You are on page 1of 73

Edmonton’s

Transit Oriented Development


Journey

Tom Young, MCIP, MCP


NZ Group Manager,
Urban Planning &
Environmental Services
Auckland Design Office Lunchtime Learning tom.young@stantec.com
July 2018
Agenda

1 Edmonton? I’m vaguely familiar…

2 Refresher: What is TOD?

3 Edmonton’s Slow Start

4 Getting Up to Speed

5 Lessons for Auckland


That’s a Long Way

12,000 km
from
Auckland
The Cities Compared

Auckland Edmonton
The Cities Compared

Auckland Edmonton
Regional Population 1.7 million 1.3 million

Population by 2042 2.3 million 2.0 million


Auto Mode Share 83% 78%
PT Mode Share (Commute) 8.4% 14.6%
PT Trips Per Capita 55/year 97/year
Urban Density 1,400/km2 1,850/km2
2 Refresher: What is TOD?
TOD is…
“A compact development, with
moderate to higher densities, located
within an easy walk of a transit station,
generally with a mix of residential,
employment, and shopping
opportunities designed for pedestrians
[and cyclists] without excluding the
auto.”
Source: Arrington, Transit Oriented Development: Understanding the
Fundamentals of TOD, 2007
TOD aims to…

Encourage walking, cycling and PT


Increase public transport revenues
Improve safety outcomes
Provide public health benefits
Support move towards Zero Carbon
Create more livable communities
Density of Development

400 m
(5 min. walk)
200 m

Station

800m (and more depending on form of transit)


Diversity –
A Mix of
Uses
Housing Shopping

Jobs
Design –
Buildings, Streets and Public Spaces

Architecture and Street Multi-modal Streets


Relationships
Design – Connected Networks
3 Edmonton’s Slow Start
1978
• Downtown to Belvedere
• 6.9 km, 5 stations
May or may not be Auckland
Belvedere Station
PARK + RIDE
BUS TERMINAL

100 m
Belvedere Station
PARK + RIDE
BUS TERMINAL

LOW INTENSITY
INDUSTRIAL

100 m
Belvedere Station
AUTO-ORIENTED
RETAIL
LOW DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL

PARK + RIDE
BUS TERMINAL

LOW INTENSITY
INDUSTRIAL

100 m
Belvedere Station
Coliseum Station Area Zoning
Bonnie Doon
Coliseum Station Area
Clareview Station Area
Clareview Station Area
SCHOOLS AND
HOSPITALS
RECREATION
FACILITIES

HOUSING INTEGRATED
WITH RETAIL AND PARKING

Clareview Station Area


Clareview Station Area
TOD didn’t succeed because:

Density Zoning allowed for it, but in locations


where the market didn’t want to
build it
+
Diversity Served diverse land uses, but many
tended not to be transit supportive
+
Design Station integration and design
guidance for private development
severely lacking
4 Getting Up to Speed
1978
• Downtown to Belvedere
• Underground in
Downtown
1981
• Belvedere to Clareview
1983
• Central to Corona
• Underground
1989
• Corona to Grandin
• Underground
1992
• Grandin to University
• River crossing
2006
• University to Health Sciences
• Return to surface
2009
• Health Sciences to
Century Park
2015
• New Metro Line
• Churchill to NAIT/Blatchford
• Current extent of LRT
• 24 km, 18 stations
• 27 km Valley Line under
construction
• Multiple extensions in design
Lewis Farms

2008
• Proposed West Line
• Health Sciences to
Lewis Farms
“No more
crap!”
Stephen Mandel,
2006 State of the
City Address
Multiple Criteria Analysis

Assessment Category Weighting


Land Use/Promoting 26.7%
Compact Urban Form
Movement of 20.0%
People/Goods
Feasibility/ 13.3%
Constructability
Effects on Parks and 13.3%
Public Spaces
Natural Environment 13.3%
Social Environment 13.3%
Overall 100%
From this…
…to this
and this…
…to this
Station/TOD Typologies
TOD Plans Since 2008

• 30,000+
residential units
planned
• 230,000 sm
commercial
floor space
• More proposals
in progress
• 24 ha shopping
mall site
• 1,750 residential
units
• 70,000 sm of
reconfigured retail

Mill Woods Town Centre


• 24 ha shopping
mall site
• 1,750 residential
units
• 70,000 sm of
reconfigured retail

Mill Woods Town Centre


Mill Woods Town Centre
• 12 ha shopping
mall site (1950s)
• 3,000 residential
units
• “Daylighting” of
redeveloped
retail to a series of
on-site streets

Bonnie Doon
• 12 ha shopping
mall site (1950s)
• 3,000 residential
units
• “Daylighting” of
redeveloped
retail to a series of
on-site streets

Bonnie Doon
• 12 ha shopping
mall site (1950s)
• 3,000 residential
units
• “Daylighting” of
redeveloped
retail to a series of
on-site streets

Bonnie Doon
• 18 ha former
shopping mall site
• Current end-of-line
park and ride
• 4,200 residential
units
• Office and retail

Century Park
Century Park
• 217 ha former
airport site
• Council acting as
developer
• 15,000 residential
units
• 130,000 sm office
and retail
• 25 year build-out

Blatchford
Blatchford
H
B
2 km 9 km

CBD
CBD

Blatchford vs Hobsonville
5 Lessons for Auckland
Essential Elements for TOD
Edmonton’s Lessons

1 Plan LRT that integrates with and


adds to communities
Edmonton struggled for Consider a broad-based
decades because early route range of effects and
choices were easy ones, not the possibilities. Focusing
best ones. narrowly on moving people
as quickly as possible may
Choose technology and design have negative side effects
infrastructure that is adapted to and create missed
context. LRT should be an asset opportunities.
rather than a liability.
Edmonton’s Lessons

2 Choose your route and station


locations carefully
Think not only about what exists now, but where the best
potential is in the future.

Station areas with large sites Areas with small lots and
that have older building stock areas that are vehicle-
or government-owned land oriented (e.g., large
provide better opportunities unadaptable blocks, big box
for more rapid transformation retail, newer buildings not
into TOD and public transport supportive of public transport)
supportive areas. are difficult areas for TOD.
Edmonton’s Lessons

3 Establish firm
principles but be
Target public sector planning
efforts where conditions are
not ripe for the private sector
open to different to lead (i.e. areas with
fragmented ownership or the
methods of need for significant public
achieving them infrastructure investments).

TOD frameworks should be Let the private sector lead


prepared early to set clear where the market is strong,
expectations for density, but hold them to a high
diversity, and design, for all standard on transit-
actors. orientation.
Edmonton’s Lessons

4 Have patience, and


avoid “zone it and
Redevelopment that can be
implemented in small,
progressive steps over time is
they will come” or best. Government priorities
change and economies rise
silver bullet strategies and fall, so hanging your hat
on megaprojects is
Density is but one piece of dangerous.
the puzzle, and is best
negotiated to maximize Successful TOD is complex
public value on diversity and and requires coordination of
design, rather than given up multiple parties over many
at the beginning of the years. Be prepared to be in it
process. for the long haul.
Tom Young, MCIP, MCP
NZ Group Manager, Urban
Planning & Environmental
Services
tom.young@stantec.com

Thank You!
Edmonton’s Lessons

1 Plan LRT that


integrates with 3 Establish firm
principles but be
and adds to open to different
communities methods of
achieving them

2 Choose your
route and station 4 Have patience, and
avoid “zone it and
locations they will come” or
carefully silver bullet
strategies