Literature 45—Understanding Literature

PLAY ON WORDS

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rama is a subcategory of fiction. Like the novel, drama has a specific setting (or settings), characters, plot with conflict, point of view, and theme. The point of view of a play, film, or TV show is usually third person, because members of the audience view what is happening within the play from the outside. A character can tell the story from his or her point of view, but the audience is a third eye—seeing all that occurs in the play, even what happens while the character is gone from the scene. Drama is meant to be acted out and enjoyed. Drama is easy to watch because the story is acted out with props, scenery, and dialogue. Think about your first experience with drama. Did you ever act in a play? I got to be Michael in my fifth-grade play, Peter Pan. My mother bought me footed pajamas, and I thought I was super cool because I was a girl acting as a boy. At the time, I didn’t know that women acting as men can be commonplace in theater. I believed that I was making some bold statement for womankind everywhere—too bad the only audience was the parents and relatives of my classmates. I convinced myself that someone out there was impressed. I still remember the first three speaking lines I had in the play. I probably have those lines memorized due to the fact that I not only repeated the words, but acted with the words. A relationship occurred between myself and the script. Has that ever happened to you? Maybe you didn’t act in a school play, but in a skit or some other type of drama. Have you ever made movies with your friends on a camcorder? One of my most prized possessions is an old video production I created with my neighbor when we were eleven or twelve. We acted out courtroom dramas, commercials (laxatives and Jenny Craig

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commercials being our top choices), and endless talk shows. What treasures! What great blackmail potential I have! Nevertheless, to some extent, we all have experience with drama. Maybe you didn’t act in front of a camcorder like I did, but you have seen something acted out on the stage, on the big screen, or on your television. Often times, as viewers or as audience members, we connect with words that actors and actresses share. We may even remember these words in our memory. We can remember the words because we can visualize what happened as the words were being spoken. Senses were being used. This is the greatest aspect of drama—being able to add sensory experience to the written experience. For lesson 3, now that you have a good foundation for fiction because of your experience with The Outsiders, you will read a play titled Twelve Angry Men. As you read, you will not be getting the full sensory experience, because no one will be acting it out for you (unless you have eleven really good friends that want to kill some time by reading with you). However, after reading the play, you might want to rent the movie version of this play. There is an old black-and-white movie with Henry Fonda when he was young (the version I would highly recommend) and a newer, made-for-TV version made in 2001. Watching the play being acted will allow you to sit and take in how the play was intended to be shared. As you read, you will need to find the five key components of fiction writing (learned in lesson 1) at work in the play. Read and enjoy as these words become a play in your mind. Ponder the words used and the way in which they are used. Reginald Rose is masterful as he plays with words to create a drama filled with intense characters, realistic dialogue, and thoughtprovoking themes.

