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EXAM ORIENTATION WORKSHOP

Purpose: To assist students in making the right choices when given the opportunity to acquire an official
evaluation of their overall English proficiency and comprehension.

TOEFL TOEFL UIMP


TOEIC IELTS Cambridge Exam *CEFR
PBT (Paper) IBT (Internet) Immersion
0 - 310 0-8 0 - 1.0 0
0 - 250
310 - 343 9 - 18 1.0 - 1.5 A1
1.0 - 1.5
347 - 393 19 - 29 2.0 - 2.5 A1

KET
255 - 400 (IELTS 3.0)
1.6 - 3.5 A2
397 - 433 30 - 40 3.0 - 3.5
PET B1
(IELTS 3.5) (IELTS 3.5)
437 - 473 41 - 52 4.0 PET 3.6 - 5.5 B1

PET B1
405 - 600 (IELTS 4.5) (IELTS 4.5)
477 - 510 53 - 64 4.5 - 5.0
FCE B2
(IELTS 5.0) (IELTS 5.0)
5.6 - 7.5
605 - 780 513 - 547 65 - 78 5.5 - 6.0 FCE B2

785 - 990 550 - 587 79 - 95 6.5 - 7.0 CAE 7.6 - 9.0 C1


590 - 677 96 - 120 7.5 - 9.0 CPE C2

In the process of being discontinued


*The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) is a series of descriptions of
abilities which can be applied to any language. These descriptors can be used to set clear targets for
achievements within language learning, to help define language proficiency levels and to interpret
language qualifications. It has become accepted as a way of benchmarking language ability, not only
within Europe but worldwide, and plays a central role in language and education policy.

For each of the different exams you’ll find worksheets to facilitate


practice of the various sections. Use as many worksheets as needed
based on number of students and student levels as well as time left in
the workshop.

IELTS (www.ielts.org)
What is it?
- IELTS stands for International English Language Testing System and is designed to test English
proficiency and to assess the language ability of candidates who want to study or work
where English is the language of communication.
- IELTS is offered more than 4 times a month in over 125 countries.
- There are two versions of the test – Academic and General Training.
o There is no such thing as PASS or FAIL in IELTS. Results are reported as band scores
on a scale from 1 (the lowest) to 9 (the highest):
 9 Expert user
 8 Very good user
 7 Good user
 6 Competent user
 5 Modest user
 4 Limited user
 3 Extremely limited user
 2 Intermittent user
 1 Non user
 0 Did not attempt the test

Use worksheet 1 (page 2) to illustrate chart above – “IELTS folder”


“Which test is right for me?”
 ACADEMIC - The Academic format (generally speaking) is for those who want to study or train in
an English-speaking university or Institutions of Higher and Further Education. Admission to
undergraduate and postgraduate courses is based on the results of the Academic test.
 GENERAL TRAINING - The General Training format focuses on basic survival skills in broad social
and workplace contexts. It is typically for those who are going to English-speaking countries to
do secondary education, work experience or training programs.
o *People migrating to Australia, Canada and New Zealand must sit the General Training
test.
Which organisations accept IELTS?
- IELTS is accepted by more than 7,000 organisations worldwide. These include universities,
immigration departments, government agencies, professional bodies and multinational
companies.

Who owns IELTS and who writes the test?


- IELTS is jointly owned by British Council, IDP: IELTS Australia and Cambridge English Language
Assessment and offered through over 800 test centres and locations in over 130 countries.
International teams of writers contribute to IELTS test materials. Ongoing research ensures
that IELTS remains fair and unbiased. Test writers from different English-speaking countries
develop IELTS content so it reflects real-life situations.

What is the test format and how long does it take?


- IELTS has four parts - Listening (30 minutes), Reading (60 minutes), Writing (60 minutes)
and Speaking (11–14 minutes).
- The total test time is 2 hours and 45 minutes. The Listening, Reading and Writing tests are
done in one sitting. The Speaking test may be on the same day or up to seven days before or
after the other tests.

