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Earthschooling

Third Grade Lesson Plans Sample Index & Introduction


Main Index
1. The Third Grade Year
a. How to Start………………………………………….4
b. Third Grade Supplements…………………………..5
c. Introduction to Third Grade……………………….6
d. Third Grade Year Map……………………………..7
e. Third Grade Basics………………………………….8
f. Planning & Schedule for Grade Three…………….9
g. Storytelling for Grade Three……………………….9
h. Lesson Blocks in Waldorf Education………..……10
i. Third Grade Schedules…………………………….13
j. Third Grade Form Drawing………………………15
k. Third Grade Main Lesson Blocks………….….…..16
l. Language for Grade Three………………….….…18
m. Opening Songs & Movement………………..…..…20
2. August
a. Themes of the Month…………………..…Integrated
b. Bread of the Month……………………...Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month………See Section 1
d. Index for the Month…………………..………..….23
e. Verses ………………………………………………26
f. Stories……………………………………………….27
g. Crafts……………………………………………….50
h. Lessons…………………………………...…………71
3. September
a. Themes of the Month…………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month…………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month……… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month………………………..……...84
e. Verses ………………………………………..…….87
f. Stories………………………………………..……..91
g. Crafts……………………………………………..166
h. Lessons……………………………………………183

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4. October
a. Themes of the Month………………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month…………………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month……………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month……………………………...226
e. Verses …………………………….……………….229
f. Stories…………………………………………..…231
g. Crafts…………………………………………..….277
h. Lessons…………………………………………....288
5. November
a. Themes of the Month………………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month………………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month…………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month…………………………..…302
e. Verses …………………………………………....305
f. Stories…………………………………………….307
g. Crafts……………………………………………..373
h. Lessons……………………………………………381
6. December
a. Themes of the Month……………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month……………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month……………………………..400
e. Verses ……………………………………………403
f. Stories…………………………………………….407
g. Crafts……………………………………………..451
h. Lessons……………………………………………461
7. January
a. Themes of the Month………………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month……………….…………. Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month……………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month……………………………..483
e. Verses …………………………………………….486
f. Stories…………………………………………......488
g. Crafts…………………………………………..…532
h. Lessons…………………………………………....547

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8. February
a. Themes of the Month………………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month…………………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month……………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month…………………….……….559
e. Verses …………………………………………….562
f. Stories……………………………………………..566
g. Crafts……………………………………………..654
h. Lessons……………………………………………673
9. March
a. Themes of the Month………………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month…………………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month……………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month……………………………..691
e. Verses ……………………………………………693
f. Stories…………………………………..………...696
g. Crafts……………………………………………..770
h. Lessons…………………………………………...778
10. April
a. Themes of the Month………………………… Integrated
b. Bread of the Month………………………… Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month……………See Section 1
d. Index for the Month……………………………..782
e. Verses …………………………………………….784
f. Stories……………………………………………..790
g. Crafts…………………………………………..…817
h. Lessons…………………………………………....829
11. May
a. Themes of the Month……………………….. Integrated
b. Bread of the Month…………………………Not for G3
c. Teacher Guide for the Month…………… See Section 1
d. Index for the Month……………………………...834
e. Verses ……………………………………………..836
f. Stories……………………………………………...841
g. Crafts……………………………………………...852
h. Lessons…………………………………………..…862

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How to Start
You will need two resources at your disposal before you start. You do not need to completely
read these resources but you will NEED them as you create your lesson plans and start to teach.
Once you are enrolled as a member you can download these from your website. I will also be
sending these to you via E-mail. If you do not receive them please tell me.

Waldorf Yearly Lesson Plan Guide


This is a ―look-ahead‖ guide for the year as well as a resource for different ideas on how to plan
your lessons, your day, your week, your month and your year. This guide talks also talks about
rhythms and the ―whys‖ of what we are doing. Additionally, there is a guide to the ―grades and
ages‖ in this packet so you know what is appropriate for each age.

Basic Waldorf Teacher Resources


These come in the form of downloadable handouts that you can read. These handouts include all
the basics for the lessons such as ―How to Tell a Waldorf Story,‖ ―How to Knit‖, ―How to
Finger-knit‖, etc…All the basic bread recipes are found here as well.

