You are on page 1of 9

content

From: David Bedar Tuesday, February 07, 2017 10:21:28 AM


Subject: Re: Guidelines Document
To: Jonathan Bassett
Cc: Albert Cho Amy Worth Andrew Ziomek Anthony Patelis
Aylin Tamburrini Brian Goeselt Caitlin O'Rourke
"Caitlin O'Rourke" <caitlinor@gmail.com>,internet David Bedar Duncan Wood
Emily Lewis Gregory Drake
Isongesit Ibokette Jamie E. Bal Jamie Moore Jennifer Devlin Jennifer 
Devlin <jendevlin@gmail.com>,internet
John Fitzgerald Julie Lebeaux Kathryn K. Codd Katie Connolly Kristen Durocher
Leah A. Doyle ( Morelli )
Max F. Roberts Meghan Burns Peter B. Turner Rachel Unger Rob Greenfield
Stephen Hess Stephen Martin
Subheen Razzaqui Susan Mucci Susan Wilkins Tom Barry Ty Vignone
William Joiner

This is a very helpful, well written set of guidelines. Thanks!

And now...an essay!  I know we'll talk about all of this at the department meeting,
but I'm struggling with my (incoherent) thoughts on these issues.

Personally, I'm finding it really difficult in the current climate to teach kids to
appreciate other perspectives, "identify facts, opinions and bias in sources" and 
make evaluations based on evidence, reasoning, and rigorous, thoughtful analysis 
when we're seeing the complete opposite at the highest levels of government.  I 
really do want to protect all kids' ability to share their opinions and comfort 
worried, but it feels wrong to not call out ideas that I know will offend many of 
my students and create a hostile and potentially unsafe environment.  We obviously 
have an obligation to "strive not to Present our own personal opinion on a current 
controversial issue as more right than another viewpoint," and avoid indoctrinating
our students.  But, if the "other viewpoint" might not really be an argument about 
"about which reasonable people can disagree" and might not lead to any kind of 
intellectual, policy debate; it might just be blatantly racist.  I don't always 
want to tip‐toe around that, asking what evidence kids could provide when it's 
clear that there is none.  We need to "Teach students to distinguish between 
personal attacks and civil political disagreement," but I want to make it clear 
that some people are couching the former in the language of the latter, and that's 
bad.

We have an obligation to avoid all of the following: "Present our own personal 
opinion on a current controversial issue as more right than another viewpoint," 
"Present facts or logic that support only one side of a current controversial 
issue," "Assume that all students agree with us," and "Assume that all students 
feel comfortable disagreeing with us."  But I also think I have an obligation to 
teach civic duty and teach kids right and wrong, and about social justice and basic
Page 1
content
decency.  In the long term, what would influence kids to become thoughtful, 
responsible adult citizens ‐ seeing their teachers' passion for social justice, or 
watching them tip‐toe around and avoid controversy, and perhaps not acknowledge 
anything that's going on out of fear of having a tough conversation?  I'm not sure 
that's the kind of modeling I want to do.   This will probably be an unpopular 
opinion, but I don't actually think we should have the option of not discussing 
these issues.  I feel responsible for doing so.  School is where kids learn stuff 
and have to think;  history classroom in which we spend our time discussing big 
ideas.  Why not these?  We can help kids interpret the lessons of the past better 
than anybody.  I feel like a phony when I'm not doing that.

Thinking about the president's (and his supporters') criticisms of "political 
correctness," but from the opposite perspective, I'm worried that as a school we're
so focused on making all kids feel safe and being PC that we're not showing enough 
concern for students whose very rights to attend this school and receive an 
education are being seriously threatened.  If we make such a big deal about bias, 
safety, etc. etc. then why aren't we taking stronger positions?  I have a Muslim 
student from Bangladesh whose family is preparing to leave pretty soon.  I don't 
feel good about protecting another student's right to a so‐called "political" view 
that says my girl from Bangladesh shouldn't be allowed to sit next to him in class.
 For all our concern about creating "safe spaces," it doesn't feel like I'm 
creating such a safe space.  How, exactly, do I  "Teach students to distinguish 
between personal attacks and civil political disagreement" when "policies" are 
based on personal attacks, nativism, xenophobia, homophobia, etc.?   One of my 
students who is lesbian was harassed outside the cafe several weeks back and didn't
feel safe reporting it; another student did so on her behalf.  In a classroom 
environment, I wan't kids to understand that homophobia is not a "political 
perspective" ("well, that's just my view of things, and I'm entitled to share my 
opinion) but a perspective that's fundamentally wrong and unjust.  To use some of 
the complicated vocabulary we've learned via Tweets, some ideas are just "wrong" 
and "bad."  Sad!