Lesson 3: Play on Words

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........ Prentice Hall Literature. Be sure to pay attention to the stage directions written by Rose......... A movie version was made several years later in 1957.. do the Let’s Check Your Mastery..... the setting moves to a jury room.... and apply what you read in act 1 of Twelve Angry Men.....Joe . Most of the play takes place in a jury room. interpret. and Christine Beckert Long........ Platinum version... in your mind.. an eloquent and wealthy man who seeks facts in the case ____ 3.... 5 Recall. then a stage version was written ten years after the first television play ran.... The foreman is Juror #1.... a dull-witted man who listens intently Interesting bunch of men! Hope you did well. the author of Twelve Angry Men.. (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.. makeup. 310. What You’ll Learn to Do This play is about twelve jurors... Staging is the art of bringing a play to life..... 1.......... Answer the following questions and then check your answers in the Answer Key at the back of this course manual...... is the stage direction. 1 Match each character to his description... The setting is twofold.. and apply what you read in act 3 of Twelve Angry Men.. Frances Earle. a soft-spoken old man who yearns to be courageous ____ 5... was born in 1920.. . Then.. Many people want to skip over the stage directions as they read plays. but don’t! Critical information is given in the stage directions! 1 Claro. etc.. Once you are familiar with each character........ Read through the character list in your copy of Twelve Angry Men.. Do not submit your answers to Independent Study. .. interpret. Inc.. 1989)..... and how to act.. 3 Recall... Twelve Angry Men Read the character list and become familiar with each character... a petty man with authority who isn’t overly intelligent ____ 4.... You will be asked on your Speedback assignment to match characters in the play to the types of characters we learned in lesson 1.. Match each character to his description.... The twelve major characters are the twelve jurors.. These gestures and unspoken actions are truly what make a play great. what to do... lighting.............. scenery. Character Descriptions in Twelve Angry Men Reginald Rose. The most important aspect of staging....... a shallow snob who has no real understanding of people ____ 6... and apply what you read in act 2 of Twelve Angry Men.... an obnoxious bully who forms opinions too easily ____ 11.... Stage directions are written in italics... Then. a prejudiced and angry man with no real accomplishments ____ 7.. a humorless man who forces his ways onto others ____ 12.......... Let’s Check Your Mastery Objective 1 Match each character to his description by writing the correct juror’s number out to the side of his description.. 4 Recall.... though. picture what the actors are doing and how they are doing it. 40 Literature 45—Understanding Literature Reading Assignment .......... All of the characters are American males..... He intentionally wrote this Emmy-winning play for television after being on jury duty.... 2 Learn the definition of each informal fallacy and differentiate examples of each informal fallacy.. interpret. We are reading the play version in three acts. a naive young man who has a hard time speaking his mind ____ 9.. Stage directions tell the characters how to say their written script..... a fickle man who changes his opinion due to others’ views ____ 8... The drama begins inside the courtroom at the end of a murder trial.. .. a compassionate man who seeks justice ____ 2...... props. sound effects... ____ 1... .. a humble refugee who pleases others but truly wants justice ____ 10.... Staging includes all the necessary elements needed to make a play: actors....

solid facts in their persuasive tactics. we see this all the time in politics.. Commercials on the radio and TV use this tactic...” Lesson 3: Play on Words 7. in topics such as gun control.. 41 . If I were to use a post hoc. I can’t even get my ears 3.. When peers pressure their friends into taking drugs or alcohol.. not all the jurors use good... Commercials also use the “everyone else is buying it” technique. Sadly. so you should... abortion. Then.. The mother doesn’t want her daughter to go. 5. Learn the definition of each informal fallacy and differentiate examples of each informal fallacy... For instance.. most people stand somewhere in the middle instead of fighting tooth and nail on the extreme side. After her visit. In the middle of the argument. People generalize about people in certain occupations. once you have become skilled in the art of identifying informal fallacies.. So she must have had something to do with the death of my cat. Post Hoc (after this. nationalities.. “Women are emotionally unstable” is another generalization I’ve heard. there may be some men who seem like pigs to some women....... Objective 2 For instance. dress... That’s why it is called a red herring. As you listen to people talk this week. the daughter says.. A lot of commercials use super models. but people use them all the time... Ad Hominem (against the person) This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when a person slanders or makes rude comments against the person or people opposing the argument. actors or actresses. These false ideas and beliefs are called informal fallacies... A bad argument has a conclusion based on false ideas and beliefs... My grandmother must be a cat killer. For instance.. A good argument has a conclusion based on solid reasons and facts. see how many generalizations you catch people making. A definition and example of each are provided. True.. people often generalize about men and women. and environmental safety. .. Informal Fallacies 1.. 6. Sound ridiculous? Informal fallacies are ridiculous.. but definitely not all men are pigs.. Politicians try to find one small weakness in their opponent and then blow it up to a larger scale— making the other person seem incompetent. Literature 45—Understanding Literature 4..... True. This is also called bandwagon.. they usually use this technique—”everyone else is doing it.. I would blame my grandmother for unintentionally killing my cat. Read through the following fallacies... Everyone is not doing the same thing. too. an example would be “she’s innocent because she’s innocent” or “he’s guilty because he’s guilty. Some people can’t see that there could possibly be middle ground.. Red Herring This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when a person throws into the argument something totally unrelated in order to either sidetrack or confuse the other person.. women tend to be more emotional than men.. An example of this would be if a daughter was having an argument with her mother about going to a party. Everything was fine with the cat until my grandma came. my cat died.. Either/or reasoning is just that: you are either for something or against it. In a jury room.. “You don’t let me do anything.. you can see that it is just a technique. many people think you are either for gun control or against gun control. do the Let’s Check Your Mastery.. Appeals to False Authority/ Bandwagon This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when a person tries to get others to think like him or her by persuading them that a famous person or many others think that way.. Obviously. Sadly. Circular Reasoning This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when people state their reason as their argument. my grandmother recently visited. Either/Or Reasoning This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when a person states that there are only two options—there’s no middle ground or gray area.. A generalization generalizes... they will try to use persuasion to convince each other of their opinions. Because these jurors will be trying to come to a decision of guilty or innocent.. and even age. Bill Clinton is a good example of one who had a lot of ad hominem tactics thrown his way. “I don’t like her because I don’t like her” would be an example of circular reasoning. 2... that is the greatest aspect of human behavior.. and sports stars to convince people to buy their products.. because of this) This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when someone blames what is happening on something that happened before that is unrelated.. Hasty Generalization This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when someone creates a generalization of some sort. It’s like a fish being suddenly thrown into the argument.. “All men are pigs” is a phrase I’ve heard before...” Hopefully. but that doesn’t mean all women are more emotional than men or the least bit emotionally unstable.

