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Sotheby's

European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern


London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 1
BYZANTINE, 7TH/ 8TH CENTURY

PECTORAL CROSS WITH CHAIN


gold, the obverse of the cross with a raised oval collet set with a garnet at the intersection
of the arms
cross: 76mm., 3in. including suspension loopchain overall: 54.5cm., 21½in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Czech private collection, since the early 1980s

CATALOGUE NOTE
Another solid gold cross with a similar bezel and suspension loop is in the collection at Dumbarton Oaks, Washington
D.C. (inv. no. 58.39). The faceted arms can also be found on a nielloed example in the British Museum, London (inv.
no. PE AF 355).
RELATED LITERATURE
M. C. Ross, Catalogue of the Byzantine and Early Medieval Antiquities in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection, cat.
Dumbarton Oaks Collection, Washington, 1965, p. 137, no. 179I, pl. XCVII; R. Cormack and M. Vassilaki (eds.),
Byzantium 330-1453, exh. cat. Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2008, pp. 224-225 and p. 428, no. 193
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 2
ENGLISH, CIRCA 1300

SIGNET RING
the gold inscribed in Lombardic script: Amor Vincit Omnia (love conquers all), the intaglio
carved with an eagle bearing a laurel wreath in its beak
gold, set with a Roman, 1st/ 2nd century AD, onyx agate nicolo intaglio
inside diameter: 1.8cm., ¾in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with H. Ulreich Juwelier, Frankfurt, 1964

CATALOGUE NOTE
Martin Henig (op. cit.) discusses the medieval elite's fascination for ancient gems to serve as a sigilum secreta and the
manner in which such seals were subtly re-interpretated by the intelligentsia. In the ring offered here, the emblem of
Victory embodied in the Roman intaglio has in fact been ingeniously interpreted and reflected in the accompanying
inscription. Martin Henig emphasises the status of such ancient seals, which were given equal value to their gold or
silver settings, during the medieval period, in citing a Statute of Edward I dated to 1300 ordering that 'gravers or
cutters of stones, and of seals shall give to each their weight of silver and gold, as near as they can, upon their
fidelity'. The latin phrase on the present ring appears on two further medieval rings in the British Museum illustrated by
Dalton (op.cit. nos. 960, 960a). Dalton also notes that the same motto appears on the brooch worn by the Prioress in
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

RELATED LITERATURE
O.M. Dalton, The Franks Bequest, Catalogue of the Finger Rings, London, 1912, pl. 37 A-E; C. Oman, British Rings.
800-1914, London, 1974, no.218; M. Henig, 'The re-use and copying of ancient intaglios set in Medieval personal
seals mainly found in England: an aspect of the Renaissance of the 12th century', J. Cherry and J. Robinson (eds.),
Good Impressions: image and authority in medieval seals, London, 2007, pp. 25-34
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 3
IN FRENCH, LIMOGES, LATE 12TH/ EARLY 13TH CENTURY STYLE

RELIQUARY WITH ST. VALERIE HOLDING HER HEAD


partially gilt and champlevé enamelled copper, set with a rock crystal
27cm., 10 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 4
NORTH SPANISH, 13TH/ EARLY 14TH CENTURY

CHRIST ENTHRONED
partially polychromed wood
62cm., 24 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
art market, Barcelona, 1940s
Spanish noble family
and thence by family descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
X. Company, I. Puig and J. Tarragona (eds.), Pulchra. Centenari de la creació del museu, exh. cat. Museu Diocesà de
Lleida, Lleida, 1993, p. 121, no.185
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 5
GERMAN, RHINELAND, 10TH CENTURY

RELIQUARY CASKET
bone and horn on a wood core, with iron mounts
7.5 by 23 by 14cm., 3 by 9 by 5½in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present casket is part of an important early group of reliquary caskets dated between the 8th and 10th centuries.
They seem to have survived in church treasuries alone, such as that of the Stift St. Peter in Salzburg and the
Cathedral of Chur. The closest comparison, however, is in the St. Gereon church in Cologne. This casket has nearly
identical biforcated iron mounts, similar bands of wave and ring-and-dot patterns and rows of circular holes flanked by
bands of ring-and-dot decoration.
RELATED LITERATURE
A. Goldschmidt, Die Elfenbeinskulpturen aus der Zeit der karolingischen und sachsischen Kaiser. VIII.-XI. Jahrhundert
, pp. 53-55, nos. 180-184, pl. LIV-LVIII
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 6
NORTH FRENCH, CIRCA 1360

DIPTYCH WITH THE ADORATION OF THE VIRGIN AND CHILD AND THE CRUCIFIXION
the left wing with two white labels on the reverse inscribed: 1xxn/y and 15 in ink and a red
label numbered: 743 in ink
ivory, on a modern metal stand
each leaf: 10.5 by 6.5cm., 4 1/8 by 2½in.stand: 13cm., 5 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Baron Ribeyre et Associes, Richelieu-Drouot, Paris, 27 March 2009, lot 122
with A&E Foster, Naphill
private collection, London

LITERATURE
Gothic Ivories Project. Diptych, 1 register, 3 paired arches across (plaquettes; frise d'arcatures) (Front), available at:
http://www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk/images/ivory/cc6693a7_b101e3db.html. [Accessed 18 May 2013]
CATALOGUE NOTE
Pocket-sized ivory diptychs, conveniently hinged to close flat, were produced in large numbers in the 14th century to
satisfy the popular demand for portable devotional imagery. The scenes of the Glorification of the Virgin, holding the
Christ Child, and the Virgin and St. John sorrowful at the foot of the cross, were frequently paired to juxtapose two
great Christian mysteries: Christ's Incarnation and the Passion. This didactic strategy would not have been lost on the
worshipper, who would have meditated on the relationship between the two scenes.

A diptych and a further leaf in the Museum of Fine Arts, Saint Petersburg, Florida (inv. no. 68.30) and the Smith
College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts (inv. no. 1961:62) published by Randall (op.cit., nos. 110-111)
as Flemish, third quarter of the 14th century, have similar beaded borders. The same projecting architecture is
visible in a French diptych from a German private collection illustrated by Koechlin (op.cit., no. 388) and another in the
British Museum, London (inv. no. 1856,0623.82) from the second half of the 14th century. The former in particular
shows such a similar style of carving that it may have originated from the same workshop.

RELATED LITERATURE
R. Koechlin, Les ivoires gothiques français, Paris, 1924, vol. II, p. 163, no. 388, vol. III, pl. LXXXIV; R. Randall, The
Golden Age of Ivory. Gothic Carvings in North American Collections, New York, 1993, p. 92, nos. 110-111
A radio carbon dating measurement report by RadioCarbon Dating dated 27 April 2009 (RCD-7247) shows that the
ivory was made between 1220 and 1390.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 7
FRENCH, CIRCA 1350

VIRGIN AND CHILD


ivory, on a possibly associated ivory base
10.5cm., 4 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 50,000-70,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Schulz collection, United States
with Sam Fogg, London, 2010
private collection, London

LITERATURE
Gothic Ivories Project. Statuette, band of rosettes (decor de roses) (Side), available at:
http://www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk/images/ivory/b6ef5a1e_eafc008d.html. [Accessed 18 May 2013]

CATALOGUE NOTE
This ivory statuette is noteworthy for the tenderness of the embrace of the Virgin and Child and the finesse of the
details. The Madonna is represented seated here on a throne with a rosette frieze. She wears a veil that flows in
undulating folds down both sides of her head. Her mantle is draped over her shoulders and falls in a soft M-pattern
over her knees, which lean slightly to her left side. She looks down and lifts the Christ Child, who is balanced by a foot
on each of His mother's legs, as He pulls himself closer to her.
The rubbing to the heads of both figures indicates that this was an object meant for private devotion. Like a talisman, it
would have been rubbed or kissed when divine intervention was most needed.
Another small ivory with the enthroned Virgin and Child in a very similar embrace was sold at Sotheby's New York on
29 January 1999 (lot 42) and is now in the Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario (see Lowden/ Cherry,
op.cit., no. 17).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Lowden and J. Cherry, Medieval ivories and works of art, cat. Thomson Collection, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto,
2008, pp. 54-55, no. 17
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 8
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
PROBABLY MOSAN, LATE 13TH/ EARLY 14TH CENTURY

VIRGIN AND CHILD


gilt and polychromed oak
83.5cm., 32 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This polychromed oak group of the Virgin and Child stands in a rigidly frontal position with the Christ Child seated in a
three-quarter pose. Her veil is short and her cloak is swept up beneath the Child in soft U-shaped folds revealing the
pleats of her robe beneath. This pose and the absence of a relationship between the Mother and Child point to a
date late in the thirteenth or early fourteenth century. Compare this sculpture with the Virgin and Child in the
Catharijne Convent Museum, Utrecht, attributed to the Mosan area (inv. no. ABM bh261).
RELATED LITERATURE
M. van Vlierden (ed.), Hout- en steensculptuur van Museum Catharijneconvent ca. 1200-1600, cat.
Museum Catharijneconvent, Utrecht, 2004, pp. 63-64
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 9
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FRENCH, LIMOGES, 14TH CENTURY

PRICKET CANDLESTICK WITH THE FRENCH ROYAL COATS OF ARMS


with two old labels respectively inscribed: 3004.2 in ink and M511 in pencil
partially gilt and champlevé enamelled copper
18cm., 7 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
These pricket candlesticks were probably made for travel and are usually adorned with coats of arms. They were
produced in Limoges in the second half of the 13th and 14th centuries. An example of such a candlestick with Italian
arms can be found in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (inv. no. M.579-1910).
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 10
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
AUSTRIAN, SALZBURG, CIRCA 1420-1430

VIRGIN AND CHILD ON A CRESCENT MOON


polychromed wood, with a later crown and on a possibly later wood base
140cm., 55 1/8 in. overall

ESTIMATE 100,000-150,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, Vienna
Galerie A. Mehringer, Munich

CATALOGUE NOTE
Schöne Madonnen, or Beautiful Madonnas, are among the most recognisable and sought-after works of art from a
distinctive artistic movement that emerged around 1400 in Europe. Throughout the continent, artists departed from the
generally more expressive style of the 14th century and introduced a more refined language. It focused on decorative
effects, which were meant to evoke a fairy-tale environment for the onlooker. Graceful silhouettes, a calm charm and,
famously, a voluminous drapery style characterised by sinuous cascading folds became the leitmotivs of the style, as
exemplified in this exceptionally large Virgin and Child from the Rau collection. Today this phenomenon is referred to
as the International Gothic, a term coined by Otto Pächt in 1962 (op.cit., p. 53).

At the cradle of the International Gothic stood the House of Luxembourg, the ruling family of Bohemia. In the second
half of the 14th century it employed the architect Peter Parler from Cologne and a group of manuscript illuminators
who would introduce many of the style’s distinctive traits. During the early stages, images of the Virgin in particular
were laden with a supernatural grace, which was distinctly human at the same time. This coincided with the fresh
resurgence of the Marian cult in which new texts celebrated Mary’s physical beauty as a reflection of her spiritual
beauty (Guillot de Suduiraut, op.cit., pp. 27-28).

This environment also gave rise to the prototypes for the Beautiful Madonnas: the statues of the Virgin and Child from
Krumlau, Plze and Altenmarkt. Their grace was achieved through a set of stylistic traits that would come to
characterise all the Schöne Madonnen and influenced sculpture as far afield as London, Paris, Avignon and
Barcelona. The Virgin was represented with a pronounced contraposto supporting a usually very lively Child on Her
hip with both hands. His position counterbalances the sway of his mother. Swathes of drapery suspended from one or
both arms were given volume and lightness by arranging them in zig-zag folds. Lastly, both the Virgin and the Child
have an expression and physiognomy with a somewhat grave sweetness, lending to the figures the noble air for which
the Beautiful Madonnas have become so well known.

Of the three prototypes, the limestone statue in the Church of St. Bartholomew in Plze relates most closely to the
present Madonna. It shares its generous proportioning of the Child and the way in which the swing of the virgin’s hip is
balanced by drapery hanging from her proper right arm. The Rau Madonna is, however, more likely to stem from the
Salzburg School. This Prince-archbishopsric of the Holy Roman Empire sought to establish a different artistic and
religious character after it became independent of Bavaria, faced the Black Death and expelled non-Christians in
quick succession during the years around 1400. It therefore eagerly absorbed the exciting new style from nearby
Bohemia. Guillot de Suduiraut (op.cit., p. 28) points out that even though the courtly elegance and refined beauty of
the Prague style came to characterise the art from the Austrian city, a regional variety soon took shape. Beautiful
Madonnas from Salzburg are more opulent than their counterparts from Bohemia, due to the more portly body type
and more voluminous drapery. Equally distinguishing traits are the more juvenile facial features of both the Virgin and
the Child. Compare for example the Colli Madonna in the Liebighaus, Frankfurt (inv. no. 1066).

RELATED LITERATURE
O. Pächt, Europäische Kunst um 1400. Achte Ausstellung unter den Auspizien der Europarates, exh. cat.
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, 1962, p. 53; E. G. Grimme, Deutsche Madonnen, Cologne, 1966, p. 108, no. 20;
K. Woisetschläger, Gotik in der Steiermark, exh. cat. Stift St. Lambrecht, Graz, 1978, pp. 228-29, 233-34 and 236-37,
nos. 194, 199 and 203; M. Maek-Gérard, Nachantike grossplastische Bildwerke. III. Die deutschsprächigen Länder ca.
1380-1530/40, cat. Liebighaus-Museum alter Plastik, Melsungen, 1985, no. 126; S. Guillot de Suduiraut (ed.),
Sculptures allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques françaises 1400-1530, exh. cat. Musée
du Louvre, Paris, 1991, pp. 27-30, 50-51, 55-58; G. Schmidt, ‘The Beautiful Style’, B. Drake Boehm and J. Fajt (eds.),
Prague. The Crown of Bohemia 1347-1437, exh. cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and Prague Castle, New
Haven/ London, 2005, pp. 105-111
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 11
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
MASTER OF THE AMIENS TRIPTYCH
FRENCH, PARIS, 1310-1320

THE GUSTAV RAU TRIPTYCH WITH SCENES FROM THE DEATH OF THE VIRGIN
with two circular paper labels inscribed: 50 / Oct 20 / 71 and: 117 NATURAL LE COULTRE
GENEVE
ivory, with some traces of polychromy and gilding
26.7 by 26.5cm., 10½ by 10 3/8 in. open26.7 by 13.2cm., 10½ by 5¼in. closed

ESTIMATE 2,500,000-3,500,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Paul Robert Gustav Horst collection,
sold by his son Robert Horst, Christie's London, 28 November 1961, lot 84
Christie's London, 20 October 1971, lot 50
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012 (on display)
EXHIBITED
Zürich, Galerie Le point, Crédit Suisse, Engel., 1999-2000, no. 134

LITERATURE
J. Schoch (ed.), Engel., exh. cat. Galerie Le Point, Crédit Suisse, Zurich, 1999, p. 142, no. 134

CATALOGUE NOTE
The Gustav Rau Triptych is amongst the most outstanding Gothic ivories surviving from the early 14th century. It is of
breathtakingly sublime quality, and one of the supreme masterpieces of medieval sculpture ever to appear at auction.
It must have been commissioned for a patron of royal or near-royal status and while it would have been used
for personal devotion, its ambitious conception evokes in the viewer the grandeur of the Gothic Cathedral portals of
Amiens or Notre-Dame in Paris with their famous sculptures depicting the life and death of the Virgin.
From the reign of Louis IX, Paris became the intellectual and artistic capital of Europe. With an increase in the supply
of ivory from Africa in the mid-13th century, specialist ivory workshops became established there to fulfil a high
demand for all forms of ivory objects, such as mirror backs and combs with profane subjects, as well as religious
ivories. The large size, complex iconography and outstanding quality of the Rau Triptych are exceptional. It is
distinguished by the depth of the carving, which the sculptor uses to bring many of the figures into high relief, with
many heads carved fully in the round. The sculptor of the Rau Triptych re-interprets many standard subjects with
great originality. The Virgin reclining on her bed as the angel announces her death, for example, is conceived with a
graceful twisting movement quite different from standard, rigid representations of this scene. The figure of Christ in the
Coronation is posed with great nobility and monumentality that defies its small scale and seems ahead of its time.
THE ICONOGRAPHY OF THE GUSTAV RAU, AMIENS AND MARTIN LE ROY TRIPTYCHS
The iconography of the Rau Triptych (Rau) is extremely close to two important triptychs, generally dated around
1330. One formerly in the Martin Le Roy collection (Le Roy) is currently unlocated, but was previously in the Spitzer
collection (fig. 1). The other is in the Bibliothèque d’Amiens Métropole (Amiens) (fig. 2). These three triptychs are
undoubtedly the most elaborate Gothic ivories to represent the Death of the Virgin. The narrative in all three begins at
the top of the left wing and runs downwards, across the bottom centre panel with the scene of the Entombment of the
Virgin, and continues up the right hand wing and left across to the top of the centre panel culminating in the
Coronation of the Virgin. The middle of the centre panel shows a parallel vertical narrative with the Ascension of the
Virgin’s soul, initially represented as a child holding a palm in a mandorla supported by two angels, then as a baby
held by Christ, accompanied by angels.
LEFT WING
The Rau Triptych is unique in the use of a double scene in the top register of the left wing. The story begins with the
angel kneeling in front of the Virgin, who reclines on her bed, resting on her left arm. A heavy curtain is suspended
above her. Amiens incorporates the same elements, but the composition is transposed. The latter shows the angel
with a palm, whereas the angel in Le Roy passes a candle to the Virgin (probably a replacement); the attribute in Rau
is lost. The use of space and the subtlety of the twisting poses of the angel and Virgin are much more sophisticated in
Rau. The top half includes the rare scene of the Virgin kneeling in prayer on the Mount of Olives with the hand of God
emerging from clouds in the corner. A small hole in the Virgin's hands suggests she originally held a palm indicating
the chronology of the two events. This is confirmed by three other representations in diptychs where this episode is
shown after the Annunciation of the Death: ex-Kofler-Truniger no. S64, Bode Museum, Berlin, SKS (inv. no. 2722) and
ex-Christie's London, 4 November 2010, lot 29.
All three triptychs have the next scene in common: St John the Evangelist meeting the Virgin who is accompanied by
three women. The undulating clouds along the top of the middle register are repeated in the scene of the Dormition
below to indicate the miraculous transport of the apostles to the Virgin’s bedside. In Rau the Virgin lies in her bed, her
head resting on a pillow, with all 12 apostles crowded around. Amiens and Le Roy treat this register with some key
variations, which extend into the following two episodes. Raymond Koechlin misinterpreted the iconography in the
lower left register in Amiens when he criticised the awkward arrangement of the arch above the prostrate apostle. In
fact the prostrate figure in Amiens, also seen in Le Roy, clearly has a halo and must represent the Virgin, who in some
accounts of the Dormition, falls to the floor in prayer when Christ appears at the gathering of the apostles at her
bedside (see the Ante-Nicene Fathers, vol.8). Besides, all 12 apostles are clearly shown in the Amiens Dormition in
addition to the prostrate figure. Both Rau and Amiens make some compromises in scale to incorporate all the
apostles, but Rau has the clearest narration of all three triptychs because it simplifies the scene by excluding the
prostrate Virgin. The individual heads of the apostles in Rau are keenly observed, many carved completely in the
round, in a manner that is very close to Amiens.
CENTRE PANEL
As the narrative moves into the bottom of the centre panel, the lower register in all three triptychs incorporates two
episodes. In Amiens and Rau, where the Virgin is shown in her bed in the previous scene, on the left the Virgin is
placed in her coffin. Rau is unique here in showing the face of the Virgin shrouded, her facial features delicately
indicated beneath the cloth. This is unusual, but appears also in a single left leaf from a Death of the Virgin diptych
(OA 2606) and in the triptych with scenes of the Life and Death of the Virgin (OA 6931), both in the Louvre. Amiens
divides the 12 apostles between the two episodes in the register with six attending the placing in the coffin and six
attending the next scene of the carrying of the bier; the transition is skilfully handled by one apostle pointing in the
direction of the action. In Le Roy the Dormition begins in the lower left wing, where three apostles sit above the
prostrate Virgin, and extends into the left part of the central register, where four more apostles gather around Her bed.
To complete the representation of all 12 apostles in Le Roy the remaining five are shown carrying the bier with St
John in the lower right register holding the palm. Here again Rau is the most ambitious, because it succeeds in
depicting three complete groups of 12 apostles in the Dormition, Entombment and Funeral Procession. This is
achieved by showing four figures on the right of the lower central register walking towards the Funeral Procession in
the lower right wing, the remaining eight apostles carrying the bier for the Virgin’s coffin, St John in front holding the
palm. This arrangement creates less confusion in the central register because the four apostles on the right at first
appear to be part of the placing of the Virgin's body in the coffin; only their slightly smaller scale indicates a separation
from the main scene.
RIGHT WING AND THE ASCENSION
The small figure in front of the bier, seen in all three triptychs, is the Jewish high priest who tries to knock the bier to
the ground. In his attempt his hands are miraculously fixed to it (and in some accounts his arms are torn off) until he
repents and acknowledges Jesus as the Son of God. In Rau, the apostles carry an empty bier, because the coffin has
been dramatically elevated up into the middle right register by four angels. The continuity of the story is cleverly told
with the repetition of the cloth hanging from the bier. The middle register in Amiens has an animated scene with the
elevation of the Virgin’s body wrapped in a blanket, held by two angels, whilst some sleeping and some astonished
apostles are shown around the tomb. Le Roy has a simpler composition, analogous to Rau, with four angels carrying
the Virgin’s body. Finally, at the top of the right wing, the Virgin is shown as a young woman with angels leading her
towards the upper central panel with the Coronation. Rau, again, is the more ambitious composition as it incorporates
four angels (Le Roy has two and Amiens three) and one of the angels is beautifully depicted playing the violin.
With the physical body of the Virgin being led by the angels into the heavenly central scene, the narrative splits to
show the Virgin's soul in a mandorla transported up from the Entombment in the bottom central register which is then
transformed into a baby held by Christ. Twelve attendant angels play instruments or wave censers. Amiens matches
the number of figures in this register, but Christ is shown half-length and the unity of the Rau scene is broken in
Amiens by the arches which separate two of the angels. Le Roy is simpler still, lacking the figure of Christ.
The final scene is the Coronation of the Virgin. Here the three triptychs have a similar distribution of the figures, the
Virgin and Christ enthroned with an angel above crowning the Virgin, but whereas Amiens and Le Roy add two angels
on either side, Rau skilfully adds four angels, two of whom play musical instruments.
DATING THE GUSTAV RAU TRIPTYCH
Koechlin dated Le Roy and Amiens around 1330. In the 1981 exhibition Les fastes du Gothique Danielle Gaborit
Chopin concurs with this dating, cataloguing Amiens to around 1330-1340 and suggesting that Le Roy may be slightly
earlier. However, this conclusion is based on the perceived mishandling of the Dormition in Amiens which has been
demonstrated above to be unfounded. More recently Gaborit Chopin has associated Amiens with a triptych in the
Louvre with scenes from the Life and Death of the Virgin (OA6932) which she dates earlier to 1315-1335. Today
Koechlin's grouping of these ivories as products of the Workshop of the Death of the Virgin is generally dismissed
because the carvings are too varied. Gaborit Chopin proposes a tighter, more homogenous group associated with OA
6932, including Amiens, the diptych with the Life of the Virgin and Christ in Lille and the triptych with the Passion of
Christ in the Thyssen-Bornemisza collection. She evocatively describes the archetypal early 14th century Parisian
style of these works with their: 'figures aux proportions élancées , drapés habiles, gestes graciuex, visages aimables
aux long yeux fendus, cheveux et barbes aux ondulations soignés. La nette elongation des torses des personnages
assis … est caractéristique de cette période. Les proportions des figures, leurs visages très souriants et munis d’un
nez retroussé, un peu vulgaire...'.
This description perfectly corresponds to the style of Rau and clearly places it in this esteemed group. However, Rau
is of notable refinement within this group, and perhaps stands at the head of it. Its iconography has both originality
and complexity that has been discussed in detail above and this superiority is achieved not only by the clarity of the
compositions, but also by the depth of the carving and animation of the gestures and expressions. This is best
illustrated in the placing of the Virgin's body in the coffin, where St John leans dramatically forward, his head carved
fully in the round, his left hand held up in a simple gesture of sadness, whilst two apostles talk intently by his side.
Such lively characterisation of story and emotion seems in advance of the other two triptychs, or any of the same
scene from diptychs, such as those in Berlin (SKS 2722), or ex-Kofler Truniger (S 64) or ex-Christie's 4.11.2010 lot
29. For a comparably sophisticated treatment of action in a Gothic ivory relief one must look at the great ivory from the
Musée du Cluny known as the Triptych of Saint-Sulpice-du-Tarn (fig. 3). Here the figure of St John from the Crucifixion
provides a strong comparison with the Rau St John in his forward movement, bringing his head completely clear from
the background, in the treatment of his characteristic physiognomy and in his composed gesture. Clearly, the drapery
in the Cluny triptych is more complex and voluminous than in Rau, but it may be suggested that the latter forms a link
between the workshop of the triptych of Saint-Sulpice-du-Tarn and that of the Death of the Virgin group proposed by
Gaborit Chopin. Therefore, the date of the Rau Triptych could be suggested to be the earliest in this group, around
1310-1320.
THE COLLECTION OF PAUL R. G. HORST
Paul Robert Gustav Horst was born in New York in 1863 and died in Germany in 1958. He was married twice; his first
wife, Anna Carolin Christensen, was an opera soprano. He had four children, the youngest being Robert Percival
Kendall Horst (1911-1978). Horst was a businessman who worked in the family Hop business in America around
1900. He travelled extensively in Europe and was in business in London around 1916 and lived partly in Paris in the
1920s.
The Paul R. G. Horst collection was sold at Christie’s, London on 28th November 1961 by his son, Robert. It
comprised a total of 63 lots, 17 important French, Flemish and German ivories, 13 pieces of Continental metalwork, 17
Limoges and Spanish enamels, two Roman objects and 23 lots of Renaissance jewellery. The two outstanding
enamels in the collection were a 13th century enamel bookcover of the Crucifixion and a Chasse, formerly in the
Jacon Astley, 16th Baron Hastings collection, which had been exhibited in the 1857 Manchester Art Treasures
Exhibition; Horst may have bought this when it appeared at auction in Paris in 1910. Amongst the collection of ivories
there were four Flemish 17th century figures and one German late 15th century plaque of the Annunciation, now in the
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. The French Gothic ivories included six single leafs and four diptychs. One of
the latter is now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Saint Petersburg, Florida. Another was formerly in the Abbot Robert
Charles collection at La Forte-Bernard and was sold in the Dormeuil sale, Sotheby's Paris, 19th November 2007, lot
19. Several of the ivories from the Paul R. G. Horst collection can be traced back to auctions in Paris such as those of
Abbot Robert Charles (1873), George Hoentschel (1910), two pieces from Alexandre Léonce Rosenberg (1924) and
Emile Levy (1928). Pride of place in the ivory collection, however, was undoubtedly reserved for the Gustav Rau
Triptych.
RELATED LITERATURE
R. Koechlin, Les ivoires gothiques français, Paris, 1924, vol. 1, pp.139-141, vol. 2, pp.89-94, nos. 210, 211, 212, pls.
LII, LIII;
D. Alcouffe (et al.), Les Fastes du gothique: Le siècle de Charles V, exh. cat. Grand Palais, Paris, 1981, pp.185-6,
no.143
P. Williamson, The Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection Medieval Sculpture and Works of Art, London, 1987, pp.122-125,
no.23
R. Randall, The Golden Age of Ivory. Gothic Carvings in North American Collections, New York, 1993, p. 92, no. 111
P. Barnet (ed.), Images in Ivory, exhib. cat. The Detroit Institute of arts, Detroit, 1997, pp.26-27, no.26
D. Gaborit Chopin, Ivoires médiévaux Ve-XVe siècle, cat. Louvre Museum, Paris, 2003, p. 344, no. 123, pp. 286-388,
no.152, pp. 388-389, no.153

Fig. 1

Triptyque de Saint-Sulpice-du-Tarn, © RMN-Grand Palais (Musée


de Cluny - Musée National du Moyen-Âge) / Droits reserves

Fig. 2

French, c. 1330, Ex-Martin Le Roy Death of the Virgin Triptych,


location unknown

Fig. 3

French, c. 1330, Amiens Death of the Virgin Triptych ©Amiens,


Bibliothèque d'Amiens Métropole
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 12
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
AUSTRIAN, SALZBURG, CIRCA 1420

ST. AGNES
gilt and polychromed poplar
68cm., 26¾in.

ESTIMATE 60,000-80,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 9 April 1981, lot 40
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

EXHIBITED
Paris, Musée du Louvre, Sculpture allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques francaises:
1400-1530, 1991-1992, no. 4
LITERATURE
Sculpture allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques francaises: 1400-1530, exh. cat. Musée
du Louvre, 1991, pp. 58-60, no. 4

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present sculpture was one of a small group of works from private collections selected for the important
Sculptures allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age exhibition at the Louvre in 1991 (op.cit.). It was there to illustrate the
quality and charm of the Salzburg International Gothic, of which the voluminous drapery and youthful rounded face
are typical features.

The composition follows the traditional pose and drapery scheme of Beautiful Madonnas such as the stone Virgin and
Child in Plze, with Christ substituted by the lamb. An emphasis on the sway of the upper body was created by
the pronounced curve of the left side of the mantle towards the hand on the opposite side. The heavy folds cascading
from the sleeves and down the legs onto the base serve to frame the course of the drapery on the torso, creating an
even greater sense of movement. A St. Catherine in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum Munich (inv. no. MA1112) has
similarly arranged drapery.

The lamb identifies the present Saint as St. Agnes, a young Roman martyr known for her kindness and chastity. Her
name is derived from the Latin for lamb, agnus, while in Greek the word lamb means chaste, pure or sacred when
used as an adjective. In some accounts of her martyrdom, St. Agnes is said to have appeared to her parents upon her
death with a lamb at her side, a vision which may be evoked in the present sculpture.

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Legner, Spätgotik in Salzburg. Skulptur und Kunstgewerbe 1400-1530, exh. cat. Neuen Haus, Salzburg, 1976, pp.
43-74
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 13
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
GERMAN, RHINELAND, SECOND HALF 14TH CENTURY

STANDING VIRGIN
gilt and polychromed wood
40cm., 15¾in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present figure belongs to a series of Rhenish statuettes of the Virgin which generally only survive in museums or
in situ. They are united by a sideways and forward S-shaped sway of the body, and a rhythmic arrangement of the
drapery typical of the 14th century. They follow on from the early Virgin from the Rautenstrauch collection now in the
Schnütgen Museum, but take on the traits of the International Gothic after the middle of the century, here
characterised by the folds to the sides of the figure. The stylised hair appears in statuettes in both Cologne and
Salzburg, but the contrast between the drapery and the archaic face, and the absence of columnar folds around the
legs terminated by the horizontal edge of the mantle, are unusual. Perhaps this points towards an Austrian
origin similar to that of an Enthroned Madonna exhibited in Gotik in Tirol (op.cit., no. 18), which originates from the
Wipptal.

RELATED LITERATURE
Gotik in Tirol. Malerei und Plastik des Mittelalters, exh. cat. Tiroler Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum, Innsbruck, 1950, p.
19, no. 18, fig. 11; E.G. Grimme, Deutsche Madonnen, Cologne, 1966, pp. 101 and 105, nos. 7 and 16; R. Suckale
(ed.), Schöne Madonnen am Rhein, exh. cat. LVR-Landesmuseums, Bonn, 2009, pp. 191 and 205, nos. 18 and 38
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 14
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
WORKSHOP OF THE MASTER OF SEEON (POSSIBLY HANNS SWEICKER)
GERMAN, UPPER BAVARIA, CIRCA 1440-1450

PIETÀ
partially polychromed wood
23.5 by 25 by 11cm., 9 7/8 by 10¾ by 4¼in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
by repute Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Munich
with Julius Böhler, Munich, 21 June 1965

CATALOGUE NOTE
Even though few survive, there seems to have been a healthy demand for highly detailed small scale sculptures in the
International Gothic style. Several major museums possess small wood standing Madonnas from Paris or Cologne
(e.g. MAK, Cologne, inv. nos. A1154 and 72) and a number of small alabaster Pietàs attributed to the Master of Rimini
have appeared on the market recently (see Sotheby’s London, 3 July 2012, lot 37). This small wood Pietà in the
Beautiful Style, however, seems to be unique. The attention to naturalistic detail, small proportions of the heads and
bodies, and the Virgin’s level knees covered with regular folds are similar to the large scale enthroned Madonnas from
the cricle of the Master of Seeon. The name derives from the abbey from which his masterpiece, an Enthroned
Madonna and Child, now in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich (inv. no. MA1126), was taken. It has been
recently suggested that the sculptor's name was Hanns Sweicker.

RELATED LITERATURE
D. Grossmann, ‘Der Meister von Seeon’, Marburger Jahrbuch für Kunstwissenschaft, 19, 1974, p. 103; R. Suckale
(ed.), Schöne Madonnen am Rhein, exh. cat. LVR-Landesmuseums, Bonn, 2009, p. 205, nos. 36-37
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 15
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
NETHERLANDISH OR BURGUNDIAN, 15TH CENTURY

KNEELING DONOR FROM A RETABLE


with an old paper label to the underside inscribed: 2371 and the remains of an illegible old
dealer's label printed in red ink
limestone
37.5cm., 14¾in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Kunsthaus Lempertz, Cologne, 13-16 May 1994, lot 304

CATALOGUE NOTE
This kneeling figure would have originally formed part of an altarpiece or monument. It would have been placed on the
left hand side representing the man who commissioned the church or chapel for which the ensemble was intended. A
donor figure beneath the Seated Christ, dated to circa 1500, in the Eglise de Chaource, and a similar figure at the foot
of St. James, 1520, in Neuvy-Sautour, both in the Aube region of present-day Northeastern France, compare well to
the present figure (see Boccador, op.cit.).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Boccador, Statuaire medievale en France de 1400 a 1530, Zoug, 1974, vol. II, figs. 170 and 260
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 16
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FRENCH, PROBABLY CHAMPAGNE, 15TH CENTURY

CEPHALOPHORIC BISHOP SAINT


limestone
87.5cm., 34½in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Maître Blache, Hôtel Rameau, Versailles, Collection d'un amateur bourguignon, 9 March 1975, lot 58
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
‘Cephalophore’ derives from the Ancient Greek phrase ‘head-carrier’. The artistic motif of representing figures holding
their own heads signified their martyrdom.
The present sculpture bears a strong resemblance to other sacred works from the region of Champagne, in
Northeastern France. The sculpture of Saint Nicaise in the Musée du Louvre, Paris (inv. no. RF 1051), also a
cephalophore and dated to the second half of the fifteenth century, compares well to the present sculpture.
Furthermore, Leroy illustrates a bishop saint from the fifteenth century in the Church of Saint-Pierre in Bar-sur-Aube (
op. cit., p. 172), which shares a similar physicality to the present saint: sturdy and slightly stocky, with a rounded
compact face. The simplicity of the drapery is also similar. The present bishop wears robes, with few heavy folds and
discreet areas of decoration. The repetition of IHS, a Christogram, adds detail of decoration to his robes and neck line.
A stone Saint Hubert in the Church of Saint-Hubert in Par-les-Chavanges from the fifteenth century, also illustrated in
Leroy (op. cit. p. 175), is modelled with equivalent physical proportions.

RELATED LITERATURE
F. Baron, Sculpture française. Moyen âge, Paris, 1996, p. 178, no. RF 1051; P.E. Leroy, Sculpture en Champagne au
XVI siècle, Dijon, 2009, p. 172 and 175
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 17
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ITALIAN, PROBABLY TUSCANY, LATE 14TH CENTURY

STANDING BISHOP SAINT


gilt and polychromed wood
170cm., 66 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 8 July 1976, lot 43

CATALOGUE NOTE
Decorated with well-presented gilding and polychromy, the present work stylistically compares with statues from the
Tuscan workshops of the late fourteenth century. There is fine punching on the drapery with delicate floral motifs
featuring throughout. Small flowers are also carved into the gilt bands of his mitre. The bishop’s solid, frontal pose,
sincere expression and incline of the head are found throughout Tuscan works of this time. San Giacomo in the
chiesa di Sant’Andrea in Ceserana from the end of the fourteenth century, illustrated in Frosini (op. cit., pl. 23a), is a
good example. Both this figure and the present bishop share earnest expressions and thrust their lower bodies
forward, while the drapery of their copes weighs down in heavy and enveloping folds. There is a distinctive ‘V’ shape
to the folds of San Giacomo, correlating with those of the present saint and found in other Tuscan works as illustrated
by Frosini (op. cit., pl. 6-7 and 23b). Though more opulently decorated, the facial shape of a Venetian sculpture of a
bishop from the fifteenth century, in the cathedral of San Pietro (inv. no. 243) is similar to his elongated face and
gesture of showing two fingers in blessing. This motif is found in works from across Italy, such as the Tuscan Angelo
annunciante in the Museo d’Arte Sacra, Montalcino, also illustrated by Frosini (op. cit., pl. 5a).
A very similar sculpture, though missing both arms, attributed to fourteenth century Tuscany, was sold in Sotheby's
Florence, in the 2009 sale of Florentine antique dealer Salvatore Romano's collection (lot 27).

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Frosini, Scultura lignea dipinta nella Toscana Medievale, San Casciano, 2005, pp. 69-71 and 87; E. N.
Lusanna and L. Faedo, Il Museo Bardini a Firenze. Le sculture, Milan, 1986, pl. 280; C. Fratini (ed.), All’ombra di
sant’Ercolano. Sculture lignee tra Medioevo e Rinascimento nella diocese di Perugia, exh. cat. Museo del Capitolo di
San Lorenzo, Perugia, 2009, p. 91
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 18
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ITALIAN, FLORENCE, SECOND HALF 15TH CENTURY

BUST OF A MAN
stone
48 by 49cm., 18 7/8 by 19¼in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Heim Gallery Ltd., London, 1972

EXHIBITED
London, Heim Gallery Ltd., Sculptures of the 15th & 16th Centuries. Summer Exhibition 1972, 1972, no. 10

LITERATURE
The Burlington Magazine, vol. 114, no. 834, September 1972

CATALOGUE NOTE
Sculpted portraits became increasingly fashionable in Florence from the 1450's onwards. They had become so
popular by the end of the century that Giorgio Vasari (1511-1574) noted that there could be 'seen in every house in
Florence, over the chimney-pieces, doors, windows and cornices, infinite numbers of [sculpted] portraits, so well made
and so natural that they appear alive' (quoted in Butterfield, op. cit. p. 213). This phenomenon had arisen through the
success of portrait busts created for the Medici and their circle, and it spread rapidly through Florentine and,
eventually, wider Italian society. Portraits of living persons were justified by the belief that representations of virtuous
individuals could have a didactic function by serving as moral role models. Under these circumstances, the art of
portraiture flourished, with artists including Mino da Fiesole (1429-1484), Benedetto da Maiano (1442-1497) and
Antonio Rossellino (1427/8-79) sculpting some of the most striking portraits ever created.