Use worksheet 1 (pages 4 & 5) to show the 4 parts below - “IELTS folder”

1. Listening
a. Timing – approx. 30 minutes
i. There are 4 sections (40 questions including multiple choice, matching, short-
answer, form completion, etc.)
1. Section 1 is a conversation between two people set in an everyday social
context (eg. A conversation I a travel agency)
2. Section 2 is a monologue set in an everyday social context (eg. a speech
about local facilities)
3. Section 3 is a conversation between up to 4 people set in an educational
or training context (eg. a university tutor and student discussion)
4. Section 4 is a monologue on an academic subject (eg. a university
lecture)
a. Each section is heard only once
ii. Skills assessed: A wide range of listening skills is assessed, including
understanding of main ideas and specific factual information; recognizing
opinions, attitudes, and purpose of a speaker.

Use worksheets 21 & 22 (Listening examples folder) to provide examples - “IELTS


folder”

2. Reading
a. Timing – approx. 60 minutes
i. There are 3 sections (40 questions including multiple choice, matching, short-
answer, sentence completion, etc.)
1. Section 1 contains two or three short factual texts (topics are relevant
to everyday life)
2. Section 2 contains 2 short factual texts on work-related issues (eg.
applying for a job)
3. Section 3 contains one longer, more complex text on a topic of general
interest
a. Texts are authentic and are taken from different media and
public sources (journals, newspapers, articles, etc.)
ii. Skills assessed: A wide range of reading skills is assessed, including reading for
main ideas, reading for detail; understanding implied meaning as well as the
writer’s opinions, attitudes, and purpose.

Use worksheets 2-5 (Academic examples - reading folder) and worksheets 11-13
(General training examples – reading folder) to provide examples - “IELTS folder”

3. Writing
a. Timing – approx. 60 minutes
i. There are 2 tasks: Candidates are required to write at least 150 words for task 1
and at least 250 words for task 2
ii. ACADEMIC WRITING
1. In task 1, candidates are presented with a diagram, graph, table, or chart
and are asked to describe, summarise, or explain the information in
their own words.
2. In task 2, candidates are asked to write an essay in response to a point
of view, argument, or problem.
a. Responses should be written in a formal style

Use worksheets 6-10 (Academic examples - writing folder) to provide examples -


“IELTS folder”

iii. GENERAL TRAINING WRITING


1. In task 1, candidates are presented with a situation and are asked to
write a letter requesting information or explaining the situation.
2. In task 2, candidates are asked to write an essay in response to a point
of view, argument, or problem. *Topics are of general interest
a. Responses may be written in a more personal style
iv. Skills assessed: In both tasks, candidates are assessed on their ability to write a
response which is appropriate in terms of content, the organization of ideas, and
the accuracy and range of vocabulary and grammar.

Use worksheets 14 & 15 (Academic examples - writing folder) to provide examples


- “IELTS folder”
4. Speaking
a. Timing – approx. 11-14 minutes
i. There 3 parts:
1. Individual and interview (4-5 minutes): Candidate is asked to introduce
him/herself and confirm his/her identity.
2. Individual long turn (3-4 minutes): The examiner gives the candidate a
task card about a particular topic with specific points to cover.
3. Two-way discussion (4-5 minutes): The examiner asks further questions
which are connected to the topic of part 2.
ii. Skills assessed: A wide range of speaking skills are assessed, including the ability
to communicate opinions and information on everyday topics and common
experiences/situations by answering a range of questions.

Use worksheets 16-21 (Speaking examples folder) to provide examples - “IELTS


folder”

How do I practise and prepare for my test?