... See how courage is used in the first act.. while one man stands alone in his own conviction.. When an unrelated topic is addressed in an argument.. Answer the following questions and then check your answers in the Answer Key at the back of this course manual... Slippery Slope This type of unsound argument or reasoning occurs when a person assumes that just because a person is headed down a wrong path or made a wrong choice. Twelve Angry Men Read act 1... “You’re either a friend or an enemy. interpret.. Each question will ask you to recall......” 16.. . however.. “Please say yes! You didn’t say yes last week.. interpret.. Now..pierced. For instance.......... Obviously.. the jury will deliberate in the jury room. A young man is on trial for the murder of his father... “You told a white lie! You’re a fraud!” 17. let’s begin reading the play......... everyone was happy.......... . Let’s Check Your Mastery Write the type of informal fallacy being used in each example....... “After she came.. or that everyone who has taken candy from a grocery store is going to be a criminal... “All old people are bad drivers.” The daughter is bringing up a topic unrelated to the argument at hand...... “Everyone’s doing it—come on!” 15. Have you ever been in that situation? Maybe everyone around you believed or thought a different way than you? How did that make you feel? Courage is often needed to stand up for what we believe..” 18. he is putting himself and his beliefs on the line.. Your Speedback assignment will have you match each character to an informal fallacy he made throughout the play... and apply what happened in the first act......” 19.” Reading Assignment . 13... a slippery slope fallacy would assume that everyone who tries alcohol is going to be an alcoholic. If no one votes “not guilty. Most of the jury thinks one way..” he will stand up to his promise and vote “guilty” like the rest... Recall. it is called a red herring....... What are your thoughts on Juror #8? I think he has a lot of confidence in himself to go out on a limb and stand up against others. it seems.. so let’s dive into what happens.............. I love that the act leaves us in suspense— wondering how the vote will go. Act 1 Now that you are familiar with the characters and what informal fallacies are... At first.. “He’s a jerk because he’s a jerk!” 14. Take note of how each character thinks and if he uses informal fallacies in his thinking... they all thought he was crazy. 42 Literature 45—Understanding Literature Objective 3 8. Do not submit your answers to Independent Study.... .. We’ll see in act 2 how this is working for him...” 20..... Now that you are finished with act 1. How did you react to the switchblade brought in by Juror #8? I think that was the first time many of the jurors actually thought that there was any substance to what Juror #8 was thinking. that person will follow that path all the way. he has put a lot into this trial—more than anyone else.... ... In the first act. “Don’t vote for him! He’s mean to animals... not everyone who makes a wrong choice will go all the way down the wrong path. and apply what you read in act 1 of Twelve Angry Men. We’ve already discussed the setting...... complete the Let’s Check Your Mastery..

