEO Michael
A. Finney; Wayne State University President Allan Gilmour; Business Leaders of Michigan CEO Doug Rothwell; and
Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon.

The Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition is an international business plan competition designed to highlight
Michigan as a robust and vibrant venue for innovation and business opportunity. The competition will fuel innovation-
based business growth by uncovering the best and brightest new business concepts from local and global entrepreneurs,
exposing those opportunities to potential investment capital and fostering their growth within Michigan. The
competition targets student concepts with longer-term business viability. With more than $50k for the students and a
total of $1 million in cash winnings, the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition is the world’s largest business
plan competition.

To qualify for the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition prize monies, businesses must make a commitment to
locate and grow in Michigan. These companies must also be past proof of concept and in the commercial stage of
business development.

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation is a sponsor of Accelerate Michigan. Visit here to see a complete
list of sponsors, to register or to learn about exhibit opportunities.

This communication was sent to you because you requested email communications from the MEDC.
To ensure that you receive future emails, please add reply@info.michiganadvantage.org to your safe senders list.

To unsubscribe or to update your subscriptions, modify your password or email address at any time visit your
Subscriber Preferences Page. You will need to use your email address to log in. If you have questions or problems with
the subscription service, please contact support@govdelivery.com.

This service is provided to you at no charge by Michigan Economic Development Corporation. Do not respond to this
email.
This email was sent to mayor@cityofflint.com , on behalf of: Michigan Economic Development Corporation · 300 N.
Washington Sq. · Lansing, MI 48913 · 888-522-0103 Powered by GovDelivery

Attachments:
ForwardedMessage.eml 26.1 KB
Subject: Invitation to Manufacturing Community Roundtable in Flint, September 4, 2013
From: Dayne Walling <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 8/15/2013 5:15 PM
To: Jananich@att.net, BMcGarry@senate.michigan.gov
CC: mmurray@cityofflint.com, Overmeyer.patricia@epa.gov, matt.ward@strategiesdc.com,
catherine.sims@emsus.com, chris.rossomando@emsus.com, abraham.parker@emsus.com
Reply-to: Catherine.Sims@emsus.com

August 15, 2013

On behalf of the City of Flint, I am pleased to invite you to a "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" to be held in
Flint on September 4, 2013. This Roundtable will convene leadership from the federal and state governments, local
governments in the region, the private sector, educational and philanthropic partners, and other key officials to discuss
how to revitalize communities and boost manufacturing expansion in communities like Flint. We are pleased to be
hosting this Roundtable in partnership with the Obama Administration, and are excited that Senator Debbie Stabenow
and Congressman Kildee, among others, are confirmed to speak at this event. Please review the attached invitation, the
Roundtable agenda, and a briefing sheet explaining our objectives. And please RSVP by responding to this email or
contacting Catherine Sims at catherine.sims@emsus.com by August 20. Thank you for your consideration - I look
forward to seeing you in Flint!

Mayor Dayne Walling

Enclosures (3)

-- Dayne Walling Mayor, City of Flint City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw St. Flint, MI 48502 810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com www.cityofflint.com follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments-1/Flint-Roundtable-Draft-Agenda-August-12_V2.docx
Attachments-1/Manufacturing-Roundtable-Overall-Briefing-Sheet.docx
Attachments-1/ananich-walling-invite.pdf
Subject: Invitation to Manufacturing Community Roundtable in Flint, September 4, 2013
From: Dayne Walling <mayor@cityofflint.com>
Date: 8/15/2013 5:07 PM
To: woodrowstanley@house.mi.gov
CC: mmurray@cityofflint.com, Overmeyer.patricia@epa.gov, matt.ward@strategiesdc.com,
catherine.sims@emsus.com, chris.rossomando@emsus.com, abraham.parker@emsus.com
Reply-to: Catherine.Sims@emsus.com

August 15, 2013

On behalf of the City of Flint, I am pleased to invite you to a "Manufacturing Community Roundtable" to be held in
Flint on September 4, 2013. This Roundtable will convene leadership from the federal and state governments, local
governments in the region, the private sector, educational and philanthropic partners, and other key officials to discuss
how to revitalize communities and boost manufacturing expansion in communities like Flint. We are pleased to be
hosting this Roundtable in partnership with the Obama Administration, and are excited that Senator Debbie Stabenow
and Congressman Kildee, among others, are confirmed to speak at this event. Please review the attached invitation, the
Roundtable agenda, and a briefing sheet explaining our objectives. And please RSVP by responding to this email or
contacting Catherine Sims at catherine.sims@emsus.com by August 20. Thank you for your consideration - I look
forward to seeing you in Flint!