How to Print & Organize E-books


This reference file will help you decide how you want to use your e-book and what printing
option is most suitable to your usage. This file will help you save money and time on printing.

Videos & MP3


These can all be found at your online page. You can log in to your online page by going to
www.EarthSchooling.com and entering your personal username and password. If you do not
have a personal username and password please contact me at: herbnhome@gmail.com.

IMPORTANT Note
I have divided everything into the months of the year so that lessons are more appropriate for the
seasons and holidays and to make your monthly planning easier. This organization style works
well for large families, groups, and people using this program to enrich their existing curriculum.
However, you may mix lessons from other months with your current month. Students may work
at a quicker pace some months and a slower pace other months depending on their level and on
their interest in a subject. Note that the months of August and November have extra stories and
lessons so if you find yourself needing material you can use extras from those months. Be sure to
highlight or mark the lessons you DON’T use each month so as the year progresses you know
what extra lessons you have. Also note that you can use the June and July lesson blocks during
the year if you do not teach during the summer or you find that the block is too large to cover in
the summer.

If you are planning on working strictly in lesson blocks then you will need to extract the blocks
from each month of lessons.

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Third Grade Supplements
Now that we are working with grade three we will be working in more intense blocks. For this
reason I have included a number of concentrated blocks outside this curriculum book. Most are
refereced in this book so you have an idea where and how you can use them. Here is a summary
of the extra lesson blocks included with the grade three curriculum:

Watercolor Supplement for Grade Three


I am excited to add this to the grade three curriculum. This is an E-book version of a book I
published I cooperation with the 5th grade class and their teacher at Four Winds Waldorf school
in the Chicago suburbs. I wrote the story and the teacher took the class through the story with
watercolors. This story is perfect for the gardening and farming unit of grade three as it talks
specifically about herbs and their usage. I especially like this book because it shows the wide
range of watercoloring styles and skill levels instead of showing ―just the best pictures‖. To use
this supplement tell the story to the children and paint pictures to go with it. The children will
then ―copy‖ your picture.

Exploring Mandalas
This is perfect for the free form geometry we do in third grade form drawing lessons.

Housebuilding
This supplement is based on a vintage book that provides short summaries and pictures of
housebuilding across history and culture. Use this as a basis for your lessons. I have also
included some personal examples of how we used these lessons.

Herbs for Kids Two


This supplement is perfect for third grade farming and gardening – it talks about ―wildcrafting‖
and identifying plants and herbs.

Third Grade Form Drawing


This supplement is being developed in 2009 and will be sent on a monthly basis. Each lesson
will be drawn out in a step-by-step manner with examples given. You can see a sample lesson in
the September lesson plans below.

The Persian Market


An introduction to the more intense unit on Persian studies in grade five.