... interpret... b. c... He found a knife at a pawn shop exactly like the knife used as a murder weapon.. The el tracks are a. landlord hearing the murder from his downstairs apartment d. the act ends in a pretty suspenseful part.. Which is not one of Juror #8’s reasons for uncertainty about the boy’s guilt? a.... the subway system b.... Wow! Once again. c. Juror #7 d. answer the Let’s Check Your Mastery for act 2..... The boy has had a hard life. Juror #8 26.... Juror #3 reflecting on his son c..... Reading Assignment .... We always assume “innocent until proven guilty. He has a good relationship with his mother.... 27. He can yell “I’ll kill him” and not mean it literally... Literature 45—Understanding Literature . He has been in reform school... interpret..... Objective 4 Act 2 As you begin to read act 2.. do you believe the boy is guilty or innocent? Why or why not? Read act 2 and see if your mind changes.. once again take note of each juror and whether he uses informal fallacies. We always let the judge decide. old man seeing the boy running down the stairs c. hanging out on the streets 28.... Juror #2 thinks the boy is guilty because “no one proved otherwise. He has been arrested for mugging and knifing. elevated railroad tracks d.. Juror #9 b.. d.. at a friend’s b. a bus system 23. 24. Juror #8 taking the knife out Hope you did well! Let’s get to act 2... but this poor kid from the slums with a bad background and a bad track record has to mean it if he yells it.. at the movies c. Also. working d. b.....” b.. grounded railroad tracks c... d.... Lesson 3: Play on Words 43 .. in the jury room d. try to find who is Juror #8’s main antagonist. 25.... We always assume “guilty until proven innocent. 21. The stage directions were critical to which part because no words were spoken? a..... What is not part of the boy’s past behavior as it is presented in the play? a.... and apply what you read in act 2 of Twelve Angry Men. Before we move on...... His dad beat him.......... What are your feelings about him at this time? Are you like me? Don’t you want to shake him into common sense and decency? He’s pretty much a hypocrite. woman across the street seeing the murder through the window 22.. Why do you think he is on a personal vengeance to send this boy away? He said he would like to be his executioner! Who would really want to do that? Think about all of these ideas as we venture into reading act 3..... He likes being on the jury.. Juror #1 c.. I’m sure you are anxious to find out who cast the “not guilty” vote. the final act.. . d... Juror #3 is truly heated up.. Each question will ask you to recall.” c. I think we found our antagonist.. Twelve Angry Men Read act 2...... Juror #8 is the protagonist as he takes a stand against the other jurors.... Let’s Check Your Mastery Read each multiple-choice question and answer to the best of your ability.” In what way is his thinking in conflict with the United States legal system? a.. Recall. Which was not a fact discussed to prove the boy’s guilt? a.. Do not submit your answers to Independent Study.. the boy said he was where? a... Which character seems the most determined to find the defendant guilty? Why? After hearing the facts of the court... and apply what happened in the second act. He didn’t think the defense counsel crossexamined well..... Answer the following questions and then check your answers in the Answer Key at the back of this course manual....... Who set up the conditions of the vote at the end of the act? a.. We always let the jury decide... The night of the murder. old man who lived underneath hearing the murder b.. in the courtroom b.