The present bust owes much to the work of each of these sculptors. The fine carving of the sumptuous pattern
adorning the sitter's doublet, recalls the emphasis on the expensive fabric worn by Pietro Mellini in his portrait bust
sculpted by Benedetto da Maiano in the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence (Carl, op. cit., pl. 70). The focus on
textiles is seen in other Florentine busts, including Mino da Fiesole's portrait of Niccolò Strozzi in the Bode Museum,
Berlin (Butterfield, op. cit., p. 220). The characterful hat worn by the sitter is a typical form of 15th-century headdress,
similar hats can be seen in numerous contemporary painted portraits, including in Benozzo Gozzoli's (c. 1421-
1497) 1459-61 fresci for the Magi Chapel of the Palazzo Medici-Riccardi, Florence, and in Antonello da Messina's
1475-6 Portait of a Man in the National Gallery, London (inv. no. NG1141).

RELATED LITERATURE
D. Carl, Benedetto da Maiano. A Florentine Sculptor at the Threshold of the High Renaissance, Regensburg, 2006,
vol ii, pp. 92-93, pls. 70-1; A. Butterfield, 'The Rebirth of the Sculpted Portrait in 15th-Century Florence,' B. Paolozzi
Strozzi and M. Bormand (eds.), The Springtime of the Renaissance. Sculpture and the Arts in Florence 1400-60, exh.
cat. Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, and Musée du Louvre, Paris, Florence, 2013, pp. 212-221
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 19
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ITALIAN, VENICE, LAST QUARTER 15TH CENTURY

RELIEF WITH THE VIRGIN AND CHILD


with an old Sotheby's label printed with the Sotheby's logo and with two green stickers
each printed and inscribed in ink: SOTHEBYS NEW YORK / 7
stone
66.5cm., 26¼in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Cyril Humphris, London
his sale, Sotheby's New York, 10 January 1995, lot 7

CATALOGUE NOTE
The composition and facial types of this Virgin and Child are the characteristics of a Venetian sculptor active in the
last quarter of the 15th century. Comparisons can be made with the work of Giovanni Giorgio Lascaris, who adopted
the pseudonym of Pyrgoteles, the ancient Greek lapidist. Lascaris was active in the workshop of Pietro Lombardo in
the 1480's when he produced his only known signed work, the Madonna and Child on the tympanum on S. Maria dei
Miracoli in Venice. Note also Lascaris' Madonna Mocenigo in the Doge's Palace, Venice.

RELATED LITERATURE
L. Planiscig, Venezianische Bildhauer der Renaissance, Vienna, 1921, pp. 177-206, fig. 196; A. M. Schulz,
Giambattista and Lorenzo Bregno. Venetian Sculpture in the High Renaissance, Cambridge/ New York, 1991, pp. 10-
11
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 20
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO GREGORIO DI LORENZO (CIRCA 1436-1504)
ITALIAN, FLORENCE, CIRCA 1500

RELIEF WITH THE PIETÀ


marble, on a red velvet-lined wood mount
relief: 34.5cm., 13 5/8 in.mount: 48cm., 18 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Heim Gallery, London, 30 June 1972

EXHIBITED
London, Heim Gallery, Sculptures of the 15th & 16th Centuries. Summer
Exhibition 1972, 1972, no. 6
LITERATURE
A. Bellandi, Gregorio di Lorenzo. Il maestro delle Madonne di marmo, Morbio Inferiore, 2010, p. 367, no. III.3.13

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present relief takes its inspiration from contemporary Flemish art, a style adopted by Gregorio di Lorenzo in
another pair of reliefs Uomo del dolore and la Vergine addolorata in the Staatliche Museum, Berlin (inv. nos. 3/68 and
4/68). The present composition is modelled on a painting by the Flemish artist Hans Memling, entitled The Man of
Sorrows in the Arms of the Virgin, in the National Gallery, Melbourne (inv. no. 1335-3). In this work, Mary stands
behind the upright body of her son; together they create a united vertical form. In both the painting and the present
sculpture, Christ holds his arms slightly away from His upper body and the mood is characterised by emotional
restraint, in contrast to other Pietàs, which tend to evoke a despairing mother with Her perished son.

The modelling of the present figure of Christ corresponds with other representations of Christ in Gregorio di Lorenzo’s
oeuvre, distinguished by his pointed chin, high cheekbones, hollowed cheeks and heavy-lidded eyes, such as Cristo
coronato di spine in the Museo Archeologico dell’Agro Falisco and his work of the same name in the Szépmüvészeti
Múzeum, Budapest (see Bellandi, op. cit. nos. 193 and 207). There is also striking continuity throughout di Lorenzo’s
body of work (particularly in his representations of Christ but also in his wider range of figures) in the slight turn of the
head downwards and to one side (Bellandi, op. cit., nos. III.3.1-III.3.8 and III.3.10-III.3.13 ).

Where the present relief varies most notably from Memling's painting, is in the position of Mary, who places Her hands
on Christ’s shoulders, rather than His waist, and looks in the same direction as Christ. The mirroring of their head
gestures emphasises their physical similarity, with prominent cheekbones and sunken cheeks. This modelling is
evident in other representations of older Virgins in the work of di Lorenzo, such as his Mater dolorosa.

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Bellandi, Gregorio di Lorenzo. Il maestro delle Madonne di marmo, Morbio Inferiore, 2010, pp. 213, 231 and 361-
367, nos. 193 and 207, III.3.1-III.3.8 and III.3.10-III.3.13
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 21
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO GIOVANNI ANTONIO AMADEO (CIRCA 1447-1522) AND
WORKSHOP
ITALIAN, LOMBARDY, LATE 15TH CENTURY

RELIEF WITH ST. FRANCIS RECEIVING THE STIGMATA AND NOLI ME TANGERE
marble
63 by 143cm., 24¾ by 56¼in.

ESTIMATE 150,000-250,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Heim Gallery, London, 1982

EXHIBITED
London, Heim Gallery, Seven Centuries of European Sculpture. Summer Exhibition,1982

LITERATURE
Seven Centuries of European Sculpture. Summer Exhibition, exh. cat. Heim Gallery, London, 1982, no. 10

CATALOGUE NOTE
When this important Italian Renaissance relief was last offered on the art market, it was attributed to Giovanni di Pietro
da Rho (fl. 1481-1513), a sculptor working in the circle of the celebrated Lombard master, Giovanni Antonio Amadeo.
The relief features the same compositions as two of the panels from the shrine of St Arealdo in Cremona, a signed
monument by Amadeo dating to 1484 (Hill. op. cit., nos. 2/8/114-115). The attribution to da Rho was based on the
fact that the sculptor was responsible for two comparable reliefs, one of which is taken from another of the
models found on the St Arealdo shrine, representing St Jerome in Penitance. Its pendant is signed by da Rho, and
both are housed today in the Museo Civico, Cremona (inv. nos. 317 and 318).
A comparison between da Rho's panels and the present relief, however, confirms that they are not by the same hand.
Da Rho's scenes are in lower relief, the drapery is more angular, and the trees are wholly more schematic. Ultimately,
the quality of the present marble is superior. Note, for example, the flat and unanimated fictive silk ribbons falling from
the title plaque in da Rho's signed relief. These contrast starkly with the ribbons seen in the present marble, which are
carved in billowing high relief folds. A comparison with other works by da Rho, for example his tomb of St. Agostino in
Cremona (Hill. op. cit., nos. 2/8/117-119), adds further weight to the conclusion that the present scenes are the work
of a more skilled master.

The closest comparisons for the present panels are found in the oeuvre of Amadeo, who, as is outlined above, we
know carved near-identical reliefs. The first point to note is that Amadeo used certain models repeatedly, and so it is
not unusual that the same compositions appear on both the present relief and on the St Arealdo shrine. The
Stigmatization of St Francis and the Noli me Tangere were popular subjects with 15th-century patrons, and many
artists would naturally have reused successful models with variations. Amadeo, in fact, borrowed motifs and
compositions from accessible sources, such as antique coins and contemporary plaquettes. This is indeed the case
with the present Stigmatization scene, which is almost directly taken from a model found on a 14th-century seal in the
Metropolitan Museum of Art (inv. no. 8.70.15).

An important comparison for the present marble is found in a statue of Christ in Soragna, which is signed by Amadeo
and dated 1470 (see Bildarchiv Foto Marburg, no. 260.08). The model is the same as that appearing in the Noli me
Tangere scenes from the present relief and on the St Arealdo shrine. It is interesting to note the chartaceous (paper-
like) drapery and the stylised physiognomy, which are particularly close to those seen on the present relief. However,
the Soragna Christ's drapery is more softened than that seen in the St Arealdo relief. More angular drapery is a
feature of Amadeo's work from the 1480s and has been ascribed to the influence of Antonio Piatti and Christophoro
Mantegazza. Christ's drapery in the present relief is closer to the Soragna marble, possibly indicating that it dates to
the same period, before 1480.

Numerous additional features of the present marble would indicate that it was carved by Amadeo or by one of his
associates under his supervision. Note the figure's deeply carved ocular orbits, which compare with those seen in
other works by Amadeo, including the Soragna Christ and a relief with angels in the Victoria and Albert Museum (inv.
no. 450-1869). Most importantly, the superb trees, which are carved in high relief, are comparable with the very finest
work by Amadeo, see, for example, the trees appearing on the reliefs of the shrine of St Lanfranco in Pavia (Hill, op.
cit., nos. 2/8/136-141). The exquisite classicising motifs adorning the pilasters and entablature are characteristic of
Amadeo's work, and equal those seen on the St Lanfranco shrine.

Giovanni Antonio Amadeo was the most successful and influential sculptor active in late- 15th-/ early- 16th-century
Lombardy. During his lifetime, his prominence in North Italy was such that he eclipsed even Donato Bramante and
Leonardo da Vinci. Amadeo is best known today for his work on the Certosa di Pavia, and for his leading role in
introducing all'antica motifs to Lombard sculpture. However, his oeuvre is complex to assess, because he operated
a sizeable workshop and collaborated with other sculptors, notably Antonio Piatti, Francesco Cazzaniga, Cristophoro
Mantegazza and Benedetto Briosco. With any work attributed to him, even signed or recorded sculptures, it therefore
has to be accepted that skilled assistants or associates may have been involved; the present marble is no exception.

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Puerari, Museo Civico 'Ala Ponzone', Cremona, 1976, nos. 32-33; C. Hill (ed.), Courtauld Institute Illustration
Archives. Archive 2. 15th & 16th Century Sculpture in Italy. Part 8. Lombardy, London, 1978, nos. 2/8/114-115,
2/8/117-119, 2/8/136-141; R. V. Schofield, J. Shell and G. Sironi, Giovanni Antonio Amadeo. Documents, Como,
1989, pp. 7-18; M. Leino, 'Italian Renaissance Plaquettes and Lombard Architectural Monuments,' A. Lombarda, 146-
148, 2006, pp. 111-126
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 22
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
GERMAN, SWABIA, CIRCA 1490

ST. GEORGE
gilt and polychromed limewood
53.5cm., 21in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby´s London, 8 July 1981, lot 310;
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
An important source for sculptures of armoured saints such as St. George, St. Florian and St. Michael in 15th-century
Swabia were three knights on a fountain in the city centre of Ulm known as the Fischkasten, or fish box. The name
refers to its location near the medieval fish market and it is the oldest preserved fountain in Ulm. It is thought to have
been a collaboration between the workshops of Jörg Syrlin the Elder (c. 1425-1491) and Michel Erhart (c. 1440-1522).
The type of armour, with a rounded sallet and high bevor, and the forward placement of the foot of the three knights
on the fountain compare well to the present statuette, as does the thick cape draped over the figure's shoulders.

RELATED LITERATURE
B. Rommé, ‘Der Ulmer Fischkasten. Eine weitere Kooperation der beide Syrlins mit Michel Erhart’, Michel Erhart und
Jörg Syrlin d. Ä. Spätgotik in Ulm, exh. cat. Ulmer Museum, Ulm, 2002, pp. 180-193
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 23
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
GERMAN, FRANCONIA, SECOND HALF 15TH CENTURY

FEMALE SAINT, PROBABLY THE VIRGIN OF THE ANNUNCIATION


limewood
87cm., 34¼in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Lempertz Cologne, 15-17 November 1972, lot 1470

CATALOGUE NOTE
The voluminous drapery, squat proportions and thoughtful expression of the present female figure are likely to have
originated in Swabia under the influence of the sculptor Hans Multscher. Multscher revolutionised German wood
sculpture by introducing the weight and realism of Northern French and Netherlandish sculpture. The result was a
style that maintained the beauty and interest in decorative effects of the International Gothic but was much
more varied and earthly. For a figure with a similarly rounded face and stark drapery scheme, see the Mary Magdalen
on the left hand side of the St. George altarpiece by a follower of Multscher in Scharenstetten.

RELATED LITERATURE
B. Reinhardt (ed.), Hans Multscher. Bildhauer der Spätgotik in Ulm, exh. cat. Ulmer Museum, Ulm, 1997, pp. 345-350,
no. 30
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 24
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
AUSTRIAN, NORTHERN TYROL, LATE 15TH CENTURY

BUST OF ST. SIGISMOND


with an old red label inscribed: 15400
gilt and polychromed limewood, on a possibly later wood base
49cm., 19¼in. overall.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 11 December 1980, lot 97
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012 (on display)

CATALOGUE NOTE
St. Sigismond is represented here with thick curly hair typical of Tyrolian representations of young male saints. See for
example the St. George from the Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum in Innsbruck and a St. Sebastian from Schloss
Tratzberg illustrated in Müller (op.cit., nos. 135 and 184). The physiognomy is equally emblematic of Austrian wood
carving: two half-length figures from Hans Klocker’s altar piece from Tramin, today in the Bayerisches
Nationalmuseum, Munich (inv. no. MA 1952.1-6), look similarly jovial.

St. Sigismund was the first Christian King of Burgundy, ruling from 516 to 524. His conversion inspired him to found a
monastery in Valias, where he remorsefully retreated after strangling his son for insulting his wife. He reemerged and
in 523 he led the Burgundians in battle against the Franks and was captured and executed, prompting his people to
venerate him as a martyr. This veneration spread towards Eastern Europe as his relics were moved to churches in
Prague and Varad among others.

RELATED LITERATURE
T. Müller, Gotische Skulptur in Tirol, Bozen/ Vienna, 1976, pp. 438-439 and 443, nos. 135, 146 and 184
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 25
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
SOUTH GERMAN, PROBABLY SWABIA, CIRCA 1500

TWO RELIEFS OF ST. DOROTHY AND ST. ODILE


St. Dorothy with an old paper label printed: R. VON KAUFMANN / 331 and an old paper label
inscribed: 201St. Odile with an old paper label printed: R. VON KAUFMANN / 330
gilt and polychromed limewood, with partially velvet covered wood frames
St. Dorothy: 110cm., 43¼in.St. Odile: 111cm., 43¾in.

ESTIMATE 50,000-80,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Richard von Kaufmann, Berlin, before 1898
his sale, Paul Cassirer and Hugo Helbing Berlin, 4 December 1917, lots 330 and 331
there purchased by Jüstizrat Pollak
Sotheby's London, 20 December 1973, lot 34
EXHIBITED
Berlin, Kunstgeschichtlichen Gesellschaft, Ausstellung von Kunstwerken des Mittelalters und der Renaissance aus
Berliner Privatbesitz, 1898, nos. 258-259

CATALOGUE NOTE
This elegant pair of low reliefs is likely to have adorned the wing of a major altar piece. These wings, also known as
shutters, were mounted on either side of most altarpieces and usually represent ancillary scenes or saints. The wings
could not be too heavy so German sculptors solved this problem by adorning them with very shallow reliefs. During
the time around 1500 many grappled with the problems of foreshortening and suggestion of plasticity this
involved. The results are often charming, with figures stretched or widened against the background in order to
accommodate their animated facial expressions, limbs and drapery. The wings of some of the foremost South German
altarpieces were supplied with this type of carving. See, for example, Tilman RIemenschneider’s altarpiece with
scenes from the Life of the Virgin in Creglingen (see Kahsnitz, op.cit., pp. 238-253).

Even though individually carved saints are usually attributable to Swabian masters, the elongated bodies, vertically
oriented drapery scheme and classical proportions of the faces of the present saints suggest that they may have
been carved further North, in Franconia. Compare with, for example, a Mourning Virgin in the Germanisches
Nationalmuseum from Nuremberg illustrated by Baxandall (op.cit., pl. 62).

Saint Dorothea of Caesarea was often among the fourteen Nothelfers, a group of saints venerated because their
intercession was believed to be particularly effective against diseases. Her attribute is a basket with apples and roses
from the gardens of heaven, which she sent as a gift to Theophilus, one of her converts, shortly before her
death. According to a late 10th century account of the life of St. Odile of the Alsace, she was born blind but
miraculously gained eyesight after being baptised and therefore she became the patron saint of eyesight. She was
among eleven Virgins that set off from England to spread the gospel during a pilgrimage to the East. She founded the
monastery in Hohenburg, Alsace, and plays an important part in the Order of the Crosiers, hence her nun’s habit.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Baxandall, The limewood sculptors of Renaissance Germany, New Haven/ London, 1980, pl. 62; R. Kahsnitz and
A. Bunz, Die groen Schnitzaltäre. Spätgotik in Süddeutschland, Österreich, Südtirol, Munich, 2005, pp. 238-253; N.
Jopek, German Sculpture 1430-1540. A catalogue of the collection in the Victoria and Albert Museum, cat. Victoria
and Albert Museum, London, 2002, pp. 102-103, no. 46
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 26
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO TILMAN RIEMENSCHNEIDER (C. 1460-1531)
GERMAN, WÜRZBURG, CIRCA 1490-1500

CORPUS CHRISTI
polychromed limewood
61.5cm., 24¼in.

ESTIMATE 200,000-300,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, Würzburg;
art market, Munich

EXHIBITED
Würzburg, Mainfränkisches Museum, Tilman Riemenschneider - Frühe Werke, 1981, no. 48;
Paris, Musée du Louvre, Sculptures allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques francaises.
1400-1530, 1991-1992, no. 49

LITERATURE
B. Buczynski, F. Buchenrieder, P.Bloch et al., Tilman Riemenschneider - Frühe Werke, exh. cat. Mainfränkisches
Museum, Würzburg, Berlin, 1981, p. 236, no. 48;
Sculptures allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques francaises. 1400-1530, exh. cat. Musée
du Louvre, Paris, 1991, pp. 186-187, no. 49

CATALOGUE NOTE
In the seminal 1981 exhibition on Tilman Riemenschneider’s early work the present corpus was published as one of a
group of small corpora produced by the young master. The figure’s distinguished naturalism and the exquisite
rendering of the face and drapery show Riemenschneider’s talent for small scale sculpture for private devotion – a
lesser known facet of his oeuvre.

The corpus is likely to have formed part of an ensemble like that kept in the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt
(inv. no. PL.01.08), which shows Christ on the cross flanked by Mary and St. John the Evangelist on a rocky base
meant to resemble Golgotha. These miniature altarpieces were the centre of private chapels and cells of noblemen
and clerics and, as such, they formed the focus of their solitary prayers and confessions. The empathy with which
Riemenschneider represented the crucified Christ must have been successful. Three further fragmentary corpora
survive in the Mainfränkisches Museum in Würzburg (inv. nos. S43503 and 4) and in the Convent of the Misericordia
Sisters in Graz. Each of these figures is characterised by a fine sense of plasticity and mastery of unstrained anatomy
typical of Riemenschneider. The drapery invariably crosses at the front of the body and, when well-preserved,
terminates in flourishes such as that on the proper left side of the present figure. A particularly similar execution of this
side of the perezonium can be seen on a larger scale in Riemenschneider’s Crucifix with St. Nicholas and St.
Catherine in Steinach an der Saale. The long straight nose, angled open eyes, strand of hair flowing onto the shoulder
and the dense crown of thorns are equally comparable. The contrast between the high finish of the drapery and less
sinewy treatment of the anatomy in the present corpus, however, led Muth to suggest that this is the first of the
surviving corpora (op.cit., 1981, no. 51).

Tilman Riemenschneider was born in Heiligenstadt in 1460. Little is known of the sculptor's early career, although it is
likely he was apprenticed to a stone mason in Erfurt, specialising in carving alabaster. He settled in Ulm for a time,
where he may have worked as an apprentice to Michel Erhart. A "Tilman Riemenschneider" appears in the Würzburg
town records before 1479 when he turned down a commission for an altarpiece. Settling and marrying there in 1483,
he became a citizen and a member of the painter's Guild of Saint Luke, achieving the status of 'Meister'. His new
wife's wealth provided a large house with sufficient space for workshops and quarters for assistants, apprentices and
his family. He subsequently received numerous commissions from various town councils, including one in 1490 from
the town council of Münnerstadt for an altarpiece for the high altar of St. Maria Magdalene, the parish church. Further
major commissions were executed by Riemenschneider's workshop for local patrons, as well as for clients in
Franconia and Saxony. In 1504, he was elected to Würzburg city council and, in 1509, he was the first artist to enter
the Upper Council. He was elected mayor of the town in 1520-21, by which time he had married for the fourth time.
During the peasant revolt in 1525, Riemenschneider allied himself with the lower classes against the Prince-Bishop,
Conrad von Thüngen. As a result of his actions, he was arrested, imprisoned and tortured. Riemenschneider's
steadfast empathy during the revolt is manifest in the soulfulness of his sculpture.

After his death in 1531, interest in Riemenschneider's work waned considerably due to changing tastes as well as the
Reformation. Most of his sculpture was destroyed or modified, which is why works of art attributed to him and his
atelier are extremely rare. Since the 19th century, however, appreciation of Riemenschneider's work has been
rejuvenated. With the 1931 Hannover exhibition on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of his death, which followed
the publication of the first volume of Justus Bier's monograph, interest in Riemenschneider's brilliance continued its
revival. At this time, his popularity in Germany was only surpassed by Albrecht Dürer's (Chapuis, op.cit. p.20). The
renewed interested in German art and the early 20th-century dispersal of prestigious private collections containing
important works by Riemenschneider, spurred museums such as Berlin and Munich to purchase his works. Wixom
(Chapuis, op.cit., p. 149) explains that the great European collections influenced the tastes of foreign collectors and
museums, particularly in America, who consequently sought out German masterpieces.

RELATED LITERATURE
Riemenschneider Gedächtnis-Ausstellung 1931, exh. cat. Museums für Kunst und Landesgeschichte im Provinzial-
Museum, Hanover, 1931; M. Baxandall, The limewood sculptors of Renaissance Germany, New Haven/
London, 1980, pp. 172-90, 259-65; H. Muth (ed.), Tilman Riemenschneider – Frühe Werke, exh cat. Mainfränkisches
Museum, Würzburg, 1981, nos. 8, 49-51; H. Muth, Tilman Riemenschneider. Die Bildwerke des Bildschnitzers und
Bildhauers, seines Werkstatt und seines Umkreises in Mainfränkisches Museum, cat. Mainfrankisches Museum,
Würzburg, 1982, pp. 140-141 and 162-165, nos. 32 and 38; J. Chapuis, Tilman Riemenschneider. Master sculptor of
the late Middle Ages, London, 1999
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 27
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO THE WORKSHOP OF TILMAN RIEMENSCHNEIDER (1460-
1531)
GERMAN, FRANCONIA, FIRST HALF 16TH CENTURY

TWO RELIEFS OF ST. LIBORIUS AND ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST


limewood
St. Liborius: 73cm., 28¾in.St. John the Baptist: 67cm., 26 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Tilman Riemenschneider’s distinctive style loomed large over Franconia in the first half of the 16th century. His vast
workshop produced a number of independent masters who flocked to the far corners of the land to satisfy the demand
for Riemenschneider-style sculpture. The workshop in Würzburg, meanwhile, continued producing sculpture under
Riemenschneider's son Georg (or Jörg) after the master's death.
The present figures are likely to have been produced by an associate of the great master of German limewood
carving. They compare well to a St. Lawrence and St. Urban in the Mainfränkisches Museum, Würzburg (inv. nos.
14178 and 32695) and the juvenile features of St. John the Evangelist are reminiscent of Riemenschneider own
youths, such as the sleeping St. John on the altar piece in the parish church in Detwang.

RELATED LITERATURE
H. Muth, Tilman Riemenschneider. Die Werke des Bildschnitzers und Bildhauers, seiner Werkstatt und seines
Umkreises, cat. Mainfränkisches Museum, Würzburg, pp. 182-185, nos. 43 and 44; W. Schneider (ed.), Tilman
Riemenscneider – Werke seiner Glaubenswelt, exh. cat. Museum am Dom, Würzburg, 2004, p. 45, fig. 20
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 28
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
GERMAN, SWABIA, CIRCA 1500

CORONATION OF THE VIRGIN


with an old paper label to the reverse
gilt and polychromed wood
56cm., 22in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
Carvings of the Coronation of the Virgin were a regular feature on South German altarpieces and often followed the
compositional scheme of the present sculpture. A number of comparable groups originate from Bayerisch-Schwaben,
a part of Swabia that lies in modern Bavaria, suggesting that the prototype was an important altarpiece in that region.
Compare to another example formerly in the collection of Dr. Richard Oertel (Neumeister Munich, 5 November 1979,
lot 22) and one in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Munich (inv. no. MA 1312).

RELATED LITERATURE
T. Müller, Die Bildwerke in Holz, Ton und Stein von der Mitte des XV. bis gegen Mitte des XVI. Jahrhunderts, cat.
Bayerischen Nationalmuseums, Munich, 1959, pp.178-180, no. 177
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 29
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FRENCH, CHAMPAGNE, FIRST QUARTER 16TH CENTURY

ST. ANNE TEACHING THE VIRGIN TO READ


partially polychromed limestone, on a later octogonal marble base
118cm., 46½in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 10 March 1983, lot 42
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present portrait of St. Anne teaching her daughter to read comes from a long tradition of representations of the
Education of the Virgin, a particularly popular theme in the sixteenth century. The image demonstrates the diligence
and virtue of young Mary as she listens to her mother. Embedded in the subject is the ideal of transmitting culture and
wisdom from one generation to the next. The Virgin’s future responsibility as mother and educator of Christ is an
important association. With its combination of dignity and genre detail, this stone sculpture successfully balances
divine piety with human character.

The present work compares closely with stone sculptures dated to the turn of the sixteenth century from Champagne
in the North East of France. As recorded by Leroy, the iconography of the Education was popular in Champagne (op.
cit., pp. 59-64). The strong vertical figure, almond-shaped face and serious expression of St. Anne, compare to figures
of the same scene in the Church of Saint-Croix in Mesnil-Selières from the sixteenth century and from the Church of
Saint-Pierre in Bar-sur-Aube, from the fifteenth century, both illustrated in Leroy (op. cit., pp. 61 and 64). The latter
Virgin, though older in date than the present sculpture, shares the same heavy eyelids and distinct thin brows. Forsyth
has noted the tendency in eastern France to represent less joyful figures (op. cit., p. 176). It is also worth noting the
common representation in Champagne sculptures of a maturer Mary who reaches the waist of her mother in height
(see Leroy op. cit., pp. 60 and 62-64).
Though more modestly decorated than most sculptures from Troyes in the Champagne region, the present sculpture
compares with Troyes figures as illustrated in Avery for the band around Mary’s head and the long, striated curls
falling down her back (op. cit., nos. 2-5 and 8-9). St. Anne’s drapery, bunched up to one side, also has affinities with
other figures from Northeastern France, such as the representation of St. Syre, dating to the end of the fifteenth
century, illustrated in Boccador (op. cit. p. 154).

RELATED LITERATURE
P.E. Leroy, Sculptures en Champagne au XVIe siècle, Dijon, 2009, pp. 59-64; J. Boccador, Statuaire médiévale en
France de 1400 à 1530, Zoug, 1974; C. Avery, Sculpture from Troyes in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London,
1974, pp. 64-65 and 68-69; W. H. Forsyth, ‘The Virgin and Child in French fourteenth century sculpture. A method of
classification’, The art bulletin, September 1957, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 171-182
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 30
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
GERMAN, SWABIA, EARLY 16TH CENTURY

ST. FLORIAN POURING WATER ON TO A BURNING CASTLE


limewood
87cm., 34¼in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
St. Florian is represented here in an idealised manner which, although not often associated with late Gothic wood
sculpture now, was current throughout South Germany around 1500. Imbuing saints with youthful beauty illustrated
their Christian innocence and virtuousness while the sculptor, much like his Italian counterparts, showcased his
control over nature. Master woodcarvers such as Michel and Gregor Erhart, Veit Stoss and Nikolaus Weckmann all
experimented freely with idealisation as opposed to realism or caricature. The facial features of St. Florian compare to
those of a Bust of St. Vitus associated with Jörg Syrlin the Younger, which was exhibited in New York in 1968 (op.cit.).
Saint Florian is the patron saint of firefighters, soapmakers and chimneysweeps. Particularly in the former capacity he
was widely venerated in Germany and Austria. Florian was a Roman soldier, who next to his military responsibilities
organised a fire brigade in the Roman town of Aelium Cetiumin, in modern day Upper Austria. He was drowned when
he refused to persecute Christians in his district. Like most soldier saints, Florian is usually represented in elaborate
Gothic armour. He is identifiable by the pail with which he pours water on a burning house or castle.

RELATED LITERATURE
C. Gómez-Moreno, Medieval art from private collections, exh. cat. The Cloisters, New York, 1968, no. 63
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 31
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
WORKSHOP OF DANIEL MAUCH (C. 1477-1540)
GERMAN, ULM, CIRCA 1510-1520

VIRGIN AND CHILD ON A CRESCENT MOON


with an old Sotheby's label printed: SOTHEBYS / ITEM NO SUB. ITEM and stamped:
H009285 / 0037 and a label inscribed: 150 (twice)
limewood
75.5 by 27cm., 29¾ by 10 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Hugo Helbing, Munich, 1927
Sotheby's London, 16 November 1972, lot 37
LITERATURE
G. Otto, Die Ulmer Plastik der Spätgotik, Reutlingen, 1927, p. 305, fig. 356

CATALOGUE NOTE
Daniel Mauch was the last great Late Gothic woodcarver to emerge from the famous Ulm School in Upper Swabia.
Ulm was the foremost Southwest German centre for wood sculpture and its influence was felt in the rest of South
Germany, Franconia, and Austria. Trade in iron, wood and textiles, the advantageous location on the bank of the
Danube and at the foot of the Alps, and its function as the seat of the Swabian Union, brought extraordinary wealth to
its citizens. By 1500, the size of the city’s territory was second only to Nuremberg.

Mauch ran a successful workshop in Ulm from 1503 until the Reformation hit the town in 1531. His extant
works include the Maggmannshofer Altar, representing the Crowning of the Virgin, in the Marienkapelle in Kempten,
and the altarpiece with the Holy Family in the Franz-Xaver Kapelle in Bieselbach, which is signed and dated 1510.
Both of these retables feature a representation of the Virgin that is characterised by the same long flowing hair, slight
facial features and crumples on the ridges of the drapery folds that can be seen on the present Virgin.
Throughout Mauch's oeuvre, the figures of the Christ Child are animated and have tightly wound conical curls of hair.
Particularly comparable to the present Christ Child are the children from the Anna Selbdritt in the Germanisches
Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg (inv. no. PI.O.199) and the Virgin and Child from the altarpiece in the city church of
Geislingen. The overall conception, however, relates most closely to the Oertel-Madonna in the Kunst Palast in
Düsseldorf (inv. no. mkp.P 1936-2). This too shows the Virgin and Child on a crescent moon and is also notable for
the tender and prudent way in which the Child is held by the Virgin. The drapery scheme of both statues – which
emphasises the Virgin’s contraposto by curving folds that run from Her left foot to Her right hip and a crumpled area
under the proper left arm – largely follows the same pattern. The present statue differs in the engaging outward gaze
of both figures and carefully carved details such as the Virgin’s collar.

RELATED LITERATURE
S. Wagini, Der Ulmer Bildschnitzer Daniel Mauch (1477-1540), Ulm, 1995; B. Reinhardt and E. Leistenschneider,
Daniel Mauch. Bildhauer im Zeitalter der Reformation, exh. cat. Ulmer Museum, Ulm, 2009, pp. 138-145, 152-160,
176-179, 207-210 and 228-233, nos. 1, 3, 9, 20 and 26
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 32
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
SOUTH GERMAN, SWABIA, CIRCA 1500

THREE RELIEFS OF CHRIST PRAYING AND ST. PAUL AND ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST
ASLEEP ON THE MOUNT OF OLIVES
limewood
Christ: 116 by 57cm., 45 5/8 by 22½in.St. Paul: 20.2 by 40.2cm., 8 by 15¾in.St. John: 40.5
by 27.6cm., 15 7/8 by 10 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 18,000-25,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Reinhold Hofstätter, Vienna, 7 October 1960

CATALOGUE NOTE
Narrative low-reliefs from late Gothic Germany were often based on graphic sources. Scenes from the Life of the
Virgin and the Passion, the main subject-matter of altarpieces, relied heavily on the prints of Dürer, Schongauer, and
unknown monogrammists like the Masters ES, HL and AG. The present carvings may only be fragments of a relief of
Christ on the Mount of Olives, but the inspiration must have come from engravings of the same subject by
Schongauer and the Master AG (Lehrs 19 and 81). In both of these prints, Christ is represented kneeling in a rocky
landscape as he receives a vision of his impending death, while three Apostles sleep in the foreground in slightly
different configurations. A number of major altarpieces contain a scene based on these sources, including Veit Stoss’
altarpiece for the St. Sebald church in Nuremberg, Tilman Riemenschneider’s Holy Blood altarpiece in Rothenburg,
and that made for the Franciscan monks from the same town, now in Schloss Berchtesgaden.

RELATED LITERATURE
S. Guillot de Suduiraut, Sculptures allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques françaises
1400-1530, exh. cat. Musée du Louvre, Paris, 1991, pp. 178-183 and 200-202, nos. 46 and 55; R. Kahsnitz, Die
Groen Schnitzaltäre. Spätgotik in Süddeutschland, Österrreich, Südtirol, Munich, pp. 222-237
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 33
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FLEMISH, ANTWERP, CIRCA 1510

RELIEF WITH THE LAMENTATION


with the engraved marks of the wood merchants on the reverse
oak, on a grey velvet covered wood base
relief: 57.5 by 61.2cm., 22 5/8 by 24 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Dr. Stefan von Licht, Vienna
his sale, Galerie Hugo Helbing, Frankfurt, 1929, lot 320, pl. VIII
Kunsthaus Lempertz, Cologne, 22-26 November 1973, lot 1941

CATALOGUE NOTE
From the mid-fifteenth century onwards, the Netherlands, and the cities of Antwerp and Brussels in particular, were
noted for their production of large retables consisting of narrative scenes against architectural backgrounds in a boxed
framework. The output was regulated strictly by a set of guilds -the wood suppliers, wood carvers and wood painters-
who would each add assay marks to the altar pieces, branding the object with the good name of their hometown and
guild. The production of such altarpieces was substantial, but their survival was often compromised by the dismantling
of altars. Iconoclastic revolutions, the dissolution of the monasteries and events such as the Napoleonic Wars lead to
their destruction. With the Gothic Revival in the 19th century, however, some of the material was saved by early
collectors of Flemish late Gothic art, albeit often only in fragments, such as the present carving.
The narrative scenes of most extant Netherlandish altar pieces depict scenes from the Life of Christ or the Virgin. On
the former, The Lamentation over the Dead Christ usually features. The composition of the scene then follows a
common source: Christ lies diagonally at the centre of the scene, supported by Joseph of Arimathea with Mary
Magdalene presenting her ointment at his feet, while the Virgin and other figures lament his passing in the
background. The complete retables in Hulshout, Aarlen, Elmpt (Germany), Den Bosch, Waase and Neerharen, all
made in Antwerp and exhibited there in 1993 (op.cit., nos. 2, 4, 6, 7, 9 and 11), retain such a scene in a register on
the right hand side. The present scene is more unusual for having the body of Christ supported by the Virgin as well, a
Pietà, which is more reminiscent of the two figure-groups in small Lamentation retables, such as that in the Sint-
Walburgis Church in Netterden, Holland. The regular appearance of the scene in retables from Antwerp in particular,
and the intricately carved elaborate costumes, suggest that the present relief originates from Antwerp as well. Its size,
accomplished pyramidical composition and the variety in the attitudes of the characters are outstanding.

RELATED LITERATURE
H. Nieuwkoop, Antwerpse retabels. 15de-16de eeuw, exh. cat. Antwerp Cathedral, 1993, pp. 30-35, 40-43, 48-57,64-
69, 74-83 and 142-145, nos. 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 22 and 23
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 34
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
CIRCLE OF HUBERT GERHARD (1540-1620)
SOUTH GERMAN, EARLY 17TH CENTURY

ANGEL
with an old label to the underside of the socle inscribed: 2.358 / E3
gilt bronze, on an ebonised wood socle
Angel: 24.3cm., 9 5/8 in.socle: 14.5cm., 5¾in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

EXHIBITED
Zürich, Galerie Le point, Crédit Suisse, Engel., 1999-2000, no. 61

LITERATURE
J. Schoch (ed.), Engel., exh. cat. Galerie Le Point, Crédit Suisse, Zurich, 1999, no. 61
CATALOGUE NOTE
This beautiful gilt bronze angel is close to the work of Hubert Gerhard and his workshop. The pose, with one arm
raised and one arm lowered, the heavy, flowing, drapery, and the strap running across the abdomen, are reminiscent
of the pair of kneeling angels by Gerhard from the Fugger Altar, dating to 1581-4, in the Victoria and Albert Museum
(inv. nos. A.21-1964 and A.22-1964). The facial type and the frayed edges of the drapery compare particularly with
Gerhard's Weihbrunnenengel of 1593-6 in the church of St. Michael, Munich (Diemer, op. cit., no. G 12 b). For a very
similar pose, see Gerhard's terracotta angel, which is also in the church of St. Michael, Munich, and dates to 1584-8
(Diemer, op. cit., pl. 7).