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Introduction to Third Grade
Third graders are listening to myths, legends of animals, hero stories, stories of inventors,
advanced fairytales, math, science and nature Stories Stories from the Old Testament are also
introduced for this age. Even if you are not Christian I recommend going through this unit with
your child. In today’s world I feel it is important for every child to have a familiarity with the
four major religions on the planet – Buddhist, Christianity, Islam and Juddaism. If you want to
teach stories from another religious book you can start introducing those at this time. Contact me
if you would like references for Islamic, Jewish or Buddhist sources. If you want to find good
independent reading books for your child at the book store try to find ones that cover the topics
above. Many Waldorf teachers recommend that the Persian and Indian studies unit be done in 3rd
grade instead of 5th grade. For my 3rd graders I do a gentle introduction to Persian and Indian
studies in 3rd grade and then delve deeper into the subject in 5th grade. In February of this year I
give the 3rd graders a hint of some of the 5th grade material by including some poetry from Rumi.
In May, I introduce them to an annotated version of the original 1001 Nights – this original
version actually has 1001 stories and contains a lot more detail, however, it still needs to be
edited down for the G5 students. The version I use for the G3 students in the short version of the
Arabian Nights, authored by Lang and intended to be family friendly. His version includes only
32 nights. Performing and Arabian Nights play at the end of the year will guide the children in
researching some costumes, habits and language of that time period in Persia.
If you are looking for a unit on creation myths I have put those in the November lesson plans.
Note that in G3 the emphasis is on creating things that can be used and on self sufficiency topics
like making bags, hats, baskets, your own toys, planting your own food and building your own
homes. If you want to find activities for your child that are ―go with‖ your G3 year focus on
finding opportunities in the community that will support these lessons. Does you local science
center or history center have a display on house building or building? Is there a knitting class at
the community center that teaches people how to make socks? Is there a toy making seminar at
Home Depot next weekend? Do you know a local toymaker or have a local factory where they
make clothing, toys or bags? Look around in your community and ask friends and family for
ideas and help with this year.
Note also that a lot of things are introduced gently this year. Grammar is introduced in a gentle
way but not in an intense ―sentence diagramming‖ sort of way. Grammar will continue to be a
part of their studies as they progress through the grades. It is especially helpful for a child’s
grammar if they are learning a second language. If your child does not have formal classes or
studies in a second language now is the perfect time to start. Geometry is also introduced in a
gentle way – circles, squares and triangles are all measured, drawn and explored but complex
mathmatecal formulas involving these shapes are not covered this year. Geometry is also
explored through form drawing this year.
Continue to introduce the children to new painting experiences by sharing stories from the
lessons and painting about them afterwards. From Grade One to Grade Three the children are
still developing the foundation for work through an artistic approach to all subjects.
The rhythm of the day throughout this period supports the child’s development. Each day begins
with a two hour main lesson (on one specific subject over a 3-6 weeks although we sometimes

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do two subjects at once). After this special subjects are covered like handiwork, movement,
nature walks, painting, ets. As always I have included some sample schedules below. However,
they are only samples. You need to follow the pace and needs of your own family. For example,
if there is a local exhibit on Persia or India or a local Indian Culture festival you may want to
plan your unit study around that instead of following the schedule I have down.

Third Grade Year Map


I have integrated the lesson blocks into the monthly lesson plans. If you would like to extract
them and use them in different months you can find them at the following locations:

Housebuilding – In the Third Grade ―Study Group‖ of your Homeroom Page


Math & Geometry – A little is located in the lesson plans section each month
Creation Myths – November
Form Drawing – Lesson one is located in the September lesson plans below. The remaining
lessons will be sent to you as one e-book and as individual lessons each month.
Form Drawing & Geometry Through Flower Arranging – February
Form Drawing Mandalas – In the Third Grade ―Study Group‖ of your Homeroom Page Herbal
Identification/ Plant Identification – In the Third Grade ―Study Group‖ of your Homeroom Page
Language – A little is located in the lesson plans section each month
Introduction to Persian Studies – A story is located in your lesson plans each month. The rest of
the block is located at: www.TheWaldorfChannel.com , click on login.

Username: persian
Password: mkt879

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Third Grade Basics

Theme: Difference Between Self and Others – Where Do I Belong? Cultivate Confidence and
Security

By the third grade, children are beginning to comprehend the difference between self and other
and wonder where in the scheme of things they belong. To fortify their growing personal
identity, they read creation and Old Testament stories. Around the age of nine comes a very
important psychological change. The child has a stronger experience of its own individuality or
identity (ego) and therefore begins to question adult authority. it may feel isolated from family
and friends and therefore need more sympathy and firmness from teachers and parents. Again,
the subjects given to Class Three are carefully chosen and timed to relate to this inner
psychological change.

The Hebrew Old Testament stories give the nine-year-old an inner picture of the security of a
God who looks after His chosen people. The Old Testament story of the Fall from Paradise is a
vivid image of what the nine-year-old is experiencing in its soul. (Other religious traditions may
also wish to add things here). In handwork the children crochet a hat, a visible form of something
protecting them. In the main lesson they learn about occupations such as house building, farming
and traditional crafts. How do farmers provide our food. Unforgettable is an early morning visit
to a cowshed with its characteristic sounds and smells, seeing the cows milked, feeling their
warm breath, tasting the fresh milk! Farming, housing, building, measurement, and mastery of
the multiplication tables and four arithmetic processes provide a practical foundation for
scientific study and help ground the children. They go away together to spend a week on a farm.
The study of grammar helps them to develop rational thinking. Each child takes up a stringed
instrument: violin, viola or cello.