Mayor Dayne Walling

Enclosures (3)

-- Dayne Walling Mayor, City of Flint City Hall, 1101 S. Saginaw St. Flint, MI 48502 810-766-7346
mayor@cityofflint.com www.cityofflint.com follow me on twitter at http://twitter.com/mayorwalling

Attachments/Flint-Roundtable-Draft-Agenda-August-12_V2.docx
Attachments/Manufacturing-Roundtable-Overall-Briefing-Sheet.docx
Attachments/Stanley-walling-invite.pdf
Subject: FW: EO No. 2016-1 Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 1/13/2016 1:11 PM
To: "Karen Weaver - City of Flint (kweaver@cityofflint.com)" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, 'Maxine Murray'
<mmurray@cityofflint.com>

Greetings,

Attached for your reference is the Executive Order creating the Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee.
Thank you, again, for your prompt response for scheduling tomorrow’s conference call.

~Stacie

Stacie Clayton, Assistant Director

Harvey Hollins III, Director

Governor’s Office of Urban Initiatives

3044 West Grand Boulevard, Ste. 14-650

Detroit, MI 48202

313.456.4994 (office)

claytons3@michigan.gov

Attachments-2/EO+2016-1.pdf
Subject: FWICC Items for 4.29 meeting
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 4/27/2016 5:52 PM
To: "'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us'" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Creagh, Keith (DEQ)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, 'Marc
Edwards' <edwardsm@vt.edu>, "'Mona Hanna-Attisha'" <MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, "Hollins, Harvey (GOV)"
<hollinsh@michigan.gov>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)" <KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)"
<KhouriN@michigan.gov>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>,
"'jim@koskiconsult.com'" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Becker, Timothy (DHHS)" <beckert1@michigan.gov>,
'Lawrence Reynolds' <lrey52@gmail.com>, "'Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)'" <lsulliva@kettering.edu>,
"'mvalacak@gchd.us'" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "'Karen Weaver - City of Flint (kweaver@cityofflint.com)'"
<kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)" <WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "'Michael McDaniel
(fastflint2016@gmail.com)'" <fastflint2016@gmail.com>, 'Scott Hiipakka' <shiipakka@gmail.com>, "Baird, Richard
(GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "Weise, Kevin (GOV)" <WeiseK@michigan.gov>, "Guerrant, Kyle (MDE)"
<GuerrantK@michigan.gov>, "Lord, Daniel (DNR)" <LordD1@michigan.gov>, "Adler, Ari (GOV)"
<AdlerA@michigan.gov>, "'sjones@cityofflint.com'" <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)"
<LyonN2@michigan.gov>, "'sbranch@cityofflint.com'" <sbranch@cityofflint.com>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)"
<ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "'Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)'" <vvanburen@cityofflint.com>
CC: "'Bishop, Melissa'" <MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Thelen, Mary Beth (DEQ)" <THELENM2@michigan.gov>,
"Garza, Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)" <DoyleM4@michigan.gov>,
"Grijalva, Nancy (DHHS)" <GrijalvaN@michigan.gov>, "Granger, Patricia (DHHS)" <GrangerP@michigan.gov>,
"'mmurray@cityofflint.com'" <mmurray@cityofflint.com>, "Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>,
"Houseman, Jennifer (MDE)" <HousemanJ1@michigan.gov>, "Burton, Diane (LARA)" <BurtonD2@michigan.gov>,
"Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)" <wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>, "Biehl, Laura (GOV)" <BiehlL@michigan.gov>,
"Bedan, Morgan (GOV)" <BedanM@michigan.gov>, "Saunders, Kelli (GOV)" <saundersk1@michigan.gov>

Greetings,

Attached is the agenda for this Friday’s FWICC meeting and the draft Lead Copper Rules Resolution that will be
discussed under New Business.

Please note this week ONLY the meeting will be held at the Genesee County Community Action Resource Department
(GCCARD) Building in Flint. The building is located at 601 N. Saginaw between University Avenue and Fourth
Avenue.