Hubert Gerhard was a highly influential sculptor. He ran a large workshop, training a number of
star apprentices who went to to become renowned sculptors in their own right, notably Hans Krumper (1570-1634).
Gerhard was the first of the three great sculptors who brought Giambologna's courtly Mannerist style to the North. A
Dutchman by birth, he worked for the princely Habsburg courts and, later, for the Dukes of Bavaria. His first
documented commission was the Christoph Fugger Altar of 1581, which commemorated a member of the powerful
Augsburg banking family.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Baxandall, 'A Masterpiece by Hubert Gerhard', Victoria and Albert Museum Bulletin, 1965, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 1-17;
D. Diemer, Hubert Gerhard und Carlo di Cesare del Palagio. Bronzeplastiker der Spätrenaissance, Berlin, 2004, vol.
II, pp. 191, 252-253, 272, 459, nos. G 1 b-c, C 5 b, figs. 68-69, 88, 275, pl. 7
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 35
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO GEORG SCHWEIGGER (1613-1690)
GERMAN, NUREMBERG, CIRCA 1640

SEATED DOG SCRATCHING ITS EAR


bronze
14 by 18.5cm., 5½ by 7¼in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 4 July 1991, lot 97

EXHIBITED
Remagen, Arp Museum, Bahnhof Rolandseck, Das Auge des Sammlers. Kunstkammer Rau, 2009, no. 14

LITERATURE
O. Kornhoff, Das Auge des Sammlers. Kunstkammer Rau, exh. cat. Arp Museum,
Bahnhof Rolandseck, Remagen, Cologne, 2010, p. 78, no. 14

CATALOGUE NOTE
This astoundingly lifelike bronze cast of a dog scratching its ear is a seminal example of German Renaissance artists’
interest in nature. It is a liberal translation in the round of a print by the Master of the Hausbuch, one of the first
engravers active around 1450, who, in turn, was probably inspired by figures in the margins of illuminated
manuscripts. The aptness with which the dog’s somewhat awkward stretch to reach its ear is modelled does suggest
that the sculptor carefully observed a canine at close quarters. He also successfully changed the turn of the head to
heighten the plasticity and unity of the composition.

The Scratching Dog is among the most famous German animal bronzes of all time. Many casts of differing quality
survive but the present bronze is not only finer than most, it is also one of a very small number of enlarged examples.
The model’s attribution has been much discussed. In the 19th century it was thought to be the work of Peter Visscher
the Elder, one of the heroes of the Gothic revival at the time. The association with Visscher is still adopted by some
authors, but more critical examinations, such as those of Weihrauch and Berger and Krahn (op.cit.), suggest that the
model is the product of the Dürer-revival around 1600. Berger and Krahn suggest an attribution to Georg Schweigger,
a revivalist sculptor who often relied on earlier sources. They convincingly compare the execution of the eyes, fur,
whiskers and veins to the way Schweigger’s portrait medallions are rendered and therefore date the prime examples
of the Scratching Dog to the 1630s.

Casts of similar quality, but invariably at a smaller scale, are in the museums in Berlin, Brunswick, Cleveland,
Dresden, Munich and Vienna. Each differ from the others in the reworking of the wax model and chasing, particularly
in the area around the head.

RELATED LITERATURE
H. Weihrauch, Europaische Bronzestatuetten. 15.-18. Jahrhundert, Brunswick, 1967, p. 286, fig. 343; W. D. Wixom,
Renaissaince bronzes from Ohio collections, exh. cat. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, no. 180; Von Leben im
späten Mittelalter. Der Hausbuchmeister oder Meister des Amsterdamer Kabinetts, exh. cat. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
and Städtische Galerie im Städelschen Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt, 1985, p. 161, no. 78; U. Berger and V. Krahn, Bronzen
der Renaissance und des Barock. Katalog der Sammlung, cat. Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, Braunschweig, 1994,
pp. 274-276, nos. 222-223
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 36
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
CIRCLE OF ANDREA DEL VERROCCHIO (C. 1435-1488)
ITALIAN, TUSCANY, CIRCA 1500

BUST OF CHRIST
the base with an old paper label inscribed in ink: 211/2 and: 11.12.79
terracotta, on an ebonised and gilt wood base
bust: 52cm., 20½in.base: 10cm., 4in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 9 April 1981, lot 89

CATALOGUE NOTE
The symmetrical facial features, domed forehead, central parting of the hair and forked beard of this idealised bust of
Christ, are ultimately derived from Verrocchio's celebrated figure of the Redeemer from his monumental Christ and St.
Thomas bronze group on Orsanmichele in Florence, which was begun in 1467. This conception became one of the
canonical models for Christ, profoundly influencing generations of Florentine artists long after Verrocchio's death.

Like the Verrocchio model, the present figure of Christ gazes downwards, his head tilted to one side. An
interesting comparison is made in a terracotta bust of Christ attributed to Pietro Torrigiani (1472-1528) in the Museo
d'Arte Sacra, San Gimignano (Bule et al., op. cit., fig. 90), which is also inspired by Verrocchio's bronze. Note, in
particular, the similar unsymmetrical arrangement of the drapery. A further relevant comparison, notably in the turned
head and in the modelling of the beard, is found in a Florentine bust of Christ, dating to the second half of the 15th-
century, in the Victoria and Albert Museum (inv. no. 6862-1860).

The present bust is particularly well modelled and, in its calm serenity, conveys the sense of 'authenticity', which
Butterfield suggests made Verrocchio's model of Christ such a successful and enduring image (op. cit.).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, Catalogue of Italian Sculpture in the Victoria and Albert Museum. Volume I: Text. Eighth to
Fifteenth Century, London, 1964, pp. 209-210, no. 197; S. Bule, A. P. Darr and F. Superbi Gioffredi, Verrocchio and
Late Quattrocento Italian Sculpture, Florence, 1992, p. 129, fig. 90; A. Butterfield, The Sculptures of Andrea del
Verrocchio, New Haven/ London, 1997, pp. 56-80; B. Boucher (ed.), Earth and Fire. Italian Terracotta Sculpture from
Donatello to Canova, exh. cat. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London,
New Haven/ London, 2001, pp. 150-151, no. 22

This lot was sold in 1981 with a thermo luminescence test certificate stating that this bust was last fired between 370
and 570 years ago, dated 23rd July 1980.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 37
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
WORKSHOP OF ALESSANDRO ALGARDI (1598-1654)
ITALIAN, ROME, 17TH CENTURY

ROUNDEL WITH THE BEHEADING OF ST. PAUL


with an old Christie's label printed twice with the Christie's logo, stamped twice: 05 DEC
1989 inscribed twice in ink: 77 and inscribed twice in pencil and red ink: 2.349
bronze
50cm., 19½in. diameter

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Christie's London, 16 December 1986, lot 34

CATALOGUE NOTE
Along with Gianlorenzo Bernini, Alessandro Algardi was the most important and distinguished sculptor in Rome in the
mid-seventeenth century. In October 1634, he was commissioned to model a monumental freestanding group, the
Beheading of St Paul, for the altar of La Basilica di San Paolo in Bologna. Designs for the altar had already been
drawn up by Bernini. However, the task fell to Algardi, and the resulting magnificent monumental sculpture in marble
can be seen on the high altar today.

In 1648, Algardi added to this a bronze relief for the decoration of the altar-frontal, below the marble group. The
present sculpture is an extremely finely chased cast derived from this model. It continues the narrative of the marble
group: St. Paul’s severed head now lies on the ground. The relief represents the story that, as his head hit the ground
three times, three springs welled up from within the Earth. Algardi depicts the horror and shock of the executioner with
an exaggerated arm gesture as the water flows before him. It provides a dramatic counterpoint to the narrative
moment of the marble group, wherein the executioner is composed and empowered.

The present sculpture is a particularly refined cast of the famed model, which exists in marble, terracotta, silver,
bronze, clay and gilt-bronze versions. The finer details, such as the musculature of the executioner and the figure on
the left gently kissing St. Paul’s feet, are crisp and delicate. Another bronze relief version of The Beheading of St. Paul
is in the Victoria and Albert Museum (inv. no. A.68-1962).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Montagu, Alessandro Algardi, New Haven / London, 1985, vol. II, pp. 369-376, no. 69; M. H. Ravalli, Allesandro
Algardi scultore, Rome, 1972, pp. 141-143, no. 49; J. Montagu, Algardi, l'altra faccia del barocco, exh. cat. Palazzo
delle Esposizioni, Roma, 1999, p. 142, no. 21
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 38
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
CIRCLE OF ARTUS QUELLINUS I (1609-1668)
FLEMISH, MID- 17TH CENTURY

THE MARTYRDOM OF ST. SEBASTIAN


with two old paper labels respectively inscribed in ink: 223 and 2.355
ivory
42.5cm., 16¾in.

ESTIMATE 100,000-150,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
George Field collection, United Kingdom (recorded in 1862);
Christie's, London, 7 July 1987, lot 126;
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012
EXHIBITED
London, South Kensington Museum (known today as The Victoria and Albert Museum), June 1862

LITERATURE
J. C. Robinson (ed.), Catalogue of the special exhibition of works of art of the mediaeval, renaissance, and more
recent periods on loan at the South Kensington Museum June 1862, exh. cat. Science and Art Department of the
Committee of Council on Education, South Kensington Museum, London, 1863, no. 252

CATALOGUE NOTE
This superb and exceptionally large ivory figure of St. Sebastian was catalogued as being 'by an Italo-Flemish ivory
sculptor working in the style of Algardi, ca. 1650,' when it was exhibited at the South Kensington Museum, London, in
1862. A study of 17th-century Netherlandish ivories, however, would indicate a close relationship between the present
carving and the work of Artus Quellinus I (1609-1668) and Lucas Faydherbe (1617-1697). In addition, the
composition is clearly influenced by the oeuvre of François Duquesnoy (1597–1643), the Flemish sculptor, who was
active in Rome during the first half of the 17th century.

Very few ivories are attributed to Artus Quellinus, the great Antwerp-born sculptor who was responsible for the
sculptural programme at the Stadhuis in Amsterdam. The most significant ivories ascribed to Quellinus are carved on
an even larger scale, his Mercury and Venus in the Hermitage in St Petersburg (56.5 and 54.5cm respectively; inv.
nos. 12262 and 12261; the attribution was made by Alfred Schädler, see Feuchtmayr, op. cit., no. 140). The Mercury
makes an interesting comparison with the present figure of St. Sebastian. Although, Mercury's disposition is altogether
more serene than the anguished saint, certain correspondences can be observed. In particular, note the prominent
curling strands of hair, the similarly idealised ephebic body, the detail in the sandal straps, and the seemingly
wet drapery, which sits heavily on the body, but lifts as it terminates, as if caught by a breeze. The composition of the
drapery, when seen from the reverse, is particularly close to that seen on the Venus, whose drapes fall behind her
head in two distinct folds suspended from her hands above her head. This arrangement is analogous to the way in
which the drapery is cast over the tree trunk in the present group, when seen from the back.

In addition to these ivory carvings, a comparison can be drawn with the marble relief representing Mercury by
Quellinus and his workshop in the Stadhuis in Amsterdam (see Theuerkauff, op. cit., fig. 1). The low relief vines with
trefoil leaves, which climb up the tree trunk behind Mercury, are very close to those seen on the trunk in the present
group. Finally, it should be noted that Quellinus' nephew and student Artus Quellinus II was responsible for a large
scale oak statue of St. Sebastian (La sculpture... op. cit., no. 119). Whilst this group is more Baroque than the present
classicising figure, clear correspondences can be seen in the composition, musculature (particularly the bound proper
left arm), the tree trunk with foliage, and the arrangement of the drapery.

The present group can also be linked to some of the ivory carvings attributed to another Flemish sculptor, Lucas
Faydherbe, whose work is often associated with Quellinus stylistically. The Venus in the Hermitage was, in fact,
ascribed to Faydherbe by David Jaffé in 1994 (Jaffé, op. cit., p. 53). Aspects of the physiognomy, such as the slender
legs and carefully delineated feet, together with the presence of gesturing putti, are comparable with an ivory relief of
the Deposition, which has been attributed to Faydherbe.

The figure of François Duquesnoy looms large over 17th-century Netherlandish sculpture. Artus Quellinus, in fact,
worked in Duquesnoy's studio for five years after arriving in Rome in 1634. As a consequence, it is unsurprising that
the present group shows Duquesnoy's influence. The idealised Sebastian compares with a large ivory bound Christ
attributed to Duquesnoy, which was acquired by the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. (inv. no.
2007.67.1). Most strikingly, the putto, that reaches up towards the dying saint, closely resembles the figure of Cupid
from a lost terracotta group by Duquesnoy, which is recorded as having been in the Girardon collection (M. Boudon-
Machuel, op. cit., no. OE.60). Artus Quellinus also sculpted studies of putti, reflecting his tutor's work. These include
an ivory sleeping putto in the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, which is signed and dated: A. Quelinus 1641 (inv. no.
71.393).

RELATED LITERATURE
K. Feuchtmayr and A. Schädler, Georg Petel 1601/2-1634, Berlin, 1973, pp. 179-181, 186-188, nos. 140, 153, 154,
pls. 232-233, 238-240, 245-249; La sculpture au siècle de Rubens dans les Pays-Bas méridionaux et la principauté
de Liège, exh. cat. Musée d'art ancien, Brussels, 1977, pp. 158-159, no. 119; C. Theuerkauff, 'Enkele kanttekeningen
bij Artus Quellinus en de 'antiche Academien', Bulletin van het Rijksmuseum, vol. 50, Amsterdam, 2002, pp. 308-319,
fig. 1; M. Jaffé, 'Contributions to Lucas Faydherbe (1617-1697)', A. González-Palacios (ed.), Antologia di belle arti. La
scultura. Studi in onore di Andrew S. Ciechanowiecki, vols. 48-51, Milan, 1994, pp. 53-58, figs. 1-3, 8; M. Boudon-
Machuel, François du Quesnoy 1597-1643, Paris, 2005, pp. 226-227, 272-273, nos. In.10 dér 3, OE. 60; F. Scholten,
Artus Quellinus beeldhouwer van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 2010
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 39
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
CIRCLE OF LUCAS FAYDHERBE (1617-1697)
FLEMISH, 17TH CENTURY

VIRGIN AND CHILD WITH THE INFANT ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST
with an old label to the base inscribed in ink: D106
ivory, on a separately carved ivory support and an ivory and wood base
group: 33.5cm., 13 1/8 in.base: 7cm., 2¾in.

ESTIMATE 50,000-70,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 10 December 1981, lot 176
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
This fine ivory group with the Virgin and Child and the Infant St. John compares with the work of the Flemish sculptor
Lucas Faydherbe, who produced both large scale sculptures, as well as smaller carvings, including ivories. The
monumental Virgin, with her heavy classicising drapery, terminating in swallow tail folds to one side, closely resembles
a number of figures carved by Faydherbe, such as his St. Helen, dating to 1662, from the church of Sainte-Croix,
Liège (Philippot, op. cit., p. 863, fig. 2). Like the Virgin in the present ivory, St. Helen stands in a contrapposto pose
with her head angled to her left; see also Faydherbe's Mater Dolorosa from Sint-Jacobskerk in Antwerp for a similar
pose and monumental drapery.

A number of Faydherbe's groups include infants gesturing in an analogous manner to the two children in the present
ivory; see, for example, his seated Virgin and Child from the Rockoxhuis, Antwerp, in which Christ reaches out to his
mother (inv. no. 77.18). The Infant St. John's pose finds a parallel in a winged putto that reaches up towards the figure
of Time in the funerary monument to Archbishop André Cruesen in the Cathedral of St. Rombaut in Malines (Philippot,
op. cit., p. 874, fig. 1). The most striking similarity between the current ivory and Faydherbe's work, however, can be
found in a marble Christ Child, dating to circa 1652, in the Stedelijk Museum, Mechelen (see La sculpture...op. cit., no.
68). The large cranium and thin, straight, hair of the Christ Child, which is brushed forwards, is almost identically
conceived as Christ's head in the present ivory.

The present group is also reminiscent of the work of François Duquesnoy (1597-1643), who commanded a
strong influence on Flemish sculptors throughout the second half of the 17th century; Faydherbe, in fact, owned
a group by François' brother, Jérôme (his Ganymede and the eagle). In the present ivory, the Virgin's slightly swaying
pose is similar to that of François Duquesnoy's famous St. Suzanna from the church of Santa Maria di Loreto in Rome
(Boudon-Machuel, op. cit., no. OE.34). Her face, with downward-cast eyes, is particularly close to a series of busts of
the Virgin by Duquesnoy, in which the heads are similarly set at an angle (Boudon-Machuel, op. cit., nos. In.127 ex. 1-
6). Finally, gesturing children are, of course, characteristic of the work of Duquesnoy and his followers, and the figure
of St. John finds a model in a leaping Cupid by the sculptor (Boudon-Machuel, op. cit., no. In.119).

An ivory with a very similar composition and catalogued as Flemish, mid-17th century, manner of François
Duquesnoy, was sold in these rooms on 5 July 1990, lot 248.

RELATED LITERATURE
La sculpture au siècle de Rubens dans les Pays-Bas méridionaux et la principauté de Liège, exh. cat. Musée d'art
ancien, Brussels, 1977, p. 104, no. 68; P. Philippott, D. Coekelberghs, P. Loze and D. Vautier, L'architecture
religieuse et la sculpture Baroques dans Les Pays-Bas Meridionaux et La Principauté de Liege 1600-1770, Sprimont,
2003, pp. 863-885; M. Boudon-Machuel, François du Quesnoy 1597-1643, Paris, 2005, pp. 327-328, 336-337, nos.
In.119, In.127 ex. 1-6
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 40
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
NORTHERN FRENCH OR FLEMISH, CIRCA 1600

A YOUNG MOURNER
marble
60cm., 23 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Christie's London, 15 December 1982, lot 62

CATALOGUE NOTE
This figure of a young girl follows a type of kneeling mourner made for tombs that were popular in France from the late
Middle Ages, but were replicated in the Netherlands and, eventually, in England by the late 16th century. Her
elaborate clothing suggests that she was the daughter of a dignitary; her eternal grief set in stone and placed upon the
tomb. The child wears a cross pattée.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 41
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
SOUTH GERMAN OR AUSTRIAN, 18TH CENTURY

ST. BRUNO
partially polychromed pine
figure: 53cm., 20 7/8 in.base: 5cm., 2in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Julius Böhler, Munich, 1968
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 42
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ALVISE TAGLIAPIETRA (1670-1747) AND CARLO TAGLIAPIETRA (ACTIVE
MID-18TH CENTURY)
ITALIAN, VENICE, CIRCA 1730

RELIEF WITH THE PRESENTATION BEFORE THE TEMPLE


with an old paper label inscribed: A130 and inscribed in white paint to the reverse: 15
terracotta
43 by 46.5cm., 16¾ by 18¼in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 11 December 1980, lot 220
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
This lively terracotta is the bozzetto for a large marble relief carved by Alvise Tagliapietra and his son Carlo for
the Dominican church of SS. Giovanni e Paolo in Venice. Tagliapietra was one of a small group of
celebrated Venetian sculptors who produced reliefs for the church's Rosary Chapel in the 1730's. His scenes of
the Presentation before the Temple and the Visitation are still in situ and flank the altar. Prior to carving these
compositions in marble, Tagliapietra would have modelled them in terracotta, giving him the opportunity to perfect his
designs. The bozzetto for the relief with the Visitation can be found in the Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk VA (inv. no.
78.634B). This compares closely with the present relief, particularly in the freshness of the modelling. Note, for
example, the similarity between the old women in both scenes. It is also interesting to observe subtle differences
between the present relief and the final marble. The priest's head is raised higher in the bozetto, for example,
presenting a clearer view of his joyful facial expression. The overall sense of the joy of the occasion is conveyed
particularly successfully in the present sketch, whilst it is less apparent in the final marble.

RELATED LITERATURE
C. Semenzato, La scultura Veneta del seicento e del settecento, Venice, 1966, p. 62, fig. 201; A. Ress (ed.),
Giovanni Maria Morlaiter. Ein venezianischer Bildhauer des 18. Jahrhunderts, Munich, 1979, fig. 153
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 43
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
SOUTH GERMAN, 17TH CENTURY

CALLISTO REVEALING HER PREGNANCY TO DIANA


fruitwood
21.5cm., 8½in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Art market, Germany, 1970s

CATALOGUE NOTE
The pose of this charming wood figure of Callisto, the goddess Diana's nymph who conceived a child with Jupiter, is
derived from the famous Callipygian Venus in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples (inv. no. 6020). Her
identity as Callisto is indicated by her swollen belly, which she reveals by lifting her drapery. Fruitwood and
boxwood carvings of this type were much sought after in 17th-century Germany.
RELATED LITERATURE
W. Rößler, V. Schneider and W-G. Fleck, Die Künstlerfamilie Kern 1529-1691, Sigmaringen, 1998, pp. 150-151, 160-
161 and 174
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 44
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FRENCH, LATE 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY

RELIEF WITH THE DEPARTURE OF ULYSSES


stone
70.5 by 132.5cm., 27¾ by 52in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 10 December 1987, lot 181

CATALOGUE NOTE
This intriguing relief appears to be inspired by an engraving by Melchior Küsel I (1626-c.1683) entitled Ajax competes
with Ulysses for the arms of Achilles, no. 118 from his 1681 series Metamorphosis oder Ovidii des Poeten
Wunderliche Verenderung. The figure of Ulysses in the present relief is near-identical in pose to the figure in the
centre of the engraving, who presses his right hand to his breast, whilst raising his left arm. It is interesting to note that
the ship in the right corner of the relief finds a parallel in a trireme, which similarly has a sloping mast, from engraving
no 134 in the same series. The lines delineating water may further indicate the use of graphic sources.

Stylistically the present relief is reminiscent of the work of the French sculptor Christophe Veyrier (1637-1689). See,
for example, his relief with The Family of Darius Before Alexander at Stowe, Buckinghamshire (Pope-Hennessy, op.
cit.). The faces of Achilles and his wife are close to a pair of busts of a warrior and a woman, which were attributed to
Veyrier and sold at Sotheby's New York on 9 November 2006, lot 105.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, 'A Relief by Veyrier at Stowe', Burlington Magazine, vol. 89, no. 530, May, 1947, pp. 134-135
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 45
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO DIO CLAUDIO BEISSONAT (ACTIVE SECOND HALF 17TH
CENTURY)
ITALIAN, NAPLES, LATE 17TH CENTURY

MOOR CARRYING A HELMET FROM AN EQUESTRIAN GROUP


together with a further, ivory base from Mentmore Towersthe underside with three old
paper labels respectively inscribed in pencil: 1587 ink: 357 and stamped: 139056
ivory, on a later ebonised wood base
ivory: 23.5cm., 9¼in.base: 4.5cm., 1¾in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, Mentmore Towers, Buckinghamshire, by 1884
by descent to Albert Edward Harry Meyer Archibald Primrose, 6th Earl of Rosebery and 2nd Earl of Midlothian,
Mentmore Towers, Buckinghamshire
his sale, Sotheby's, Mentmore, 18 May 1977, lot 1869
Sotheby's London, 22 April 1986, lot 202
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

LITERATURE
Mentmore, London, 1884, vol. II, p. 76, no. 15

CATALOGUE NOTE
This charming figure of a Moor compares closely with the work of the celebrated Neapolitan ivory carver, Dio Claudio
Beissonat. The stylised frayed edges of the drapery are directly comparable with those seen on the clothing of an
ivory figure of St. Joseph signed by Beissonat in the Museo Arqueológico in Madrid (Estella, 2011, op. cit., fig. 5).
Note also the remarkably similar large ears with their thick edges, the pierced eyes, the carefully delineated set of
teeth, and the oversized hands.

The Moor is clearly a loyal attendant to a knight or king on horseback. He delicately holds an elaborate plumed
helmet, whilst staring upwards in awe at the figure he is attending, his pose slightly stooped, as if about to bow.
Significantly, two lots before the present ivory in the Mentmore sale, there was an ivory equestrian group of Archduke
Ferdinand Karl of Austria (1628-1662) by Beissonat, which was signed: Dio. Cl. Beissonat F. This group is today
believed to represent King Charles II of Spain (1661-1700) and to have been inspired by Giacomo Serpotta's (1656-
1732) equestrian statue of the monarch in Palermo (destroyed 1848). Beissonat's statuette stands at 37cm (41½in.) in
height to the Moor's 23.5cm (9¼in.). Given the relative sizes, the shared provenance and the closeness of the present
ivory to Beissonat's work, it seems likely that the two were conceived together as a group, with the young Moor
tentatively walking up to his sovereign to hand him his helmet.

Moors had been a focus of interest to sculptors in Italy from the 16th century onwards. Nicolas Cordier (c. 1567-1612),
the French sculptor active in Rome around 1600, had carved a number of representations of Moors from black marble,
including the superb Il Moro in the Musée du Louvre, Paris (inv. no. MR303). Beissonat's contemporary Balthasar
Permoser (1651-1732) created numerous statuettes of Moors, including an extraordinary Moorish attendant in pear
wood with bejewelled mounts by Johann Melchior Dinglinger (1664-1731), in the Grünes Gewölbe, Dresden (inv.
no. VIII 303). The present Moor, with his round face and cropped hair, is perhaps most reminiscent of a
beautiful marble bust of a Moor in the Saint Louis Art Museum by Melchior Barthel (1625-1672), a German sculptor
active in Italy (inv. no. 54:1990).

Representations of Moors were popular with European elites throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, because they
conveyed a sense of exoticism. This rare and beautiful ivory would have appealled particularly to aristocratic patrons
because of the playful inversion of the notions of skin colour and ethnicity in carving a black man from white ivory. This
conceit, together with fine quality of the workmanship, most evident in the differing textures on display, would
have meant that the present ivory would have been especially treasured by the patron who was fortunate enough
to commission it.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. M. Estella Marcos, La escultura barocca de marfil en España. Las escuelas Europeas y las coloniales, Madrid,
1984, p. 73, no. 106, fig. 108; M. Estella, 'Esculturas italianas de marfil en España de los siglos XVI al XVIII con
nuevas noticias sobre Gualterio, Beissonat y Caffieri', R. Marth and M. Trusted (eds.), Festschrift für Christian
Theuerkauff. Barocke Kunststückh, Munich, 2011, pp. 22-29, fig. 5
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 46
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
DAVID LE MARCHAND (1674-1726)
ENGLISH, LONDON, CIRCA 1704-1716

PORTRAIT MEDALLION WITH A GENTLEMAN, PROBABLY SIR JOHN HOUBLON,


GOVERNOR OF THE BANK OF ENGLAND AND LORD MAYOR OF LONDON (1632-1712)
with an old paper label to the reverse printed and inscribed in ink: David Le Marchand
c.1674 d.1726. / Samuel Pepys. 1633-1703. / GEORGE BUCKTON BROWNE. / Exhibited
BurlingtonFine arts Club 1932. Cat No 220 / "Charles II loan Exhibition 1923 Cat no. 131. /
...entioned by M H Longhurst in "English Ivories" p.59
initialled: D.L.M. fec.
ivory
21.2cm., 8 3/8 in

ESTIMATE 150,000-200,000 GBP


PROVENANCE
G. Buckston Browne Esq., 80 Wimpole Street, London W1
Sotheby's London, 27 April 1945, lot 62
Sotheby's London, 14 December 1978, lot 232
on loan to Museum Schnütgen, Cologne, September 2009 to December 2012

EXHIBITED
London, Burlington Fine Arts Club, Exhibition of Carvings in Ivory, 1923, no. 220
London, Young Women's Christian Association of Great Britain, 22-23 Grosvenor Place, A loan exhibition depicting
the reign of Charles II, 1932, no.131
Edinburgh, National Gallery of Scotland; London, The British Museum; Leeds, City Art Gallery, David Le Marchand
1674-1726. 'An Ingenious Man for Carving in Ivory', 1996-1997, no. 70

LITERATURE
G. Buckston Browne, Exhibition of Carvings in Ivory, exh. cat. Burlington Fine Arts Club, London, 1923, no. 220, pl. LI
M. Longhurst, English Ivories, London, 1926, p. 59
A loan exhibition depicting the reign of Charles II, exh. cat. Young Women's Christian Association of Great
Britain, London, 1932, no. 131
L. Grodecki, Ivoires Français, Paris, 1947, p. 137
F. Davis: 'Talking about Salerooms', Country Life, 29 March 1979, p. 902 f.
C. Avery, David Le Marchand 1674-1726. 'An Ingenious Man for Carving in Ivory', London, 1996, pp. 93-95, no. 70, pl.
8

CATALOGUE NOTE
This superb relief portrait by the virtuoso French Huguenot ivory carver David Le Marchard is one of the most
important English Baroque ivories in existence. Describing the medallion in 1996, Charles Avery observed that it ‘is
one of the more celebrated of David’s reliefs’ and noted that, ‘its large size and the direct, unflinching gaze of the sitter
engage a viewer’s attention immediately’ (Avery, op. cit., p. 94).

David Le Marchand was the foremost ivory carver, and one of the most influential portraitists, operating in late 17th-
and early 18th-century Britain. He was born in 1674 in the Northern French port of Dieppe, a town famed for its long
tradition of ivory carving. With the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, which persecuted the Huguenot
community, Le Marchand chose to flee to Britain, settling in Edinburgh in 1696, where the city granted ‘Liberty and
Licence to David Lemerchand designer and cutter in Ivory to exercise the sd. Arte’ (Avery, op. cit., p. 13). By 1700, Le
Marchand moved to London, where he established himself as one of the most fashionable portraitists in the city. His
sitters included many of the leading notables of the day, including Sir Christopher Wren, Samuel Pepys and Sir Isaac
Newton. Le Marchand’s oeuvre should ultimately be viewed against the backdrop of Restoration London, a hive of
commercial activity and the rapidly changing heart of a burgeoning trading empire. The expensive medium of ivory
and Le Marchand’s dramatic Baroque style appealed particularly to those men of enterprise who had helped to
elevate The City. Le Marchand’s most loyal patrons were the Raper’s, a family of wealthy silk merchants, who were
amongst the earliest Directors of the Bank of England.

The present relief most probably represents Sir John Houblon, first Governor of the Bank of England and Lord Mayor
of London. The identity of the sitter was proposed by Avery, who, noting the importance of the Raper family's
patronage to Le Marchand, looked for further patrons within their circle, in particular, fellow founders of the Bank of
England. Within this small group of individuals, Houblon, who was of Huguenot descent, emerges as the most likely
candidate. A comparison with Closterman’s 1696 painting of Houblon, confirms a strong correspondence between him
and the man portrayed in the present ivory. Note the same oval-shaped eyes, hooded eyelids, fleshy cheeks, and
prominent lines running from the sides of the nose to the corners of the mouth. Charles Avery suggests that it is likely
that Le Marchand carved the relief after Closterman’s portrait, and that it may have been commissioned as a
posthumous memento, possibly by members of the Raper family. The absence of the inscription ad vivum, found on
several other Le Marchand ivories, would further indicate that the relief was carved not from life, but posthumously. A
previous suggestion that the portrait represents Samuel Pepys can be discounted by a comparison with Le
Marchand's portrait of Pepys in the British Museum (inv. no. 458).

Within Le Marchand’s oeuvre, the present relief finds its closest comparisons in his busts in the round. The majority of
his other reliefs depict the sitter in profile and in low relief, placing the present work in a distinct and rarer class of alto-
relievo carvings. This deep carving, is believed to have been borne out of Le Marchand’s practise of modelling his
portraits in malleable wax prior to working them in ivory. The only comparable reliefs in alto relievo, are his Sir Isaac
Newton in the Thomson Collection and his Thomas Guy in the V&A (inv. no. A.I-1936), both of which similarly present
the sitter en-face. The arrangement of the extraordinary wig, open collar, comfortable fold of flesh beneath the chin,
drilled eyes and searching gaze, are, however, closest to his Lord John Somers at Wimpole Hall, dated 1706. Another
relevant, though less elaborate, comparison is with a bust in the Thomson collection dating to c. 1716-29, which is
believed to represent another Govenor of the Bank of England, Sir Humphry Morice; the central parting of the wig
terminating in almost rigid curls, is very similar to that worn by Houblon. The turned head and generous drapes, are
particularly close to those seen in the bust of Francis Sambrooke, dated 1704, in the Thomson collection. On the
basis of a comparison with the Lord John Somers, Theuerkauff suggests that the present portrait dates to the first
decade of 18th century, whilst Avery, considering the possibility that it could have been a posthumous tribute, dates
the relief to the second decade. What is clear, given the above comparisons, is that the present ivory would almost
certainly have been carved between c. 1704-1716.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Longhurst, English Ivories, London, 1926, p. 59; L. Grodecki, Ivoires Français, Paris, 1947, p. 137; S. R. Houfe, 'A
Whig Artist in Ivory,' Antique Collector, April/ May 1971, pp. 66-70; C. Avery, David Le Marchand 1674-1726. 'An
Ingenious Man for Carving in Ivory', London, 1996, pp. 93-95, no. 70, pl. 8; C. Avery, 'David Le Marchand. Precursor
of eighteenth-century English portrait sculpture,' The British Art Journal, vol. I, no. 1, pp. 27-34; C. Avery, 'David Le
Marchand (1674-1726): Addenda to the Catalogue', R. Marth and M. Trusted (eds.), Festschrift für Christian
Theuerkauff. Barocke Kunststückh. Sculpture Studies in Honour of Christian Theuerkauff, Munich, 2011, pp. 149-155;
A. Dawson, 'A Virtuoso Ivory Carving by David Le Marchand (1674-1726): Louis XIV Victorious', R. Marth and M.
Trusted (eds.), Festschrift für Christian Theuerkauff. Barocke Kunststückh. Sculpture Studies in Honour of Christian
Theuerkauff, Munich, 2011, pp. 156-159
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 47
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
SOUTH GERMAN, MID-18TH CENTURY

VIRGIN OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION


boxwood
statuette: 19.5cm., 7 5/8 in.base: 3.5cm., 1½in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Boxwood carvings with the Virgin Immaculata were very popular in South Germany in the 18th century, see, for
example, the mid-18th century fruitwood group sold in these rooms on 2 December 1969, lot 128.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 48
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
SOUTH GERMAN, MID-18TH CENTURY

PIETÀ
fruitwood, on a later wooden base
group: 11.4 by 16.4cm., 4½ by 6½in.base: 4.8 by 17.8cm., 1 7/8 by 7in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Compare with a number of Pietà groups by the South German Rococo sculptor Ignaz Günther (1725-1775), which are
characterised by an emphasis on Christ's ribcage (Volk. op. cit., pp. 205-2066, nos. 244-245).

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Volk (ed.), Bayerische Rokokoplastik Vom Entwurf zur Ausführung, exh. cat. Bayerisches Nationalmuseum,
Munich, 1985, pp. 205-206, nos. 244-245
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 49
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FRENCH OR FLEMISH, 17TH CENTURY

CHRIST ON THE CROSS WITH MARY MAGDALENE


fruitwood, on an ebonised wood cross
123.5cm., 48 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Art market, London

CATALOGUE NOTE
This beautifully carved crucified Christ and attendant Mary Magdalene compares closely with a larger Calvary group
sold in these rooms on 8 December 2006, lot 78. The corpus is particularly close; note the same robust
musculature, and the near-identical perizonium, which is knotted at the proper left side. There are also
correspondences between the two Magdalenes; note the similar rocky bases, the same turn of the head and
the analagous coiffures.

Both of the above can be compared to a third Calvary group in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, which is catalogued
by Schädler as Flemish or French, second half 17th century, having previously been attributed to Georg
Petel (1601/1-1634) (inv. no. 59/2). The corpus from the Munich group is compared by Schädler to a bronze Christ by
François Girardon (1628-1715) at the church of Saint-Remy, Troyes. Like all three of the corpora discussed above,
this example has a broad and powerful chest, and his hair similarly falls in curls onto one shoulder. The eyes, lips and
the individual strands of hair are particularly beautiful and well executed.

RELATED LITERATURE
F. Souchal, French Sculptors of the 17th and 18th centuries. The reign of Louis XIV, Oxford, 1981, vol. II, pp. 14-83,
nos. 67 and 113; K. Feuchtmayr and A. Schädler, G. Petel 1601/1-1634, Berlin, 1973, pp. 184-185, no. 148, fig. 259
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 50
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
CIRCLE OF JOHANN PETER SCHWANTHALER THE ELDER (1720-1795)
AUSTRIAN, THIRD QUARTER 18TH CENTURY

PIETÀ
boxwood
17.8cm., 7in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Julius Böhler, Munich, mid-1960s

CATALOGUE NOTE
This finely carved Pietà is similar to a number of carvings by the Austrian Rococo sculptor Johann Peter Schwanthaler
the Elder. A particularly close comparison is found in a Pietà with St. John and Mary Magdalene by Schwanthaler in
the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremburg (inv. no. Pl.O.2495). Note Christ's similarly skeletal torso, the angular
drapery, and the instruments of the passion lying on the ground. The textured surface of the ground is also very close
to that seen in the present group.

RELATED LITERATURE
C. Diemer, 'Unbekannte Arbeiten der Bildhauerfamilie Schwanthaler in Nürnberg und Berlin', Anzeiger des
Germanischen Nationalmuseums 1980, pp. 109-111; H. Achleitner, 'Johann Peter d. Ä. Schwanthaler (1720-1795)',
Weltkunst, July 1992, pp. 1789-1791
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 51
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO FRANZ IGNAZ GÜNTHER (1725-1775)
GERMAN, MUNICH, CIRCA 1750

CHERUB
partially polychromed wood
19 by 18.5cm., 7½ by 7¼in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Art market, London, November 1986

CATALOGUE NOTE
This beautiful cherub compares closely with another from Günther's Pietà in Weyarn, Bavaria (Feulner, op. cit., pl. 5)
as well as that published by Wilm (Wilm, op. cit., p. 276). The present sculpture is particularly finely carved, notably
the set of front teeth, and is enhanced by the surviving original polychromy.
RELATED LITERATURE
A. Feulner, Ignaz Günther. Kurfürstlich Bayrischer Hofbildhauer (1725-1775), Vienna, 1920, pl. 5; H. Wilm, 'Engel von
Ignaz Günther', Pantheon, September, 1933, pp. 276-278; C. Hertel, Pygmalion in Bavaria. The Sculptor Ignaz
Günther and Eighteenth-Century Aesthetic Art Theory, University Park, 2011, pls. 12, 25
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 52
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
ATTRIBUTED TO CHRISTIAN JORHAN THE ELDER (1727-1804)
SOUTH GERMAN, SECOND HALF 18TH CENTURY

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST


limewood
133cm., 52 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Galerie A. Mehringer, Munich

CATALOGUE NOTE
This impressive figure of St. John the Baptist can be attributed to the South German 18th-century Rococo sculptor,
Christian Jorhan. It compares closely with another wood figure of the Baptist by Jorhan adorning his altarpiece in
the Wallfahrtskirche in Maria Thalheim, Bavaria (Schmidt, op. cit., pp. 108-9). Note, in particular, the similarly
conceived fur-lined drapery, beard and tufts of hair on the Saint's head. The present figure's strong brow, prominent
cheekbones and downcast eyes compare closely with one of the Evangelists from the altar by Jorhan in Altfraunhofen
(Schmidt, op. cit., p. 170). In terms of the physiognomy, a close parallel is found in a sculpture of St. Sebastian in the
Pfarrkirche in Wolnzach (Schmidt, op. cit., pp. 204-5). The almost skeletal thorax, slender fingers, thin legs and large
feet are very similar to those seen in the present sculpture, and would indicate that both works were made by the
same hand.