... I think act 3 really gives us a flavor of all of the jurors’ personalities. 44 Literature 45—Understanding Literature .. 29. As the play resolves.” to whom is he referring? a... like Juror #8... Why does Juror #9 relate to the old man? a. the landlord’s testimony 32.... When Juror #3 screams in the end of the act. Juror #4 c. Juror #3 has said before that when a person yells those words. What scene of the crime was recreated by the jurors? a.. How does the end resolve the conflicts? How many conflicts need to be resolved? Which jurors have the hardest time changing their minds? What are your opinions of Juror #8...... c... Who did Juror #3 automatically assume changed his vote? a. “I’ll kill him”? a. What is the first point of argument Juror #8 questions being true in the case? a... Recall.. Hope you are scoring well on the Let’s Check Your Mastery questions! These questions will help you succeed in the Speedback assignment. d.. ask yourself how effective the end is. Who is the third juror to change his vote to not guilty? a.. They have the same occupation... the author of this play. Juror #7 truly wasn’t concerned about the boy’s sentence.. b.. Reginald Rose. the man being murdered d... did a great job of creating characters who truly represent our society. he was truly trying to decide from the facts about the fate of the boy.. Juror #7 b. Twelve Angry Men Read act 3.. Let’s move on to act 3—the final act. Juror #8 likes that Juror #3 is angry. Juror #3 30. Juror #5 b.. Even though Juror #4 was one of the last to change his vote............. Juror #3 really would like to kill Juror #8.. the store clerk’s testimony d. “I’ll kill him.... interpret... b.. the lady’s testimony b. .. social status.... Juror #3 really does kill Juror #8. Juror #11 d.. Juror #9 c.. the boy screaming “I’m going to kill you” 35.. he or she means them... Also. look for the tension that is building between certain jurors. Do not submit your answers to Independent Study.. and Juror #10 in particular? Now... Why is it ironic that Juror #3 screams. See if you can pinpoint the climax.... and then we find out who he is at the beginning of act 2? a.. while other people tend to be like Juror #3—stubborn and biased... Juror #12 36.. Juror #11 c.. the boy running down the stairs b........ All of us can think of people we know who are considerate and thoughtful of others.... and apply what you read in act 3 of Twelve Angry Men... Juror #3. Juror #1 c... Strong signs will indicate that the action of the play is reaching the climax.. Juror #10 was so caught up in prejudice and bias that he couldn’t even create a solid argument.. Juror #7 31... look to see what conflict types are apparent in this act. Objective 5 Act 3 As you read the final act.. Juror #9 d.. Let’s Check Your Mastery Read each multiple-choice question and answer to the best of your ability. Juror #5 34.. the old man’s testimony c..... only about going to his play.. Juror #8 b... Juror #11 b. Juror #5 d.. Rose is making a great statement in this play about how we as people judge others so easily by outward appearances. 33. They both wear glasses. and economic background.... Answer the following questions and then check your answers in the Answer Key at the back of this course manual... Which juror changes his vote at the end of act 1. Many people automatically assume people are a certain . the old man getting to the door c... read on my friend! Reading Assignment ... They are from the same town.. d.. c........ Juror #2 d.... They are both old and lonely......