The parking lot is behind the building and can be entered from University Avenue or Fourth Avenue. The building
entrance is located off the parking lot.

Best regards,

~Stacie

Stacie Clayton, Assistant Director
Harvey Hollins III, Director

Governor’s Office of Urban Initiatives

3044 West Grand Boulevard, Ste. 14-650

Detroit, MI 48202

313.456.4994 (office)

claytons3@michigan.gov

Attachments-3/FWICC Agenda for 4.29.16.pdf
Attachments-3/FWICC LCR Resolution 2016-04 Final 4.29.16.pdf
Subject: NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of
all
From: "Clayton, Stacie (GOV)" <claytons3@michigan.gov>
Date: 11/17/2016 1:59 PM
To: "Creagh, Keith (DNR)" <creaghk@michigan.gov>, 'Marc Edwards' <edwardsm@vt.edu>, 'Mona Hanna-
Attisha' <MHanna1@hurleymc.com>, "'Sylvester Jones'" <sjones@cityofflint.com>, "Kelenske, Chris (MSP)"
<KelenskeC@michigan.gov>, "Khouri, Nick (TREASURY)" <KhouriN@michigan.gov>,
"'jim@koskiconsult.com'" <jim@koskiconsult.com>, "Lyon, Nick (DHHS)" <LyonN2@michigan.gov>,
'Lawrence Reynolds' <lrey52@gmail.com>, "'Laura L. Sullivan (lsulliva@kettering.edu)'"
<lsulliva@kettering.edu>, "'mvalacak@gchd.us'" <mvalacak@gchd.us>, "'Karen Weaver - City of Flint
(kweaver@cityofflint.com)'" <kweaver@cityofflint.com>, "Whiston, Brian (MDE)"
<WhistonB@michigan.gov>, "Zimmer, Mike (GOV)" <ZimmerM1@michigan.gov>, "'Michael McDaniel
(fastflint2016@gmail.com)'" <fastflint2016@gmail.com>, "'Vicki VanBuren (vvanburen@cityofflint.com)'"
<vvanburen@cityofflint.com>, "'jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us'" <jcurtis@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Hollins, Harvey
(GOV)" <hollinsh@michigan.gov>
CC: "Tkaczyk, Judy (DNR)" <TKACZYKJ@michigan.gov>, 'Schuyler Davis' <sdavis@cityofflint.com>, "Garza,
Oralya (MSP)" <GarzaO@michigan.gov>, "Doyle, Maureen (Treasury)" <DoyleM4@michigan.gov>,
"Richards, Denise (DHHS)" <richardsd@michigan.gov>, 'Maxine Murray' <mmurray@cityofflint.com>,
"Carefoot, Karen (MDE)" <CarefootK@michigan.gov>, "Wisniewski, Wendy (GOV)"
<wisniewskiw@michigan.gov>, "Baird, Richard (GOV)" <bairdr@michigan.gov>, "'Bishop, Melissa'"
<MBishop@co.genesee.mi.us>, "Steckelberg, Larry (TREASURY)" <SteckelbergL@michigan.gov>,
"Scorsone, Eric (TREASURY)" <ScorsoneE@michigan.gov>, "Manolakoudis, Virginia (GOV)"
<ManolakoudisV@michigan.gov>

NEWS RELEASE: Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of all

Greetings FWICC Members,

As you may recall, FWICC supported the Flint Water Advisory Task Force recommendation to re-establish the
Michigan Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Commission. On May 20, 2016, Governor
Snyder signed Executive Order 2016-9 establishing the Michigan Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board,
chaired by Lt. Governor Calley.

Today the Commission released its report and recommendations. We will have a presentation on the final
report and its recommendations at our December FWICC meeting. In the meantime, below is the news
release with a link to the report.

COMM News Release

Contacts:
Laura Biehl, Lt. Governor’s Office
517-335-6397

Jen Eisner, DHHS
517-241-2112

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley: Eliminating child lead exposure requires committed efforts of all
Calley unveils recommendations of Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board

LANSING, Mich. – In order to eliminate child lead exposure in Michigan, a greater focus on primary
prevention tactics will be crucial for success, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said today.

Gov. Rick Snyder formed the Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board in May to design a long-term strategy
for addressing child lead exposure and poisoning in Michigan. Snyder appointed Calley to chair the board and
asked for recommendations by November.

“The impact of lead exposure on a child can be life-alte