RELATED LITERATURE
O. Schmidt and W-C. von der Mülbe, Christian Jorhan d.Ä. 1727-1804, Riemerling, 1986, pp. 108-109, 170 and 204-
205
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 53
PROPERTY FROM THE GUSTAV RAU COLLECTION SOLD TO BENEFIT THE GERMAN
COMMITTEE FOR UNICEF
FRANÇOIS POMPON

FRENCH
1855-1933
OURS BLANC (POLAR BEAR)
signed: POMPON
white marble
24.2 by 46.5cm., 9½ by 18¼in.

ESTIMATE 150,000-200,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Galerie Motte, Geneva, 2-3 November 1971, lot 141
on loan to the Arp Museum, Bahnhof Rolandseck, Remagen, September 2009 to December 2012

CATALOGUE NOTE
François Pompon’s Ours Blanc is a shining example of the early 20th-century movement in the arts that sought to
escape both the rules of the Academy and the expressive modelling style of Rodin. Together with such masterpieces
as Aristide Maillol’s La Méditerannée and, later, Brancusi’s L'Oiseau dans l'espace, the Ours Blanc brought about a
formal language in sculpture which focused on the reduction of form and volume to its essentials. The aim was to
break from a narrative and descriptive tradition of representation. Sculpture was gradually freed from the notion of
subject, which was substituted for the quest for pure shape that characterised the work of Henry Moore and Barbara
Hepworth.

In contrast to his contemporaries, however, Pompon would never abandon his beloved animal subjects. Instead he
employed the new language of sculpture in order to create ever more arresting portraits of the animals he
observed. His concentration on geometrical volumes enabled him to summarise typical animal attitudes
effectively whilst the smooth homogenous surfaces of the marbles, stones and lacquers illustrated the subjects’ grace
and nobility. The Ours blanc portrays a polar bear as it pauses during a forward stride, and raises its nose to smell
and see something that has caught its interest. Thick, rounded legs and the strong neck supporting the raised head
lend to the sculpture the polar bear’s characteristic noble force. The smooth polish of the surface of the marble, the
small incisions that form the eyes and mouth and further understated details, such as the little ears, in the meantime,
combine to suggest the density of the coat of white fur.

It is not surprising that the Ours Blanc became François Pompon’s most important and revered sculpture. It came to
define the long career of an animalier sculptor who, at the age of 67, first presented the monumental model to great
acclaim at the 1922 Salon d’Automne in Paris. Thereafter, the Ours Blanc was executed in different materials and on
various scales over a period of eleven years. The catalogue of the 1994 retrospective suggests that 13 marble
versions on the scale of the present marble were made between 1923 and 1933, of which several seem to be lost (
op.cit., p. 212). Liliane Colas has suggested that the present bear is the fourth, fifth or seventh version, made around
1927-1928, since the signature is of an earlier type (with M's without an extension to the arm furthest right) and
because Pompon slightly elongated the neck of the Ours Blanc after 1928.

A bronze cast of the Ours Blanc’s head adorned the door of the sculptor’s atelier in Paris from 1930 and, in 1937, the
city of Dijon erected a monumental sculpture of the white bear in honour of Pompon, who had once worked and
studied there. A monumental version, measuring nearly 2 meters, is one of the highlights of the Musée d’Orsay’s
collection of 20th century art (inv. no. RF3269). Many further versions in bronze and plaster belong to museums,
including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (inv. no. 30.123) and the Middelheim Museum, Antwerp.

RELATED LITERATURE
R. Escholier, 'Au Salon d' Automne. La peinture et la sculpture', Art et décoration, December 1922, p. 21; M. Dufrène,
Ensembles mobiliers. Exposition Internationale 1925, 1re Série, Paris, 1925, fig. 26; E. de Courières, François
Pompon. Vingt-sept reproductions de sculptures, Paris, 1926, p. 49; François Pompon, sculpteur animalier
bourguignon, exh. cat. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon, 1964, p. 14, fig. 1; C. Chevillot, L. Colas and A. Pingeot,
François Pompon. 1855-1933, exh. cat. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon, etc., Paris, 1994, pp. 35-37, 43, 84, 86-87,
92, 94, 158, 211-212, no. 122, figs. 1, 3, 44, 52; François Pompon 1855-1933. Rétrospective, exh. cat. Musee des
Beaux-Arts, Clermont-Ferran and Galerie Brame & Lorenceau, Paris, 1999, pp. 1-7, figs. 84-87; E. Horswell,
Rembrandt Bugatti, une vie pour la sculpture, Paris, 2004, p. 126

We would like to thank Liliane Colas for her assistance in cataloguing this lot.

Fig. 1

Pompon François (1855-1933), Ours blanc, © RMN-Grand Palais /


Christophe Chavan
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 54
OTHER PROPERTIES
EMBRIACHI WORKSHOP
ITALIAN, VENICE, EARLY 15TH CENTURY

CASKET
certosina wood, horn and bone
14 by 28.5 by 17.5cm., 5½ by 11¼ by 6 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-10,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The Embriachi workshop was founded by Baldassare degli Embriachi in Venice in the early 15th century. It
specialised in caskets which consist of wood carcases mounted with small reliefs of ivory or cow bone and certosina
word borders.

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Lorenzelli and A. Veca (eds.), Tra/e. Teche, pissidi, cofani e forzieri dall'Alto Medioevo al Barocco, exh. cat.
Galleria Lorenzelli, Bergamo, 1985, pp. 259 and 359, no. 33, fig. 325; L. Syson and D. Thornton, Objects of Virtue. Art
in Renaissance Italy, London, 2001, pp. 58-61, figs. 41-2
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 55
ATTRIBUTED TO MICHELE DA FIRENZE (C. 1385-1443)
ITALIAN, FLORENCE, CIRCA 1430

VIRGIN AND CHILD


gilt and polychromed terracotta
123.5cm., 48 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Carel Welker, London, before 1939
and thence by family descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present relief must have been intended to be set into the wall of a side altar to be used as a devotional image. It
belongs to a group of painted terracotta reliefs which depend on the traditional style of Lorenzo Ghiberti, but were
originally attributed to the so-called Master of the Pellegrini Chapel in the church of Sant’ Anastasia, Verona. This
sculptor is now known to be Michele da Firenze, thanks to the discovery of a document of 1436 recording payment to
Michele for the reliefs in the aforementioned chapel.

Michele da Firenze spent time in the workshop of Ghiberti in Florence between 1403 and 1420. From 1433 to 1443 he
was active in the Veneto, Emilia and Ferrara. Of the five reliefs in the Victoria and Albert Museum, attributed by Pope-
Hennessy to Michele’s workshop (op.cit., nos. 56-57), the nearest to the present example are inv. nos. 7572-1861 and
73:5-1866. The first, from the Gigli Campagna collection, was fired in two parts and came to the museum in 1861. It
shows the seated Virgin flanked by full-length saints with a winged cherub above a swathed curtain and, together with
the Gothic foliate outline, strongly reflects the present relief. The other, by comparison, shows a standing Virgin, but
also has standing boys on columns as in this relief. The entries for these two reliefs in the Victoria and Albert
Museum’s catalogue note several other examples on the art market in the 1920s, although none appear to match the
present terracotta exactly. Closer still, are two three-quarter length Madonnas in the Bode Museum illustrated by
Antonio Galli (op.cit., fig. 102). Another very similar relief, formerly at the Certosa in Pavia, is in the Bargello and is
illustrated by Gentilini (op.cit.).

An expertise on the reverse of a photograph of the present relief, dated London, 19. VIII. 1929 by Dr. Hans
Mackowsky gives the relief to the Master of the Pellegrini Chapel around 1430 and states that it retains its original,
well-preserved colours and gold. Mackowsky (1871-1938) worked on both Michelangelo and Verrocchio.

We would like to thank Peta Motture of the Victoria and Albert Museum for her assistance with cataloguing this relief.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, Catalogue of Italian Sculpture in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1964, vol. I, pp. 65-58,
nos. 56-57, vol. III, pls. 68-69; A. Galli, ‘Michele da Firenze. Problemi dell’ attivita’, Prospettiva, 68, 1992, pp. 13-29,
figs. 1-2; G. Gentilini, 'Michele di Firenze, San Leonardo', G. Romano (ed.), Da Biduino ad Algardi: pittura e scultura a
confronto, Turin, 1990, pp. 25-38

The present lot is offered with a thermoluminescence analysis report from Oxford Authentication Ltd dated 30 July
2012 stating that the sample (No: N112h77) was last fired between 400 and 700 years ago.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 56
ITALIAN, 15TH CENTURY

CANDLE-BEARING ANGEL
partially gilt white marble
67.5cm., 26½in.

ESTIMATE 35,000-45,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Although the treatment of the figure’s heavy drapery suggests a later date, the style of the present Angel is indebted
to the International Gothic style as it developed in Italy. The facial features compare well to the work of fourteenth-
century sculptors such as Tino di Camaino. A detail of Camaino’s Monument of Cardinal Petroni, illustrated in Pope-
Hennessy, represents a figure of similar facial proportions: a small mouth and nose, and rounded face (op. cit., pl. 26).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, Italian Gothic sculpture, London, 1955, pl. 26
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 57
ITALIAN, PROBABLY SIENA, EARLY 16TH CENTURY

FEMALE SAINT HOLDING A BOOK


gilt and polychromed wood
151cm., 59½in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Sienese woodcarving reached its height when Francesco di Valdambrino was active in the city around 1400. He
pioneered a Gothic style imbued with elegance and subdued beauty. His figures are characterised by their subtle
movement beneath simple vertical folds of drapery. He often carved figures in the round, which would be placed in
narrative ensembles, such as the two Annunciations in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and in the Bode Museum (op.cit.
, Leeuwenberg). Valdambrino’s work possesses a timelessness, an influence felt well into the Renaissance. A female
saint illustrated by Bacchi (op.cit.) is likely to stem from the same workshop.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Leeuwenberg and W. Halsema-Kubes, Beeldhouwkunst in het Rijksmuseum, cat. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, The
Hague/ Amsterdam, 1973, pp. 343-344, no. 574; A. Bacchi (ed.), Dalla Bibbia di Corradino a Jacopo della Quercia.
Sculture e miniature italiane del Medioevo e del Rinascimento, exh. cat. Galleria Nella Longari, Milan, 1997, pp. 106-
107, no. 39

A radio carbon dating measurement report by RadioCarbon Dating dated 28 March 2013 (RCD-8038) shows that the
ivory was made between 1470 and 1640.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 58
ENGLISH, NOTTINGHAM, LATE 15TH CENTURY

RELIEF WITH THE RESURRECTION


alabaster, some remnants of polychromy, in a later velvet covered wood frame
relief: 47 by 24cm., 18½ by 9½in.frame: 65 by 42cm., 25½ by 16½in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The Resurrection is among the most popular images produced by the English alabaster carving workshops in the 15th
century. Few surviving examples, however, display such an accomplished sense of depth, anatomy and execution of
the clothes and attributes as here. Judging by Cheetham's extensive list of carvings (op.cit.) with this subject,
this example is also one of the largest of its kind.

RELATED LITERATURE
F. Cheetham, Alabaster Images of Medieval England, Woodbridge, 2003, pp. 134-141, figs. 74-83
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 59
NORTHERN FRENCH, SECOND HALF 15TH CENTURY

FRAGMENTARY HEAD OF THE VIRGIN


limestone, on a modern wood base
head: 23cm., 9in.base: 15cm., 5 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Frau Dr. Lilli Fischel, former Director and Curator of the Kunsthalle Karlsruhe
and thence by descent

CATALOGUE NOTE
Compare another head of the Virgin in the Musée Dobrée in Nantes illustrated by Boccador (op.cit., fig. 368).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Boccador, Statuaire médiévale en France de 1400 à 1530, Zoug, 1974, vol. II, p. 328, fig. 368
This lot is sold with an expertise by Adolf Mehringer dd. 30 April 1979.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 60
PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE BRITISH COLLECTOR
ENGLISH, NOTTINGHAM, 15TH CENTURY

THE ADORATION OF THE MAGI


with an old collection label to the reverse printed: THE ADLER COLLECTION
partially polychromed and gilt alabaster, within a red velvet lined and partially polychromed
and gilt wood frame
relief: 41.5cm., 16 3/8 in.frame: 66.5cm., 26 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sir Alfred Bossom, United Kingdom (as listed by Cheetham, op. cit. p. 85, no. 61, pl. 59)
John and Judith Adler, United Kingdom
their sale, Sotheby's London, 24 February 2005, The Adler Collection. European Sculpture, Works of Art and Early
Furniture, lot 56
private collection, United Kingdom
EXHIBITED
York, City of York Art Gallery, English Medieval Alabaster Carvings, York Festival Exhibition, 1954, no. 9

LITERATURE
J. Jacob and H. Hess, English Medieval Alabaster Carvings, exh. cat. City of York Art Gallery, York, 1954, no. 9
F. Cheetham, Alabaster Images of Medieval England, Woodbridge, 2003, p. 85, no. 61, pl. 59

CATALOGUE NOTE
Alabaster was quarried near Derby, west of Nottingham, from the Middle Ages onwards. Initially it was used in tomb
carving and although unsuitable for outdoor use its popularity increased and it was carved as figures and reliefs
illustrating the Life of Christ and the Saints. It was easy to carve as well as to paint with vivid medieval paints, which,
in many, instances remain. By the fifteenth century, an international trade for such reliefs was in existence with
examples reaching as far north as Iceland and as far south as Spain and the Mediterranean (see the
magnificant altarpiece from Castropol in Spain, which was sold at Sotheby's on 5 December 2012, lot 13).

Although these reliefs were carved in a number of places, such as Burton-on-Trent, Chellaston, York and even
London, it was Nottingham, which was the major centre for production. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in
1539, the industry suffered as the number of commissions shrank away, dying out completely by the end of the reign
of King Henry VIII in 1547.

The present relief, which is a particularly superb example of Nottingham alabaster carving, was illustrated in
Francis Cheetham's Alabaster Images of Medieval England (Cheetham, op. cit. p. 85, no. 61, pl. 59).
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 61
OTHER PROPERTIES
GERMAN, PROBABLY SWABIA, CIRCA 1420-1430

VIRGIN AND CHILD ENTHRONED


silvered and polychromed limewood
87cm., 34¼in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
C. Lichte and H. Meurer, Die mittelalterlichen Skulpturen. 2. Stein- und Holzskulpturen 1400-1530 Ulm und südliches
Schwaben, cat. Landesmuseum Württemberg, Ulm, pp. 29 and 35, nos. 22 and 34
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 62
GERMAN, UPPER RHINE, CIRCA 1490-1500

THREE HALF-LENGTH SAINTS FROM A PREDELLA, PROBABLY ST. BARBARA, ST. JOHN
THE EVANGELIST AND ST. PAUL
gilt and polychromed limewood
St. Barbara: 35.5cm., 14in.St. John: 36.5cm., 14 3/8 in.St. Paul: 37cm., 14½in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
by repute from an altar in Kloster Stuben, Bremm
noble family, Rhineland-Palatinate
private collection, the Netherlands

CATALOGUE NOTE
The limewood carvers of South Germany often incorporated half-length figures, particularly in the predellas, and choir
stalls. Dismantling, damage and restorations caused many of these works to be lost and finding a set of three on the
market is therefore rare.
Half-length figures from choir stalls were seldom polychromed and usually represent male secular figures, church
fathers, prophets or apostles. See, for example, the set of seven from the Frauenkirche in Munich, now in the
Bayerisches Nationalmuseum (inv. nos. MA 3989-3995). However, the presence of polychromy and a female saint in
this group therefore suggests that they came from a predella. Similar sets can be found on several altarpieces,
including another group of three on the predella of the St. George retable from Bruneck in Lille (inv. no. A343).

The genesis of busts and half-length figures on the predellas of German altarpieces is illustrated by the winged retable
from Dornstadt by the Master Hartmann in the Landesmuseum Württemberg from 1417 (inv. no. 14230). Its
predella incorporates painted portraits of four young women, probably female saints, peering out of four registers
surrounding a space in which their relics would have been kept. As the fifteenth century progressed, this imagery
became more complex, resulting in the incorporation of large groups of half-length statuettes such as the Christ and
the Twelve Apostle on the altar from Weisweil in the Badisches Landesmuseum (Kahsnitz/ Bunz, op.cit., fig
30). Following that the predella figures became more engaging, projecting into the church and interacting both with
each other and the onlooker. This final development is illustrated by the four male saints on the high altar in
the Pfarrkirche St. Ursula in Oberndorf (Kahsnitz, op.cit., fig. 38), but also very aptly by the extended gestures
and expressions of the present set.

RELATED LITERATURE
T. Müller, Die Bildwerke in Holz, Ton, und Stein vond der Mitte des XV. bis gegen Mitte des XVI. Jahrhunderts, cat.
Bayerischen Nationalmuseums, Munich, 1959, pp. 50-52, nos. 38-44; S. Guillot de Suduiraut (ed.), Sculptures
allemandes de la fin du Moyen Age dans les collections publiques françaises 1400-1530, exh. cat. Musée du Louvre,
1991, pp. 153-160, no. 37; R. Kahsnitz, Die großen Schnitzaltäre. Spätgotik in Süddeutschland, Österreich, Südtirol,
Munich, 2005, pp. 26 and 33, figs. 30 and 38; C. Lichte and H. Meurer (eds.), Die mittelalterlichen Skulpturen. 2.
Stein- und Holzskulpturen 1400-1530 Ulm ind südliches Schwaben, cat. Landesmuseum Württemberg, Stuttgart,
2007, vol. I, pp. 31-38, no. 10, vol. II, pp. 16-17, no. 10
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 63
GERMAN, MIDDLE FRANCONIA, CIRCA 1520-1530

MALE SAINT, POSSIBLY ST. PAUL OR ST. JOSEPH


with a partially legible old paper label to the reverse inscribed in ink: No 2. Hl. Joseph ?
Stammt aus der Kirche in Herbstadt wie No 1
limewood
128.5cm., 50½in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
probably the Heilig-Kreuz-Kirche, Herbstadt, Lower Franconia
Erbgraf zu Erbach
and thence by descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
The enlarged eyes, the naturalism with which the skin and bone structure of the face is rendered, and continous
drapery folded over the proper right hand recall the work of Veit Stoss. See for example his Man of Sorrows from the
Volckamer monument.

RELATED LITERATURE
R. Kahsnitz and W.D. Wixom, Gothic and Renaissance art in Nuremberg 1300-1550, exh. cat. The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New York and the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg, Munich, 1986, pp. 237-238, no. 89
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 64
FOLLOWER OF TILMAN RIEMENSCHNEIDER (C. 1460-1531)
GERMAN, FRANCONIA, CIRCA 1520-1540

FEMALE SAINT, POSSIBLY THE VIRGIN


limewood
116.5cm., 45¾in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Erbgraf zu Erbach
and thence by descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
C. Lichte (ed.), Tilman Riemenschneider - Werke seiner Blütezeit, exh. cat. Mainfränkischen Museum Würzburg,
Festung Marienberg, Regensburg, p. 290, no. 38
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 65
FLEMISH, MALINES, FIRST QUARTER 16TH CENTURY

VIRGIN AND CHILD


stamped with the Malines three-bar mark on the reverse
gilt and polychromed walnut wood
36.5cm., 14 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, Lille, circa 1959
private collection, Belgium

LITERATURE
W. Godenne, 'Préliminaires à l'inventaire général des statuettes d'origine malinoise, présumées des XVe et XVIe
siècles', Handelingen van de Koninklijke Kring voor Oudheidkunde, Letteren en Kunst van Mechelen, 63, 1959, no.
LXXXV
S. Guillot de Suduiraut, Sculptures brabançonnes du Musée du Louvre. Bruxelles, Malines, Anvers. XVe-XVIe siècles
, cat. Musée du Louvre, Paris, 2001, p. 102, fig. 11b
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 66
WORKSHOP OF THE MASTER OF ELSLOO (ACTIVE FIRST HALF 16TH
CENTURY)
NETHERLANDISH, LIMBURG, CIRCA 1520-1530

VIRGIN AND CHILD


oak, with some remnants of polychromy, with a possibly associated silver coronet marked:
OH, and with an illegible coat-of-arms
overall: 117cm., 46in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The oeuvre of the so-called Master of Elsloo consists of a number of sculptures with specific corresponding features,
grouped around two statues representing St. Anne teaching the Virgin to read in the parish churches of Elsloo and
Montfort by Timmers (op.cit.). These works are mainly found in the late medieval Duchy of Upper Gelre (effectively the
area from Roermond up to Kleef and the Mosan and Rhenish regions in between), and are dated to the first half of the
16th century. Within the body of work assigned to the master, four main groups are distinguished according to the
Horst exhibition catalogue (op.cit.). Despite the differences in the appearance of the surface, the present Madonna
and Child can be compared to a Marianum in the church of St. Martinus in Venlo and to several further Mariana in the
churches of Thorn, Horst, Neer and Wessem. These are grouped within the so-called Maaseik variety. A further
comparable work from the Maaseik group was sold at Sotheby’s Amsterdam, 14 December 1998, lot 320. The crown
is also likely to stem from Limburg: it closely resembles one on a figure of St. Agatha by Van Steffenswert sold in
these rooms on 5 December 2012, lot 11.

RELATED LITERATURE
J.J.M. Timmers, 'Een onbekend beeldsnijder der 16e eeuw: De “Meester van Elsloo”', Oud Holland 57, 1940, pp. 75-
78; J.J.M. Timmers, Houten Beelden, Amsterdam/ Antwerp, 1949, pp. 38-42; De Meester van Elsloo. Oppergelders
beeldsnijder XVIe eeuw, exh. cat. Gemeente Horst en de Kring Norst van het Limburgs Geschied- en Oudheidkundig
Genootschap, Horst, 1974
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 67
NETHERLANDISH, CIRCA 1500

SET OF SIX LIONS FROM A LECTERN


numbered I to VI on the haunch, I numbered 189 in red ink on the underside, II with a white
label inscribed 852C2 in black ink on the inside, IIIII with a white label inscribed 852C1 in
black ink on the inside and VI with a white label inscribed BLUMKA GALLERY, a white label
stamped DOUANE CENTRALE PARIS and numbered 189 in red ink on the inside
bronze
each: 16 by 22 by 9.5cm., 6¼ by 8 5/8 by 3¾in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
by repute from the collection Daguerre, Paris
with Ernest Brummer Gallery, Paris or New York, before 1964
with Blumka Gallery, New York

CATALOGUE NOTE
Compare with the pair of 15th-century bronze lions sold at Sotheby's New York on 27 January 2011, lot 398.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 68
NORTH NETHERLANDISH, FIRST QUARTER 16TH CENTURY

PRAYER NUT WITH CHRIST SEATED SURROUNDED BY THE INSTRUMENTS OF THE


PASSION
the interior inscribed: PRONTER PECCATA POPVLI PERGVSSVS EST INNOCENS (For the
sins of the people the innocent man was struck) and: PVLCHRA ES ELECTA MEA VT SOL
LVGENS (O my chosen one, thou art beautiful in mourning, as the sun)the exterior
inscribed: OMNIA BENE FESIT MERGI SEPTIM (Any good deed pays seven times) and:
OMNIA DAT DOMINVS NON HABET ERGOMINV (Anything God gave he didn't do for his
own sake)
boxwood
4.5cm., 1 3/4 in. diameter.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, Israel
CATALOGUE NOTE
Prayer nuts were originally designed to be worn on a rosary or belt as portable devotional imagery. The openwork on
the outside is not only decorative, but also served to keep the object light in weight. A fragrant substance could have
been inserted behind the reliefs so that the prayer nut doubled as a pomander. However, it has been suggested by
Scholten that the current type of early 16th-century prayer nuts was reduced to such a small scale that it became
impractical to use (op.cit., Bulletin, pp. 337-339). Nowadays Netherlandish boxwood prayer nuts are found in the
world's leading museums, including good examples in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (inv. nos. 17.190.473, 474a
and 475), the Louvre (OA 5609), the Rijksmuseum (BK 1981-1 and 2010-16) and the Art Gallery of Ontario (see J.
Lowden and J. Cherry, op.cit., nos. 49 and 50). The architecture of the present nut and lettering compares closely to a
nut with St. Christopher formerly in the Spitzer collection (op.cit., no. 15).

RELATED LITERATURE
E. Molinier, La Collection Spitzer. Antiquité, Moyen Age, Renaissance, Paris/ London, 1890-1892, vol. III, p. 258, no.
15; P. Williamson, Netherlandish sculpture 1450-1550, cat. Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2002, pp. 107, 140-
149; J. Lowden and J. Cherry, Medieval ivories and works of art, cat. Thomson Collection/ Art Gallery of Ontario,
London, pp. 138-143. nos. 48-51; F. Scholten, 'A prayer-nut for François Du Puy', The Burlington Magazine, July,
2011, pp. 447-451; F. Scholten, 'A prayer nut in a silver housing by 'Adam Dirckz'', The Rijksmuseum Bulletin, 59,
2011, pp. 323-347
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 69
PROPERTY FROM A MIDDLE RHENISH PRIVATE COLLECTION
AUSTRIAN, TYROL, CIRCA 1420-1430

PIETÀ
polychromed Steinguss
96.5cm., 38in.

ESTIMATE 50,000-70,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, Verona
Dr. Peter Hierzenberger, Vienna
his sale, Sotheby's London, 3 April 1984, lot 5

CATALOGUE NOTE
Among the most poignant images of the International Gothic are the Bohemian-Austrian Pietàs of the present type.
Like other sculpture in the Beautiful style, the statues are characterised by the profusion of cascading drapery folds
and the Virgin’s youthful face. The scene's anguish, as Mary bows her grief-stricken face over the horizontally
presented Christ, influenced representations of the Pietà until well into the 16th century. Some of the earliest
examples of this type are groups in the parish churches of Bruneck and Lienz (see Mülller, op.cit., pl. VIII and fig. 45).
The present group’s nervous, irregular drapery and the elongation of the torso of the Virgin differs from these
prototypes and Christ is also not usually turned towards the onlooker. This motif is repeated in a slightly later
polychromed wood Pietà from the Alsace, illustrated by Boccador (op.cit., fig. 207), and therefore the present statue
may have originated in the middle of the 15th century. The material from which it is made, called steinguss, is thought
to be typically Austrian.

In addition to wood and limestone, Austrian Gothic sculptors worked with a cement consisting of pieces of limestone,
lime, and casein. The material has the appearance of limestone and was cast in moulds and is therefore referred to as
steinguss. Cast stone was inexpensive and lighter than any other material and casts could be produced at much
higher speed than carvings. Steinguss statues played a central role in the dissemination of Beautiful Madonnas and
Pietàs since they were available to a wider clientele and could easily be transported further afield. Grossman (op.cit.,
p.49) suggests that many of the cast stone statues were produced in church workshops in Salzburg, but it is likely that
the technique was also extensively used in Tyrol.

RELATED LITERATURE
D. Grossmann, Stabat Mater. Maria unter dem Kreuz in der Kunst um 1400, exh. cat. Salzburg Cathedral, Salzburg,
1970, p. 49; T. Müller, Gotische Skulptur in Tyrol, Bozen/ Vienna, 1970, pp. 19-20, 429-430; J. Boccador, Statuaire
Médiévale en France de 1400 à 1530, Zoug, 1974, p. 188, fig. 207; M. Koller, ‘Bildhauer- und Malertechnologische
Beobachtungen zur Werkstattpraxis um 1400 anhand aktueller Restaurierung’, Kunsthistorisches Jahrbuch Graz,
XXIV, 1990, pp. 135-161
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 71
PROPERTY FROM A MIDDLE RHENISH PRIVATE COLLECTION
ATTRIBUTED TO DAMIANO CAPPELLI (FL. 1662-1688)
ITALIAN, FLORENCE, MID- 17TH CENTURY

MAN SPIRITED AWAY BY DEVILS


bronze, on a serpentine marble base
goat and flying devil: 33.5 by 31cm., 13¼ by 12 1/8 in.walking devil: 22cm., 8 5/8 in.base: 10
by 40 by 22cm., 4 by 15¾ by 8 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-25,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
the Hon. Major Richard "Hanning" Phillips, Esq.
his sale, Christie's London, 15 December 1982, lot 214

LITERATURE
C. Avery, Renaissance & Baroque Bronzes in the Frick Art Museum, Pittsburgh, 1993, pp. 87-89, fig. 22.1

CATALOGUE NOTE
When this extraordinary bronze group was sold in 1982, it was attributed to Ferdinando Tacca (1619-1686) on the
basis of a comparison with a pair of boar and bull hunting groups in Budapest (Szöcs, op. cit.). These compositions
were, in fact, conceived as part of a series of four, including stag and lion groups. A complete set, signed by Damiani
Capelli (fl. 1662-1688), an expert bronze caster, who trained with Ferdinando Tacca, is currently in a New York private
collection. It has therefore been assumed that Cappelli cast each of the known versions, and may have even
been responsible for the models themselves (Warren, op. cit., p. 110-111).

The present bronze group is indeed very close to the Cappelli groups, chiefly in the sense of movement, the Baroque
gestures and in the prancing pose of the goat. Moreover, the group has a similar tableau-like quality. Two casts of the
bull and lion hunting groups in the Peter Marino collection have attractive naturalistic terraces, increasing the tableau
like appearance of the bronzes; it is likely that the present sculpture had a similar base. The beautiful, rose-gold
lacquer on the surface of the present group is typical of Florentine bronzes. The superb chasing to the goat's coat and
to the devils' heads indicates that the bronze was cast by a leading master. Given the affinities to the hunting groups
discussed above, an attribution to Capelli can be confidently proposed.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Warren, Beauty and Power. Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Peter Marino Collection, exh. cat. The
Wallace Collection, London; the Huntington Art Collections, San Marino; and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, London,
2010, pp. 100-113 and 202-215, nos. 9 and 19; M. Szöcs, 'Horseman killing a bull and Horseman pursuing a boar.
Two small bronzes by Damiano Cappelli in the Budapest Museum of Fine Arts', Bulletin du Musée Hongrois des
Beaux-Arts, 100, Budapest, 2004, pp. 119-131
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LOT 72
PROPERTY FROM A MIDDLE RHENISH PRIVATE COLLECTION
NORTH ITALIAN, 16TH CENTURY AND LATER

DAVID WITH THE HEAD OF GOLIATH AT HIS FEET


marble
114cm., 44 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
probably with Jacques or Arnold Seligmann & Co., Paris, circa 1900
Christie's London, 8 December 1987, lot 109

CATALOGUE NOTE
Despite later alterations, the treatment of the base and torso of the present marble suggest that it was carved by
a skilled Italian sculptor from the 16th century. Representations of David were important symbols of the civic power of
Florence in particular. Here Goliath is likely to have been inspired by the head of Goliath on the David by Andrea del
Verrocchio, which is also carved with elaborate hair. The current pose of the marble mirrors that of Michelangelo’s
David.
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LOT 75
PROPERTY FROM A MIDDLE RHENISH PRIVATE COLLECTION
BAVARIAN OR UPPER AUSTRIAN, LATE 17TH CENTURY

CRUCIFIX
polychromed wood, on a later wood cross
Christ: 115cm., 45¼in.cross: 142.5cm., 56 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 10 December 1981, lot 194

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
C. Zoege von Manteuffel, Die Bildhauerfamilie Zürn 1606-1666, Weissenhorn, 1969, figs. 238-239
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LOT 76
PROPERTY FROM A MIDDLE RHENISH PRIVATE COLLECTION
AUSTRIAN, 17TH CENTURY

RELIEF WITH THE CRUCIFIXION


bronze
39 by 29cm., 15¼ by 11¼in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Christie's London, 15 December 1982, lot 77

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
E. Kris (ed.), Beiträge zur Kunsttätigkeit am Osterreichischen Kaiserhofe im 17. Jahrhundert, pp. 223-248, pl. XIX
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 77
PROPERTY FROM A MIDDLE RHENISH PRIVATE COLLECTION
ATTRIBUTED TO MATTHIAS KOLB (ACTIVE 18TH CENTURY)
SOUTH GERMAN, MUNICH, MID-18TH CENTURY

THE BAPTISM OF CHRIST


ivory and fruitwood, set with glass eyes
35 by 31 by 13.5cm., 13¾ by 12 1/8 by 5¼in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 22 April 1993, lot 187

CATALOGUE NOTE
This fine combination group with the Baptism of Christ is close to the small ivory and fruitwood sculptures made by
Simon Troger, an Austrian sculptor who was active in Munich. Such works mostly represent religious, mythological
and bucolic subjects, and are characterised by the technique of combining ivory, fruitwood and glass. They were
particularly sought after by members of the aristocracy, who enjoyed the irony of using expensive and exotic materials
to represent often humble subjects. Troger's principal patron was Maximilian III Joseph, Prince Elector of Bavaria
(1727-1777), who is believed to have commissioned many of the sculptor's works as lavish gifts.

Combination groups (Kombinationsgruppen) are believed to have originated in late 17th-century South Germany and
Austria. There are a number of elaborate examples with religious subjects in the Museo degli Argenti in Florence,
which appear to prefigure the present group in their use of rocky landscape settings carved from wood; see, for
example, the extraordinary St. Michael fighting Lucifer (inv. no. A.s.e. 167). This art was developed with great success
by Troger, and it is often to his hand that such works are ascribed.

The present group, however, can be attributed to Matthias Kolb, who was one of Troger's most talented students. The
Rococo drapery, which sits on the figures' hips, is very close to that seen in his Beggar with a Book in the Grünes
Gewölbe, Dresden (Syndram, op. cit., p. 80). Particularly interesting are the straps, which bind the drapes
together. Such straps also appear on the Grünes Gewölbe Beggar, and can be seen on a figure of Zeus in the Reiner
Winkler collection, which has been attributed to Kolb (Theuerkauff, op. cit., no. 30). In addition, whilst the naturalistic
base would indicate that the present group was not produced by Troger himself (his bases are more abstract, with a
grooved surface), the superb carving of the faces and the dextrous hands would strongly indicate that it was created
by someone who worked closely with the master, and, given the comparisons noted above, that artist is likely to be
Matthias Kolb.

RELATED LITERATURE
C. Theuerkauff, Elfenbein. Sammlung Reiner Winkler, Munich, 1984, pp. 66-7, no. 30; E. von Philippovich,
'Kombinationsfiguren aus Elfenbein und Holz', Kunst in Hessen und am Mittelrhein, vol. 17, 1997, pp. 27-35; D.
Syndram, Die Barocke Schatzkammer Das Gruene Gewolbe zu Dresden, Dresden, 2006, p. 80; S. Defrin,
'Recognizing the Hand of Simon Troger (1683-1768)', R. Marth and M. Trusted (eds.), Sculpture Studies in Honour of
Christian Theuerkauff, Munich, 2012, pp. 178-84
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LOT 78
OTHER PROPERTIES
ITALIAN, VENICE, 16TH CENTURY

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST


gilt bronze, on a carved ebony base
bronze: 21.5cm., 8½in.base: 5cm., 2in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Wixom notes seven variants of this model, which he dates to the 16th century and suggests emanate from a Venetian
workshop. All are based on the earlier Tuscan, probably Sienese, model from the Milliken collection in the Cleveland
Museum of Art.

Another version of this bronze was sold in these rooms on 9 July 2008, lot 109.

RELATED LITERATURE
W. Wixom, Renaissance Bronzes from Ohio Collections, exh. cat. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, 1975, no. 32
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LOT 79
ITALIAN, 16TH CENTURY

OVAL RELIEF WITH THE HEAD OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST


inscribed: MISERICORDIAE+ARCH.ICONFRATER
marble
55 by 44.5cm., 21 5/8 by 17½in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


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LOT 80
CIRCLE OF ANDREA RICCIO (C. 1470-1532)
ITALIAN, PADUA, EARLY 16TH CENTURY

SLEEPING NYMPH
bronze, on a later painted wood base
bronze: 14.5 by 19 by 9.7cm., 5 5/8 by 7½ by 3¾in.base: 4.5 by 20 by 8cm., 1¾ by 7 7/8 by 3
1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 150,000-250,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Phillips London, 30 June 1987, lot 107

LITERATURE
V. Avery, Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, exhib. cat. Daniel Katz Ltd.,
London, 2002, pp.112-5, no. 11; V. Krahn, Bonzetti Veneziani. Die venezianischen Kleinbronzen der Renaissance aus
dem Bode-Museum Berlin, Berlin, 2003, pp. 116-119, no. 28
CATALOGUE NOTE
The Nymph is shown asleep. Resting her head in her right hand she leans back, seemingly lost in a dream, her mouth
slightly open. This beautiful Renaissance statuette has no specific subject; she has no attributes. Two other fine casts
of this model are published: one Bode Museum, Berlin and one in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Discussing the
Berlin cast in his 1927 monograph on Andrea Riccio, Leo Planiscig compared the bronze, and related statuettes, to
images of nudes in early 16th century painting, such as Giorgione’s Concert Champêtre, in the Louvre (op. cit.,
p.423). A further striking affinity can be observed with the nymph, resting against a tree in a mirrored pose, in
Giovanni Bellini and Titian’s Feast of the Gods in the National Gallery of Art, Washington. As the gods relax and turn
to watch the sleeping nymph, so this sensual bronze would have been intended for personal reflection on the beauty
of the human form, as suggested by V. Avery (op. cit.,2011, p.131), without the need for extraneous subject matter.

Wilhem von Bode’s firm attribution of the Berlin bronze to Riccio has been generally accepted until recently. Krahn (
op.cit., p116) attributed it to the circle of Riccio, in a detailed study which identified it as a prime example of the
model made in Padua, 1530-40 . However, Avery has proposed an alternative theory of a Mantuan sculptor active in
the early 16th century for the Fitzwilliam bronze. The latter was acquired by Colonel Boscawen from the dealer Alfred
Spero as a work by the Milanese sculptor, Antico. Both authors have noted a bronze sold in Sotheby’s, London, 12th
July 1979, lot 169, as a further cast of the Nymph, but it should be excluded from this group because it is of inferior
quality, without comparable decoration in the hair.

The facture of the present Sleeping Nymph compares more closely with the hammered surface of the Berlin cast, a
technique often associated with Riccio and Paduan bronzes. By contrast the Fitzwilliam Nymph has a smooth surface
and sharper details, such as in the teeth, mouth and eyes. The Fitzwilliam version lacks a comparable diadem to the
present and Berlin bronzes, but has more detail in the ribbons and pearls in the hair. The tree in the Berlin bronze is
cast separately and it must be supposed that all the figures originally had some sort of support for the right arm, most
likely a tree as in the Berlin version.