In my U.S. class I'm teaching about immigration during the Gilded Age, and they 
need to know not only the facts of what happened but also the  larger lessons we 
can  of our nation's immigration story.  Do I really have to avoid saying "I think 
nativism is bad?  The eugenics movement was based in large part on immigrants 
destroying our country.  If teachers could march on Boston with students during the
Vietnam War, do I really have to wait until after class to tell a student that I 
went to a protest so I don't influence their thinking?  Isn't having an impact on 
their thinking sort of...the point?  As long as I teach them what other people are 
saying and why I think they're saying that, I feel like I should be able to present
my thesis.  We have discussions for a living, so of course I want to hear from all 
kids, and they learn when they have to listen to each other.  But..this is hard.  

I don't want to get fired for being a liberal propagandist. 

Just a few thoughts!
 
Page 2
content

Jonathan Bassett writes:
Dear Esteemed Colleagues:

The attached is a document that we were going to discuss at our half day last week 
if time allowed (it did not). It's based on a document that Jen Morrill is working 
on with her department at South; she drafted it based on an article posted by Peter
Turner. You'll recognize some of the ideas from my faculty meeting powerpoint this 
fall.

Henry has asked me to share this with the whole faculty this afternoon, and I 
wanted you to have a copy ahead of the meeting. I understand that we have not 
discussed this as a department, and had I known that Henry would ask for this to go
to everyone I would have made sure we had time for it. I don't think there's 
anything objectionable here ‐ I think it just articulates good practices that we 
all do already ‐ but we can certainly discuss it at our department meeting next 
week. 

Thank you for all your hard work, and I'll see you this afternoon!

Best,

Jonathan Bassett
History & Social Sciences Department Chair
Room 359
Newton North High School

Newton Teacher Residency Program Director
www.newton.k12.ma.us/ntr

Sincerely,

David Bedar
Newton North High School
Dept. of History and Social Sciences
321E

Page 3
content

From: Kathryn K. Codd Tuesday, February 07, 2017 4:27:08 PM


Subject: Re(3): Guidelines Document
To: Jonathan Bassett
Cc: David Bedar Albert Cho Amy Worth Andrew Ziomek
Anthony Patelis Aylin Tamburrini Brian Goeselt
Caitlin O'Rourke "Caitlin O'Rourke" <caitlinor@gmail.com>,internet
David Bedar Duncan Wood Emily Lewis
Gregory Drake Isongesit Ibokette Jamie E. Bal Jamie Moore Jennifer 
Devlin
Jennifer Devlin <jendevlin@gmail.com>,internet John Fitzgerald Julie Lebeaux
Kathryn K. Codd Katie Connolly
Kristen Durocher Leah A. Doyle ( Morelli ) Max F. Roberts Meghan 
Burns Peter B. Turner Rachel Unger
Rob Greenfield Stephen Hess Stephen Martin Subheen Razzaqui Susan Mucci
Susan Wilkins Tom Barry
Ty Vignone William Joiner

Dear history nerds,

Thanks, Jon for this.  And thank you to Peter for the article and David for the 
thoughtful reflection.

Here's my 2 cents: 

For what it's worth, it seems that kids (and I) feel that they have two options: 
avoid these discussions or get into big arguments.  I suggested to my students that
there is a 3rd way: they just ask questions.  One basic question to give them is: 
"What makes you think that?"  I suggested that sometimes the best way forward is to
seriously listen to understand and/or to push the other person to really think 
through their own arguments.  I suggested that they actually might get further with
that strategy.  A lot of kids seemed to think this was a good strategy ‐ it was 
helpful that a great student had actually modeled it the day before in class in a 
class discussion about the women's march.