If you need to review any of those from lesson 1 and lesson 2 before attempting Speedback assignment 3. Watch yourself this next week and see if you do judge people based on appearances. some African Americans on trial went to jail or prison.. Juror #8 c. Juror #3 43. Juror #4 c. Answer the following questions and then check your answers in the Answer Key at the back of this course manual. kind vs.. d. b. Hopefully. you’ve thought about yourself and whether you are quick to judge other people. c. Juror #1 d. Who is the last juror to leave the jury room? a. He really thinks the boy is innocent. like Juror #8 did for the boy on trial. Do not submit your answers to Independent Study. Who is the last juror to assume the boy is guilty? a. Have you ever misjudged someone? I think we all have. Then... mean vs. truly get to know others for who they are.. 39.. Juror #10 b.. Most of the jurors turn their backs on whom due to his prejudice against people from the slums? a. You will be asked to pick out examples of informal fallacies from the play. the world would be a better place to live. Hinton does a remarkable job in The Outsiders of relaying this similar theme of misjudging people. justice. shy c. Juror #3 b. eleven to one d. Who was the first person to remember that the woman testified with glasses on? a.. What is the vote at the beginning of act 3? a. Let’s Check Your Mastery Literature 45—Understanding Literature Read each multiple-choice question and answer to the best of your ability. make a change in your life.way depending upon how they look.. now would be a good time. Juror #6 41. Juror #10 c. Juror #12 d... when you are ready. Why does Juror #7 really want to declare a hung trial? a. E. He grew up in the slums. What are the best adjectives to describe Juror #8 versus Juror #3? a. nine to three b. and respect. many court cases in the South reflected much of what happened in this play. He’s confused. Juror #8 d. at the time this play was on television. b. He listened to the trial. c. Jurors tended to be biased against African Americans... move on to Speedback assignment 3. He has show tickets for the evening.. Interestingly. intelligent Lesson 3: Play on Words 45 . stubborn d. many white criminals were set free due to the judgment the jurors had in their minds of what a white person was... Juror #4 b.. Good luck! May the force be with you! . thoughtful vs. On the flip side.. and seek fairness and justice in all dealings with others. complete the Let’s Check Your Mastery on act 3. 40. kind b.. 37. six to six c. dim-witted vs. Why does Juror #5 have so much information about using switchblades and the angle with which to stab a person? a. not worry about where a person comes from. Do you think biases still exist today? Who do you think is the recipient of biases? Why do you think that happens? Will our society ever be bias-free? I think this play gives us a lot to think about.. Now that you are finished reading the play.. not because of guilt. but because of biases... View all people with fairness. and find examples of literary elements within the play. He’s a lawyer... d.. He’s a criminal... If all of us could put biases aside. Juror #11 42. relate the five key components of fiction directly to the play. if needed. Juror #1 b. S. He really thinks the boy is guilty. Juror #10 44. Juror #2 d.. sadly. Then.. four to eight 38.. Juror #3 c.

46 Literature 45—Understanding Literature .

. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of an ad hominem? (See objective 2...) a. “They’re all the same”—speaking about people from the slums having no values. b. The boy is from the slums. so he’s a murderer. “You’re either with us or against us.... The boy is from the slums.. “The man’s a dangerous killer.) a. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of circular reasoning? (See objective 2. b.... See your Read Me First pamphlet for instructions. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of a red herring? (See objective 2.. c. The murder was committed after the boy had a fight with his father.. d. then transfer them to your Speedback answer form..) a.” b.. c.. You could see it. The murder was committed after the boy had a fight with his father.. so he’s a murderer.. The murder was committed after the boy had a fight with his father...” 2.. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of a hasty generalization? (See objective 2. 6.” 5. so the boy must be guilty... Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of a post hoc? (See objective 2... b. You may either submit your completed answer form to Independent Study for processing... “They’re all the same”—speaking about people from the slums having no values.... or you may use WebGrade for immediate grading. d. c.. “You’re either with us or against us.. “They’re all the same”—speaking about people from the slums having no values. c. The boy is from the slums. Juror #3 talking about his own son as reasoning for the boy being guilty. You could see it..” d.” b.” 3. d. d.. “He’s guilty because he’s guilty.) a.Literature 45—Understanding Literature LESSON 3 Speedback Assignment Mark all answers here. b... Multiple Choice 1.” c.) a.” c.” d..... You can see it on his face.. so the boy must be guilty. so he’s a murderer. You can see it on his face... You could see it... The boy is from the slums...) a. “They’re all the same”—speaking about people from the slums having no values. so the boy must be guilty.. The murder was committed after the boy had a fight with his father. Juror #3 talking about his own son as reasoning for the boy being guilty... You could see it..” 4.. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of a slippery slope? (See objective 2...... “The man’s a dangerous killer.. “You are the only one voting not guilty.... so he’s a murderer... “You are the only one voting not guilty.. “The man’s a dangerous killer.. Lesson 3: Speedback Assignment 47 . . “He’s guilty because he’s guilty.. so the boy must be guilty. “The man’s a dangerous killer..