RELATED LITERATURE
W. Bode, The Italian bronze statuette of the Renaissance, rev. ed. by J.D. Draper, New York, 1980, p.20, pl. XXXIII; L.
Planiscig, Andrea Riccio, Vienna, 1977, pp.420-3, fig. 506; V. Avery, Vulcan’s Forge in Venus’ City. The Story of
Bronze in Venice 1350-1650, New York, 2011, p. 131, fig. 10.31

Fig. 1

Italian, Mantua, early 16th century, Nymph Seated, Asleep © The


Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Fig. 2

Circle of Andrea Riccio, Padua, c.1530-40, Sleeping Nymph Berlin,


Skulpturensammlung SMPK (photo: J. P. Anders)
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 81
PORTUGUESE, LISBON, CIRCA 1575

PORTRAIT RELIEF OF JACOPO DE PAYVA DE ANDRADE


the front with an 18th-century inscription: DIOGO DE PAYVA DE ANDRADE, the reverse
inscribed with calligraphic engraving:
H ancce JACOBI DE PAYVA DE ANDRADE aeneam Effigiem diutinè in S. Nicolai
Tolentinatis Sacello, quod erat apud Augustinianos in Templo Lisbonesi Deiparae à Gratia
conservatam, ubi ab anno millesimo quingentesimo septuagesimo quinto JACOBUS ipse
sepultus jacebat prout proximo exarata lusitana, in eodemmet Templo adhuc asservata,
indicat inscriptio = Aqui jaz Diogo de Payva d Andrada Doctor insigne na sagrada
Theologia, o qual no Concilio Tridentino, onde foi de idade de 33 annos por madado de
EIRey Do Sebastiao, e nos livros que escreveo cotra Ereges, e na rar doctrina de suas
pregaçoes mostrou tata erudiçao, e zelo da Fe Catolica, que bem mereceo o muito nome, e
grade fama que deixou. Foi filho de Fernao d Alvares d Andrada do – Concelho de Estado
de EIRey Dom Joao o III, e que decendeo per linha direita do nobre sanguedos Condes d
Andrada de Galiza. Faleceo de idade de quarenta et sete annos o p° de Dezebro de – 1575.
Dona Joanna de Noroña, filha da Condesa de Linhares sur Irma Ihe mandou concertar e sta
Capela, e a dotou com obrigaçao de Missa perpetua quotidiana = Inhibí in praedicti Sacelli
pariete è regione Altaris, infra que aediculam, in qua parvum S. Augustini simulacrum
lapide um venerabateur, D. Joanna de Noroña Comitissae de Linhares ejusdemmet JACOBI
germanae sororis filia, unà sequentibius supposito sculptis lapide distichis aponi
curavit:Condiderat Payvam marmor telure sub ima,Payvam munifici munera rara
Dei.Augustinus ait nostra sub Sede latebitPayva, cui haec Sedes lumina prima dedit.Tum
vocat aes, gratos que Viri sub limune vultusRestituti, gremio Pignora grata fovens.Ergo si
terris umbram, Augustine, tueris,Quem teneat Coelo, te duce, Payva locum?Cum vero fatali
diei primae Novembris Anni 1755 Terraemotu sacra corrueret Domus, dein que è loco
sublata, quo incolumis remanserat, memorata Effigies in obscuram indies traheretur
oblivionem, hanc, decurrente, Anno à Virginis partu M.DCC.LXXI. interclufit jacturam,
eruditorum Patronus, Scientiarum que in Luistania Restitutor, Illustrissimus, ac
Excellentissumus Dominus Marchio de Pombal SEBASTIANUSJOSEPHUS DE CARVALHO
E MELLO, quippè qui JACOBI DE PAYVA DE ANDRADE memoriae consulens, ipsius
Effigiem servare, ac à temporum injuria tueri sit dignatus.(This bronze medallion showing
JACOPO DE PAYVA DE ANDRADE was for many years in the chapel of Saint Nicholas of
Tolentino which was in the Augustine church dedicated to the Mother of God, in Lisbon. It
was there that Jacopo was buried in 1575, as attested by the following Portuguese
inscription which was discovered nearby and which is still in the church:Here lies Diogo de
Payva de Andrade, distinguished doctor in theology who, byhis presence at the age of 33
years at the Council of Trent mandated by king DonSebastien; by the books he wrote
against heresy; by his erudite sermons, thedoctrines he preached and by the fervour of his
Catholic faith, thus earned therenown he so deserves. Son of Fernao d’Alvares d’Andrada –
Counsellor to KingJon Joao III, and who descended directly from the noble line of Andrade
de Galice.He died at 47 years old, on the first of December 1575. Dona Joanna deNoronha,
daughter of the Countess of Linhares, his sister, (…).In the wall opposite the altar in this
chapel, under the niche where there wassmall stone statue of Saint Augustine, Dona
Joanna de Noronha, Countessof Linhares and Jacopo’s niece, had the following lines
engraved onto astone which was added on:Payva has been hidden by marble in the depths
of the earth,Payva who had received rare gifts from God.Augustine said: Our Throne will
cover and protect Payva,Like this throne gave him the first light.This bronze must throw
light upon the beautiful face of the ManAnd bring out his fine features.So, if you are
protecting his shadow on this earth, Augustine,To what place are you taking Payva in
heaven?The church was destroyed by the disastrous earthquake of November 1st, 1755;
the medallion was recovered intact from the ruins but was forgotten about until such time
as the Protector of Letters and Restorer of Sciences in Portugal, the Most Famous and
Most Excellent SEBASTIEN JOSEPH DE CARVALHO E MELLO, Marquis de Pombal, made
amends for this negligence. In so doing, the memory of JACOPO DE PAYVA DEANDRADE
has been preserved and protected from the ravages of time.)
gilt bronze, with a silvered brass plaque mounted on the reverse, on a modern revolving
painted metal and mottled red marble stand
medal: 33.3cm., 13 1/8 in.stand overall: 75cm., 29½in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Tomb of Jacopo de Payva de Andrade, Church of Our Lady of Grace, Chapel of St Nicholas de Tolentino, Lisbon,
until 1755
Sebastião José de Carvalho Melo e Daun, 4th Count of Oeiras and 4th Marquess of Pombal
Christie's London, 1 July 1997, lot 59

CATALOGUE NOTE
Payva has been hidden by marble in the depths of the earth,
Payva who had received rare gifts from God.
Augustine said: Our Throne will cover and protect Payva,
Like this throne gave him the first light.
This bronze must throw light upon the beautiful face of the Man
And bring out his fine features.
So, if you are protecting his shadow on this earth, Augustine,
To what place our you taking Payva in heaven?

Recorded in a later inscription in Latin on the back of the present bronze, this tender poem composed by the sitter’s
niece accompanied the portrait when it was first placed at his tomb in the Church of Our Lady of Grace in Lisbon.
The sitter is sixteenth-century Portugese theologian, Diogo Payva de Andra, celebrated internationally by his peers for
his extraordinary humanist and biblical knowledge, and his mesmerising oratorical skills. He was chosen by the king,
Don Sebastian, to be Portugal’s representative at the Council of Trent. His austere appearance in the present bronze,
with protruding lower jaw and thick lips, suggests a portrait that captures not only the physical likeness of the sitter,
but also some of his character, defined by philosophical rigour.
The present medallion is an extreme rarity: few bronze Renaissance works can with certainty be traced back to
Portugal. The inscription notes how the church in which it was placed suffered badly in an earthquake of 1755; it was
only recovered in 1771 by the Marquis de Pombal who led the vast task of reconstruction. It is also one of only a
few known bronze funerary plaques from the regions of Spain and Portugal; another was made for the tomb of Suarez
de Figueroa in the cloisters of the cathedral in Badajoz.

The style of representing figures more realistically was prevalent at the end of the sixteenth century. The present
bronze falls into the Italian tradition of Renaissance medal making, suggesting that an Italian sculptor active in
Portugal may have been involved here. The rarity of its provenance and the prestige of its sitter make this work one of
particular quality and importance.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Babelon, Jacopo da Trezzo et la construction de l’Escurial. Essai sur les arts à la cour de Philippe II 1519-1589,
Paris, 1922; J. Babelon, 'Le tombeau de Dona Juana de Portugal', Revue de l’Art Ancien et Moderne, 1913, vol. xxxiii,
pp. 307-316; A. Cloulas, 'La sculpture funéraire dans l’Espagne de la Renaissance. Le mécénat aristocratique',
Gazette des Beaux Arts, October 1992, vol. cxx, p. 102; Grande enciclopédia portuguese brasileira, vol. xx, pp. 23-24
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LOT 82
ATTRIBUTED TO BARTHÉLEMY PRIEUR (CIRCA 1536-1611)
FRENCH, PARIS, LATE 16TH/ EARLY 17TH CENTURY

BUST OF CERES
bronze, on a gilt bronze socle
18cm., 7in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The attribution of this statuette of Ceres to Barthélemy Prieur is based on three allegorical busts attributed to the artist
in the Musée du Louvre (inv. no. MRR 309), the Musée National du Château de Pau (inv. no. 1121) and the National
Gallery of Scotland (inv. no. PG 2508). All of the works, similar in size, not only share facial similarities but also bear
the same intricate handling of the woman’s hair, which is drawn together behind the head and adorned with a
headpiece. The folding drapery delicately articulates the form of her body underneath and the figures share a
distinctive turned head and upwards gaze. Barthélemy Prieur was recognised as an expert in the arts during his own
lifetime and was particularly regarded for his bronze statuettes, noted for their charm and simple elegance.
RELATED LITERATURE
G. Bresc-Bautier and G. Scherf (eds.), Cast in bronze. French sculpture from Renaissance to Revolution, exh. cat.
Musée du Louvre, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Paris, 2009, pp. 128-131, nos. 25-26
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LOT 83
AFTER A MODEL ATTRIBUTED TO GIUGLIELMO DELLA PORTA (CIRCA 1500-
1577)
ITALIAN, ROME, LATE 16TH/ EARLY 17TH CENTURY

CORPUS CHRISTI
gilt bronze
24cm., 9½in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
A particularly impressive cast of the present model can be found in the Convent of Porta Coeli, Valladolid.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Urrea (ed.), Los Leoni (1509-1608). Escultores del Rinacimiento italiano al servicio de la corte de Espana, exh. cat.
Museo del Prado, Madrid, 1994, pp. 158-160, no. 23
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LOT 84
SOUTH GERMAN OR ITALIAN, 17TH CENTURY

RELIEF OF THE ASCENSION OF MARY MAGDALEN


gilt bronze
76cm., 29¾in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby’s London, 6 April 1995, lot 41
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LOT 85
SOUTH GERMAN, CIRCA 1600

RISEN CHRIST
gilt bronze
24cm., 9½in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with David Peel & Co. Ltd., London, 1965
private collection, London
by descent to the present owner

EXHIBITED
London, David Peel & Co. Ltd., From Riccio to Clodion. An Exhibition of European Works of Art, 28 April - 21 May,
1965

LITERATURE
From Riccio to Clodion. An Exhibition of European Works of Art, exh. cat. David Peel & Co. Ltd, London, 1965, no. 21

CATALOGUE NOTE
When this refined gilt bronze Risen Christ was exhibited with David Peel in 1965, it was attributed to the Austrian
sculptor Johann Baptist Hagenauer (1732-1810). Further research has established that the bronze is, in fact, much
earlier in date. The slender physiognomy and fluid sense of movement, are closer to German mannerist bronzes of
the late 16th and early 17th centuries. The classicising, toned, musculature and the graceful pose are, for
example, reminiscent of figures by the Nuremberg-based Dutch sculptor Johann Gregor van der Schardt (c. 1530-
1580), in particular his Mercury (see the cast in the J. Paul Getty Museum, inv. no. 95.SB.8) and his Autumn
from the destroyed Fountain of Prague, cast by Wenzel Jamnitzer (c. 1507-1585), in the Kunsthistorisches Museum
(inv. no. 1126), Vienna.

The strongest comparison can be found in the oeuvre of Hubert Gerhard (c. 1540-1631), another Dutch artist active in
South Germany. The present figure's svelte torso, with high pectoral muscles and lengthy abdomen, are close to
Gerhard's Christ in his relief of the Resurrection from the Christoph Fugger Altar of 1581 in the Victoria and Albert
Museum, London (inv. no. A20-1964). There is also an obvious compositional similarity between the two, with both
figures raising their right arms, whilst their lowered left arms support a bannered crucifix (lost in the present bronze).

The present Christ's perizonium, appears, at first glance, unusual, and seems incongruous with a late 16th/ early 17th
century date. With its angular folds and fluttering drapes, it is reminiscent of the type of drapery found in earlier
Gothic wood sculpture. However, this form of drapery is seen in another gilt bronze Risen Christ with mannerist
inspired physiognomy in the Peter Marino Collection (Warren, op. cit. no. 5). Jeremy Warren has argued that this
bronze is probably Flemish or South German, c. 1600-30, and suggested that it was a product of the so-called 'Dürer
revival' of the early 17th century. The present bronze should be viewed within this same historical context. The
fluttering drapes find clear correspondences in the work of Martin Schongauer and it seems likely that the sculptor was
looking back to such sources; see Schongauer's engravings of Christ Blessing and The Resurrection in the British
Museum (inv. nos. 1895,0915.271 and 1895,0915.251). The unusual 'sun-burst' hair arrangement may also be a
consequence of the sculptor attempting to mimic the light halos, which often appear in these graphic
sources. Returning to the Marino bronze, it is interesting to note that the drapery is likwise stippled; such textured
surfaces are a typical feature of South German bronzes. Consider also the similar treatment of the hair to the back; as
in the present bronze, multiple wavy strands of hair terminate in twists of curls.

The surface of the present figure has clearly been carefully chased after casting, giving the bronze a goldsmith-like
finish. Note, in particular, the textured surface of the drapery, the crisp eyelids and brow, and the punched nipples.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Baxandall, 'A Masterpiece by Hubert Gerhard,' Victoria and Albert Museum Bulletin, vol. i, no. 2, April 1965, pp. 1-
17; P. Fusco, Masterpieces of the J. Paul Getty Museum. European Sculpture, Los Angeles, 1998, pp. 35-37, no. 9; J.
Warren, Beauty and Power. Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Peter Marino Collection, exh. cat. The
Wallace Collection, London; The Huntington Art Collections, San Marino; and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts,
Minneapolis; London, 2010, pp. 70-73, no. 5
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LOT 86
AFTER A MODEL BY STEFANO MADERNO (1571-1636)
ITALIAN, 17TH CENTURY

HERCULES AND ANTAEUS


bronze, on an ebonised wood base
bronze: 52cm., 20½in.base: 9.5 by 23 by 23cm., 3¾ by 9 by 9in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Christie's London, 7 December 1993, lot 122

LITERATURE
J. Warren, Beauty and Power. Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Peter Marino Collection, exh. cat. The
Wallace Collection, London, The Huntington Art Collections, San Marino, and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts,
Minneapolis, London, 2010, p. 86

CATALOGUE NOTE
This fine bronze compares closely with another cast of Stefano Maderno's Hercules and Antaeus in the Peter Marino
collection, which is believed to date to the 17th century (size: 47cm., see, Warren, op. cit. no. 7). The hands and feet,
with their broad, prominent, nails, are very similar to those of the Marino group. The way in which the tongue has
been chased, the teeth cursorily delineated with a few chisel marks, and the pupils incised, together with the presence
of coarse filemarks are characteristics of both bronzes. Most significantly perhaps, in both groups, Hercules' legs and
Antaeus' proper left leg have been cast separately, leaving visible casting joints.

Maderno's Hercules and Antaeus, represents the mythical contest between Hercules and the giant king of Libya,
Antaeus, who was famed for his invincibility. Learning that Antaeus' strength derived from the earth, Hercules'
simply lifted the giant off from the ground and suffocated him. According to Jeremy Warren, Maderno's group is partly
inspired by a colossal ancient Roman marble representing the contest, which was sent to Florence by Pius IV in 1560
and was installed in the Pitti, where it remains today. Hercules' pose in the ancient group, with legs spread apart, is
particularly comparable to the demi-god's stance in Maderno's composition. Warren suggests that the figure of
Antaeus is derived from the representation of the giant in a group atop the Fountain of Hercules at the Villa Reale,
Castello, which was designed by Niccolò Tribolo and sculpted by Bartolomeo Ammanati after 1550.

An early terracotta model of the Hercules and Antaeus, signed and dated by Maderno in 1620, can be found in
the Royal Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh (inv. no. 198I.I). The present group is, however, closer to the terracotta,
which is signed and dated 1622, in the Galleria Franchetti alla Ca' d'Oro, Venice (inv. no. 81). It is from this group that
each of the later bronze versions of the model are believed to have been cast, although mostly without the treetrunk
support and lionskin (Warren, op. cit., p. 85). Bronze versions can be found in the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen,
Skulpturensammlung, Dresden (height: 53.7cm, inv. no. H4 153/5); the Museum of Art, Toledo (height: 52.7cm., inv.
no. 52.14) (with lionskin); the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore (height: 55.3cm., inv. no. 54.665) (with integral base and
tree trunk); and the Art Museum, Cincinnati (height: 52.1cm., inv. 1982.30) (with lionskin). Warren notes that the
Marino bronze is comparable to the Dresden cast, which has the earliest recorded provenance of each of the groups,
having been acquired from the Brühl collection in 1765.

The present bronze differs from each of the other known versions of the Hercules and Antaeus, both in bronze,
terracotta and clay, in that Antaeus' proper right arm and hand are raised, rather than being clenched to Hercules'
forehead.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, Catalogue of Italian sculpture in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1964, vol. II, pp. 593,
594; A. Nava Cellini, Maderno, Milan, 1966; H. R. Weihrauch, Europäische bronzestattuetten 15.-18. Jahrhundert,
Braunschweig, 1967, pp. 246-247, fig. 299
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 87
GERMAN, 16TH CENTURY

LARGE RING WITH A PORTRAIT OF A CLASSICAL WOMAN


the shoulders with engraved foliate decoration and scrollwork
silver-gilt, set with a cornelian intaglio
inside diameter: 21mm., 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Ralph Andrew Harari, London, until 1969
and thence by descent
with S.J. Phillips Ltd., London, 1988
private collection, United Kingdom

LITERATURE
J. Boardman and D. Scarisbrick, The Ralph Harari collection of finger rings, London, 1977, p. 66, no. 152;
2,500 Years of rings, cat. S.J. Phillips Ltd., London, 1988, p. 34, no. 74
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 88
FRENCH OR ITALIAN, CIRCA 1600

CAMEO WITH A BUST OF CHRIST


inscribed:APPAETHPIAET KAOXEE
sardonyx, set in a later gold ring
cameo: 24mm., 1in.ring: 18mm., 11/16 in. inside diameter

ESTIMATE 3,000-5,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The presence of a Greek inscription on the back of this finely carved cameo, translated as "let me be your salvation
and your promise", is unusual. Greek inscriptions can be found on a small number of carved gems, such as the
cameo of the Emperor Commodus now in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, and formerly part of the Marlborough
gems. Three other gems with Greek inscriptions mentioned in the Alsdorf collection catalogue (op.cit.) are in the gem
collections of Paris, Florence and Munich. Further cameo bust portraits of Christ attributed to 16th-century Italy are in
the Museo degli Argenti of the Pitti Palace in Florence and the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. This cameo would
originally have formed part of a devotional pendant or object, as one included in the pax kept in the Treasury of Friuli
Cathedral.
The conception of Christ is very close to Antonio Abondio's bust of Christ of circa 1591, which is in the Royal Castle,
Warsaw (Bialonowska, op. cit.p. 335, fig. 42). Antonio Abondio (1538-1591) was an important Renaissance sculptor
who worked on a small scale; he is particularly celebrated for his wax portrait reliefs.

RELATED LITERATURE
E. Kris, Renaissance-Kleinkunst in Italien. Gefasse, Gemmen, Schmuckstucke und Skulpturen in Bergkristall und
Edelstein, Leipzig, 1935, figs. 614, 617 and 620-622; I. Wardropper (ed.), Renaissance Jewellery in the Alsdorf
Collection Catalogue, cat. The Art Institute of Chicago, 1999, pp. 60-62, no. 2; R. Gennaioli, Le gemme dei Medici al
Museo degli Argenti, Florence, 2010, no. 427; M. Bialonowska (ed.), Andrzej Stansilaw Ciechanowiecki. Kolekcjoner,
marszand i mecenas, Lublin, 2010, p. 75, fig. 42

We would like to thank Diana Scarisbrick for her assistance in cataloguing this lot.
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LOT 89
AFTER JACQUES CALLOT (1592-1635)
FRENCH OR FLEMISH, 17TH CENTURY

SET OF FOURTEEN ENGRAVINGS FROM LES MISÈRES ET LES MALHEURS DE LA


GUERRE (THE MISERIES AND MISFORTUNES OF THE WAR)
the title plaque inscribed: Les MISERES ET LES MALHEURS DE LA GUERRE \ Representez
Par IACQUES CALLOT Noble Lorrain \ ET mis en lumiere par ISRAEL son amy. \ A Paris
1633. \ Avec Privilege du Roy and each engraving with an explanatory caption
ivory, mounted in an ebonised wood frame
plaques: 8 by 18cm., 3 1/8 by 7 1/8 in., 9 by 7.5cm., 3½ by 3in. and 8cm., 3 1/8 in.
diameterframe: 100.5 by 86cm., 39½ by 33 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Another set of ivory plaques engraved with scenes after Callot's Miseries of War series was offered at Sotheby's,
London, on 7 April 1987, lot 212. Callot's engravings were inspired by the horrors of the Thirty Years War
(1618–1648). They show a group of delinquent soldiers rampaging through the countryside, raping and pillaging,
before being reprimanded and punished by their superiors. The captions, which were written by Abbé Michel de
Marolles (1600-1681), add a further layer of realism to Callot's fictive scenes. The present reliefs are distinguished by
the inclusion of additional portrait roundels and the impressive ebonised frame, which adds a monumental quality to
the whole.

RELATED LITERATURE
H. D. Russell, Jacques Callot. Prints and Related Drawings, Washington, 1975, pp. 224-262, nos. 195-213
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LOT 90
CIRCLE OF JACQUES STELLA (1596-1657)
FRENCH, SECOND HALF 17TH CENTURY

TOBIAS AND THE ANGEL


with a red label stamped: COLLECTION OSTERRIETH and inscribed: no 45 to the reverse
oil on alabaster, in a gilt wood frame
plaque: 31.5cm., 12 3/8 in.frame: 42.5 by 35cm., 16¾ by 13¾in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Jacques Ernest Osterrieth, Osterriethhuis, Antwerp

CATALOGUE NOTE
Son of the Flemish painter François Stella, Jacques Stella moved to Rome in the 1623 following seven years working
in the Medici grandducal workshop in Florence where he became proficient at painting on hardstones and slate. In
1635 he returned to France and became court painter to Louis XIII. For an Adoration of the Shepherds on alabaster
see the exhibition catalogue Masterpieces of Reality. French 17th century painting.
RELATED LITERATURE
C. Wright (ed.), Masterpieces of Reality. French 17th century painting. A loan exhibition from public and private
collections in Britain and Ireland, exh. cat. Leicestershire Museum and Art Gallery, New Walk, Leicester, 1986, pp. 68
and 142, no. 52
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LOT 91
ITALIAN, NAPLES OR ROME, CIRCA 1620-1630

BUST OF A MAN
marble
70cm., 27 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 18,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present bust fits into a style of formal portraiture pioneered by Alessandro Vittoria. Portrait busts of this type are
generally truncated beneath the pectoral muscles and are nearly or fully frontally positioned. The men are represented
with short pointed beards, cropped hair and a piercing gaze which, added to the austere contemporary dress, lend an
appearance of power to the sitters. A similar style was introduced in Rome by Neapolitan sculptors such as Pietro
Bernini. See, for example, the bust of Domenico Fontana thought to be Neapolitan in the Victoria and Albert Museum
(inv. no. A.14-1938).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, Catalogue of Italian sculpture in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1964, vol. II, pp. 498-
499, no. 526
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LOT 92
ITALIAN, POSSIBLY TRENTINO, 18TH CENTURY

BAPTISMAL FONT
white marble, inlaid with yellow, red, grey, green and black marble
125 by 95cm., 49¼ by 37 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP


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LOT 93
ITALIAN, 17TH CENTURY

FOUNTAIN FIGURE WITH A PUTTO RIDING A HIPPOCAMP


marble
65.5 by 45cm., 25¾ by 17 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The spirited fluid movement of the hippocamp with flowing tousled mane and body terminating in a dolphin's tail
and the deeply drilled locks of the putto's hair point to a sculptor working in the tradition of the Roman Baroque
fountain sculptures so popularized by Gian Lorenzo Bernini.
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LOT 94
ATTRIBUTED TO DOMENICO GUIDI (1625-1701)
ITALIAN, ROME, CIRCA 1677

STUDY FOR THE MONUMENT TO LOUIS PHÉLYPEAUX, MARQUIS DE LA VRILLIÈRE (1598-


1681)
terracotta
21cm., 8¼in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This fine terracotta appears to be a preliminary study for Guidi's 1677-1679 funerary monument to Louis Phélypeaux,
Marquis de la Vrillière, in the church of Saint Martial, Chateauneuf-sur-Loire. It has a freshness and plasticity, which
would indicate that it was made as the sculptor initially formulated his composition. A more finished terracotta model
for the monument can be found in the Staatliche Museen, Berlin (Giometti, op. cit., no. 6.M). Terracotta models
became increasingly sought-after during the course of the 17th century, with Giovanni Battista Pamphilj stipulating to
Guidi in the contract for the altar of Sant'Agnese, that he produce such a sketch and that it remain with the finished
work in perpetuity (Barberini, op. cit. pp. 57-8).
RELATED LITERATURE
M. G. Barberini, 'Base or Noble Material? Clay Sculpture in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Italy', B. Boucher
(ed.), Earth and Fire. Italian Terracotta Sculpture from Donatello to Canova, exh. cat. The Museum of Fine Arts,
Houston, and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, New Haven and London, 2001, pp. 57-58; C. Giometti,
Domenico Guidi 1625-1701. Uno scultore barocco di fama europea, Rome, 2010, pp. 234-235 and 293, nos. 36.S and
6.M
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LOT 95
ATTRIBUTED TO GIUSEPPE SANMARTINO (1720-1793)
ITALIAN, NAPLES, SECOND HALF 18TH CENTURY

THE ARCHANGEL ST. MICHAEL VANQUISHING THE DEVIL


the reverse inscribed in pencil: 8205
terracotta
55.5cm., 21 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This dynamic terracotta group compares closely with the work of the Neapolitan Baroque sculptor Giuseppe
Sanmartino. St Michael's pose, with one arm raised, head slightly lowered, and one foot trampling on his vanquished
enemy, is very similar to that of his Archangel St. Michael in Monopoli cathedral (Catello, op. cit., p. 89). The
attribution to Sanmartino is confirmed when the present group is compared with a number of the sculptor's other
terracotta bozzetti. In particular, note the crisp incised decoration adorning the habit of his Bozzetto of St. Philip Neri
in the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (Catello, op. cit., p. 68); this is conceived in a near-identical manner to the
decoration on the Archangel's cuirass and shield. Also compare with his signed terracotta St. Vincent Ferrer in the
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (inv. no. 1996.93), in which the saint's wings are modelled in an analagous
way to those of St. Michael in the present bozzetto.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Hecht, '"I'm No Angel": A Terracotta Model of Saint Vincent Ferrer by Giuseppe Sanmartino', Metropolitan Museum
Journal 37, 2002, pp. 229-238; E. Catello, Giuseppe Sanmartino (1720-1793), Naples, 2004, pp. 32, 68 and 89
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LOT 96
CIRCLE OF MATTHIAS STEINL (C. 1643-1727)
AUSTRIAN, CIRCA 1700

PAIR OF EQUESTRIAN GROUPS WITH AN OTTOMAN SULTAN AND AN EMPEROR


ivory, on associated ebonised wood bases with ivory mounts
Sultan: 17.6cm., 6 7/8 in.Emperor: 18cm., 7 1/8 in.bases: 5 by 16.3 by 7.6cm., 2 by 6½ by 3in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's, London, 6 July 2007, lot 91

CATALOGUE NOTE
What distinguishes these ivory horses is the fine ribbon-like treatment to the tails and manes, giving the impression of
movement, exquisitely undercut in a medium that requires expert skill to carve. This attention to detail is epitomised in
the work of Matthias Steinl, appointed ivory engraver to the Habsburg Emperor Leopold I in Vienna in 1688 and
whose work undoubtedly influenced the present pair. Note, in particular, the two equestrian groups of the Emperor
Joseph I dated 1693 and one of the Emperor Leopold I (1711-1712) conceived as memorials to be placed in the
Imperial Treasury and now in the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

The choice of subjects is likely to reflect Austrian interest in the interaction between Europe and the Islamic
World, following The Great Turkish War, which culminated in the Battle of Vienna in 1683, when the Holy Roman
Empire inflicted a decisive defeat upon the invading forces of the Ottoman Empire.

RELATED LITERATURE
W.Seipel, Kaiserliches Elfenbein, Matthias Steinl (1643/44-1727) in der Kunstkammer des Kunsthistorischen
Museums, Vienna, 2007
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LOT 97
ATTRIBUTED TO MARTIN VOLK (C. 1700 - 1756) AND JOHANN THEODOR
DÜRINGER (1696-1761)
GERMAN, SAUERLAND, CIRCA 1740-1750

CORPUS CHRISTI
fruitwood
46cm., 18 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
by repute from the church in Offheim, near Limburg/ Lahn
private collection, Wiesbaden

CATALOGUE NOTE
The physiognomy of this beautifully carved corpus is particularly impressive, with the tendons, muscles, veins, nipples
and the ripples of skin around the three nails being precisely delineated. In certain areas, there is a tendency towards
‘ornamentalisation’, especially visible at the almost mannerist knee joints. The emotional force of the Passion is
apparent in the head, which is tilted to one side, and the anguished facial expression, with pained eyes and open
mouth, framed by windswept hair.

RELATED LITERATURE
L. Baron Döry, Hadamarer Barock. Sakrale Bildhauerkunst des 18. Jahrhunderts, exh. cat. Diözesanmuseum
Limburg/ Lahn, 1990, no. 20
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LOT 98
FRENCH, DIEPPE, 19TH CENTURY

CRUCIFIX
the ivory titulus inscribed: INRI
ivory, on an ebony cross with metal nails
corpus: 27.5cm., 10¾in.cross: 62cm., 24¼in.

ESTIMATE 4,000-6,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Compare with the Dieppe corpus offered in these rooms on 16 July 1999, lot 38.
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LOT 99
CIRCLE OF PEDRO DE MENA (1628-1688)
SPANISH, MALAGA, LATE 17TH CENTURY

MATER DOLOROSA
polychromed wood, set with ivory teeth, and glass eyes and tears
40cm., 15¾in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, Spain

CATALOGUE NOTE
In the early 1670s Pedro de Mena first carved two of the most moving images known in European sculpture, his Ecce
Homo and Mater Dolorosa, at which time he fully realised the potential of the mixed-media technique fathered by Juan
Martínez Montañés half a century earlier. The idealised faces of Christ and Mary were not only enlivened by realistic
polychromy; ivory teeth, glass eyes, tears made of droplets of glass and eyelashes of animal hair were all expertly
fitted into the carved heads. To suggest cloth and attributes De Mena carved the wood paper-thin and appropriated
real objects in a quest to approach reality as closely as possible. Christ and the Virgin's humanity and their palpable
anguish caused rapturous responses in Southern Spain's churches and monasteries when they first appeared.
Consequently, his busts and half-length figures set the standard for this type of imagery, prompting many further
commissions for both his workshop and his followers.

Among De Mena's most important Mater Dolorosas are those in the Monastery of San Joaquín y Santa Ana in
Valladolid and the Convent of the MM. Conceptionistas in Zamora. These figures are characterised by sweeping
Baroque drapery and animated by their clasped hands and turn of the head (see Moreno, op.cit., nos. 7 and 9). It is
intriguing that the former figure is also mounted on a base with inset upper edge. A closely related bust is in the the
Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid dated to circa 1680 (Moreno, op.cit., no. 13) and another is in the collection
of the Hispanic Society of America. This example is signed by Pedro's daughter Andrea de Mena and dated to 1675
illustrated by Trusted (op.cit., no. 127) suggesting that at least some of these busts were carved by others under
Pedro's supervision.

RELATED LITERATURE
L.L. Moreno (ed.), Pedro de Mena y Castilla, exh. cat. Museo nacional de escultura, Valladolid, 1989, pp. 34-47; M.
Trusted, The arts of Spain. Iberia and Latin America 1450-1700, London/ New York, 2007, no. 127
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LOT 100
ATTRIBUTED TO JOHANN GEORG KERN (1622-1698)
GERMAN, KOBLENZ, SECOND HALF 17TH CENTURY AND LATER

TANKARD WITH THE WISE AND FOOLISH MAIDENS


with seated putti on the lid, the mounts marked thrice, on the cover, body and foot, for
Adolf Zethelius, Stockholm, 1816
ivory, with silver-gilt mounts
21cm., 8¼in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Christie's London, 17 December 1986, lot 79

EXHIBITED
Exhibition of Italian Art (documented in the 1986 Christie's cataloguing)
CATALOGUE NOTE
The elegant classicising frieze, which wraps around the present tankard, has the same composition as one found on a
tankard in the Grünes Gewölbe in Dresden, which dates to 1661 and has been attributed to Johann Georg Kern (inv.
no. II 399). Both sleeves portray the Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins from the Gospel of Matthew 25:1-13. The
parable, which is an allegory for the Last Day of Judgement, tells of ten maidens who are given the honour of waiting
to greet a bridegroom prior to his marriage feast. As the event takes place at night, they each hold lamps to welcome
their visitor. The five wise virgins take the precaution of bringing additional oil in case the bridegroom arrives late, but
the five foolish virgins are unprepared. When it becomes clear that they face a long wait, the foolish virgins go in
search of oil, but are still absent when the bridegroom finally arrives and so are excluded from the feast.

Johann Georg's idealised nudes show the influence of the work of his uncle, the celebrated ivory carver Leonhard
Kern (1588-1662). Compare, for example, the women in the present frieze with the three graces in Leonhard's stone
relief in the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg (Möller, op. cit., p. 75, fig. 2). It is due to the conceptual
similarity with Leonhard's work that the Dresden sleeve has been attributed to the elder Kern in the past, though this
theory is today considered unlikely (Möller, op. cit.p. 76). The present sleeve is particularly refined, notably in the
superb carving in the hair, the subtle, swirling, drapery, and the flickering flames in the lamps. The virtuoso quality of
the carving and the similarity with the Dresden example, provide a strong case for the present sleeve having
also been carved by Johann Georg Kern.

RELATED LITERATURE
R. Berliner, Die Bildwerke des Bayerischen Nationalmuseums. IV. Die Bildwerke in Elfenbein, Kochen, Hirsch-und
Steinbockhorn, exh. cat. Bayerischen Nationalmuseums, Munich, 1926, pp. 55 and 113, no. 194; L.L. Möller,
'Trinkgeschirre von Johann Georg Kern and Johann Jacob Betzoldt', Leonhard Kern (1588-1662). Meisterwerke der
Bildhauerei für die Kunstkammern Europas, exh. cat. Hällisch-Fränkisches Museum, Schwäbisch-Hall, 1988, p. 77,
fig. 5
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LOT 101
WORKSHOP OF FRANCESCO FANELLI (1577-AFTER 1642)
ANGLO-ITALIAN, CIRCA 1630-1640

ST. GEORGE AND THE DRAGON


bronze
18.5 by 26cm., 7 1/4 by 10 1/4 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sir John Wyndham Pope-Hennessy, Florence
and thence by descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
Francesco Fanelli's equestrian bronzes were highly celebrated in seventeenth-century England. George Vertue wrote
that 'he had a particular genius for these works and was much esteemed in King Charles I time – and afterwards.'
Fanelli's bronzes were instrumental in establishing the vogue for Baroque sculpture in England. According to Abraham
van der Doort's 1639 inventory of the Royal Collection, Charles I owned five statuettes by Fanelli, including 'a little St.
George on horseback with a dragon by.' The present bronze is an excellent example of the superb decorative qualities
for which Fanelli's statuettes were so appreciated.

St George and the Dragon exists in two principal compositions. The present bronze is taken from the first, in which
Fanelli adapted his model of the Leaping Horse, a work which can be identified by its extended hind legs and
pronounced twist of the head. St George leans backwards and is represented with both hands gripping the lance.
Examples of this first type are in the V&A (inv. no. A.5-1953) and at Welbeck Abbey, with slight variations (Pope-
Hennessy, op.cit., p. 169, fig. 195). In his second variant of the subject of St George, Fanelli used his model of the
Rearing Horse, where the saint leans forward, grasping the reigns of the horse with one hand, while lancing the
dragon with the other. A cast of this model is in the Holburne Museum, Bath (Pope-Hennessy, op.cit., p. 169, n. 23,
fig. 193).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Pope-Hennessy, 'Some bronzes by Francesco Fanelli', Essays on Italian sculpture, London, 1968, pp. 166-71; P.
Wengraf, 'Francesco Fanelli & sons in Italy and London, on a grander scale', European bronzes from the Quentin
Collection, exh. cat. The Frick Collection, New York, 2004, pp. 30-53; S. Stock, 'Fanelli, Francesco (b. 1577)', Oxford
dictionary of national biography, Oxford, 2004; B. Van Beneden and N. de Poorter, Royalist refugees. William and
Margaret Cavendish in the Rubens House 1648-1660, exh. cat. Rubenshuis, Antwerp, 2006, pp. 198-199, no. 59
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LOT 102
CASKETS FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
INDO-PORTUGUESE, 17TH CENTURY

CASKET
tortoiseshell, bone and ivory, on a wood core, with silver mounts
10 by 15.5cm., 4 by 6 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 3,000-5,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This unusual casket finds comparisons in 17th-century Indo-Portuguese ivory and tortoiseshell cabinets. Compare, for
example, with the cabinet sold at Sotheby's London, on 5 December 2007, lot 57. Note the analagous combination of
ivory and tortoiseshell, the small drawers, and the similar rosette-shaped silver handle plates.
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LOT 103
CASKETS FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
SPANISH COLONIAL, MEXICO, CIRCA 1700

CASKET
the body incised with arms inspired by those of the Royal House of Habsburg supported by
a double-headed eagle, the lid incised with the symbol of a pierced heart, and the interior
with the painted monogram of the Jesuit Order: IHS
tortoiseshell, on a wood core with silver mounts
17.3 by 21cm., 6¾ by 8¼in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This fine casket would have been made in Mexico for the European market, using a technique that is believed to have
been introduced to the Americas by Missionaries travelling from India. It compares closely with another in the Hanns
Schell collection, Graz (inv. no. 4669). Note the similar incised decoration, which also includes the symbol of the
pierced heart on the lid.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Pall (ed.), Locked Treasures. Caskets and Cabinets from Around the World, cat. Hanns Schell Collection, Graz,
2006, p. 84, no. 66
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LOT 104
CASKETS FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
NORTH ITALIAN, 17TH CENTURY

CASKET
ivory, on a wood core, lined with red velvet, and with gilt copper mounts
11.6 by 17 by 9.4cm., 4½ by 6 5/8 by 3¾in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's, London, 7 July 2006, lot 120

CATALOGUE NOTE
This beautiful casket compares with an Italian ivory coffer with gabled lid, which was sold at Sotheby's, London, 5 April
2006, lot 119. Another was sold in the Ernst Brummer Collection sale, Galerie Koller and Spink and Sons, Zurich, 16-
19 October 1979, lot 75. This example was catalogued as 'Hispano-Mauresque or Sicily, c. 1200,' presumably
because of its similarity to earlier Siculo-Arabic caskets, many of which exhibit the same attractive simplicity and also
have gabled lids. The facture of the present casket nonetheless confirms a dating to the 17th century. It is
distinguished by the charming addition of a concealed draw in the lid.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 105
CASKETS FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
DUTCH COLONIAL, INDONESIA, 17TH CENTURY

CASKET
tortoiseshell, on a wood core with silver mounts, the interior lined with red velvet
16 by 22cm., 6¼ by 8 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 3,000-5,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The incised silver mounts with foliate designs on the present casket compare closely with those adorning another
tortoiseshell coffer from the Dutch East Indies, formerly known as Batavia, modern-day Indonesia, which was offered
at Sotheby's Zurich on 3 April 1981, lot 31. Note the handles with their similar flower petal mount plates. A particularly
delightful detail of the present casket is the fictive keyhole in the centre of the lockplate; the real keyhole is only
revealed once the clasp is lifted.