Jon's email was timely as I was thinking of asking who was interested in chatting 
about some strategies. Specifically, I am trying to stategize on how to do a better
job on some of the following:  immigration, Islam, gay rights, checks and balances,
the impeachment process, the Holocaust, how to contact your congressional 
representatives, etc... as a starting list.  Wondering if anyone is interested in 
getting together to chat about possible ways to help one another, e.g. anyone have 
an excellent lesson on the gays rights movement I could steal?

I know we are all busy.  But anyone up for a strategy session?  One possibility, 
this Friday after school?  Let me know if you are interested, even if that time 
doesn't work.  I can provide snacks and coffee, or buy the first round depending on
Page 1
content
the location.

Kathryn

Jonathan Bassett writes:
David:

Your "essay" is very good, and raises a lot of the questions that we are all 
dealing with. I hope that today's faculty meeting will help, and I look forward to 
further discussion. We are in unprecedented times, and we are all struggling to do 
good.

Best,

Jonathan Bassett
History & Social Sciences Department Chair
Room 359
Newton North High School

Newton Teacher Residency Program Director
www.newton.k12.ma.us/ntr

Page 2
content

From: Isongesit Ibokette Tuesday, February 07, 2017 10:15:49 PM


Subject: Re(2): Guidelines Document
To: David Bedar
Cc: Jonathan Bassett Albert Cho Amy Worth Andrew 
Ziomek Anthony Patelis Aylin Tamburrini Brian Goeselt
Caitlin O'Rourke "Caitlin O'Rourke" <caitlinor@gmail.com>,internet
David Bedar Duncan Wood Emily Lewis
Gregory Drake Isongesit Ibokette Jamie E. Bal Jamie Moore Jennifer 
Devlin
Jennifer Devlin <jendevlin@gmail.com>,internet John Fitzgerald Julie Lebeaux
Kathryn K. Codd Katie Connolly
Kristen Durocher Leah A. Doyle ( Morelli ) Max F. Roberts Meghan 
Burns Peter B. Turner Rachel Unger
Rob Greenfield Stephen Hess Stephen Martin Subheen Razzaqui Susan Mucci
Susan Wilkins Tom Barry
Ty Vignone William Joiner

David Bedar writes:
This is a very helpful, well written set of guidelines. Thanks!

And now...an essay!  I know we'll talk about all of this at the department meeting,
but I'm struggling with my (incoherent) thoughts on these issues.

Personally, I'm finding it really difficult in the current climate to teach kids to
appreciate other perspectives, "identify facts, opinions and bias in sources" and 
make evaluations based on evidence, reasoning, and rigorous, thoughtful analysis 
when we're seeing the complete opposite at the highest levels of government.  I 
really do want to protect all kids' ability to share their opinions and comfort 
worried, but it feels wrong to not call out ideas that I know will offend many of 
my students and create a hostile and potentially unsafe environment.  We obviously 
have an obligation to "strive not to Present our own personal opinion on a current 
controversial issue as more right than another viewpoint," and avoid indoctrinating
our students.  But, if the "other viewpoint" might not really be an argument about 
"about which reasonable people can disagree" and might not lead to any kind of 
intellectual, policy debate; it might just be blatantly racist.  I don't always 
want to tip‐toe around that, asking what evidence kids could provide when it's 
clear that there is none.  We need to "Teach students to distinguish between 
personal attacks and civil political disagreement," but I want to make it clear 
that some people are couching the former in the language of the latter, and that's 
bad.

We have an obligation to avoid all of the following: "Present our own personal 
opinion on a current controversial issue as more right than another viewpoint," 
"Present facts or logic that support only one side of a current controversial 
issue," "Assume that all students agree with us," and "Assume that all students 
Page 1
content
feel comfortable disagreeing with us."  But I also think I have an obligation to 
teach civic duty and teach kids right and wrong, and about social justice and basic
decency.  In the long term, what would influence kids to become thoughtful, 
responsible adult citizens ‐ seeing their teachers' passion for social justice, or 
watching them tip‐toe around and avoid controversy, and perhaps not acknowledge 
anything that's going on out of fear of having a tough conversation?  I'm not sure 
that's the kind of modeling I want to do.   This will probably be an unpopular 
opinion, but I don't actually think we should have the option of not discussing 
these issues.  I feel responsible for doing so.  School is where kids learn stuff 
and have to think;  history classroom in which we spend our time discussing big 
ideas.  Why not these?  We can help kids interpret the lessons of the past better 
than anybody.  I feel like a phony when I'm not doing that.