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Planning & Schedule for Grade Three
Third Grade
Morning:
Trimester One: Math (Measurements of volume, space, money and time) – Cursive writing –
Form Drawing (Vertical Symmetry).
Trimester Two: Grammar & Spelling – Native American stories
Trimester Three: Old Testament stories
Note: You can study these lessons in any order through the year. This was our schedule.

Afternoon:
Housebuilding & gardening
Nature based crafts & art
Circle time including songs & verse in other languages & rounds
Complex knitting/crochet/painting/block crayons/beeswax modeling/etc…depending on the
monthly focus in the lesson plans
Soprano recorder & reading music

Storytelling for Grade Three


For third graders you can tell them the story and then have them create tiny wax figures. You
can also do stories as water-color stories and you can tell stories using chalk drawing. Any story
below can be used in the Main Lesson Book as a “reader” or as a writing lesson – as you skim
the stories, if you find one that looks to be your child’s level in reading or writing you can
extract that story to also use as their lesson. Watercolors or colored pencils can be used. Start to
introduce chalk drawing.

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Lesson Blocks in Waldorf Education
& How the EarthSchooling Program Uses Lesson Blocks
Note: This article is intended to be useful for all people following a Waldorf inspired method of
schooling or enrichment. Even if you do not use the Earthschooling lesson plans you will find
this article very helpful in your planning.

When Rudolf Steiner started the first Waldorf school, he established the ―main lesson‖—a two-
hour class during which all academic subjects except for foreign languages would be taught. The
subjects taught in the main lesson were studied for block of time lasting from three weeks to
three months. There are many activities that would fall outside of the main lesson block
category, however. These include nature walks , bread making, cooking and circle time (which
happen daily), some crafts and handiwork (which naturally flow into some lessons even if they
are not your main lesson block focus) and review (for example, you may include some math
review in your circle time even if that is not your main lesson block focus).

Teaching in main lesson blocks is one of the most successful features of Waldorf education, for
it allows teachers to cover the curriculum intensively and allows the students to become
immersed. I know from experience with myself and my own students and children that
immersion is the most effective way to learn many things. Learning in a block allows a student to
open up to a subject slowly and naturally learn or to open up to it quickly and fully experience
the joy of becoming completely involved in something.

One wonderful and unique aspect of the Earthschooling program is that you can choose to use
the program as a monthly enrichment or you can use it to work in blocks with your child. This
article will discuss:

A. The importance of blocks and how to use them

B. How to use the Earthschooling program as a block-method

C. Some specific examples for grade one – grade eight on how to plan the day

For ages 1-7 you will not be working in blocks. Instead you will follow a schedule that balances
the head, heart and hands and breathing out activities with breathing in activities. I have provided
a few sample schedules for this age in The Waldorf Year Planner that comes with your
EarthSchooling lessons. Note also that foreign language, eurhythmy, yoga, nature walks,
movement, some academic review and some music are not usually done in blocks. A child has
exposure to these each week.

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If you are wanting to follow a block system with my lesson plans or any other lesson plans then
you would include verses, a nature walk, foreign language, and perhaps some review or ―short
lessons‖ in various subjects every day in the afternoon. In the morning, however, you would
focus on one or two blocks of lessons. Some teachers hold firm to the ―one block‖ at a time
method. However, I find that with a smaller homeschooling class that two blocks can often be
done at once as long as they are complimentary subjects. For example, if we are doing a lesson
block on Native American stories we could easily do a grammar and writing block at the same
time as these can ―go together‖. Or, if we are studying Greek Mythology it is also a natural time
to do the block on Greece in general and learn more about the geography and culture of the
country. I have provided a sample of our plans below which include two lesson blocks at a time.
However, you can easily change them if you wish so instead of doing two lesson blocks during
trimester one, you could do one lesson block at the first part of the trimester and another during
the second half of the trimester. I have to admit I have also done that at times when my child
needed that. I have three children and sometimes I have other children over for programs so the
schedule below is an outline, but even I make changes and adaptions to it from time to time. As
Steiner suggested, each teacher is unique. However, I hope this sample can inspire and guide you
in your planning.