Demand for tortoiseshell goods flourished in Europe after Catherine of Austria, Queen of Portugal (1507-1578),
adopted it as her material of choice for exotic diplomatic gifts. Many tortoiseshell objects were traded by the Dutch
East India Company, or V.O.C., and this example would undoubtedly have been made for the European market.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 106
CASKETS FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION
DUTCH COLONIAL, INDONESIA, LATE 17TH CENTURY

CASKET
tortoiseshell, on a wood core, with silver mounts, the interior lined with rose velvet
11.3 by 16.1cm., 4½ by 6 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The pierced silver mounts adorning the present casket compare with those found on a similar 17th-century Dutch East
Indian tortoiseshell casket sold at Christie's, London, on 4 July 2000, lot 62. Note also the similarly shallow lid and the
silver handle on the lid with central knop.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 107
OTHER PROPERTIES
SOUTH GERMAN, 18TH CENTURY

ALLEGORY OF THE ARTS WITH PUTTI


an illegible inscription to the tablet held by the putto with the stylus
limewood
88 by 159.5cm, 34 5/8 by 62¾in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Hampel Munich, 30 June 2006, lot 1327
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 108
FRENCH, 18TH CENTURY

LION MASK FROM A WALL SCONCE OR FOUNTAIN


gilt bronze
42cm., 16½in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
An analogous bronze water spout of similar dimensions but of a human mask rather than a lion is in the Rijksmuseum
(inv.no. R.B.K.16930f).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Leeuwenberg and W. Halsema-Kubes, Beeldhouwkunst in het Rijksmuseum, cat. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, The
Hague/ Amsterdam, 1973, p. 405, no. 703
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 109
FOLLOWER OF JEAN-ANTOINE HOUDON (1741-1828)
FRENCH, 19TH CENTURY

BUST OF A CHILD, POSSIBLY ANTOINETTE-CLAUDE, CALLED CLAUDINE HOUDON


with a metal plaquette inscribed: BUSTE TERRE CUITE PAR HOUDON and an old paper
collection label to the reverse inscribed in blue ink: 2
terracotta, on a white marble socle
39.5cm., 15½in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
A. L. Poulet (ed.), Jean-Antoine Houdon. Sculptor of the Enlightenment, exh. cat. National Gallery of Art Washington,
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and Musée et Domaine National du Château de Versailles, Washington,
2003, pp. 137-140, no. 18
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 110
AFTER CLAUDE MICHEL, CALLED CLODION (1738-1814),
FRENCH, 19TH CENTURY

SATYRE ET BACCHANTE PROPOSANT DES RAISINS À UN ENFANT (SATYR AND A


BACCHANTE OFFERING GRAPES TO A CHILD)
white marble
49.5cm., 19½in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
A.L. Poulet and G. Scherf, Clodion 1738-1814, exh. cat. Musée du Louvre, Paris, 1992, p. 393, fig. 211
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 111
ITALIAN, LATE 18TH CENTURY

PORTRAIT RELIEF WITH A NOBLEWOMAN


marble, in a gilt bronze frame
47 by 38.5cm., 18½ by 15 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
noble family, Italy
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 112
ITALIAN, 19TH/ EARLY 20TH CENTURY
AFTER THE ANTIQUE

MASK WITH THE FACE OF SILENUS


onyx marble, on a metal stand
mask: 27cm., 10 5/8 in.stand: 35 by 20.5cm., 13¾ by 8 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 4,000-6,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present mask is probably based upon an oscillum, a type of Roman decorative object, which took the form of a
theatrical mask, disc, shield or rectangular relief. Made of marble and sometimes polychromed, they feature in
Pompeian wall paintings, suspended from garlands hanging within fictive colonnades. Given that oscilla are often
decorated with Dionysiac imagery, it is likely that they were connected with cult ritual, while also being seen to have
apotropaic properties.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 113
FRENCH, LATE 18TH CENTURY
AFTER THE ANTIQUE

APOLLO BELVEDERE
bronze
38cm., 15in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The facture of the present bronze compares with other late 18th-century French bronzes. The fingers, with their
carefully delineated fingernails, are comparable to those seen on a Dying Gaul dated to the end of the 18th
century sold at Christie's on 10 December 2009, lot 859.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 114
ENGLISH, 19TH CENTURY
AFTER THE ANTIQUE

RELIEF WITH NIKE ADJUSTING HER SANDAL


white marble
86.5 by 46.5cm., 34 by 18¼in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This attractive marble is carved after a relief from the Temple of Athena Nike on the Acropolis in Athens, dating to the
last decades of the 5th Century B.C.E. The relief is today housed in the Acropolis Museum, Athens.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 115
ITALIAN, 19TH/ 20TH CENTURY
INSPIRED BY THE ANTIQUE

FRAGMENTARY HEAD OF MINERVA


crystalline beige marble with yellow and red veining, on a modern metal stand
head: 33cm., 13in.base: 26.5cm., 10 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 116
EUGENIO BATTIGLIA

ITALIAN
19TH/20TH CENTURY
DISCOBOLUS
signed: E:Battiglia / Firenze

white marble
172.5cm., 67 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This impressive marble is carved after the famous Discobolus, which is recorded by the ancient writers Lucian and
Quintilian as having been created by Myron, the celebrated 5th-century Greek sculptor. The Discobolus was
celebrated by ancient writers for its beauty and naturalistic anatomy, qualities which made it, in their eyes, one of
the crowning artistic achievements of Classical art. In 1781, a full marble copy of the sculpture was discovered at the
Villa Palombara on the Esquiline Hill, Rome. Achieving instant fame and distinction, the sculpture was moved around
various prestigious palaces of Rome. In 1938, after pursuing it fervently, Adolf Hitler obtained it and displayed it in the
Glyptothek, Munich. It was eventually returned to Italy in 1948 and placed in the Museo Nazionale Romano, where it
remains today.

Copied frequently in antiquity and since its discovery, the Discobolus has captured popular imagination for centuries.
It represents an ideal of youthful beauty and health; it maintains an element of intrigue with its association to a greater
undiscovered antiquity. Eugenio Battiglia, a Tuscan artist working in Florence in the nineteenth century, produced this
fine version of the renowned sculpture. It is a beautiful and powerful work in itself, while also reflecting the enduring
appeal of the antique and its original mastery of sculpture.

RELATED LITERATURE
F. Haskell and N. Penny, Taste and the antique. The Lure of Classical sculpture 1500-1900, New Haven/ London,
1981, pp. 199-202
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 117
GIULIO TADOLINI

ITALIAN
1849 - 1918
ODALISCA
signed and dated: Giulio Tadolini Roma 1877
white marble, on a veined purple marble column
figure: 113cm., 44½in.marble base: 84cm., 33 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 35,000-50,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The Tadolini family counts among the most significant sculpture dynasties since the early 19thcentury. Four
generations of stone and bronze sculptors worked in the same studio on Via del Babuino for some 150 years. The first
Tadolini to find acclaim was Adamo, who quickly became the privileged protégé of Canova. Adamo inherited Canova’s
atelier, which was to become the workshop of the Tadolini dynasty. Today the studio is preserved as the Canova-
Tadolini Museum. Following Adamo was his son Scipio, who found his own renown in adding a Romantic quality to
the Classical style sculptures of his father.
Giulio Tadolini was the third generation of Tadolini, son of Scipio and grandson of Adamo. He was working in an
expanding 19th century Europe, when travel to exotic destinations was suddenly possible, giving rise to the Orientalist
art movement. Giulio's imagination was inspired by the Orient (op. cit., no. 1807) and his works are often ornamented
with gilt, silvered bronze, onyx and precious stones to achieve an effect of Orientalist exoticism.
The present sculpture of an Odalisque chimes with Giulio’s distinctive Orientalist style, but maintains an element of
romantic Classicism, evocative of the work of his father. A comparable slightly larger marble sculpture of a Greek
slave by Scipio sold in these rooms in 2010 for £133,250 (for another version see Panzetta, op. cit., no. 1808). The
present figure drops her right hip in a traditional contraposto pose, while the low hanging drapery revealing the crease
at the top of her leg adds an erotic element. The figure’s act of tying a jewelled necklace alludes to the exotic riches of
the Orient which so enchanted contemporary imagination and defined many of Giulio’s most accomplished works.

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Panzetta, Nuovo dizionario degli scultori Italiani dell'ottocento e del primo novecento, Turin, 2003, pp. 900 and 919-
921, nos. 1807 and 1808
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 118
ITALIAN, EARLY 19TH CENTURY

RECLINING BOY
white marble
67 by 100.5cm., 26 3/8 by 39 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This marble reclining boy is reminiscent of the work of Lorenzo Bartolini and his workshop, particularly in the hair with
ringlets and the languid pose. Compare, for example, with Bartolini's famous Demidoff Table of 1845 (Falletti, op. cit.,
no. 63).

RELATED LITERATURE
F. Falletti, S. Bietoletti and A. Caputo (eds.), Lorenzo Bartolini. Beauty and Truth in Marble, exh. cat. Accademia,
Florence, 2011, pp. 336-9, no. 63
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 119
ITALIAN, 19TH CENTURY
AFTER A MODEL BY ANTONIO CANOVA (1757-1822)

DANZATRICE CON LE MANI SUI FIANCHI (DANCER)


white marble, on a veined pink marble column
Dancer: 86.5cm., 34in.column: 93cm., 36 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Praz and G. Pavanello, L'opera completa del Canova, Milan, 1981, pp. 112-3, no. 172
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 120
GIOVANNI MARIA BENZONI

ITALIAN
1809-1873
BOY PLAYING WITH TWO SPANIELS
signed: G . M . BENZON I . F . ROMA . A . 1867 .
white marble
83 by 56.5cm., 32 5/8 by 22¼in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 121
WORKSHOP OF SCIPIONE TADOLINI

ITALIAN
1822-1892
FLORA
signed: TADOLINI ROMA 1872
white marble, on a veined pink marble column
Flora: 91cm., 35 7/8 in.column: 93cm., 36 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 122
WORKSHOP OF LORENZO BARTOLINI

ITALIAN
1777-1850
CARITÀ EDUCATRICE
white marble, on a white marble base
group: 97.5cm., 38 3/8 in.base: 25.5cm., 10in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
F. Falletti, S. Bietoletti and A. Caputo (eds.), Lorenzo Bartolini. Beauty and Truth in Marble, exh. cat. Accademia,
Florence, 2011, pp. 306-309, no. 53
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 123
PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTOR
JOHN STEELL

BRITISH
1804 - 1891
BUST OF A BOY
signed and dated: JN. STEELL. R.S.A. Sculpt. Edinr. 1861.
white marble, on a white marble socle
overall: 51cm., 20 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 2,500-3,500 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 124
PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTOR
MARIA ELISA PISTRUCCI

BRITISH
1824-1881
MEDALLION WITH THE HEADS OF FLORA AND CERES
signed: M. E. Pistrucci
white marble
22cm., 8 5/8 in. diameter.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

EXHIBITED
London, Sir John Soane's Museum, Pistrucci's Capriccio. A Rediscovered Masterpiece of Regency Sculpture, 2006,
no. 14;
Waddesdon, Waddesdon Manor, Pistrucci's Capriccio. A Rediscovered Masterpiece of Regency Sculpture, 2006, no.
14

LITERATURE
C. Milano and M. Trusted (eds.), Pistrucci's Capriccio. A Rediscovered Masterpiece of Regency Sculpture, exh. cat.
Sir John Soane's Museum, London, and Waddesdon Manor, Waddesdon, 2006, pp. 15, 21, no. 14

CATALOGUE NOTE
This rare and superb double-sided marble medallion was carved by Maria Elisa Pistrucci, daughter of the virtuoso
gem-cutter and Chief Medallist at the Royal Mint, Benedetto Pistrucci (1784-1855). The present relief can be
described as a homage to Maria Elisa's father, as the head of Flora is an almost exact copy of the head appearing on
his extraordinary and recently rediscovered Capriccio, carved in 1829. The head of Ceres derives from a wax by her
father in the Museo della Zecca, Rome (Milano and Trusted, op. cit., no. 14, p. 21).
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 125
PROPERTY OF AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTOR
AFTER LORENZO BARTOLINI (1777-1850)
ITALIAN, 19TH CENTURY

BUST OF BYRON
white marble, on white marble socle
overall: 65cm., 25 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 1,500-2,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
F. Falletti, S. Bietoletti and A. Caputo (eds.), Lorenzo Bartolini. Beauty and Truth in Marble, exh. cat. Accademia,
Florence, 2011, pp. 226-8, no. 23
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 126
HIRAM POWERS

AMERICAN
1805-1873
BUST OF THE GREEK SLAVE
signed: H. POWERS / Sculp.
white marble, on a white marble socle and a veined purple marble column
bust and socle: 61cm., 24in. overall.column: 111.5cm., 43 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
'The celebrated Greek Slave ... is surely one of the most exquisite embodiments of grace, beauty and symmetry that
the hand of man ever executed, or even his heart conceived. Let the canting of prurient objectors to the nude gaze on
this, with its irresistable grace and pathos, and utter absence of the sensual, and go away rebuked and purified, to
return, as all do return, to gaze on that most sweet and saddening sight' (Edinburgh Political and Literary Journal, 10
May 1851).
No other single piece of 19th-century sculpture was more praised, eulogised or parodied than Powers's Greek Slave.
The circumstances of its fame were without precedent. Never before had a marble statue embarked on an equivalent
world tour, being shown to huge crowds in Europe and across the United States. Its appearance at the Great
Exhibition in London in 1851, organised without the sculptor's knowledge, was an unqualified success, with
crowds said to have admired her nude beauty in silent awe.

Once the Greek Slave embarked on its public round of exhibitions, Powers was careful to ensure that its subject was
clearly understood. The theme is taken from the Greek revolution of the 1820's. The young woman has been
abducted by the Turks and is about to be sold in a slave market. Powers explained in his own words that, 'she stands
exposed to the people she abhors, and waits her fate with the intense anxiety, tempered indeed by the support of her
reliance upon the goodness of God. Gather all the afflictions together and add to them the fortitude and resignation of
a Christian, and no room will be left for shame. Such are the circumstances under which the Greek Slave is supposed
to stand.'

The Greek Slave is today regarded as Powers's most iconic sculpture. As Lauretta Dimmick writes in the Metropolitan
Museum of Art catalogue of American sculpture, it 'became the most famous sculpture of the period and established
Powers's international reputation' (Tolles, op. cit., p. 8). Wunder records that only nine full size versions were carved,
the first being the superb marble at Raby Castle in County Durham. Powers offered busts of the Greek Slave in either
life-size or two-thirds life-size versions. The present bust is typical of the busts Powers carved, in bearing the
signature: H. POWERS / Sculp., and in being truncated just below the breasts. This particular bust is distinguished by
the fact that it has retained its beautiful original surface, and therefore exhibits in full the sculptor's virtuoso talents as a
carver.

RELATED LITERATURE
R. P. Wunder, Hiram Powers: Vermont Sculptor, 1805-1873, Newark, 1991, vol. I, pp. 207-274, vol. II, pp. 157-177; T.
Tolles (ed.), American Sculpture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1999, vol. I, pp. 8-9; F. Falletti, S.
Bietoletti and A. Caputo (eds.), Lorenzo Bartolini. Beauty and Truth in Marble, exh. cat. Accademia, Florence, 2011,
pp. 330-331, no. 60
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 127
CHRISTIAN DANIEL RAUCH

GERMAN
1777 - 1857
LAURENTIA VIRGO TANGERMUNDIANA (THE MAIDEN LAURENTIA OF TANGERMÜNDE)
inscribed: LAURENTIA VIRGO TANGERMUNDIANA on the plinth and the base with a metal
plaque engraved C. RAUCH and LAURENTIA VIRGO TANGERMUNDIANA
signed: C.RAUCH
partially silvered and damascened bronze set with coloured pastes, on an oak base
bronze: 44.5 by 35.5cm., 17½ by 14in.base: 3.5 by 35 by 17cm., 1 3/8 by 13¾ by 6 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 128
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
PAIR OF TAZZE
each signed: BARYE and numbered: 02
bronze, light brown patina, with metal ballasts
14.5 by 19cm., 5¾ by 7½in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 129
PIERRE-JULES MÊNE

FRENCH
1810-1879
ÉCOSSAIS MONTRANT UN RENARD À UN CHIEN AND VALET DE CHIENS TENANT DEUX
GRIFFONS ÉCOSSAIS (SCOT PRESENTING A FOX TO A DOG AND SERVANT HOLDING
TWO SCOTTISH GRIFFONS)
both signed: P.J. MÊNE
bronze, golden brown patina, on veined black marble bases
Scot: 49.5cm., 19½in.Valet: 51cm., 20 1/8 in.bases: 11.5 by 31.5cm., 4½ by 12 3/8 in.
diameter

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Pierre-Jules Mêne 1810-1879. Catalogue raisonné, Paris, 2007, pp. 34-35, nos. F6-F7
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 130
JULES MOIGNIEZ

FRENCH
1835 - 1894
PHEASANT
signed: J. MOIGNIEZ
bronze, greenish brown patina, on a veined dark green marble base
bronze: 51cm., 20 1/8 in.base: 4 by 50 by 25cm., 1½ by 19 5/8 by 9¾in.

ESTIMATE 3,000-5,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 131
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
AMAZONE, IN JACOBEAN DRESS
signed: BARYE and inscribed: F.BARBEDIENNE. Fondeur, numbered: 43 and Y on the
underside
bronze, dark brown patina
39 by 31cm., 15 3/8 by 12¼in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present bronze is a rare companion group to another model by Antoine-Louis Barye, entitled Equestrienne in the
Style of 1830. A rare model in itself, Poletti and Richarme estimate that only around twenty casts of this exist, which
were all executed during the artist’s lifetime; no posthumous editions are known to exist (op. cit. no. F4).

The present group is a distinctive variation on Equestrienne in the Style of 1830. Though it is often misidentified as the
work of his son, Alfred, it in fact reflects Antoine-Louis Barye’s characteristic remodelling and development of his own
works. The present figure wears Jacobean clothing and the saddle too has been modelled to look older. It compares
well with other historical works by the artist, such as Gaston de Foix and Charles VII Victorious (op. cit. nos. F5 and
F8).

The sharp casting of the present bronze and the delicate chasing of the drapery makes this a particularly fine version
of a rare model by the bronze master.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Barye. Catalogue raisonné des sculptures, Paris, 2000, pp. 67-69 and 72-73, nos. F4, F5
and F8
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 132
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
LION DÉVORANT UNE BICHE (LION DEVOURING A HIND)
signed and dated: BARYE 1837
bronze, rich brown and greenish patina
14 by 32cm., 5½ by 12 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Barye. Catalogue raisonné des sculptures, Paris, 2000, p. 163, no. A42
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 133
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
CHEVAL TURC NO 2 (ANTÉRIEUR DROIT LEVÉ, TERRASSE OVALE)(TURKISH HORSE NO
2 (RIGHT LEG RAISED, OVAL BASE))
signed: BARYE, numbered: 12 on the abdomen and: 55697 in ink on the underside
bronze, dark brown patina
28.5 by 29cm., 11 1/4 by 11 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-50,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Capturing the intense emotion and unfettered physical power of a startled horse, the Cheval Turc should be seen
within the wider context of Romanticism. With its muscular body, windswept mane and flashing, wild eyes, the Cheval
Turc conveys the opposing themes of strength and emotion which were central to the Romantic movement. After
1857, Barye produced two variants with oval bases, one with a raised left foreleg, and one with a raised right foreleg,
as in the present bronze.
RELATED LITERATURE
W. R. Johnston and S. Kelly, Untamed. The art of Antoine-Louis Barye, Munich, London and New York, 2006, pp.
158-159, no. 57; M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Barye. Catalogue raisonné des sculptures, Paris, 2000, pp. 267-268, no.
A129
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
London | 02 Jul 2013, 02:00 PM | L13230

LOT 134
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
CHEF-MODÈLE OF THE CHEVAL DEMI-SANG (TÊTE LEVÉE, RÉDUCTION)
with white labels numbered: 252 and 115 on the underside
signed: BARYE and inscribed: No 702 on the underside
bronze, mid-brown patina
13.8 by 17.6cm., 5 3/8 by 6 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Antoine-Louis Barye, Atelier, 12, rue Beautreillis, Paris
his sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, Vente Barye, 7-12 February 1876, lot 702, purchased by Leon-Lucien Goupil for
Ferdinand Barbedienne
his sale, Paris, Vente Barbedienne, 1889, lot 41, purchased by Jacques Michel de Zoubaloff
his sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, Le collection Jacques Zoubaloff, 16-17 June 1927, lot 174, sold at FF9000
Eduardo Guinle, Brazil
his sale, Christie's New York, Barye bronzes. An important private colection, 25 April 2003, lot 33

CATALOGUE NOTE
Once described by Théophile Gautier as the ‘Michelangelo of the menagerie’ (op. cit.) Antoine-Louis Barye was
undoubtedly the leading animalier of the nineteenth-century. The present bronze is a rare foundry chef-modèle, used
by editeurs to cast reproductions.

Despite the suggestion in its name that it is a reduction of a larger work, Cheval demi-sang, tête levée, réduction is, in
fact, an independent sculpture, cast intentionally as a small object of intrinsic decorative value. With small dimensions,
the work has lost none of Barye’s characteristic fine detail for anatomy and ability to create a sense of vitality.

In contrast to other models by Barye, of animals engaged in fights or under extreme physical duress, such as Cheval
attaqué par un tigre, illustrated in Poletti and Richarme (op. cit. inv. no. A123), the present horse represents a stiller,
statelier animal. It is in his ability to depict animals in such varying forms and circumstances with an equal level of
technical skill, and while evoking an equally real sense of distinctive character, that Barye has earned his reputation
as the master of animal bronzes. Quoted in Johnston and Kelly, Rodin noted that Barye is ‘the great man of our
century’ (op. cit.)

RELATED LITERATURE
T. Gautier, Les beaux-arts en Europe, Paris, 1855, vol. ii, p. 180; M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Barye. Catalogue
raisonné des sculptures, Gallimard, 2000, p. 258 and 261, nos. A123 and A125 (2); S. Pivar, The Barye bronzes.
Catalogue raisonée, Woodbridge, 1990, p. 220, no. A148; W. R. Johnston and S. Kelly, Untamed. The Art of Antoine-
Louis Barye, Munich, London and New York, 2009, p. vii
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 135
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
ANGÉLIQUE ET ROGER, MONTÉS SUR L'HIPPOGRIFFE (BOUCHE FERMÉE)(ANGELICA
AND ROGER, MOUNTED ON A HIPPOGRIFFE (MOUTH CLOSED))
signed: BARYE
bronze, red-brown patina, with green undertones
51.5 by 68cm., 20¼ by 26¾in.

ESTIMATE 180,000-250,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
private collection, London
Victor Franses Gallery, London

EXHIBITED
The Hague, Museum Beelden aan Zee, Van Barye tot Bugatti, 'From Barye to Bugatti’, Les Animaliers, 2011, no. 14

LITERATURE
F. van Rijckevorsel (ed.), Van Barye tot Bugatti, 'From Barye to Bugatti’, Les Animalier, The Hague, 2011, p. 83, no.
14
CATALOGUE NOTE
Upon the beach the courser plants his feet,
And goaded by the rowel, towers in air,
And gallops with Rogero in mid seat
While on the croup beneath him sate
the fair;
Who of his banquet so the monster cheat;
For him too delicate and dainty fare.
Rogero turns and with thick kisses plies,
The lady’s snowy breast and sparkling
eyes.

These beautiful lines from Orlando Furioso (Canto X, stanza 112), the epic poem written by Ariosto, the Italian
Renaissance poet, inspired Antoine-Louis Barye to model his greatest narrative masterpiece, Angélique et Roger
montés sur l’hippogriffe.

Ariosto’s poem tells of how the beautiful Princess of Cathay, Angelica, was chained to a rock on the Isle of Tears and
offered as a sacrifice to an insatiable sea monster, the Orc. Moments before she is to be devoured by the beast,
Angelica is rescued by the gallant African paladin, Roger, who slays the predator and carries the young princess off
on a hippogriff, a magical half horse, half hawk, creature. As Roger rescues Angelica, he falls hopelessly in love with
her. It is this intimate moment that Barye, the great French Romantic sculptor, has captured in bronze. The nude
Angelica, her nakedness revealing both her beauty and, conversely, her vulnerability, embraces her rescuer. As she
looks back towards the scene of her near-death encounter, her protector gently secures her in place, whilst gazing
down upon her slender exposed neck. Below, Barye, the animalier sculptor par excellence, has represented an
enormous dolphin, whose writhing tail wraps around a coral wreath, as a monstrous octopus is washed up by the
waves; two natural allusions to the unnatural sea creature from which Angelica has escaped.

Barye was commissioned to model the Angélique et Roger by Prince Antoine, Duke of Montpensier (1824-1890).
The Duke appears to have wanted a sculptural ensemble to rival that of the famous surtout de table created for his
elder brother, the Duke of Orleans, the centerpiece of which was Barye’s La chasse au tigre. The Angélique et Roger
formed the key component within a larger garniture de cheminée, incorporating a clock and flanked by a pair of
classicizing candelabra (see Poletti and Richarme, op. cit., no. F24). Significantly, the artist is believed to have been
given almost free-reign in his choice of subject. The Montpensier commission is therefore a rare example of Barye,
termed the ‘Michelangelo of the Menagerie’, deliberately opting for non-animalier subject matter; it should be seen as
a mythical counterpart to the sculptor’s animal combat groups of the surtout de table.

The story of Roger and Angelica, which combined the concerns of the Renaissance revival and Romanticism, proved
to be a favoured subject for 19th-century artists, and Barye appears to have drawn upon a number of sources for his
group. Roger’s fantastical armour is reminiscent of that worn by the hero in Ingres’ Angelica saved by Ruggiero in the
National Gallery, London (inv. no. NG3292), whilst the reclining figure of Angelica has echoes of the painter’s
Odalisque, Musée du Louvre, Paris (inv. no. RF1158). Perhaps the closest source of inspiration for Barye was Louis-
Édouard Rioult’s Roger déliverant Angélique, which was exhibited at the Salon of 1824, and depicts the pair in flight
from the Isle of Tears, with Angelica turned away from Roger as he gazes at her.

The present bronze is a particularly fine cast, and betrays Barye’s characteristic virtuoso touch. Note, in particular, the
superb play of textures: Angelique’s soft flesh presses against the cold metal of Roger’s armour, which sits against the
Hippogriff’s feathers. Barye has embellished the model with lively details, such as the roaring chimera surmounting
Roger’s helmet, flanked by Renaissance-style dolphins, which respectively reference the flying hippogriff and the giant
sea creature below. These elements have been brought to life by a fine web of surface chasing and a delicate red-
brown patina, with subtle green undertones. In terms of quality, the present bronze compares with the cast believed to
have been lifetime from the Guinle collection, sold at Christie’s New York on 25 April 2003 for $354,700 (aggregate).

The Angélique et Roger was hailed by the critic Gustave Planche as ‘the most ingenious work in modern art’ for it
combined ‘the genius of Ariosto, Italy’s first poet after Dante, with the intelligence of Barye’ (Johnston and Kelly, op.
cit., p. 130). Casts are held in the collections of the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore (inv. no. WAM 27.173), the Musee
du Louvre, Paris (inv. no. OA 5724); Los Angeles County Museum (inv. no. AC1992.72.1); Bonnat Museum, Bayonne;
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (inv. no. 10.133.1).

RELATED LITERATURE
G. F. Benge, Antoine-Louis Barye. Sculptor of Romantic Realism, University Park and London, 1984, pp. 95-96, fig.
84; M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Barye. Catalogue raisonné des sculptures, Paris, 2000, pp. 94-95, no. F23; W.
Johnston and S. Kelly, Untamed. The Art of Antoine-Louis Barye, exh. cat. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore,
Munich, London and New York, 2006, pp. 130-131, no. 38
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 136
ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE

FRENCH
1795-1875
LE DUC D'ORLÉANS
signed: BARYE, the underside inscribed in pen: Lafaye and with a paper label inscribed in
pen: UDB 2000 / CR moF3 / EB moBF0030
bronze, red-brown and green patina
36.5 by 31cm., 14 3/8 by 12¼in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Barye. Catalogue raisonné des sculptures, Paris, 2000, pp. 65-66, no. F3
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 137
EMMANUEL FREMIET

FRENCH
1824-1910
NAPOLÉON III (SECOND VERSION)
signed: E. FREMIET
bronze, dark brown patina
36.5cm., 14 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
C. Chevillot, Emmanuel Fremiet, 1824-1910. Le main et le multiple, exh. cat. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon and
Musée de Grenoble, Dijon-Quetigny, 1988, p. 116, no. S230, cat. 89
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 138
ISIDORE-JULES BONHEUR

FRENCH
1827-1901
STEEPLECHASER
signed: I. BONHEUR and stamped: PEYROL
bronze, mid- to dark brown patina, on a veined green marble base
bronze: 47.5 by 67cm., 18 5/8 by 26 3/8 in.base: 3 by 58 by 18.5cm., 1 1/8 by 22 7/8 by
7¼in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Isidore Bonheur worked the steeplechase subject in several compositions reinventing the separate horse and rider
groups in various combinations to form impressive double and triple steeplechaser groups. Here, in the single horse
format Bonheur focuses his attention on the intense concentration of the jockey and the straining energy of the horse
as they approach the jump.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 139
VINCENZO VELA

SWISS
1820 - 1891
THE LAST DAYS OF NAPOLEON
signed: V. VÉLA, inscribed: F. BARBEDIENNE, Fondeur, with the: A. COLLAS RÉDUCTION
MÉCANIQUE pastille, numbered: 788 and: 44472 giv 325 on the underside
bronze, light brown patina
28cm., 11in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
I. Wardropper and F. Licht, Chiseled With a Brush. Italian Sculpture 1860-1925 from the Gilgore Collections, Chicago,
1994, p. 37
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 140
HIPPOLYTE-JULES LEFÈBVRE

FRENCH
1863-1935
CARDINAL RICHELIEU
signed: HIPPOLYTE LEFEBVRE
bronze, mid-brown patina
50 by 82cm., 19 5/8 by 32¼in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 141
ALBERT-ERNEST CARRIER-BELLEUSE

FRENCH
1824 - 1887
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
signed: A CARRIER and inscribed on the scroll: science / du / Bonhomme / Richard and:
ERiPUiT CŒLO / FULMEN SCEP- / TRUMQUE / TyRAÑiS and numbered: 838
bronze, mid-brown patina
59cm., 23¼in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 142
JEAN-LOUIS-ERNEST MEISSONIER

FRENCH
1815-1891
LE TROMPETTISTE
the base with a metal plaque inscribed: CE BRONZE PROVENANT DE L'ATELIER DE
MEISSONNIER (sic) ETAIT CONSERVE PAR MARC SANGNIER DANS SON BUREAU DU
SILLON \ A EMILIEN AMAURY EM SOUVENIR DE LEUR PÈRE \ Madeleine et Jean Sangnier
signed with the artist's profile portrait stamp
bronze, rich green and brown patina, on a mottled green marble base
bronze: 52.5 by 60cm., 20 5/8 by 23 5/8 in.base: 7.5 by 49 by 20.5cm., 3 by 19¼ by 8 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-40,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier, atelier at the Grande Maison, Poissy
Marc Sangnier, office of the Le Sillon movement, Paris, until circa 1950
by descent to Jean and Madeleine Sangnier, Paris
by whom gifted to Emilien Amaury, Chantilly, before 1977

CATALOGUE NOTE
Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier achieved exceptional fame and distinction for his meticulously detailed military and
genre paintings; regarded particularly highly among these is his series of works depicting the Napoleonic Wars.
It is not known when Meissonier first turned his creative attentions to sculpture, but, judging by the existing few
works that are modelled by his hand, it seems that he used sculpting as a means of preparing for and focussing his
paintings. Direct links between his canvases and sculptures attest to the significance he placed on the
interplay between the two. The success of an exhibition of some of his waxes and a limited number of bronze casts
persuaded his family to agree to the distinguished foundry Siot-Deceauville reproducing further casts of his models,
helping to establish Meissonier’s reputation as a talented sculptor as well as painter.

The present bronze, inscribed as being from the artist’s own workshop, represents a herald leaning back to sound his
trumpet; a subject that the Socialist journalist who owned the bronze later, would have identified with. The sense of
vitality created by the off-balance position of the horse’s right hind leg and its angled tail and mane, enhances
the drama of the occasion. Another bronze version of the present sculpture is held in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in
Dijon, while Meissonier’s preparatory drawings of the same group can be found in the B.N.F. in Paris.

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Fusco and H.W. Janson (eds.), The Romantics to Rodin. French nineteenth-century sculpture from North American
collections, exh. cat. County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, Institute of Arts, Detroit,
Museum of Art, Indianapolis, 1980, pp. 300-301
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 143
ISIDORE-HIPPOLYTE NICOLAS BRION

FRENCH
BORN 1799
MADAME DUPATY
signed and dated: Brion. 1830
white marble, on a white marble socle
80.5cm., 31¾in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
with Daniel Katz Ltd., London, 1997
Christie's, Paris, 7 December 2001, lot 645

EXHIBITED
London, Daniel Katz Ltd., 1997
LITERATURE
Art and Architecture, Courtauld Institute of Art Online Database, Mrs Dupaty, Brion, Isidore, Hippolyte, Nicholas, 1830,
marble, available at: http://www.artandarchitecture.org.uk/images/conway/28ca8797.html [accessed on 02 May 2013]

CATALOGUE NOTE
Isidore-Hippolyte Nicolas Brion was born in Paris and established a reputation for himself in genre sculpture. He
received a second prize at the Salon of 1819 aged only twenty. He gained most acclaim during the reign of popular
‘roi-citoyen’ (King of the French people), Louis-Phillipe, who was proclaimed King after the abdication of Charles X.
The present sculpture is thought to be the first time that Brion received a commission for a portrait bust of someone
associated to the French court, following the accession of Louis-Phillipe to the throne in August 1830. Madame
Dupaty was married to J.C. Mercier Dupaty, President of the Royal Court and close friend of the newly elected King.
The present sculpture represents Madame Dupaty as a figure of noble presentation and grace; her hair is
meticulously coiffured while her soft eyes with distant expression speak of gentility and kindness. The fine execution
of the present sculpture, displaying the artist’s technical skill in evoking character as well as physical likeness, is
precisely why Brion quickly became one of the most popular portraitists of his era. He continued to execute
contemporary and historical portraits to public and critical acclaim. He received a ‘rappel de médaille’ in 1857 for a
plaster model of l’Abbé Hauy, executed for the Musée d’histoire Naturelle. He was decorated with a Legion of Honour
in 1863.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 144
PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE BRITISH COLLECTOR
JOHN EDWARD JONES (1806-1862) AND EMIL WOLFF (1802-1879)
BRITISH AND GERMAN, 1854 AND 1842

QUEEN VICTORIA AND ALBERT, PRINCE CONSORT


Victoria signed and dated: J. E. JONES. Sc. / LONDON. 1854.Albert signed and dated: E.
WOLFF. FC. / ROMÆ. 1842.
white marble, with white marble and grey veined marble socles respectively, on a pair of
English, early 19th-century, marbelised wood plinths
bust of Victoria: 63cm., 24¾in.socle: 13cm., 5 1/8 in.bust of Albert: 60cm., 23 5/8 in.socle:
14cm., 5½in.plinths: 86.5cm., 34in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Albert: Sotheby's London, 3 July 1986, lot 153
the pair: with Christopher Wood, London, 1988
the plinths: with Messrs Ciancimino, 99 Pimlico Road, London, circa 1988

EXHIBITED
London, Christopher Wood Gallery at Mallet, An Exhibition of Paintings, Watercolours, Drawings and Works of Art,
1988

LITERATURE
An Exhibition of Paintings, Watercolours, Drawings and Works of Art, Christopher Wood Gallery at Mallet, London,
1988 (unpaginated)
CATALOGUE NOTE
When Queen Victoria married Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha on 10th February 1840, Albert had recently returned
from a Grand Tour of Italy. During his stay in Italy in 1839 he sat for his fellow German, Emil Wolff, a well-known
sculptor in Rome. Wolff went on to become Prince Albert's favourite sculptor and he was invited to Windsor to make
portrait studies. The present bust of Albert probably results from the sittings at Windsor. Only three versions of this
portrait are known. One is in the Royal Collection and another was donated by Albert to the Royal Patriotic Fund
Corporation.

The bust of Queen Victoria dates from a slightly later period and a version of the model, which may be identifable with
the present marble, was exhibited by its author John Edward Jones at the Royal Academy in 1854.