Thinking about the president's (and his supporters') criticisms of "political 
correctness," but from the opposite perspective, I'm worried that as a school we're
so focused on making all kids feel safe and being PC that we're not showing enough 
concern for students whose very rights to attend this school and receive an 
education are being seriously threatened.  If we make such a big deal about bias, 
safety, etc. etc. then why aren't we taking stronger positions?  I have a Muslim 
student from Bangladesh whose family is preparing to leave pretty soon.  I don't 
feel good about protecting another student's right to a so‐called "political" view 
that says my girl from Bangladesh shouldn't be allowed to sit next to him in class.
 For all our concern about creating "safe spaces," it doesn't feel like I'm 
creating such a safe space.  How, exactly, do I  "Teach students to distinguish 
between personal attacks and civil political disagreement" when "policies" are 
based on personal attacks, nativism, xenophobia, homophobia, etc.?   One of my 
students who is lesbian was harassed outside the cafe several weeks back and didn't
feel safe reporting it; another student did so on her behalf.  In a classroom 
environment, I wan't kids to understand that homophobia is not a "political 
perspective" ("well, that's just my view of things, and I'm entitled to share my 
opinion) but a perspective that's fundamentally wrong and unjust.  To use some of 
the complicated vocabulary we've learned via Tweets, some ideas are just "wrong" 
and "bad."  Sad!

In my U.S. class I'm teaching about immigration during the Gilded Age, and they 
need to know not only the facts of what happened but also the  larger lessons we 
can  of our nation's immigration story.  Do I really have to avoid saying "I think 
nativism is bad?  The eugenics movement was based in large part on immigrants 
destroying our country.  If teachers could march on Boston with students during the
Vietnam War, do I really have to wait until after class to tell a student that I 
went to a protest so I don't influence their thinking?  Isn't having an impact on 
their thinking sort of...the point?  As long as I teach them what other people are 
saying and why I think they're saying that, I feel like I should be able to present
my thesis.  We have discussions for a living, so of course I want to hear from all 
kids, and they learn when they have to listen to each other.  But..this is hard.  

I don't want to get fired for being a liberal propagandist. 

Page 2
content
Just a few thoughts!
 

Jonathan Bassett writes:
Dear Esteemed Colleagues:

The attached is a document that we were going to discuss at our half day last week 
if time allowed (it did not). It's based on a document that Jen Morrill is working 
on with her department at South; she drafted it based on an article posted by Peter
Turner. You'll recognize some of the ideas from my faculty meeting powerpoint this 
fall.

Henry has asked me to share this with the whole faculty this afternoon, and I 
wanted you to have a copy ahead of the meeting. I understand that we have not 
discussed this as a department, and had I known that Henry would ask for this to go
to everyone I would have made sure we had time for it. I don't think there's 
anything objectionable here ‐ I think it just articulates good practices that we 
all do already ‐ but we can certainly discuss it at our department meeting next 
week. 

Thank you for all your hard work, and I'll see you this afternoon!

Best,

Jonathan Bassett
History & Social Sciences Department Chair
Room 359
Newton North High School

Newton Teacher Residency Program Director
www.newton.k12.ma.us/ntr

Sincerely,

David Bedar
Newton North High School
Dept. of History and Social Sciences
321E

David, if you get fired for doing exactly what history teachers, and indeed all 
rational and ethical‐minded adults should indeed be doing, I will be right behind 
you. Thank you for articulating very succinctly many of my self‐censored thoughts 
and questions over the last couple of months. Your very coherent thoughts have 
reminded me of the title of the Nobel Prize winning Wole Soyinka's book: The Man 
Dies in all Who Keeps Silent in the Face of Tyranny. This is a very apt summation 
Page 3
content
of some of the tip‐toeing and intellectual gymnastics that may just become the new 
norm in dealing with a real, immediate and present danger. In this latest corrosive
and toxic nativist‐driven political environment, I am concerned that the call for 
"objectivity" may just inadvertently become the most effective destructive weapon 
against social justice. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

Thank You,
++++++++++++++++++++++
Dr. Isongesit Ibokette
Dept. of History and Social Sciences
Newton North High School
Office #358C

Page 4