- You do not need to attend a preparation course, but many candidates find that doing so
helps their overall performance.
- The Official IELTS Practice Materials explains the test format in detail and gives you
practice tests and answers. You can order your Official IELTS Practice Materials in one
of two ways:
 Place an order online

o http://www.ielts.org/test_takers_information/how_do_i_prepare.aspx

 Your local test centre (directory)

o http://www.ielts.org/test_centre_search/search_results.aspx

-Alcalá de Henares -Granada -Pamplona


-Alicante -La Rioja -Salamanca
-Avila -Las Palmas de Gran - -Santander
-Badajoz Canaria -Sevilla
-Barcelona -León -Tenerife
-Bilbao -Madrid -Valencia
-Burgos -Málaga -Valladolid
-Cáceres -Marbella -Vigo
-Ciudad Real -Murcia -Zaragoza
-Córdoba -Oviedo
-Donostia-San Sebastián -Palma de Mallorca
CAMBRIDGE (www.cambridgeenglish.org, spain.cambridgeenglish.org)
What is it?
- Cambridge English Language Assessment (ESOL) is a non-profit assessment organisation
that provides examinations in English language ability for non-native speakers of English and
English teaching qualifications. ESOL - “English for Speakers of Other Languages”

Which organisations accept Cambridge English exams?


- Cambridge English exams are accepted by over 13,000 universities, employers and
governments around the world. The exams can open doors to higher education, improve
employment opportunities, and because they are globally recognised, can increase learners’
choices for study or work.

The Anglosphere
Countries in which English is the first language of the majority of the population are shown in blue ;
other countries with substantial adoption of English are shown in light blue

What is the test format and how long will it take?


- The Cambridge ESOL exam covers all four language skills.
o Listening / Reading / Writing / Speaking.

- The certificates are as follows:


o Cambridge English: Key (KET): elementary (A2 in CEFR)
o Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET): intermediate (B1 in CEFR)
o Cambridge English: First (FCE): upper intermediate (B2 in CEFR)
o Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE): advanced (C1 in CEFR)
o Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE): very advanced/proficient (C2 in CEFR)

1. PET (Preliminary English Test)


a. Timing :
i. Reading (5 parts - 35 questions) and Writing (3 Parts - 7 questions) – 1 hour 30
minutes
a. Reading
i. Part 1 - The candidate needs to read and understand a
series of short texts (eg. notice signs, labels, notes,
postcards, e-mails, etc.)
ii. Part 2 - The candidate will have 5 descriptions of
people. There are then 8 short texts on a particular
topic, and the candidate has to match each person to
one of the texts.
iii. Part 3 - The candidate has to read a longer, factual text
and look for precise information. There are then 10
questions where the candidate has to decide whether
each statement is correct or not correct.
iv. Part 4 - The text read expresses an opinion or attitude.
There are then 5 questions with 4 possible answers (A,
B, C or D).
v. Part 5 - There is a short text with 10 numbered spaces.
The candidate has to find the missing word for each
space (4 choices are given per space).
b. Writing
i. Part 1 -There are 5 questions to answer in this part. For
each question, there is one complete sentence and one
sentence which has a missing word or words.
ii. Part 2 - The candidate has to write a short
communicative message of between 35 and 45 words
(instructions are provided).
iii. Part 3 - The candidate can choose to write an informal
letter or story (about 100 words)

ii. Listening (4 parts - 25 questions) - approx. 35 minutes


1. Part 1 - There are seven short listening texts taken from everyday life
(conversations, radio announcements, exchanges in shops, etc.). For
each text there is a question and 3 pictures. The candidate has to listen
to the texts and then choose the picture which best answers the
question.
2. Part 2 - There is a longer recording which may be either a monologue or
an interview with questions from a radio presenter. The candidate hears
the recording twice and then has to answer 6 questions.
3. Part 3 - This recording is longer and may give information about places
and events (sometimes it is a radio programme in which people talk
about courses, trips or holiday activities). The candidate will hear the
recording twice and then be given a paper with 6 pieces of missing
information.
4. Part 4 - The candidate will hear a recording between 2 people (an
informal conversation about everyday topics). There are then 6
statements in which the candidate has to decide whether each
statement is right or wrong.
iii. Speaking (4 parts 10 - 12 minutes per pair of candidates)
1. Part 1 - General conversation (examiner will enquire about daily
routines, likes and dislikes, etc.).
2. Part 2 - Two candidates take part in a simulated situation (eg. reaching
an agreement on a specific issue).
3. Part 3 - The examiner will have a colour photograph in which the
candidate has to describe what they see.
4. Part 4 -Two candidates will have a conversation. The examiner will give
them a subject related to the photograph in part 3.