RELATED LITERATURE
F. Leone, A Rediscovered Marble Bust of Prince Albert by Emil Wolff, Rome, 2012; A. Graves, The Royal Academy of
Arts: A Complete Dictionary of Contributors, vol. IV, London, 1906, pp. 274-276
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 145
ANGELO MINGHETTI MANUFACTORY
ITALIAN, BOLOGNA, 19TH/ EARLY 20TH CENTURY

BUSTS OF HENRI IV OF FRANCE AND MARIE DE MEDICIS


Henri IV: monogrammed in blue glaze: AVF surmounted with a star, the interior inscribed in
black paint: AVF, and with an old paper label numbered: 151 Marie de Médicis: the interior
inscribed in black paint: AVF, and with an old paper label to the reverse numbered: 150
polychromed and glazed terracotta
male: 80cm., 31½in.female: 77cm., 30¼in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Angelo Minghetti (1822-1892) worked in Imola before starting his own factory in Bologna. During the late 19th century,
his company was widely renowned for making excellent reproductions of Renaissance maiolica objects, some of
which were later sold as genuine Renaissance pieces.
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 146
JOSEPH FELON

FRENCH
1818 - 1896
ANDROMEDA
signed and dated: Joseph. Felon. Sculp. 1854 and inscribed: Jules GRAUX bronzier PARIS
bronze, gilt and brown patina
53.5cm., 21 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 147
VICTOR OSKAR TILGNER

AUSTRIAN
1844 - 1896
GLADIATOR AND DEFEATED SLAVE
signed and dated: Tilgner 1880 and numbered in ink: 1169
patinated and gilt plaster on an ebonised and gilt wood plinth with bone inlay, the top lined
with purple velvet
group: 99cm., 39in.plinth: 104.5cm., 41 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This extraordinary polychromed plaster group was modelled by the Viennese sculptor, Victor Tilgner. Born in
Bratislava in 1859, Tilgner trained at the Akademie der bildenden Künste in Vienna until 1871. After initially mixed
success, he was inspired to persevere as a sculptor after meeting Gustave Deloye (1838-99), who introduced him to
the Baroque Revival style. Tilgner was an immensely successful portraitist, modelling busts of many members of
Vienna’s social elite. He was, however, passionately interested in monumental sculpture, and was responsible for the
designs for the sculptural programmes adorning many of the most important public buildings on Vienna’s Ringstrasse,
including the Burgtheater and the Naturhistorisches Museum. Most famously, he created the monument to Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart in the Burggarten. Tilgner was a close friend of the fashionable painter Hans Makart (1840-1884),
famed for his daring approach to colour and for his vast canvases based on mythological or historical subjects. The
Gladiator and defeated Slave would undoubtedly have appealed to those with a taste for Makart’s paintings. It is
clearly inspired by one of Jean-Léon Gérôme’s (1824-1904) greatest paintings, his Pollice Verso of 1872, in which a
triumphant Gladiator treads his sandal into the neck of his defeated opponent, his sword held outstretched, whilst he
turns towards the crowd for bloodthirsty instruction (Phoenix Art Museum, inv. no. 1968.52). The presence of original
polychromy on the present group is typical of Tilgner’s approach to his plasters, and reflects the vogue for colour in
sculpture at the end of the 19th century, a fashion, which had, in part, been borne out of the success of Gérôme’s own
forays into the three dimensional at the end of his career.

RELATED LITERATURE
L. Hevesi, Victor Tilgners ausgewählte werke, Vienna, 1897, p. 7; L. Medvecky (ed.), Tilgner, exh. cat. Bratislava City
Museum, Bratislava, 1964
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 148
HENRI GODET

FRENCH
1863-1937
LE RÉVEIL DE L'AURORE
signed: HENRI GODET, the cartouche inscribed: Le Réveil de l'Aurore. / Salon des Beaux-
Arts 1895, Henri Godet
bronze, golden-brown patina
100cm., 39 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 149
EUGÈNE DELAPLANCHE

FRENCH
1836 - 1891
VIOLINIST
signed: E. DElAplANChE, inscribed: F. BARBEDIENNE Fondeur. and with the: RÉDUCTION
MÉCANIQUE A. COLLAS BRÉVÉTÉ pastille
bronze, mid-brown patina
83.5cm., 32 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 150
FRANÇOIS-LÉON SICARD

FRENCH
1862-1934
ORPHEUS
signed: F.Sicard and inscribed: F. BARBEDIENNE. Fondeur
bronze, mid-brown patina
67.5cm., 26½in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 151
RAOUL CHARLES VERLET

FRENCH
1857 - 1923
LA DOULEUR D'ORPHÉE (ORPHEUS' SORROW)
signed: Raoul Verlet, inscribed: 105 F. BARBEDIENNE Fondeur Paris, with the RÉDUCTION
MÉCANIQUE A. COLLAS BRÉVÉTÉ pastille, engraved: JJJ and numbered: 96924 in black
ink on the underside
bronze, mid-brown patina
83cm., 32 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 152
JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX

FRENCH
1827 - 1875
UGOLIN (ESQUISSE) (SKETCH)
terracotta
58cm., 22¾in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux sculpteur. Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre édité, Paris, 2003, pp.
170-171, no. ES16
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 153
JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX

FRENCH
1827-1875
FLORA ACCROUPIE (FLORA CROUCHING)
signed: JB. Carpeaux, inscribed: Susse Fres Edtrs Paris and with the SUSSE FRERES
EDITEURS PARIS pastille flanked by the stamped letters: H and M
bronze, mid-brown patina
38cm., 15in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Sculpteur. Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre édité, Paris, 2003, p.
88, no. SE11
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 154
JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX

FRENCH
1827-1875
LES TROIS GRÂCES (THE THREE GRACES)
signed: JB Carpeaux, stamped with the PROPRIÉTÉ CARPEAUX eagle and inscribed:
PROPRIÉTÉ / CARPEAUX
bronze, mid-brown patina
80cm., 31½in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
art market, Paris, early 20th century
the Canto collection, Milan
thence by descent to Dottore Bruno Canto, Milan
presented to his daughter upon her marriage, 1948
and thence in the family by descent to the present owner
CATALOGUE NOTE
Les Trois Grâces is derived from Carpeaux's monumental sculpture La Danse, which was executed for the façade of
the Opéra Garnier in Paris. On its unveiling in 1869, La Danse caused a public outcry for its apparent immorality.
During the night of 27 August 1869, a bottle of ink was hurled at the sculpture, staining one of the dancers. The work
is now considered among Carpeaux’s most accomplished masterpieces and is housed in the Musée d’Orsay, Paris
(inv. no. RF 2884).

In 1873, Carpeaux returned to the themes of his notorious allegorical relief, and produced a group of individual
decorative sculptures inspired by the model. These were to be successfully edited for the commercial market. Among
these were Le Génie de la Danse, Le Faune and the present sculpture, Les Trois Grâces. Three Graces dance
together, their hands entwined, and their beautiful nude bodies are represented in mid motion with feet lifted off the
ground. Demonstrating his immense technical skill and scientific knowledge of the human body, Carpeaux has
achieved a remarkable sense of dynamic movement and balance. The plaster model of Les Trois Grâces is in the
Musée d’Orsay (inv. no. RF 2918).

RELATED LITERATURE
A. M. Wagner, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, sculptor of the Second Empire, New Haven/ London, 1986, pp. 209-256; M.
Poletti and A. Richarme, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Sculpteur. Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre édité, Paris, 2003, p.
101, no. SE23
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 155
JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX

FRENCH
1827-1875
LE GÉNIE DE LA DANSE (THE SPIRIT OF THE DANCE)
signed: JB. Carpeaux
white marble, on a white marble socle
65cm., 25½in. overall.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Sculpteur. Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre édité, Paris, 2003, p.
109, no. BU8
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 156
JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX

FRENCH
1827-1875
LA PALOMBELLA AU PANE
signed and dated: JBte. Carpeaux. 1875, stamped: ATELIER & DEPOT / AUTEUIL PARIS /
74 RUE BOILEAU and with the PROPRIÉTÉ / CARPEAUX eagle
terracotta, on an ebonised wood base
69cm., 27 1/8 in. overall.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Sculpteur. Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre édité, Paris, 2003, p.
119, no. BU36
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 157
GUSTAVE DELOYE

FRENCH
1848-1899
DIANA THE HUNTRESS
signed: DELOYE
white marble, with a veined purple marble base, on a veined yellow marble column
group: 73cm., 28¾in.column: 93cm., 36 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 158
MATHURIN MOREAU

FRENCH
1822-1912
PRINTEMPS (SPRING)
signed: moreau / mathurin and inscribed: hors concours
terracotta
82cm., 32¼in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 159
AUGUSTE-HYACINTHE DEBAY

FRENCH
1804 - 1865
LE BERCEAU PRIMITIF (THE FIRST CRADLE)
together with a copy of J.A.L., Album du Salon de 1845. Examen critique de l'exposition,
Brussels, 1845
signed and dated: A DE BAY 1845
terracotta
134cm., 52¾in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Auguste-Hyacinthe Debay had his first major public commission at the age of 13 with a colossal bust of Louis XVIII for
his native city of Nantes. The Salon debut of this child prodigy came the following year. He trained in sculpture with his
father Jean-Baptiste Debay (père) and in painting with the renowned Baron Gros.
Auguste-Hyacinthe Debay was principally a painter, with Lami noting that he created only 15 sculptures. However, his
occasional sculptural contributions to the Salon were well received. Le Berceau primitif was exhibited in marble at the
Salon of 1845. In his account of this Salon, J.A.L. (op.cit., pp. 135-137) notes that the figure was conceived 15 months
earlier. An unveiling of an untraced large plaster figure - possibly the present statue- shrouded in mystery took place
in front of a enthusiastic crowd of contemporary artists, who urged him to carve the composition in marble. Once
exhibited, it was also admired by the most influential critics of the day, including Baudelaire and Théophile Gauthier,
who called it an "ingenious idea", comparing the infants in the encircling arms of their mother to birds clustered in a
nest. The marble was shown again at the Exposition Universelle of 1855.

Debay's poignant subject was in tune with contemporary sensibilities. The nude Eve, nestling Cain and Abel,
recalls Michelangelo's Bruges Madonna, her maternal serenity set in ominous contrast with the tragic future of her
sons.

RELATED LITERATURE
J.A.L., Album du Salon de 1845. Examen critique de l'exposition, Brussels, 1845, pp. 135-139; P. Fusco and H.W.
Janson, The Romantics to Rodin. French Nineteenth-Century Sculpture from Amrican Collections, exh. cat. Los
Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, 1980, pp. 226-227, no. 103
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 160
ÉMILE-ANDRÉ BOISSEAU

FRENCH
1842-1923
LE CRÉPUSCULE (THE TWILIGHT)
signed: Boisseau and stamped: THIEBAUT FRERES FONDEURS PARIS
bronze, rich brown patina
68.5cm., 27in.

ESTIMATE 18,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
When Boisseau exhibited his marble version of La Crépuscule at the Salon of 1883, it was accompanied by the lines
of verse translated below:
Twilight
Silence is coming. In the shadow,
When the shepherd’s star shines,
Nature under a dark sky
Quietly goes to sleep, in the Night.
Twilight is personified by a beautiful nude, whose curved posture evokes the image of a crescent moon. With her
delicately raised arms she dims the lamp, turning her head to tenderly observe the putti, who fall asleep against the
soft shadow of her wings. The Salon model was awarded the prestigious gold medal and purchased for the Élysée
Palace. In light of its popularity and distinction, the Thiébaut foundry bought the rights to edit the model in bronze.
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LOT 161
PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTOR
ÉMILE-ANDRÉ BOISSEAU

FRENCH
1842-1923
AMOUR MATERNEL (MATERNAL LOVE)
signed: EBoisseau
white marble
72 by 46cm., 28 3/8 by 18 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Boisseau studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, under Augustin-Alexandre Dumont and Jean-Marie
Bonnassieux. The sculptor was well known for his graceful groups of women and children. His most celebrated group
was his Le Crépuscule, which shows a winged personification of Dusk sheltering two sleeping putti (see the preceding
lot). It was exhibited at the Salon in 1870 and won the prestigious gold medal, before being purchased for the Élysée
Palace.
RELATED LITERATURE
E. Benezit, Dictionnaire critique et documentaire des peintres sculpteurs dessinateurs et graveurs, Paris, 1999, vol. 2,
p. 476
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 162
PIETRO FRANCHI, AFTER CHARLES-AUGUSTE FRAIKIN (1817-1893)

ITALIAN
1817-1878
VENUS AND CUPID
signed indistinctly: P. Franchi Sc / Carrara
white marble, on a veined white marble column with a revolving top
group: 107cm., 42 1/8 in.column: 95cm., 37½in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Charles-Auguste Fraikin studied at the Brussels Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts under Louis Jéhotte. His
masterpiece, L'Amour Captif, won the gold medal at the Exposition Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Brussels in 1845. It was
subsequently exhibited in London (1851) and Dublin (1853). Two marble versions were ordered for the Musée Royaux
des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, and the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. The lissom L'Amour Captif exemplifies Fraikin's graceful
interpretation of Neo-classicism. The model proved to be extremely popular and was copied by sculptors across
Europe.
Pietro Franchi worked in Carrara around 1870 and specialised in creating marble copies of famous contemporary
statues.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. van Lennep, De 19de eeuwse Belgische beeldhouwkunst, Brussels, 1990, p.175
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LOT 163
ÉMILE-ANDRÉ BOISSEAU

FRENCH
1842-1923
VENUS AND CUPID
signed: EBoisseau
white marble
71cm., 28in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 164
JOSEPH POLLET

FRENCH
1814-1870
UNE HEURE DE LA NUIT (AN HOUR OF THE NIGHT)
ivory, on an ebonised wood base with ivory mounts
ivory: 32.8cm., 12 7/8 in.base: 11.3 by 29.8cm., 4½ by 11¾in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
When Joseph Pollet first exhibited his plaster version of Une heure de la nuit at the Paris Salon in 1848 it was an
instant success, with critics and crowds alike delighting in its elegance and skilful execution. Right away, Pollet was
inundated with requests for the right to produce editions of the model. The Empress Eugenié procured a small
version, the Ministry of the Interior commissioned a marble version, while another marble version was exhibited at the
Louvre and is now in the Museum of the Second Empire at the Palais de Compiègne.

When a marble version was exhibited alongside its bronze reduction at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1855, the
renowned art critic and poet, Théophile Gautier, noted that the marmoreal whites and transparency ‘avec leur mica
scintillant’ were much better suited to the model’s subject than bronze. Ivory takes this striking effect even further.

Joseph Pollet, born in Palermo to French parents, quickly gained recognition as a sculptor once he moved to Paris
and began exhibiting at the annual Paris Salon. He received medals in 1847, 1848 and 1851. In 1856, he was
awarded the cross of the Legion of Honour. At this point, he began receiving commissions from the Royal Court, the
clergy and several French cultural institutions. Une heure de la nuit, however, remains his most popular and
celebrated model. With its magical combination of beauty, elegance and whimsy, it is a remarkably accomplished
sculpture. The present work, as a rare ivory version, enhances its particular effect of charm and finesse.

RELATED LITERATURE
R.H.R. Randall Jr., Masterpieces of ivory from the Walters Art Gallery, London, 1985, pp. 13 and 283; E. Bénézit,
Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. xi, pp. 108-109
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 165
JEAN-BAPTISTE HUGUES

FRENCH
1849-1930
LA MUSE DE LA SOURCE
signed: Jean Hugues
bronze, on a veined cream and grey marble, veined red marble, grey marble and stone
base, with bronze mounts
167 by 139cm., 65¾ by 54¾in. overall.

ESTIMATE 120,000-180,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This handsome group represents a nude Muse elegantly poised at a fountain by some lush grasses. The finely-
worked bas-reliefs and mask set into the white marble add a finished touch to the pastoral scene. The group is an
important work in the oeuvre of Jean-Baptiste Hugues, a French sculptor, who was highly regarded in his lifetime.
Other notable works by the artist include, l'Homme et sa misère in the Tuileries Gardens, as well as his grand
allegorical figures at the entrance of the Bibliothéque Nationale in Paris, the Gare de Tours in Limoges, and the Gare
d’Orsay in Paris.

The present group speaks of a significant point in art history. The discovery of traces of faded colour on antique
statuary had given rise to a scholarly debate on how Greek sculptures really looked and performed in their original
settings. The archaeological find in 1873 of thousands of small coloured terracotta figures in and around Tanagra
finally gave artists a direct visual of the Classical past: the daily life of ancient Greece suddenly presented itself in a
new, vibrant and colourful light.
Certain contemporary sculptors, inspired by these polychromatic finds, proceeded to achieve colourful effects in their
own works through a range of techniques, from painting marble and plaster to gilding to complex lacquered patinas.
The developments were by no means universally approved, with Léonce Bénédite as late as 1899, quoted in Pingeot,
asserting ‘la couleur déconsiderait l’art’ ('colour devalues art', op. cit. 1982, p. 223). French archaeologist Charles-
Ernest Beulé had earlier begged the critical question: ‘Is [polychrome sculpture] worth reviving or should it remain
forgotten?’ (op.cit. 1982, p. 576).
Hugues answers the question emphatically. The present group enjoys variation in colour by the naturalistic
association of different materials: bronze, marble and stone. The marbles used are of different intrinsic colours
themselves and are boldly but naturally veined, achieving further polychromatic effect. The languid bronze figure of
the Muse complements the effect achieved by the natural tones of the materials, creating a mood that is both sensual
and serene. The group thus upholds the noble simplicity of earlier sculptural fashions, while also entertaining the new
and exciting finds of polychromy. The present work is at once traditional and modern, questioning and deferential.
Hugues was honoured with residency for three years at the Villa Medicis in Rome in 1876 and his participation in the
1889 and 1900 Expositions Universelles earned him a gold medal. After being named Chevalier of the Legion of
Honour in 1889, he was made Officer in 1900. A fine version of the present group is in the Musée D’Orsay, Paris (inv.
no. RF3684). The Musée D’Orsay also holds the terracotta sketch of the model, entitled La Source (inv. no. RF2568).
A plaster model, which was acquired by the Salon des Artistes in 1893, is now in the Musée des Beaux-Arts,
Marseilles, while a marble version can now be found in the Jardin Botanique in that city.
RELATED LITERATURE
C.-E. Beulé, ‘La statuaire d’or et d’ivoire: la Minerve de M. Simart’, Revue des Deux-Mondes, 1856; A. Pingeot et al.,
De Carpeaux à Matisse, Calais, 1982, pp. 222-223 and 576; A. Pingeot et al., Musée d'Orsay: Catalogue sommaire
illustré des sculpteurs, Paris, 1986, pp. 176-177, no. RF 3684 and RF 2658; A. Blühm et al., The colour of sculpture,
1840-1910, exh. cat. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, 1996, pp. 11-60; L. Noet, Jean-
Baptiste Hugues, un sculpteur sous la IIIe République. Catalogue raisonné, Paris, 2002, p. 87-89, no. 14h; R.
Panzanelli (ed.), Polychromy in sculpture, from antiquity to the present, Los Angeles, 2008
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 166
ADOLPHE ITASSE, AFTER A MODEL BY WILLIAM-ADOLPHE BOUGUEREAU
(1825-1905)

FRENCH
1830-1893
L'AMOUR VAINQUEUR
signed: A. Itasse scvlp., inscribed: W. BOVGVEREAV. INV., numbered: 49309 and: 67 and
the underside of the base numbered: 311
bronze, red-brown, green and gilt patina, on a purple and white veined marble base with gilt
bronze mounts
bronze: 76cm., 29 7/8 in.base: 13.5cm., 5½in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The painting from which this composition is derived, L'amour Vainqueur by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, was painted
in 1886. It was sold in Christie's New York on 25 May 1984, lot 79.
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LOT 167
FRENCH, 19TH CENTURY
AFTER WILLIAM ADOLPHE BOUGUEREAU (1825-1905)

CUPID WITH A BUTTERFLY


indistinctly signed: ...u
alabaster, on an alabaster base
68.5cm., 27in. overall.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 168
FRANCESCO BIENAIMÉ

ITALIAN
1844-1871
VENUS AND CUPID
signed: Fsco Bienaimé / Scultore
white marble
128cm., 50 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Venus stands unashamedly nude, with arms uplifted and leaves forming a cache-sexe. She wears garlands in her hair
and an arch of flowers hangs poetically above her. She drops her right hip in a sinuous contraposto pose,
accentuating her feminine curves. Her infant son Cupid balances on one foot, having climbed up onto the branch of a
tree to reach up closer to his mother. Cupid’s energy contrasts with his mother’s languid pose. A pot lies discarded on
the ground, enhancing the carefree scene. The image is one of delightful grace and charm. It combines a human
element of touching affection between mother and child, with a mythological overtone. Innocent while sensuous, the
group is a fine example of Romantic Italian sculpture.

RELATED LITERATURE
'Francesco Bienaimé', Mapping the practice and profession of sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951, University of
Glasgow History of Art and HATII, online database 2011
[http://sculpture.gla.ac.uk/view/person.php?id=ann_1291050056, accessed 01 May 2013]
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 169
PROFESSOR ANDREI CAMBI

ITALIAN
19TH CENTURY
THE YOUNG SHEPHERDESS
signed and dated: Prof. A. Cambi / Firenze 1886
white marble, on a serpentine marble column, with a revolving top
marble: 103.5cm., 40¾in.column: 105cm., 41¼in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Another version of the present model, also signed and dated 1886, was formerly in the Dayton Art Institute, Ohio, and
was sold at Christie's, New York, on 28 October 2003, lot 156, for 26,290 USD (aggregate).
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 170
RAIMONDO PEREDA

ITALIAN
1840-1915
BIG SISTER
signed: R Pereda / Milano
white marble, on a revolving serpentine marble column
group: 115.5cm., 45½in.column: 81cm., 32in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present white marble sculpture represents an infant boy in the steady arms of his big sister, who is holding a
spoon tantalisingly out of his young grasp. The boy reaches out in impatience and delight.

The present work demonstrates Raimondo Pereda’s associations with the Italian verismo movement in sculpture,
which flourished from the mid-nineteenth century to the turn of the twentieth. Art in this style avoided the idealising
forms of earlier movements such as Neoclassicism, instead endeavouring to represent a more real and contemporary
world. Artists observed nature systematically, and concentrated on objects and people of their present-day for
subjects. Quoted in Maltese, Giovanni Fattori in 1903 wrote that verismo should be a means to ‘show posterity our
ways’ (op. cit. p. 22).
Pereda’s sculpture of Big Sister does exactly this. It is a genre piece which captures a delightful moment of domestic
life in sensitive detail. Pereda demonstrates his highly technical skill with the intricate rendering of the girl’s creased
dress and hair. The boy’s chubby skin folds at his wrist as his hand lightly clutches his sister’s arm, while his rounded
cheeks are accentuated with his smile and open mouth; this is in direct contrast to the smoother, tauter skin of his
older sister, whose form is more structurally defined. His childish temperament is tenderly depicted in his expression
and pose; he curls his little toes in joyful agitation. We are left to wonder whether his sister is innocently cooling his
food, or knowingly playing with his patience. Either way, the scene captures the sense of a passing moment in time
and the peculiarly intimate affection between brother and older sister.
Raimondo Pereda studied at the Accademia di Brera in Milan and later became an honorary member of the Brera
Academy and a member of the Swiss Federal Commission of Fine Arts. He exhibited frequently at the main Italian
Salons and also participated in exhibitions in London, Switzerland, Paris, Brussels and Munich.

RELATED LITERATURE
C. Maltese, Realismo e verismo nella pittura italiana, Milan, 1967, p. 22
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 171
ITALIAN, 19TH CENTURY

LITTLE GIRL READING


signed and dated: N: MOGGI / FIRENZE 1896, the book inscribed: CHI IMPARA INSEGNA
alabaster, on a serpentine marble column, with a revolving top
alabaster: 65cm., 25 5/8 in.column: 106cm., 41¾in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 172
ITALIAN, PROBABLY FLORENCE, 19TH CENTURY

SHEPHERD BOY
signed: A. Frioli
white marble
100cm., 39 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 173
FERDINANDO PELLICCIA

ITALIAN
1808-1892
ERMINIA
signed: Ferdo. Pelliccia F. and inscribed: Tancredi
white marble
74cm., 29 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 174
PIO FEDI

ITALIAN
1816-1892
PIA DE'TOLOMEI E NELLO DELLA PIETRA OR IL SOSPETTO (THE SUSPICION)
signed: PIO FEDI STATUARIO DI FIRENZE SCOLPi 1862: and inscribed: RICORDITI DI ME,
ChE SON LA PIA: DANTE. Purgatorio Canto V. verso 133.
partially polychromed white marble
83cm., 32 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This refined group has an intricate, patterned surface, which recalls Pio Fedi's early training as a goldsmith and
engraver. The subject is taken from a verse in Dante's Purgatorio, mourning the fate of 'La Pia'. In 19th century
scholarship it was believed that 'La Pia' referred to a lady from the Sienese Tolomei family, who married Nello
d'Ighiramo, only to be put to death by him at the Castello della Pietra in 1295, on suspicion of infidelity. In the 19th
century version of the story, Pia was innocent and wrongly killed by confinement in an area where the air of the
marshes was fatal. The contemporary commentator Theodosia Trollope, reviewing Fedi's version of the subject, wrote
of the 'ill-fated lady' and interpreted the sculptor's depiction as the moment when the husband is about to leave Pia to
her fate, ignoring 'her timid words of inquiry.' The first version of the model dates to 1846 and Fedi went on to produce
a life-size version for Grand Duke Leopold II. It was one of his most popular models and he produced a number of
reductions, mostly for the English market, who had a Pre-Raphaelite appreciation of the subject and its treatment.
Another version can be found in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, and a smaller reduction, measuring
68cm, was sold in these rooms on 2 June 2009, lot 82. The present marble has a superb surface, which is testament
to Pio Fedi's skill as a virtuoso carver.

RELATED LITEARTURE
N. Penny, Catalogue of European Sculpture in Ashmolean Museum 1540 to the Present Day, Volume I Italian, Oxford,
1992, no. 32, pp. 35-37
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 175
ANTONIO ROSSETTI

ITALIAN
B. 1819
SEATED ODALISQUE
signed and dated: Ao. Rossetti. Ft. / Roma 1872
white marble on a veined grey marble column
figure: 109.5cm., 43 1/8 in.column: 79cm., 31 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 176
PASQUALE ROMANELLI

ITALIAN
1812 - 1887
ESMERALDA
signed: Prof. P Romanelli / Florence and signed and dated: P. Romanelli Firenze 1881
white marble
102cm., 40 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 177
PIETRO BAZZANTI

ITALIAN
1842-1881
MIGNON
signed: P: Bazzanti Florence
white marble
111cm., 43¾in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Mignon is the title character of a French opera, first performed in Paris in 1866. Her character is highborn but she was
abducted in youth and raised within a gypsy community. A young, handsome man encounters her and buys her
freedom. After various trials and tribulations, which threaten the course of true love, Mignon and her deliverer profess
their devotion to one another. Mignon at last discovers the truth of her highborn identity and recovers the castle from
which she was taken. A finale of happiness and harmony draws the opera to a close.
Pietro Bazzanti, in the present sculpture, represents Mignon in her plain gypsy clothing, with the instruments alluding
to her livelihood with minstrels and dancers. Her hair is carved beautifully in full curls around her head. Her sleeve
ruffles at her elbow and the mandolin she holds is decorated with intricate ornaments and patterns. Her apparent
purity and dignity allude to her truthful identity. Her bashful gesture might indicate her inherent embarrassment in
performance, or perhaps represents the moment she falls in love. Whatever the cause may be, Bazzanti skilfully
evokes the innocent nature of Mignon and creates a captivating sense of narrative in this finely and sensitively carved
marble sculpture.

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Panzetta, Nuovo dizionario degli scultori Italiani dell'ottocento e del primo novecento, Turin, 2003, p. 78
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 178
ENRICO ASTORRI

ITALIAN
1859-1921
LA FILATRICE ARABA (THE ARAB SEAMSTRESS)
monogrammed: E.A.
bronze, dark brown patina
102 by 108cm., 40 by 42½in.

ESTIMATE 70,000-90,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Enrico Astorri was born in Piacenza and began his studies as a sculptor at the Instituto Gazzola in his home town as a
teenager. He quickly transferred to the famous Accademia di Brera in Milan, and established himself in a
studio there in 1885. In the following years he exhibited many of his works at national and international exhibitions
including his bronzed gesso Pesca interrotta (Fishing interrupted) in Milan in 1885 and Schiavo abissino (Abyssinian
Slave) in 1892. With such works he quickly established a reputation for the representation of genre figures and
orientalist subjects. In 1894, he unveiled the plaster version of the present composition at the Triennale in Milan in
which an Arab seamstress, possibly observed in the streets of Italy, is portrayed cradling her child whilst poised on a
step with oriental decoration. The model is enriched with a multitude of textures, polished skin, thick drapery and
rough stone and tiles. Her physical beauty is evident but her features are far from those of the classical nudes that
had formed academic taste in the preceding decades. Astorri's triumph of naturalism was recognised and he was
selected to exhibit at the Paris Exposition Universelle in 1900 and at the Munich exposition in the following year. On
both occassions the Filatrice Araba was awarded the Gold Medal by the jury, affirming Astorri's fame.

According to Panzetta the version of La Filatrice Araba shown in Munich is preserved in the Stadtmuseum there.
A marble version of the same dimensions sold at Christie’s London as lot 239 on 17 March 2011 for £97,250
(aggregate).

RELATED LITERATURE
V. Vicario, Gli scultori italiani dal Neoclassicismo al Liberty, Lodi, 1994, vol. I, pp. 43-46; A. Panzetta, Nuovo dizionario
degli scultori italiani dell'Ottocento e del primo Novecento, Turin, 2003, vol. I, p. 36
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LOT 179
GUSTAVE-LOUIS NAST

FRENCH
B.1826
LA DANSE DES OEUFS (THE DANCE OF GOLDEN EGGS)
signed: G. nast
bronze
193cm., 76in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
La Danse des Oeufs is acclaimed as Gustave-Louis Nast’s most successful work. It was first exhibited in plaster at the
Salon of 1880, and in bronze the following year, where it was quickly purchased by an admiring collector. Nast made
his debut at the Salon of 1852 and continued to exhibit until 1881. La Danse des Oeufs was one of his last
submissions and represents his technical development and maturity as a sculptor.
The particular accomplishment of the model lies in the deftly executed composure and poise of the figure. She dances
on tiptoes, her bare upper body sinuously curving as she balances an egg on her right index finger. The sculpture is
enlivened by the addition of gilt jewels, which hang from the dancer's belt and ears. The model was cast in an edition
of two sizes, with the present bronze being of the larger size.

RELATED LITERATURE
E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. x, p. 103
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 180
CHARLES-HENRI-JOSEPH CORDIER

FRENCH
1827-1905
MAURESQUE D'ALGER CHANTANT (MOORISH WOMAN OF ALGIERS SINGING)
signed: CORDiER
bronze, silvered, gilt, black, brown and green patina
74.5cm., 29 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
La Mauresque d'Alger Chantant was one of thirteen portraits which Cordier, ethnographic sculptor to the Musée
d'Histoire Naturelle, produced during his mission to Algeria from April to October in 1856. On 5th April 1856, Cordier
was granted a fund of 1000 francs to visit Algeria with an official brief to 'study the various types of indigenous peoples
from the standpoint of art'. The sculptor took up his sojourn with enthusiasm and was determined to experience the
culture as closely as possible. He insisted on living amongst Algerians, rather than fellow French expatriates, and
appears to have been accepted within the community. As he wrote, 'I lived in a native quarter of the Casbah, I got on
well with everyone, and as my door was always open, pretty soon I entertained quite a number of visitors'. It was here
that he captured the likeness of his Mauresque d'Alger chantant.

The Mauresque d'Alger chantant was exhibited at the Palais de l'Industrie in 1860 alongside other portraits created
during Cordier's Algerian sojourn. A descriptive catalogue of the exhibition was written by the critic Marc Trapadoux.
Trapadoux was fascinated by the Mauresque chantant and wrote passionately of her vitality:

'...the transparent colour of her skin is white and rose, her perfumed hair black and shiny, her eyes, blue and limpid,
shine with joy, her graceful face reflects an ingenious and vibrant soul. Her entire personality expresses pleasure and
surrender. Her mouth half-open like a flower, lets escape a smooth sound, a sort of chirping which swells her neck,
lifts her breast and throws back her head...'

The Mauresque d'Alger chantant was one of the most popular of Cordier's models and it was edited in bronze in
various sizes. The present bronze is notable particularly for its exuberant multi-polychromed patina. Cordier was
fascinated with the notion of polychromy in sculpture, and was inspired both by recent discoveries regarding the use
of colour in antique statuary, as well as by the work of his namesake, the early Baroque sculptor Nicolas Cordier. The
green colouring of the present Mauresque's clothing is typical of Cordier's approach. It appears again in
the rediscovered bronze Mauresque noire, which was offered at Sotheby's, London last year in The Orientalist Sale on
24 April 2012, lot 17 (sold for £205,250 aggregate). Like this Mauresque noire, the present bust similarly has a
partially silvered and gilt surface. This technique, of fusing silver or gilding to metal in a process known as
galvanoplasty, was very novel at the time that Cordier was working. When the sculptor first exhibited a pair of bronzes
made using this technique, his Chinese Man and Chinese Woman, at the Paris Salon of 1853, they caused a
sensation.

It is possible that the present bust was originally conceived as one of a pair with another model, probably the
Mauresque noire. These models appear as pairs in the 2004 catalogue raisonné by Laure de Margerie, and a similar
bust, but with an overall silvered surface, was sold as a pair with a cast of the Mauresque noire in these rooms on 26
November 1990, lot 92 (sold for £56,500 aggregate). This hypothesis is given credence by the fact that, like the pair
sold in 1990, the present bronze has a socle with a rounded base, whereas the single bronze casts of the model
appearing in the catalogue raisonné have socles with squared bases.
A marble version of the Mauresque d'Alger chantant was sold in these rooms on 2 July 2012, lot 168 (sold for
£133,250 aggregate).

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Trapadoux, L'Oeuvre de M. Cordier. Galerie anthropologique et ethnographique pour servir a l'histoire des races,
Paris 1860, pp. 11 and 13-14, no. 3; L. de Margerie and E. Papet, Facing the Other. Charles Cordier (1827-1905)
Ethnographic Sculptor, exh. cat., Musée d'Orsay, Paris, 2004, pp. 188-191, cat. nos. 359-383
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 181
ALBERT-ERNEST CARRIER-BELLEUSE

FRENCH
1824-1887
BUST OF A BACCHANTE
signed: A. Carrier
white marble, on a bronze socle
62cm., 24 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-9,000 GBP


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LOT 182
ALBERT-ERNEST CARRIER-BELLEUSE

FRENCH
1824 - 1887
LE RÉVEIL (THE AWAKENING)
signed: A. CARRiER-BELLEUSE
terracotta, on an ebonised wood socle
60cm., 23 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This attractive model, commissioned around 1854 by Henri Ardant, Director of the Limoges Porcelain factory, echoes
the mild eroticism of L'Automne - one of the first of Carrier's series of fantasy busts.

RELATED LITERATURE
S. Lami, Dictionnaire des sculpteurs de l'école française au dix-neuvième siècle, Paris, 1914, vol i, p. 284; J. E.
Hargrove, The Life and Work of Albert Carrier-Belleuse, New York and London, 1977, p. 217
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LOT 183
PIERRE EUGÈNE EMILE HÉBERT

FRENCH
1828 - 1893
L'OISEAU BLEU, BUST OF A YOUNG WOMAN
signed: EMILE. HÉBERT
bronze, gilt, reddish and dark brown patina, on a revolving mottled red marble socle, with a
gilt wood column
bust: 84cm., 33in. overallcolumn: 104cm., 41in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP


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LOT 184
HENRI WEIGELE

FRENCH
1858-1927
DANCER
signed: H. Weigèle
white marble, on a veined pink marble base, with a gilt bronze mount, on a fluted
serpentine marble column
marble: 80cm., 31½in.base: 7.5cm., 2 7/8 in.column: 81cm., 31 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. XIV, p. 510
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LOT 185
AUGUSTE-HENRI CARLI

FRENCH
1868-1930
OMPHALE
signed: A. CARLi
white marble
79cm., 31 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 186
AIMÉ-JULES DALOU

FRENCH
1838-1902
AVANT LE BAIN (BEFORE THE BATH)
signed: DALOU, stamped: SEVRES and: S G 1923 and inscribed: H.D and: o
terracotta, on a 16th/17th century gilt wood base
figure: 51cm., 20 1/8 in.base: 14.5 by 38.5 by 38.5cm., 5¾ by 15¼ by 15¼in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Avant le bain belongs to the series of individual female nudes, which Aimé-Jules Dalou modelled during the 1870s. In
exile from his own country following his involvement with the Paris Commune, Dalou built a highly successful career in
London between 1871 and 1879. Eschewing the grand allegories and idealised forms of the Salon, he presented
scenes of intimate domesticity at the Royal Academy. His several variations on the theme of mother and child and his
quiet studies of women reading caught the attention of the critics and won for him important commissions, notably his
Monument to the Grandchildren of Queen Victoria at Windsor.
The nude studies were the private counterparts to the Royal Academy exhibits. They were never exhibited and seem
to have been made for the artist's own interest and delight. They showcase Dalou's marvellous dexterity as the
malleable clay captures the soft and curved essence of the female form. Delicately observed, the nudes are
nevertheless focussed on the realism of folds of flesh and moments of everyday life. The present nude clasps her
arms across her chest against the cold, perhaps in the instant before bathing. The sculpture has a wonderful warmth
of tone through the soft brown of the terracotta, which perfectly complements the intimate subject.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Hunisak, The sculptor Jules Dalou: studies in his style and imagery, New York, 1977, pp. 119-120, fig. 69; D.
Bilbey and M. Trusted, British Sculpture 1470 - 2000, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2002, pp. 241-251
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 187
AIMÉ-JULES DALOU

FRENCH
1838 - 1902
FEMME NUE S'ESSUYANT LE PIED (NUDE WOMAN DRYING HER FEET)
signed: DALOU and stamped: CIRE PERDUE AA HÉBRARD
bronze, rich dark brown patina, on a mottled purple marble base
bronze: 34.5cm., 13 5/8 in.base: 9.5cm., 3¾in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Dalou was one of the most important and prolific sculptors in France in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. He
was fascinated by the subject of the female nude and worked and re-worked a series of models depicting nudes in
guises typical of the genre, such as before and after the bath, towelling themselves, standing, bending down, or
seated, taken by surprise or removing their stockings. These were more intimate sculptures than his studies of
labourers and are number among Dalou’s finest works. He chose to keep them private and they were never exhibited
publicly at the Salon; they would be seen only in his studio or at private exhibitions. Despite this, they did not escape
notice and his works of female nudes were well known, celebrated and collected during his lifetime. The original
terracotta sketch for the present model is housed in the Petit Palais, Paris (inv. no. 343).