There is a large variance in the way teachers across the country do it. Even Steiner varied in the
length of time he suggested that blocks be done. Some lasted as long as 3 weeks and others for 3
months. He also recognized that each teacher would need to establish this time for herself and
her own class so he did not set an exact ―rule‖ for an exact number of weeks for each subject. He
suggested ranges of time. Additionally, you may plan to do a block for three months but feel
―finished‖ at two months and want to move on. That is suitable too. Part of Waldorf education is
to follow the natural rhythms of the child and life in general.

So How do I Integrate this into the Earthschooling Curriculum?

How Can I Use Another Curriculum in Block Format?

Each month of Earthschooling lesson plans focuses on one handiwork block, one literature block
and one science block each month, so these are already planned into the year and in ―block
form‖. If you look at the lesson plans for each month you will notice that I provide on only one
or two handiwork lessons to focus on and only one or two science subjects per month. You may
choose just one of these to focus on for your science block that month.

However, if you look at the literature I have provided each month you will find that I have
provided more stories than anyone could use each month. This is so you can choose the block of
literature that is most appropriate for your family, culture and season for that month. All the
literature provided each month is age appropriate. You do not need to go through all the stories
in one month – it is intended that you choose the ones appropriate for your block each month.
However, if you are not working with a pure block method it is also completely acceptable to
follow the stories each month as they are provided and according to your needs and preferences.

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The only blocks that are not pre-planned each month are the math, cultural and language blocks.
This is because we usually spend more than one month on these blocks. If you are a year or
lifetime member you are given the math and language program for the year in block format to do
when you want. If you are a monthly member you can purchase the math or language block in
addition to your lessons (for only $7.50). However, I do provide a sample of each of these blocks
each month so no matter what month you start in and no matter what month you are using to ―try
out‖ the program, you will have everything you need for that month without making additional
purchases.

Specific Instructions on How to Block Out the EarthSchooling Lessons

Important Pre-Notes and Tips in Blocking:

1. You will notice that I have provided many more stories than you will use each month. This is
so you have more freedom in your language block planning. Depending on your focus for that
month you can choose stories only from that genre and then, after a few months, change the
stories you are choosing. For example, in first grade you could do the following in three-month
blocks: fables & folktales, learning stories, science stories, and finally, fairytales So for August,
September and October you may only use the Fables in the lesson plans, for the next three
months you may only focus on the science stories and for the next three months you would only
focus on the fairytales. You would not be using all the stories each month anyway. There is not
enough time.

2. I usually focus on two blocks at a time for one trimester each. For handiwork, science and
literature I work in 4 week blocks. The main lessons below are trimester blocks that we do in the
morning. The 4-week blocks of handiwork, science, foreign language and music we do in the
afternoon. This is just a sample of what works for us. Additionally, I may sometimes lengthen or
shorten a block depending on what my child’s needs are.

3. Note also that just because you are working in blocks does not mean you will not use the
skills from all areas. For example for one trimester we may focus on language, but we will still
use it the entire year. We will just not focus on it. Or we may focus on math for a trimester but
we won’t avoid it the rest of the year when it comes up. As much as possible we try to integrate
math and language studies into all of our lesson blocks. We also try to integrate science, music,
geography and many things. So don’t limit your learning possibilities by closing your mind to
―tie in‖ opportunities or even a little ―unschooling‖ or child-led lesson planning. The blocks are a
way to focus your lessons and not limit them.

4. In the summer months my children and I do blocks of handiwork and extra lessons such as
nutrition, herbal studies, woodworking, storytelling and other subjects. I offer these blocks in the
form of e-books at www.TheWaldorfChannel.com If we have not finished a block during the
year we may also work on it during the summer.