Use worksheet 23 to provide further information (use relevant examples based on


workshop discussion) - “Cambridge folder”

2. FCE (First Certificate in English)


a. Reading
i. Timing: 3 parts (30 questions) – 1 hour
1. Part 1 - The candidate has to read a text carefully and answer some
questions. The questions are multiple choice, each with four options (A,
B, C, or D) and they follow the same order as the information on the
text.
2. Part 2 - The candidate has to read a text from which seven sentences or
paragraphs have been removed. The candidate has to choose where
each sentence or paragraph fits in the text.
3. Part 3 - The candidate has to read a series of prompts followed by either
a long text divided into paragraphs or by a series of short texts. The
candidate has to choose which text corresponds with each prompt.
b. Writing
i. Timing: 2 parts – 1 hour 20 minutes
1. Part 1 – one compulsory question
a. The candidate has to write a letter or an email based on some
input material of up to 250 words. The candidate has to write
120-150 words.
2. Part 2 – one from a choice of 4 questions
a. The candidate can choose one of five options. These may be an
essay, an article, a report, a review, a letter of application, an
informal letter or a short story. The candidate should write 120-
180 words.
c. Use of English
i. Timing: 4 parts (42 questions – 45 minutes)
1. Part 1 - The candidate is given a text to read with 12 numbered gaps. For
each gap, there are four possible answers and the candidate has to
choose which word or phrase fits the gap correctly.
2. Part 2 - Also consists of a text with 12 numbered gaps and the candidate
has to think of a single word which will fill each gap correctly.
3. Part 3 - Consists of a text with 10 gaps. At the end of each line,
separated from the text, is a word in capital letters. Use this word to
make a new word which will fill the gap to complete the sentence
correctly.
4. Part 4 - The candidate has to rewrite a sentence in which the meaning is
the same but it is written in different words. (8 sentences)
d. Listening
i. Timing: 4 parts (30 questions – 40 minutes)
1. Part 1 - The candidate hears 8 short recordings of people talking in
different situations. For each recording the is a question with three
possible answers.
2. Part 2 - In this part of the paper, the candidate has to listen for specific
words or phrases from a longer recording. They have to complete
sentences which have gaps in them.
3. Part 3 - The candidate hears five short recordings from five different
speakers. The recordings are all connected in some way (eg. the
speakers talking about travel). The candidate has to match a statement
or opinion to each speaker.
4. Part 4 - The candidate has to listen for opinions, attitudes and main
ideas from a longer text. They then need to answer 7 questions, each
with 3 possible answers.
e. Speaking
i. Timing: 4 parts (14 minutes per pair of candidates)
1. Part 1 - Interview
a. The examiner will ask questions about topics such as family life,
daily routines, free-time activities, etc.
2. Part 2 - The candidate has to speak for 1 minute without interruption.
The examiner will present two colour photographs for comparison and
contrast.
3. Part 3 - Collaborative task
a. This part tests the candidate’s ability to take part in a discussion
(carrying out a task set by the examiner)
4. Part 4 - Discussion
a. In this part, the candidates have to discuss the the task from
part 3. The examiner will ask each candidate a series of
questions.

Use worksheet 25 to provide further information (use relevant examples based on


workshop discussion) - “Cambridge folder”