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Fusco and H. Janson, The Romantics to Rodin, exh. cat. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, 1980,
pp. 190-191, nos. 71-72
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LOT 188
AIMÉ-JULES DALOU

FRENCH
1838 - 1902
FEMME NUE LES BRAS CROISES (NUDE WOMAN WITH ARMS CROSSED)
signed: DALOU, numbered (2) and stamped: CIRE PERDUE A.A. HEBRARD
bronze, dark brown patina
38cm., 15in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Joseph Hirshhorn, New York
The Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.
Sotheby's London, 15 November 2005, lot 97

CATALOGUE NOTE
Dalou's exploration of the female nude from the early 1870s onwards was a natural progression from his compositions
of women in domestic settings, reading, sewing or nursing their children. It is interesting to note that it was a decade
before Degas worked on similar themes. Many of these maquettes were worked up into more finished terracottas, but
no life-time bronze casts exist, because Dalou discouraged the production of commercial editions (op. cit.). Had he
been more open to casting his models, Dalou's contribution to the development of the nude in late 19th century
French art would be much more widely appreciated.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. M. Hunisak, The Sculptor Jules Dalou: style and imagery (part 2), New York/ London, 1975, nos. 69-71
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LOT 189
CONSTANT AMBROISE ROUX

FRENCH
1865-1929
LA TENTATION D'EVE (THE TEMPTATION OF EVE)
signed: CONSTANT ROUX / ROME 1893
white marble
41 by 75.5cm., 16 1/8 by 29¾in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Eve is represented as a beautiful classical figure, resting on the bare ground. Flowers surround her and she stretches
her upper body in a gesture of languid ease. Constant Roux has chosen to illustrate the moment before The Fall. The
peeping head of a snake to Eve’s left hints at impending doom. It is only when the sculpture is appreciated in the
round, that the viewer fully comprehends the threat: the large scaly body of a snake, as long as Eve, coils its way
towards her to whisper its malice. Its proximity to her naked body adds quiet menace; its head nearing Eve’s bare
breast alludes to Cleopatra, another legendary woman with dangerous influence over men.

Constant Roux was born in Marseilles and studied under Pierre Jules Cavelier and Louis Ernest Barrias. The present
marble is dated 1893 and Roux received the Prix de Rome in 1894. He achieved a first class medal at the Salon in
1911 and the Legion d’Honneur in 1923.
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LOT 190
SARAH BERNHARDT

FRENCH
1844-1923
BUST OF MADAMOISELLE HOCQUIGNY
signed and dated: SARAH BERNHARDT. sculpit / 1874
white marble, on a white marble socle, and a veined green marble plinth
bust and socle: 58cm., 22 7/8 in. column: 122.5cm., 48¼in.

ESTIMATE 6,000-8,000 GBP

EXHIBITED
Paris, Salon, 1879, no. 1798

CATALOGUE NOTE
Bernhardt and Hocquigny met in connection with the Theatre de L’Odeon during the Franco-Prussian war. During the
war, Bernhardt had used her influence as its most illustrious performer to transform the Theater into a hospital for
wounded soldiers. Hocquigny was at that time in charge of medical supplies for the Parisian hospitals.
Bernhardt, recalls Hocquigny in her memories precisely and with much affection. She wrote: “I received lint and
bandages from every corner of Paris, but it was more particularly from the Palais de l’Industrie that I used to get my
provisions of lint and of linen for binding wounds. There was an adorable woman there, named Mlle. Hocquigny, who
was at the head of all the ambulances. All that she did was done with a cheerful gracefulness, and all that she was
obliged to refuse she refused sorrowfully, but still in a gracious manner. She was at that time over thirty years of age,
and although unmarried, she looked like a very young married woman. She had large blue, dreamy eyes, and a
laughing mouth, a deliciously oval face, little dimples, and crowning all this grace, this dreamy expression, and this
coquettish, inviting mouth, a wide forehead like that of the Virgins painted by the early painters, rather prominent,
encircled by hair worn in smooth, wide, flat bandeaux, separated by a faultless parting. The forehead seemed like the
protecting rampart of this delicious face. Mlle. Hocquigny was admired and made much of by everyone, but she
remained invulnerable to all homage. She was happy in being beloved, but she would not allow anyone to express
affection for her.” (S. Bernhardt My Double Life, Paris, 1907, p.166)
Bernhardt also exhibited a bust of the painter Lousie Abbema in Salon of 1879 (no. 4797), presently in the Musee
d’Orsay (see next lot).
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LOT 191
JESÚS FRUCTUOSO CONTRERAS

MEXICAN
1866-1902
L'ÉVEIL (AWAKENING)
signed: J. CONTRERAS PARIS.
white marble
74.5cm., 29¼in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This elegant nude was carved by the Mexican artist Jesús Fructuoso Contreras, who was active in Paris at the turn of
the 20th century. The graceful figure draws attention to her nudity by gently clasping one breast and stretching
forwards. The thin cloth draped around her arm is carved with fine delicacy. There is another version of the present
marble in the Museo Andrés Blaisten in Mexico City.

Contreras trained at Nacional de Bellas Artes in Mexico, before moving to Paris, where he earned a medal in the 1889
Exposition Universelle. On returning to Mexico City, he was commissioned to complete a number of public
monuments. Noteworthy among these is the series of twenty statues of distinguished figures from Mexican history,
placed along the Paseo de la Reforma. Despite the high demands of his monumental projects, he combined these
with small bronzes and decorative objects suited to reproduction; in doing so, he successfully mastered the modern
art of sculptor-entrepreneur.

RELATED LITERATURE
E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. iii, p. 846
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LOT 192
GEORGE ANDERSON LAWSON

BRITISH
1832-1904
GIRL WITH A SHELL
signed: G. A. LAWSON. Sc.
white marble
88.5cm., 34 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP


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LOT 193
PAUL JEAN BAPTISTE GASQ

FRENCH
1860-1944
JEUNE FILLE ET JEUNE HOMME DANS DES ROSEAUX (YOUNG MAN AND WOMAN IN THE
REEDS)
signed: GasQ
white marble, on a veined white and grey marble base
74.5cm., 29¼in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Paul Jean Baptiste Gasq excelled in Classical and allegorical subjects. Numbering among his many public
commissions is his Médée in marble in the Jardins de Tuileries, as well as L’Art et La Nature, to the left of the
entrance of the Grand Palais. Both monumental group marbles impress with their drama and motion. The present
sculpture maintains much of the vitality that characterises Gasq’s public monuments. The figures have a similar form
and group dynamic to L’Art et La Nature. The boy poses in an exaggerated position with his arm and head flung back
and foot lifted off the ground, his body bare, while the second figure appears lower and subservient. With the present
sculpture, Gasq has successfully reduced the theatrical effect of his public sculptures into an appealing decorative
work of art.

Gasq was a student at the School of Fine Arts in Dijon, before studying under Jouffrey and Hiolle at the École des
Beaux-Arts in Paris. He began exhibiting at the Salon in 1880 and won the Prix de Rome in 1890, followed by a Grand
Prix at the Exposition Universelle of 1900. He was conservateur of the Musée de Dijon from 1932 and was made a
member of the Institute in 1935.

RELATED LITERATURE
E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. v, pp. 892-893
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LOT 194
ALBERT-ERNEST CARRIER-BELLEUSE

FRENCH
1824 - 1887
L'ENLÈVEMENT D'HIPPODAMIE (THE ABDUCTION OF HIPPODAMEA)
signed: CARRIER-BELLEUSE with a title plaque inscribed: L'ENLEVEMENT
bronze, rich green patina
65 by 51cm., 25½ by 20in.

ESTIMATE 18,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
In Fusco and Janson's seminal 1980 catalogue, The Romantics to Rodin, June Hargrove speculated that Carrier-
Belleuse's Abduction of Hippodamie was in fact at least partially modelled by the young Auguste Rodin. Rodin worked
in Carrier-Belleuse's Brussels studio from 1864 to 1871 and the present model was conceived in the final year of his
employment.

It is well known that later in the 1870s Rodin produced the four figures for his Vase des Titans from designs by
Carrier-Belleuse and the vase is signed by his master. A similar impressionistic and powerful modelling is seen in the
centaur of the present bronze. Hippodamie is quite differently modelled, suggesting not only was the modelling used
to heighten the contrast between masculinity and feminity, but that the model was a collaborative work.

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Fusco and H. Janson, The Romantics to Rodin, exh. cat. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, 1980,
pp. 164-166, no. 50
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LOT 195
ALFRED GILBERT

BRITISH
1854 - 1934
VICTORY
bronze, dark brown patina, surmounted on an onyx orb atop a bronze socle
Victory: 14.5cm., 5¾in.orb and socle: 6.5cm., 2½in.

ESTIMATE 3,000-5,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
R. Dorment (ed.), Alfred Gilbert. Sculptor and Goldsmith, exh. cat. Royal Academy of Arts, London, 1986, pp. 126-
129, no. 34
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LOT 196
WILLIAM HAMO THORNYCROFT

BRITISH
1850-1925
A WARRIOR BEARING A WOUNDED YOUTH FROM THE FIELD OF BATTLE
inscribed: EXECUTED IN BRONZE BY J. A. HATFIELD. / FOR THE ART-UNION OF LONDON.
1878. / FROM THE ORIGINAL BY HAMO. THORNYCROFT.
bronze, dark brown patina
67.5cm., 26 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Thornycroft's Warrior is a key work from the formative years of the New Sculpture movement. In 1875 it won the Royal
Academy's biennial Gold Medal for the 'Best Work of Sculpture,' in competition with Alfred Gilbert. The latter sculptor
later admitted that he 'had been beaten by the best man.'

The Warrior shows the influence of Thornycroft's visits to France and Italy in 1871, and the group was guaranteed a
prominent place in the history of the New Sculpture when the Art Union of London purchased the rights to the group
after it was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1876. The Art Union Journal considered that 'there is nothing from the
hand of an academician to be at all compared with Hamo Thornycroft's Warrior.' The following year, the Art Union
began to issue reduced casts of the model, and it has been suggested that this encouraged the young Thornycroft in
his interest in bronze reductions and small scale sculpture generally, which so characterised the developing
movement. The original bronze group is today housed at Leighton House, London.

RELATED LITERATURE
E. Manning, Marble and Bronze. The Art and Life of Hamo Thornycroft, London, 1982, pp. 55 and 212; S. Beattie,
The New Sculpture, New Haven and London, 1983, p. 183
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LOT 197
THOMAS WOOLNER

BRITISH
1825 - 1892
PUCK
signed: WOOLNER.S
bronze, greenish brown patina
48.5cm., 19 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-20,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
According to Read and Barnes, Puck was Thomas Woolner’s favourite sculpture. They quote Holman Hunt’s anecdote
of watching Woolner interact with his sculpture with ‘much paternal fondness’ (op. cit. p. 142). Puckwas modelled by
Woolner around 1844 and exhibited in plaster at the British Institution in 1847, accompanied by the following lines:
As he was sailing through the air one day, searching for wherewith to place his humorous malice, right well was he
satisfied to alight on a mushroom, and awaken a sleeping frog, of which a hungry snake was about to make a meal.
The sculpture is a fine figural work, demonstrating Woolner’s technical skill in rendering naturalism of human form.
However, it is also charming for its expression of the supernatural. With his pointed ears, sharpened chin and piercing
wings, Puck is an image of creative imagination. He arches his back in mischief as he prepares to prod the frog. Read
and Barnes record Tupper’s appreciation of the sculpture as ‘the puissant sprite of Shakespeare’, and outshining the
‘quaint, fat baby of Reynolds’ (op. cit. p. 142).

Two casts in bronze have been recorded, an early version now in a private collection and one made in 1908 for Sir
John Bland-Sutton which was later bequeathed to the Royal College of Surgeons. We believe that the present bronze
is the latter.

RELATED LITERATURE
B. Read and J. Barnes (eds.), Pre-Raphaelite Sculpture. Nature and Imagination in British Sculpture, 1848-1914, exh.
cat. The Matthiesen Gallery, London, and Birmingham City Museum and Art Gallery, Birmingham, 1991, pp. 141-142,
no. 53
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LOT 198
ERNST MORITZ GEYGER

GERMAN
1861 - 1941
BOGENSCHÜTZE (THE ARCHER)
signed: E.M. Geyger fec
bronze, dark black-brown patina
258cm., 101½in. overall

ESTIMATE 50,000-70,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Sotheby's London, 20 April 2005, lot 184

EXHIBITED
Birmingham, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Kingdom of the Soul: Symbolist Art in Germany 1870-1920, 2000
CATALOGUE NOTE
The Bogenschütze is one of Germany’s most iconic and powerful works of sculpture from the turn of the last century.
It was conceived soon after Geyger's arrival in Florence in 1895. The artist worked up the monumental 4-metre-high
statue from beaten copper and submitted it to the Grosse Berliner Kunstaustellung of 1900 (op. cit., no.1587). It was
purchased by Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1902 and installed on a plinth of his design in the Sizilianischen
Garten at Sanssouci, Potsdam. It was typical of Geyger's bold experimentation with specialised techniques and
mediums to attempt a work in copper: an earlier commission from the Kaiser was a figurative hand-mirror in silver and
silver electroplated bronze, which he had cast in Paris; he also took five years to chase his first bronze of A
Hippopotamus Attacked by a Lion to emphasise the different surface textures of the animals (Nationalgalerie,
Berlin, inv. no. B II 215). When the latter was exhibited in Munich in 1895, it was acclaimed by his friend Max Klinger
as 'the first really outstanding German bronze'.

Further to its Royal acquisition, the Bogenschütze proved to be an enormous commercial success and is today
Geyger’s most celebrated work. The Gladenbeck foundry acquired the rights to cast reductions in bronze and edited
them in three sizes with one such model appearing on the front of their 1903 catalogue. While Geyger's inspiration
ultimately derives from antiquity and more specifically from an ancient torso of a wrestler in Berlin (mistakenly restored
as an archer), his particular achievement lies in the fresh and modern reinterpretation of the Ideal, harnessing a
stylised male physique in a composition full of the undiluted energy in the split second before the release of the
archers' arrow. In this, it is at once removed from the austere classicism of the monumental Achilles statue, which the
Kaiser commissioned from Johannes Götz for the Achilleion, Corfu.

While chiefly remembered as a sculptor, Geyger was also a highly-skilled printmaker and painter and from 1893,
divided his time between graphic and sculptural works. The connection between the two can be seen in the strong
linearity and the precise rendering of large surfaces evident in his sculpture. The anatomy of the figure in fact bears
strong similarities to a preliminary drawing of The Giant that Geyger executed for a print to illustrate Nietzsche’s
parable and published in the second issue of PAN in 1895 (see Shepherd Gallery, op.cit.).

Aside from the cast at Sanssouci, only five other full-size versions of the Bogenschütze are known to exist: a bronze
230cm. version finished for the Rathausvorplatz in Hannover, from which a further replica in bronze was
commissioned by Carl Jacobsen (Sportpark, Copenhagen); a copper version of 237cm. given by Geyger's parents to
the Arndt-Gymnasium in Berlin-Zehlendorf in 1926 (returned 1983); a bronze or copper version installed on the right
embankment of the Elbe in Dresden (re-erected post war) and another, believed to be bronze, in the Ebert-Park in
Ludwigshafen (1925). The present cast is a rare life-size version among these.

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Bloch and W. Grzimek, Das klassische Berlin, Berlin 1978, p. 313, no. 307; Sculpture from the David Daniels
Collection, exh. cat. The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, 1979, nos. 59-60; Ethos und pathos: die Berliner
Bildhauerschule 1786-1914, exh. cat. SMPK, Berlin, 1990, pp. 109-110, 347-348, 459-460, no. 148; R. and E.
Kashey, German drawings 1790-1915, exh. cat. Shepherd Gallery, New York, 1994, no. 59
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 199
PRINCE PAUL TROUBETZKOY

RUSSIAN
1866-1938
LANCER FROM SAVOY
signed: Paolo Troubetzkoy/ Milano 1898 and inscribed: A. Robecchi fuse / Milan 1898
bronze, brown patina, on a veined red marble base
bronze: 67.7 by 54cm., 26 5/8 by 21¼in.base: 45 by 23cm., 17¾ by 9in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
‘He is the most astonishing sculptor of modern times’. This was how George Bernard Shaw described the Italian artist,
of royal Russian descent, Prince Paul Troubetzkoy. Shaw insisted that he was ‘one of the few geniuses of whom it is
not only safe, but necessary, to speak in superlatives’ (op. cit.). Troubetzkoy returned the compliment with sculptures;
a small bronze portrait of Shaw by Troubetzkoy sold in Sotheby’s New York in 2008 for $47,500.

The present bronze was modelled during Troubetzkoy’s early life in Italy. It represents a stately lancer from Savoy.
The solid vertical lines of the composed horse are reinforced by the rider’s position, and continued by his high lance.
Lancer from Savoy, modelled with Troubtezkoy’s distinctive rough handling and textured surface, effects an
impression both of character and dignity.

RELATED LITERATURE
G.B. Shaw, ‘Word by Bernard Shaw’, P. and D. Colnaghi (eds.), Sculpture by Prince Paul Troubetzkoy, exhib. cat.
Colhaghi Gallery, London, 1931
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 200
PRINCE PAUL TROUBETZKOY

RUSSIAN
1866-1938
BARONESS ROBERT DE ROTHSCHILD WITH HER DOG
signed and dated: Paul Troubetzkoy 1911, stamped C. VALSUANI CIRE PERDUE. and
numbered in black to the underside: F19
bronze, dark green patina
45.7 by 29.5 by 31.7cm., 18 by 11 5/8 by 12½in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Baroness Robert de Rothschild (née Gabrielle Nelly Régine Beer 1886-1945), wife of international banker Baron
Robert de Rothschild, was a glamorous blonde-haired beauty and a celebrated pre-war Paris socialite. In 1940,
fearing their safety, the Rothschilds abandoned their prominent Avenue Marigny town house in Paris and fled to New
York City with their two daughters. Troubetzkoy also fashioned a portrait of Baron Robert as well as a model of one of
his prized thoroughbred horses.
RELATED LITERATURE
J. S. Grioni, 'Paul Troubetzkoy, a forgotten celebrity', Apollo, June 1968, fig. 5; J. S. Grioni, 'Paul Troubetzkoy, Il
Principe scultore', Are Illustrata, no. 41-42, 1971, no. 6; J. S. Grioni, 'Prince Paul Troubetzkoy's portraits in bronze',
The Antique Collector, October 1984, p. 83, fig. 2; J. S. Grioni, 'Le sculpteur Troubetzkoy parisien d'election', Gazette
des Beaux Arts, May 1985, fig. 6
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 201
PRINCE PAUL TROUBETZKOY

RUSSIAN
1866-1938
BUST OF PAULE-DINAH LEVI DE BENZION
signed and dated: Paul Troubetzkoy 1922 and stamped: C. VALSUANI / CIRE / PERDUE
bronze, mid-brown and green patina
44cm., 17¼in.

ESTIMATE 15,000-25,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
commissioned by Moise or Paule-Dinah Levi de Benzion, Draveil, Seine-et-Oise
and thence by family descent to the present owner

CATALOGUE NOTE
This rare and beautiful portrait bust by Troubetzkoy would have been created shortly after the sculptor's return to
Europe after his long sojourn in the United States through the period of the Great War. Troubetzkoy modelled very few
portrait busts and the present example is distinguished by its provenance, coming directly from Paule Levi de
Benzion's family. Paule was the wife of Moise Levi de Benzion, a fabled Jewish art collector who lived in Paris and
Cairo. His collection, which included famous works by Van Gogh and Corot, was plundered by Hermann Goering in
1941. Most of the works were restituted to his heirs by 1948.

The sitter's wistful expression, and the fresh modelling, compare particularly closely with Troubetzkoy's plaster bust of
the Canadian actress Mary Pickford in the Museo del Paesaggio, Verbania Pallanza (inv. no. T n. 323). The
present bronze is particularly appealing because of the sitter's fashionable 1920's hairstyle, which successfully evokes
the glamour and optimism of the age.

RELATED LITERATURE
G. Piantoni and P. Venturoli, Paolo Troubetzkoy 1866-1938, exh. cat. Museo del Paesaggio, Verbania
Pallanza, Turin, 1990, pp. 212-213, no. 173
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 202
JOSEPH BERNARD

FRENCH
1866-1931
JEUNE DANSEUSE (YOUNG DANCER)
signed: J. Bernard and stamped: C. VALSUANI / CIRE / PERDUE
bronze, dark brown patina
62.5cm., 24 5/8 in.

ESTIMATE 35,000-50,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Joseph Bernard began his studies in Lyon and received a scholarship in 1886, which enabled him to travel to Paris to
attend the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Whilst reference is often made to Auguste Rodin's influence on the sculptor, Bernard
never worked in his studio, preferring to work nights at a printing press to finance the early lean years of his career.
His fierce independence is reflected in his oeuvre, as he experimented with unconventional techniques such as
carving in taille directe and modelling directly in plaster rather than clay. Towards the end of his career, Bernard's own
influence on French sculpture had become immense. As one critic of the 1927 Salon d'Automne wrote: 'if all
sculptures influenced by Bernard were removed from the galleries, what would there be left?'

The present bronze is a reduction of Bernard's Jeune Danseuse, also known as Jeune Fille à la draperie (Young
Woman with Drapery). The original plaster was first exhibited at the Salon d'Automne of 1912, and a bronze version
was subsequently commissioned by the State. Initially housed in the Musée du Luxembourg, in 1931 it was
exchanged for a cast of the second version of the model (dating to circa 1926). The Luxembourg bronze was
subsequently acquired by the Museum of Modern Art, Madrid. Reductions of the first version, measuring
64cm., were produced from 1912. There is another fine cast by Valsuani in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon (Bernard
et al. op. cit., p. 311).

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Bernard, R. Julien, L. Stoenesco and P. Grémont Gervaise, Joseph Bernard. Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1989, p.
311, no. 185; E. Lebon, Dictionaire des fondeurs de bronze d'art, Perth, 2003, p. 186; P. Elliott, After Rodin. French
Figurative Sculpture 1900-1940 from the Marjon Collection, Perth, 2013, pp. 42-43, no. 11
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 203
RAYMOND DE MEESTER DE BETZENBROECK

BELGIAN
1904 - 1995
WALKING LEOPARD
signed: R de Meester de B and inscribed: cire perdue
bronze, dark brown patina
34 by 79cm., 13 3/8 by 31 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 7,000-10,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 204
ALBERT HAGER

BELGIAN
1857-1940
DEUX ÉLÉPHANTS AVEC UN CORNAC (TWO ELEPHANTS WITH A MAHOUT)
signed and dated: A HAGER / 1919 and inscribed: FONDERIE. NATEL DES. BRONZES. / ST
GILLES. BRUXELLES.
bronze, black patina
41.5 by 102.5cm., 16 3/8 by 40 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
C. Engelen and M. Marx, Beeldhouwkunst in België vanaf 1830, Brussels, 2002, vol. II., pp. 850-851
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 205
ALFRED BOUCHER

FRENCH
1850-1934
AU BUT (TO THE FINISHING LINE)
signed: A. BOUCHER, stamped: SIOT / PARIS numbered: 60 i
bronze, dark green patina
66 by 101cm., 26 by 39¾in.

ESTIMATE 25,000-35,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Alfred Boucher's Au But is one of his most renowned and celebrated models. It was featured as the cover image of
the 2000 exhibition at the Musée Paul Dubois- Alfred Boucher, in Nogent-sur-Seine. It depicts three athletes in the last
fraught moment of a race, each balanced on one leg as they stretch a hand forwards in the desperate frenzy to be the
first over the finishing line. Boucher captured the physical likeness of the athletes by having his explorer friend Gabriel
Bonvalot posing for him as he modelled each energetic figure.
The accomplishment of the sculpture lies in the rendering of the athletes’ precarious balance on the base and their
powerful dynamism. Boucher exhibited the plaster model for the first time at the Salon of 1886. It proved an instant
success with critics and public alike. Boucher was extolled for the technical virtuosity apparent in the modelling of
three such carefully balanced men in motion; the sculpture won him a first class medal.
Further affirming the success of the model, the State commissioned a monumental bronze version of the group to be
placed in the Jardins du Luxembourg. This cast was exhibited at the Salon in 1887 and subsequently erected in the
gardens. It remained there until its sad destruction during the Occupation. However, its impact lives on in reductions of
the life-size bronze, catering for the immense public demand for the model. Editions in three sizes were cast by the
Siot-Decauville foundry.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Piette, Alfred Boucher 1850-1934 "sculpteur – humaniste", exh. cat. Musée Paul Dubois – Alfred Boucher, Nogent-
sur-Seine, 2000, pp. 46, no. 39a
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 206
ALFRED BOUCHER

FRENCH
1850-1934
JEANNE D'ARC ÉCOUTANT SES VOIX (JOAN OF ARC LISTENING TO VOICES)
signed: ALFRED. BOUCHER, inscribed: Susse Fes Edts Paris with the SUSSE FRERES
EDITEURS PARIS pastille
bronze, golden-brown and green-brown patina
41cm., 16 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This rare bronze unusally depicts Joan of Arc emprisoned, rather than in the more recognisable guise of a victorious
warrior, clad in armour. A marble version of the model, location now unknown, was purchased by the French state in
1920.

RELATED LITERATURE
J. Piette, Alfred Boucher 1850-1934 "sculpteur - humaniste", exh. cat. Musée Paul Dubois - Alfred Boucher, Nogent-
sur-Seine, 2000, p. 64, no. 61
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 207
EDGAR HENRI BOUTRY

FRENCH
1857-1939
LA SOURCE
signed: E. BOUTRY, inscribed: A Montagutelli / cire perdue PARIS and: a / A Schmidt. / ses
amis and dated: 1 Juillet 1933
bronze, brown-green patina, on a wood stand
bronze: 47cm., 18½in.stand: 50.5cm., 19 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 208
ALFREDO PINA

ITALIAN
1883-1966
LE BAISER (THE KISS)
signed: A. Pina, stamped: CIRE PERDUE 4 A.C PARIS
bronze, dark brown patina
49 by 53.5cm., 19¼ by 21in.

ESTIMATE 8,000-12,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 209
PIETRO CANONICA

ITALIAN
1869 - 1959
PAOLO AND FRANCESCA (THE ABYSS)
signed: P. CANONICA
bronze, dark brown patina
36.5cm., 14 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 10,000-15,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 210
AGATHON LÉONARD

FRENCH
1841-1923
LA JAVANAISE
signed: A. LEOnARD, inscribed: . Susse Fres Edts Paris and: Fonte sur Plâtre and with the:
SUSSE FRERES FONDEURS PARIS pastille
bronze, gilt and red patina
45cm., 17 3/4 in.

ESTIMATE 18,000-25,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present bronze is an exquisitely chased cast of Agathon Léonard’s La Javanaise. Scarves hang down the front of
her body and heavy jewellery ornaments her bare chest and arms. The reverse of the model is equally fine, with rich
patterning and detail to the back of the dense-looking drapery and headpiece.

Among Léonard’s most accomplished works are his stylish studies of dancers, usually rendered in gilt, such as the
present bronze. His series of eight dancers exhibited at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in 1897 earned him
particular acclaim. Modelled in a distinctly Art Nouveau style, the women share delicate gestures, loose dresses and
swirling forms. Shortly afterwards, the series was executed in porcelain by Sèvres, and won Léonard the gold medal
at the Paris International Exhibition of 1900.
The present bronze represents an especially composed dancer; her position suggests a momentary pause in her
dance, which allows us to appreciate the finery of her clothing. Continuing the theme of ornament, a triangle motif
decorates the base, while flowers surround the dancer’s feet, echoed by the foliate decoration running down the front
of her dress. The activity and detail on her vestments is beautifully offset by her stillness.

RELATED LITERATURE
I. Böstge, Agathon Léonard. Le geste Art nouveau, exh. cat. Musée d'Art et d'Industrie André-Diligent, Roubaix,
Musée départemental de l'Oise, Beauvais, 2003, pp. 84-85, no. 68; E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs,
dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. viii, p. 523
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 211
PIETRO CANONICA

ITALIAN
1869 - 1959
TESTA DI CRISTO (BUST OF CHRIST)
signed: P.Canonica
white marble, on a veined green and brown marble base
bust: 33cm., 13in.base: 7cm., 2¾in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-40,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Pietro Canonica was one of the most successful and distinctive Italian sculptors of his generation. His preeminent
skills were put to use on monuments in Rome, St. Petersburg, Istanbul and Bagdad and his series of portraits of
members of the British Royal family were exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1904.

Among his most successful works are his religious subjects. It is in these that Canonica’s characteristic sensitivity and
sense of sorrow are most deeply felt. The carving of the present sculpture is delicate. Lacking hard lines, the bust
suggests suppleness of structure beneath the skin. Christ’s raised shoulder, lowered eyelids and slightly open
mouth are small indications of his suffering. The subtlety of the carving results in an impression of dignity and
restraint.

Canonica exhibited Testa di Cristoin Naples in 1922 and a version is held in the collection of the Galleria d’Arte,
Moderna. During his distinguished career, he was elected Accademico d’Italia and a member of the Accademia
Nazionale di San Luca; in 1950 he was made a senator for life for his outstanding artistic achievements.

RELATED LITERATURE
A. Panzetta, Nuovo dizionario degli scultori italiani dell'ottocento e del primo novecento, Turin, 2003, p. 197
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 212
CARL VILHELM EMIL MILLES

SWEDISH
1875-1955
VENUS
numbered: 1/12
signed: Carl Millès and inscribed: BB for the Billesdhuggernes Bronscestoberi foundry
bronze, black-green patina
67cm., 26 3/8 in.

ESTIMATE 30,000-40,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Millesgården, Lidingö, Stockholm (inv. no. M168)

CATALOGUE NOTE
The present sculpture of Venus, ancient Greek goddess of love, emerging from her shell, like a pearl of the sea has
until recently been exhibited at the Millesgården in Stolkholm, once the home of the artist and today a museum
dedicated to his life and work.

Carl Milles was fascinated by the forms of sea creatures, intrigued by their movement in and harmony with water. In
his lifetime he created a dynamic series of fountains and water features that incorporated his models of sea-dwelling
creatures, as recorded in Verneuil (op. cit.). The legend of Venus as a goddess born out of the froth of the sea and
carried ashore on a shell inspired Milles’s creative imagination. The present bronze was modelled in 1917 for a
fountain that was to be placed in front of the Swedish Academy in Stockholm. The movement of her hair and scarf
evokes the stirring sea breeze. The fine balance of the tipping shell and leaning Venus suggests the motion of the
waves and demonstrates Milles’s technical skills as a sculptor.

Milles was at the time strongly influenced by wartime Europe and increasingly turned to a lighter mythological world in
his works, creating a natural universe that he could understand and admire.

RELATED LITERATURE
M.P. Verneuil, Carl Milles. Sculpteur Suédois, Paris/ Brussels, 1929, pl. 19-27 and 126-128; E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire
des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. ix, pp. 637-638
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 213
CARL VILHELM EMIL MILLES

SWEDISH
1875-1955
THE SUN SINGER (TORSO)
signed: C. MILLES, numbered: 3/6 and stamped: E. PETTERESON FUD.
bronze, rich dark green patina
91cm., 35 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 20,000-30,000 GBP

PROVENANCE
Millesgården, Lidingö, Stockholm

CATALOGUE NOTE
In 1918, The Swedish Academy of Letters commissioned Carl Milles to model a monument in honour of the eminent
poet and Bishop, Esaias Tegnér (1782-1846). This elegant torso is a study for the grand monument, which today
stands in Strömparterren, Stockholm. Milles took inspiration for the model from one of Tegnér's most celebrated
poems, Sång till solen (Song to the sun), which directly invoked the sun, choosing to depict the lithe and classically
beautiful form of a sun singer. Milles worked on the model for ten years. The version in Stockholm is full-bodied: the
singer raises his arms upwards to the sky and his mouth is opened with song. For the present cast, the artist chose to
omit both arms and head in emulation of an antique sculpture from fifth-century Greece, weathered by time, but
perhaps all the more honorific with its implied age, history and resilience. There is a very fine cast of the present
model in the Tate Modern (inv. no. T02105).

Milles achieved international renown in his own lifetime. He was conferred the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters in
1935 by Yale University and elected an honorary member of the Royal Academy in London. He is today recognised
as one of Sweden’s leading 19th- and 20th- century sculptors.

RELATED LITERATURE
M.P. Verneuil, Carl Milles. Sculpteur Suédois, Paris/ Brussels, 1929, pl. 120-122; E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire des
peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs, Gründ, 1999, vol. ix, pp. 637-638
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 214
MARCEL HOMS

FRENCH
1910-1995
DISCUS THROWER
signed: Homs and inscribed: Susse Fres Edts Paris and cire perdue
bronze, dark brown patina
61.5cm., 24¼in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 215
ERNESTO BAZZARO

ITALIAN
1859 - 1939
IL FORTE, A THINKING ATHLETE
signed: Bazzaro and entitled: IL FORTE
bronze, mid-brown patina
50.5cm., 19 7/8 in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
RELATED LITERATURE
A. Panzetta, Nuovo dizionario degli scultori italiani dell'Ottocento e del primo Novecento, Turin, 2003, p. 78
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 216
VICTOR JOSEPH SÉGOFFIN

FRENCH
1867 - 1925
HOMME CRIANT (SCREAMING MAN)
signed: V.torSégoffin, monogrammed: VAS, numbered: 16 and with an old white label
inscribed in ink: 0459
bronze, on a black marble base
head: 29.5cm., 11 5/8 in. base: 16.5cm., 6½in.

ESTIMATE 5,000-7,000 GBP


European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 217
RUDOLF CHRISTOPHER PUGGARD TEGNER

DANISH
1873-1950
APHRODITE GUIDING THE ARROW OF EROS
signed: Tegner
bronze, dark brown-green patina, on a black marble base
bronze: 95.7cm., 37¾in. base: 5.5cm., 2 1/8 in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Rudolph Tegner was born in Copenhagen, Denmark. He trained in his hometown, before moving to France to study in
Paris. Here, he exhibited at the Salon and won a medal at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900.
Tegner was reputedly inspired to become a sculptor after visiting the Acropolis in Athens, finding himself captivated by
the sculptural marvels on show. Aphrodite Guiding the Arrow of Eros is a fine homage to Tegner’s antique muse.
RELATED LITERATURE
V. Rasmussen and S. T. Truelsen, Danish sculpture 1880-1990, cat. Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1994, pp.
160-161, no. 108; J. Mackay, Dictionary of sculptors in bronze, Woodbridge, 2000, p. 368
European Sculpture & Works of Art: Medieval to Modern
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LOT 218
PROPERTY FROM THE LONDON RESIDENCE OF A DISTINGUISHED EUROPEAN
COLLECTOR
IVAN MESTROVIC

CROATIAN
1883-1962
STATUETTE OF A WOMAN, POSSIBLY LADY MAUD CUNARD
signed: MESTROVI, with a white label on the inside inscribed: FH 1198 in ink
bronze, dark brown patina, on a mottled green marble base
bronze: 36cm., 14 1/8 in.base: 9 by 14 by 14cm., 3½ by 5½ by 5½in.

ESTIMATE 12,000-18,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
Another cast of the present statuette was exhibited in the Klovicevi Dvori Gallery in 1983 as the property of the Croat
sculptor Kosta Angeli Radovani and identified as Lady Cunard. There exists correspondence between Mestrovic and
Cunard but it is unclear whether he did sculpt a portrait of her. What is certain is that Radovani's mother was given the
plaster version of the present statuette in October 1916 on the occasion of her son's birth. It was destroyed when the
latter's studio, formerly a space used by Mestrovic, burned down in 1956.
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LOT 219
PROPERTY FROM THE LONDON RESIDENCE OF A DISTINGUISHED EUROPEAN
COLLECTOR
IVAN MESTROVIC

CROATIAN
1883-1962
YOUNG GIRL IN PRAYER
stamped: CIRE PERDUE F.CARVILLANI
bronze, rich green and brown patina
77cm., 30¼in.

ESTIMATE 40,000-60,000 GBP

CATALOGUE NOTE
This is probably the only early bronze cast of Mestrovic' Young Girl in Prayer, which is sometimes also referred to as
Sirotica (The poor girl). Only two further casts are recorded, one was the property of the Mestrovic heirs till 1988 and
the other is in the so-called Metropolitana gallery of the Archdiocese of Zagreb, but both of these are thought to be
made in 1987. The plaster maquette from 1915 was given to the Glyptoteca in Zagreb by Mestrovic's first wife in 1946.

The Girl in prayer is part of an important series of religious images which Meštrovi carved during his years in exile
during the First World War. His friend the painter Jozo Kljakovic later recalled that 'he did little else during the war ...
So deeply did the war shake him.' Mestrovic said directly that pondering the war and the need for a European unity
'brought me to biblical themes.' The destruction and chaos of the war had left the artist disenchanted with political
rationalisations and he turned to a different source of inspiration:

'The real guide is faith... when we try to find total harmony in what we call justice, truth, beauty, wisdom, divided like
this they glimmer like fireflies and are gone.'

The girl in prayer is typical of the intuitive fervour of Meštrovi's religious works. The figure is cramped into an acute
pitch of emotional intensity and her distress is articulated in her gesture and expression.

Lauded by Rodin as 'the greatest phenomenon amongst the sculptors', Ivan Meštrovi began his career exhibiting with
the Vienna Secession at the turn of the 19th to 20thcenturies. His fame led to important exhibitions across Europe,
and, in 1915, he made history as the first living artist to have a solo exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum,
London.

For Meštrovi the political concerns of his homeland were as important as his art. He was a founder-member of the
Yugoslav Committee which aimed to unify the southern Slavic states. During World War I much of his time was spent
exiled from Croatia working on this project, which was realised in 1918 at the close of the war when the Kingdom of
Croats, Serbs and Slovenes was formed. Mestrovic's dream of a Yugoslavia united and strengthened against outside
forces, was shattered in 1941 when Germany invaded. In the following years the artist resisted both Fascism and
Communism and is remembered as a hero of Croatian nationalism. He was imprisoned in Croatia from 1941-43 after
refusing the post of Chancellor at his old school - the Academy of Fine Arts in Nazi-occupied Vienna. He left Croatia in
1943 and lived briefly in Switzerland before emigrating to New York State to take up the chair of sculpture created for
him at Syracuse University. He never again lived in Croatia as he refused to live under Communism. However, in
accordance with his wishes, he was buried in the The Most Holy Redeemer church he had built in Otavice. Moreover,
he bequeathed his homes and studios in Zagreb and Split as well the chapel in Otavice to the Croatian people,
together with the majority of his sculpture. The bequest now forms the Ivan Meštrovi Museums in Croatia.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Mestrovic, Ivan Mestrovic. The Making of a Master, London, 2008; D. Kekemet, Ivan Meštrovi. The only way to be
an artist is to work, 1970, p. 125