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Third Grade Schedules
Sample One
Morning:

Trimester One: Math (Measurements of volume, space, money and time) – Cursive writing –
Form Drawing (Vertical Symmetry).

Trimester Two: Grammar & Spelling – Native American stories (for the Australians in my
program I include the aboriginal stories instead).

Trimester Three: First Part: Old Testament stories and/or stories from the religious book of
your religion (writings of Buddha, Koran, etc…).

Trimester Three: Second Part: We do some of our Persian block here and include a bit about
the Middle East too. Some schools of Waldorf thought advocate doing these blocks earlier. I
agree because of the current state of world affairs.

Afternoon:

Housebuilding & gardening

Nature based crafts & art

Circle time including songs & verse in other languages & rounds

Complex knitting/crochet/painting/block crayons/beeswax modeling/etc…depending on the


monthly focus in the lesson plans

Soprano recorder & reading music

There may be only a few lessons in a topic, like soapmaking, for example, but you want to go
farther. There is no space to put endless information about each topic but if you are interested in
doing more in a topic that is not deeply covered I can help you find free online resources.

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Sample Two
September - Farming and Gardening

October - Math Studies

November - Language, stories & grammar

December – Measurement of Space

January - House Building

February - Math Studies with Geometry

March - Farming & Gardening

April - Language & Grammar

May - Measurement of Time

June – (Week One Only) – Review & Play Performance

Summer – Field trips either this summer or the previous summer should focus on farm visits.

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Grade Three Form Drawing
For basic instructions on form drawing that you can use for all the ages please see the book
―Form Drawing Basics‖ in the ―course documents center‖. I have included one lesson for
September in this E-book. The rest of the form drawing lessons for the year will come as
monthly supplements. This year we will be doing the following:

1. Crossing the Midline: Forms this year cross over one another to create a different form.
It is interesting to note that at this age (9 & 10) the same process is happening in the
brain.
2. Crossing Over Symmetry

3. Metamorphosis – More advanced transformational forms are practiced during this year.
4. Four-Fold Symmetry – We have been working on symmetry in grades one and two. This
year we can start on the more complex four-fold symmetry of forms. Working with
Mandalas, among other methods, is one way to do this.

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Third Grade Main Lesson Blocks
Gardening
The third grader becomes aware that they are leaving the realm of childhood and they feel a loss
for this event. To help them through this we give them a connection to the earth this year –
through gardening and visiting other’s gardens and farms (and even botanical centers). Be sure to
integrate some introduction to local and world history in your lessons. Ask questions about what
is being planted and why. A good book series to read together this year is ―The Ringing Cedars‖
series by Anastasia. This is the best book for introducing the children to the real connection we
have to the earth through farming. Another thing to focus on is on the history of the grains. We
will learn about ―The Seven Grains‖ , how to identify them and where they came from. Talk
about how there used to be over 2000 kinds of wheat and now there are only a few.

Of course the life cycle of the plant will be explored as a child plants a seed, watches it grows
and harvests it. Try to do a lot of composting this year. The child will do some canning, freezing
and drying of foods as well.

Langage & Grammar


This year the third grader will be reading, writing longer papers, learning cursive and being
introduced to grammar.

Math & Geometry & Measurement of Time & Space


Continue to have the child explore and enjoy the process of counting and writing numbers. This
year we will explore numbers beyond the millions place value. Some kids really enjoy starting
their own extra paper that is just for writing numbers. Instruct them to start with one and keep
writing a bit every day. The way you do this is to keep attaching large graph paper together (to
the bottom of the previous one) and as your list of numbers gets longer and longer it can be
rolled into a scroll. Be sure to include some larger numbers this year with the four processes. The
child will be reviewing the basic processes using the number 1-10. However, now you can start
multiplying numbers like 23 x 45 and beyond. Be sure to use all four processes with the larger
numbers this year. This year you will also do less reciting and more random practice of the times
tables. You can still use bean-bags. However, tossing them you will call out random problems to
do instead of doing them in some order or with only one number as the theme.