3. CAE (Cambridge English: Advanced )


a. Reading
i. Timing: 7 parts (34 questions – 1 hour 15 minutes)
ii. Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text, such as fiction,
newspapers and magazines.
b. Writing
i. Timing: 2 parts – (1 hour 30 minutes)
ii. You create two different pieces of writing, such as articles, essays, letters,
proposals, reports and reviews.
c. Use of English: 5 parts (50 questions – 1 hour)
i. Timing:
ii. Tests your use of English with different types of exercises that show how well
you can control your grammar and vocabulary.
d. Listening
i. Timing: 4 parts (30 questions) – 40 minutes
ii. Tests your ability to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as
interviews, radio broadcasts, presentations, talks and everyday conversations.
e. Speaking
i. Timing: 4 parts (15 minutes per pair of candidates)
ii. Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations. You will
take the Speaking test with another candidate.
4. CPE (Cambridge English: Proficiency)
a. Reading and Use of English
i. Timing: 7 parts (53 questions – 1 hour 30 minutes)
1. Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text, such as
fiction and non-fiction books, journals, newspapers and manuals.
b. Writing
i. Timing: 2 parts – (1 hour 30 minutes)
1. Requires you to be able to write a variety of text types, such as essays,
proposals, reports and reviews.
c. Listening
i. Timing: 4 parts (30 questions) – 40 minutes
1. Requires you to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken
materials, such as lectures, speeches and interviews.
d. Speaking
i. Timing: 3 parts (16 minutes per pair of candidates)
1. Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations.

How do I practise and prepare for my test?


- Find out more information at:
o www.CambridgeESOL.org/PET
o www.CambridgeESOL.org/CFE
o www.CambridgeESOL.org/CAE

Your local test centre (directory) - www.cambridgeesol-centres.org/centres/index.do

* There are 99 centres in Spain which offer the FCE exam.

TOEFL (www.ets.org/es/toefl)
What is it?
- The TOEFL (formally known as Test of English as a Foreign Language) is a test of an
individual's ability to use and understand English in an academic setting.

- Since its introduction in late 2005, the TOEFL iBT format has progressively replaced both the
computer-based tests (CBT) and paper-based tests (PBT), although paper-based testing is
still used in select areas. The TOEFL iBT test has been introduced in phases, with the United
States, Canada, France, Germany, and Italy in 2005 and the rest of the world in 2006, with
test centers added regularly.

Use worksheet 26 to provide further information (use relevant examples based on


workshop discussion) - “TOEFL folder”
- This worksheet has a lot of information (90 pages) detailing the entire
TOEFL exam process!

*The CBT was discontinued in September 2006 and these scores are no longer valid.
Which organisations accept TOEFL?
- It was developed to address the problem of ensuring English language proficiency for non-
native speakers wishing to study at U.S. universities.
o It has become an admission requirement for non-native English speakers at many
English-speaking colleges and universities.
o Additionally, institutions such as government agencies, licensing bodies, businesses,
or scholarship programs may require this test.

*A TOEFL score is valid for two years and then will no longer be officially reported.

Who owns TOEFL and who writes the test?


- The test is designed and administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS), and TOEFL is a
registered trademark of ETS.

What is the test format and how long does it take?


- The TOEFL iBT test measures the English language skills important for effective
communication in an academic setting.
o It consists of 4 sections: Reading / Listening / Speaking / Writing
o The entire test is about 4 hours long, and all sections are taken on the same
day.
- The TOEFL iBT test uses integrated tasks that require test takers to combine skills just
like they would in a real academic setting.
o Read, listen and then speak in response to a question
o Listen and then speak in response to a question
o Read, listen and then write in response to a question

The TOEFL iBT test provides scores in 4 areas: (Total Sore 0-120)
- Reading 0 - 30
- Listening 0 - 30
- Speaking 0 - 30
- Writing 0 – 30

What each section is evaluated on

1. Reading (36 -56 questions / 60 - 100 minutes)


a. 3 - 4 passages
i. Read from academic texts and answer questions.
1. Reading to find information
a. Effectively scanning texts for key facts and important
information.
b. Increasing reading fluency and rate.
2. Basic Comprehension
a. Understanding the general topic or main idea, major
points, important facts and details, vocabulary in context,
and pronoun usage.
b. Reading to Learn
c. Recognizing the organization and purpose of a passage.
3. Understanding relationships between ideas.
2. Listening (34 - 51 questions / 60 - 90 minutes)
a. Listen to lectures, classroom discussions and conversations, then answer
questions.
i. 4 – 6 lectures, 6 questions per lecture
ii. 2 – 3 conversations, 5 questions per lecture
1. Listening section measures your ability to understand spoken
English. In academic settings, you must be able to listen to
lectures and conversations.

