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8/6/2018 Chemistry 2017 HSC exam pack | NSW Education Standards

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CHEMISTRY 2017 HSC EXAM PACK


Marking guidelines are developed with the examination paper and are used by markers to guide their marking of a
students response. The table shows each question and the criteria with each mark or mark range. Sample answers may
also be developed and included in the guidelines to make sure questions assess a students knowledge and skills, and
guide the Supervisor of Marking on the expected nature and scope of a students response. They are not intended to be
exemplary or even complete answers or responses.

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Chemistry HSC exam paper 2017


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Chemistry marking guidelines 2017


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HSC Marking Feedback


Select from the link(s) below to view feedback about how students performed in this year’s examination.

Use the feedback (formerly known as ‘notes from the marking centre’) to guide preparation for future examinations.
Feedback includes an overview of the qualities of better responses. Feedback may not be provided for every question.

Feedback on written examination

Sections I and II 
General Feedback

Students should:

use the number of lines as an indication of the expected length of the response
write legibly using a black pen
indicate the question being answered if using additional booklets
address the key words with coherence and logical thinking
directly answer all parts of the question
write a plan to assist in structuring a long response, using relevant scientific terminology and avoiding  the use of colloquial terms
use applied examples with specific details.

Students should expect:

questions to be of varying difficulty


to support questions requiring an opinion with facts, data and/or evidence
to support questions requiring an experimental approach by identifying the independent and dependent variables and providing an
appropriate controlled procedure (including how to measure the dependent variable).

Students can prepare for this examination by:

using past HSC exam papers and their marking guidelines to practise responses
writing plans for answers from past papers    
critically analysing the syllabus dot points.

Student Strengths
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8/6/2018 Chemistry 2017 HSC exam pack | NSW Education Standards

In better responses, students were able to:

label diagrams and graphics appropriately


use a variety of ways to answer questions and include diagrams, named examples and annotations where appropriate
directly refer to and integrate diagrams, data and/or the stimulus material in their response
provide relevant, balanced equations including chemical states to support their answer
clearly show all working when performing calculations
demonstrate a deep understanding of the chemistry behind a concept.

Section I Part B

In better responses, students were able to:

present data and information and illustrate their response using contextual examples
clearly integrate the stimulus material and answer all parts of the question.

Question 21

In better responses, students were able to:

directly answer the question and provide relevant data and information, including the correct transcription of the dot to represent an
unpaired electron
use a variety of ways to answer question parts, which may include diagrams and annotations.

Question 22

In better responses, students were able to:

construct a ruled straight line of best fit going through the origin
plot the points accurately, including the origin, using an appropriate scale
use more than 50% of the grid.

Question 23

In better responses, students were able to:

use correct terminology such as ‘ions’ when describing the use of a salt bridge
include annotated diagrams to support explanations
use a balanced equation as a basis for completing calculations using moles and mass
set out the calculation clearly identifying at all times the subject of each step.

Question 24

In better responses, students were able to:

provide all relevant working out and correct significant figures


clearly show each step in a multi-step calculation
clearly illustrate their response with a chemical equation that indicates equilibrium arrows and states.

Question 25

In better responses, students were able to:

answer the question by combining several dot points from sections 9.2.2 and 9.2.3
outline the steps by constructing a flow chart with relevant features
coherently sequence their response to address acid hydrolysis of cellulose into glucose, then fermentation of glucose to ethanol,
dehydration of ethanol to ethylene and finally using addition polymerisation to join ethylene monomers into polyethylene.
illustrate their response with relevant chemical equations such as those for fermentation, dehydration and polymerisation of ethylene.

Question 26

In better responses, students were able to:

clearly identify and outline two reasons directly related to SO2


distinguish between issues of SO2 from those of acid rain
refer specifically to the stimulus and explain the changes in concentration of SO2
outline the production of SO2 at both sites in terms of sulphide ores and sulfur impurities with valid equations to support their
response
provide suitable balanced equations with states for the relevant sites.

Question 27

In better responses, students were able to:

refer to data in the table


correctly draw structural formulae and identify the intermolecular forces present
use structure to explain bonding and explain different types of bonding for all three compounds
identify the relationship between molar mass and dispersion force strength

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8/6/2018 Chemistry 2017 HSC exam pack | NSW Education Standards
correctly specify sites of, and the polarity of, hydrogen bonding.

Question 28

In better responses, students were able to:

address the key word ‘outline’ rather than only identifying advantages/disadvantages
demonstrate correct chemistry in the working out for calculations.

Question 29

In better responses, students were able to:

link the information in the text with the data in the table
state that none of the treatment facilities provided could mitigate increased levels of calcium or phosphate ions
address each of the measures in considering which of X and Y is best and relate unsatisfactory levels to mitigation techniques
identify consequences of each measure being outside an accepted range.

Question 30

In better responses, students were able to:

provide an outline of the conditions required to maximise ammonia production


link Le Chatalier’s Principle to the question, rather than just quote the principle
provide a detailed analysis and thorough discussion of the interrelationships between factors that leads to optimal ammonia
production.

Section II

In better responses, students were able to:


interpret and represent data, identify trends and variables
use applied examples with specific details.

Industrial Chemistry

In better responses, students were able to:

draw correct structural formulae for saponification reaction


write correct procedures for saponification, including using specific quantities, and procedures for testing the product
show graphically how temperature affected concentration and rate
show working out, using an ICE table, to calculate K using the ratio given in the equation (to the power of 0.5 and not doubling the
molar ratio)
convert moles and volume for calculations
state equilibrium had not been reached and justify the comparison
demonstrate a deep understanding of the chemistry behind the question.

Shipwrecks, Corrosion and Conservation

In better responses, students were able to:

exhibit a broad understanding of oxidation/reduction chemistry


use the reduction potentials table effectiviely
design first-hand investigations that incorporate elements of replication and controlled experimental variables
interpret stimulus material, rather than restating the information in their responses
use a variety of ways to answer questions and include correctly labelled diagrams, named examples and equations where appropriate
address all three  aspects of the longer response with a detailed description of each scientist and their relationship to reducing
corrosion, provide interrelated information and show how it relates (as opposed to listing features on each aspect).

Biochemistry

In better responses, students were able to:

demonstrate a sound understanding of amino acids and Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)


convert units and apply correct mathematical operations
understand the role of models and their limitations
demonstrate familiarity with the practical experiences undertaken during their studies
demonstrate a sound understanding of carbohydrates, fats and proteins and how they contribute to the production of energy in the
body.

Chemistry of Art

In better responses, students were able to:

refer to the stimulus material (for example, graphs, diagrams) in their response
use models to relate electron movement to energy changes and colour production
demonstrate a good understanding of the different energy levels in different orbitals
explain colour in terms of absorption, reflection and emission of wavelengths of light
explain the bonding of transition metals in complex ions.

Forensic Chemistry

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8/6/2018 Chemistry 2017 HSC exam pack | NSW Education Standards
In better responses, students were able to:

distinguish sodium carbonate from starch and be specific about the colour change in the iodine test for starch
explain how the lines on an emission spectrum are produced to demonstrate understanding of AES
demonstrate understanding of chromotography and the non-polar nature of alkanes vs the polar nature of the alkanols and carboxylic
acids and the need for the mobile phase to be the same polarity as the substances to be separated
illustrate an understanding of electrophoresis with diagrams
use mass spectra to identify substances in blood samples
demonstrate understanding of DNA and the chemistry involved in using DNA to find lost relatives
draw structural formulae for a protein fragment.

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