We will also explore measuring this year – in different ways. We will measure time and space in
so many different ways. Be creative with these units. The lessons below are just guides for you.
You are intended to create from those guides. Be sure how to talk about how measurement
progressed over time the history of measurement. Talk about how many hundreds of different
calendars there are in the world and introduce facts like our own calendar was originally 10
months but two additional months were added because the king wanted something named after
him. Visit your local science and history center and explore different ways of measuring -
sundials, astrolable, water clocks, etc…

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Housebuilding
The third grader will first observe houses and different forms of housebuilding. This last week
we had an opportunity in our community to help build a sod house. You can bed I jumped at that
chance! Our local living history farms has authentic Native American T-pees. We made our own
after seeing those. Don’t limit yourself here. If you live in an area with snow this is the year you
will make blocks and create an igloo from those blocks. You will start with observation and end
the year by trying some more complex constructions such as a treehouse or small playhouse.

Math for Grade Three


Make sure you have read the e-book ―Sixth Sense Math‖ and your child has a good basis in math.

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Language for Grade Three
Grammar
This is introduced first by the teacher (you) writing out paragraphs and writings for the child to
copy. In the Waldorf schools this is done on the chalkboard and the children copy from the
board. When the teacher is first introducing grammar they will write on the board, as they have
been in 1st, 2nd and 3rd grade, but they will now start to write the nouns, verbs and adjectives in
a different color chalk. In this way, the child is gently introduced to the grammar by copying
lessons from the board. At home you can write your lessons on paper instead of the board.

Later in the year the concepts are presented through stories. However, as the child integrates this
into their own work, and ask work with the grammar is continued, the SAME COLORS are used
to represent the noun, verb and adjective in the lessons.

Spelling
This is naturally accomplished through the student continuing to copy lessons from the board
into their main lesson book. At this age the child should also start or continue to create their own
pieces of writing through book reports, reports or journal entries. When a child copies from the
board to their Main Lesson book they should copy straight into their book. When a child creates
their own piece of writing you should correct it in another color of pencil before they copy it into
their main lesson book. Exposure to writing words in this way will help with spelling.

Secondly, all children should actively work on vocabulary words once a week and these words
should have something to do with the lessons you are working on. They can also come from the
stories you are telling to them or a book you are reading with them. I keep an index card box for
each child. In that box are many index cards and a divider. As they learn the words, they are
instructed to put the card behind the divider that says "words I know". Vocabulary words will be
different for each child depending on where they live. For instance, living in the Midwest we
have a lot of vocabulary about pioneers and Native Americans in our stories. If you live in
another area you may encounter different words.

Third, the child should copy and create sentences for at least 15 of these vocabulary words each
week. You can start creating their box now by going through the stories or topics you are
working on and copying some words from these stories onto the cards. Words come from "word
family" lists, books the student is reading or the MAIN LESSON you are doing with them at the
time.

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To find main lessons and books you can do the following:

1. Use the stories intended for telling from the third grade list of the Earthschooling
Curriculum. You can print out these stories.
2. Waldorf teachers often use the Newberry Award list. This list can be found at:
http://tinyurl.com/2mfhgj
3. Have them read books from another source following the themes listed in the
Earthschooling curriclum monthly guides. So, for example, if you are working on
Valentine's or Candlemas and the themes listed for that month are candles and love, you
can find books with these themes at: www.mainlesson.com

When a child is in fourth grade they should be learning the following (this is from Kristie's
Lesson Plan Yearly Guide):

Looking Ahead to Fourth Grade


From Class Four children have developed to a point where they can be led into the history and
geography of their locality. Tumultuous stories of Norse mythology teach about character and
individuality in a complex world. Children begin to learn about their place in the surrounding
environment with the study of local geography and map making. They write their own
compositions and increase math skills by learning fractions and long division. In music they
must hold their own in playing or singing a round.

I recommend the Book "Favorite Norse Myths" by Mary Pope Osborne or ANY similar book.
You can also find LOADS of myths at:
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html

One book that might be helpful is called "The Waldorf Student Reading List" by Fenner &
Rivers. You can purchase this at: http://www.michaelmaspress.com/readinglist.htm

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