” c. Who is the main antagonist in the play? (See objective 2. nature d. society c. the courtroom b. 16. Everyone enters the jury room.” c. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of either/or reasoning? (See objective 2.) a. The judge speaks to the jury. It represents the closure and justice Juror #8 brought to the trial. “You’re either with us or against us. character vs. Juror #1 c. “You are the only one voting not guilty. Juror #6 d. What is the last thing that happens during the resolution? (See objective 5. himself 14. and 5.) a. 4. c.) a. Juror #4 12. What juror has the most intense character vs.” d. Who is the protagonist in the play? (See objective 3.7.) a.) a. Everyone votes. Juror #3 talking about his own son as reasoning for the boy being guilty. Juror #2 c. You can see it on his face. c. the murder scene d. It was open and represents the openness of the opinions shared by the members of the jury. Juror #3 and Juror #8 reenact the stabbing. Juror #8 b. the courtroom lobby 10. All the jurors turn their backs on Juror #10 during his biased speech. 4.” b. Juror #3 c. c. 48 Literature 45—Understanding Literature . closing the knife closes the trial. Juror #8 d. 8. Juror #3 15. b. He was the one who walked the same streets as the boy and bought it at the pawn shop. d. It was the murder weapon. Everyone exits the jury room. What conflict is not evident in the play? (See objectives 3.) a. Juror #10 b. What is symbolic about Juror #8 closing the knife before leaving the jury room? (See objective 5. character vs. b.” d.) a. Juror #4 13.) a. Juror #6 talks about the eyeglasses on the lady witness. You can see it on his face. 9. What is the setting of the exposition of the play? (See objective 3. character vs. d. Juror #6 b.” b. Which quote or assumption from the play is the best example of an appeal to false authority/ bandwagon? (See objective 2. himself struggle within the jury room? (See objectives 3. Juror #3 changes his mind and votes not guilty. character b. “He’s guilty because he’s guilty. and 5.) a. “He’s guilty because he’s guilty. “You are the only one voting not guilty. 11. What is the climax to the play? (See objective 4. “You’re either with us or against us. b. Juror #3 talking about his own son as reasoning for the boy being guilty. the jury room and the courtroom c. Juror #7 d.) a. character vs. d.

In the first movie production of this play. 4. The court system in America isn’t working. “You pulled a real smart trick here. Juror #7 was in a hurry to leave so he could see a Broadway play for which he had tickets.” d. Juror #5 b.) a. Which would not be a theme in the play? (See objectives 3. “Human life don’t mean as much to them as it does to us. The Seven Year Itch. Which juror would most likely be a greaser from The Outsiders because of where he was born? (See objective 1.) a. d. an alliteration c. even if they are different. the director added in a what? (See objective 3. b. This is a very fine boy. Juror #4 c. Don’t be quick to make decisions.” c. “I think they said he stabbed somebody in the arm. Literature 45—Understanding Literature Lesson 3: Speedback Assignment 49 . By adding in the name of this play. c. Maybe it still smells on me. Juror #7 18.) a. so that viewers would know which play Juror #7 was so anxious to attend. “I use to play in a backyard that was filled with garbage. the director added in the name of this play. Don’t judge people.) a.” b. Respect others and their views. a symbol 20. Juror #11 d. an allusion b.17. an irony d.” 19. Which quote would be a hyperbole? (See objective 4. and 5.

50 Literature 45—Understanding Literature .

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