3. Speaking (20 minutes)


a. 6 tasks, 2 independent and 4 integrated
i. Speaking task types – Personal preferences, choices, integrated tasks with
academic situations.
1. Express an opinion on a familiar topic; speak basedon reading and
listening tasks.
4. Writing (20 minutes and 30 minutes)
a. 1 integrated task
b. 1 independent task
i. Write essay responses based on reading based on reading and listening
tasks; support an opinion in writing.

Use worksheets 27-29 to provide various examples (practice folder) - “TOEFL


folder”

WORKSHEET 28 – starting on page 4 / reading practice


WORKSHEET 29 – starting on page 4 / reading practice
*Continue through worksheets to find examples for listening, speaking,
and writing

How do I practise and prepare for my test?


- For more information: www.ets.org/es/toef
www.ets.org/es/toef/ibt/about/resource_centers
- Your local centre (directory): www.ets.org/bin/getprogram.cgi?test=toef

* There are 19 centres (as of April 2013) in Spain which offer the TOEFL exam
TOEIC (www.ets.org/es/toeic)
What is it?
- It is designed to assess the knowledge of English in a professional environment. Like the
TOEFL , this test is performed by ETS (Educational Testing Service), an American company
based in Princeton (New Jersey) since 1979.
- Globally TOEIC is the most widely used measurement for professional English in the
world.

- TOEIC test questions are based on real-life work settings in an international


environment (meetings, travel, telephone conversations, etc).

o What about scores?


- The TOEIC Reading and Listening gives a score between 10 and 990:

Which organisations accept TOEIC?


- Currently, more than 10,000 organizations in 120 countries use the TOEIC test to determine
which candidates have the English language skills necessary to succeed in the international
workplace.
-
Who owns TOEIC and who writes the test?
- The Test of English for International Communication is produced by ETS (Educational Testing
Service).

What is the test format and how long does it take?


- There are two separate parts to the TOEIC test. You can do one or both parts.
o The Listening and Reading test is a paper and pencil test that takes 2.5 hours
and is taken at a test centre.
o The Speaking and Writing test is an online test that is taken in a test centre
and takes 90 minutes. The Speaking and Writing test is a new test which is
only available in some countries.
2. Listening and Reading – approx. 2 hours 30 minutes
c. Listening format
i. Part 1 - Photos (10 questions)
1. A picture is shown with 4 possible answers relating to the picture.
ii. Part 2 - Response (30 questions)
1. A statement or questions is read with 3 possible choices.
iii. Part 3 - Short conversation (groups of questions per conversation)
1. There are 10 conversations with multiple choices.
iv. Part 4 - Short talks (30 questions)
1. There are 3 short talks each with 3 questions.

Use worksheet 31 to provide listening examples - “TOEIC folder”

d. Reading format
i. Part 5 - Incomplete sentences (40 questions)
1. There is one part missing from each sentence with 4 possible
choices.
ii. Part 6 - Error recognition (20 questions)
1. There are 4 underlined words or phrases in each text. The
candidate has to choose which of the 4 is incorrect.
iii. Part 7 - Reading comprehension (40 questions)
1. The candidate reads a text followed by the questions. They must
choose the correct answer from each question relating to the text.
5. Speaking (20 minutes )and Writing (60 minutes)
a. Speaking
i. The test is taken online and your voice is recorded and sent to be marked.
Scores arrive in 3 to 4 weeks.
1. You have to do the following tasks:
a. read a paragraph aloud (tests pronunciation)
b. describe a picture (tests vocabulary/grammar)
c. respond to recorded questions (tests fluency/extended
discourse)
d. propose a solution
e. express an opinion

Use worksheet 32 to provide speaking examples - “TOEIC folder”

b. Writing
i. The test is taken online and sent to be marked. Scores arrive in 3 to 4
weeks.
1. You have to do the following tasks:
a. Write sentences about pictures
b. Write an email response
c. Write an essay

How do I practise and prepare for my test?


- For more information: www.examenglish.com/TOEIC
- Your local centre (directory): www.ets.org/epn_directory