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Mel Bay’s

Wall Charts

Table of Contents

Accordion ................................................................................................................................................................. 2
Banjo ..................................................................................................................................................................... 3-5
Bass ...................................................................................................................................................................... 6-9
Drums ................................................................................................................................................................ 10-12
Harmonica .............................................................................................................................................................. 13
Dulcimer ........................................................................................................................................................... 14-15
Guitar ................................................................................................................................................................ 16-32
Lap Steel / Resonator Guitar ........................................................................................................................... 33-35
Mandolin ......................................................................................................................... 36-37
Piano ............................................................................................................................... 38-40 R
Strings ............................................................................................................................ 41-43
Theory ............................................................................................................................ 44-45
Ukulele ........................................................................................................................... 46-47
Woodwinds ......................................................................................................................... 48
All Mel Bay wall charts are either 35" X 24" or 24" X 35".

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 1 11/14/13 9:19 PM


2

MB30369
Accordion
Wall Chart

on the left hand.


terminology for a
by Liam Robinson

explains the treble


basic anatomy and
The Accordion Wall

R
Chart is a useful ref-

instrument, the chart

switches on the right


piano accordion. Mir-

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 2
erence tool, providing

roring each half of the

ration of bass buttons


hand and the configu-
Accordion

Accordion Wall Chart by Liam Robinson


Treble Register Switches Bass Button Layout
dim
Treble Section Bass Bass Section 7
Register m
dim
Switches M
Notated Pitch 7
A# m
Top dim
Cx
M
7
D#
w
m
dim
Fx
&
M
7
G# m
dim
B#
Symbol Nickname Sounding Pitches M
7
C# m
dim
Bassoon E#
M
7
Instrument Sizes F#
&
m
dim
w
A#
M
= 24 Bass 7
B m
Accordion ww dim
D#
M
= 60 Bass 7
& w
E m
dim
= 72 Bass G#
M
7
Bandoneon A
w
m
dim
= 120 Bass
&
C#
M
w
7
D
m
dim
w
F#
Harmonium M
7
Player’s Hand

w
G
&
m
dim
w
B
Landmark M
7
w
= Note C m
Organ (concave dim
E
depression) M
7
&
F
w
m
C dim
A
M
w
Bass 7
Master B
b
Buttons m
dim
D
M
7
& www
E
b
m
dim
w
G
Musette M
7
A
b
m
& ww
dim
C
M
7
D
b
m
Violin dim
F
M
7
& ww
Treble G
b
m
dim
Register B
b
M
7
w
Switches
C
Oboe b
m
dim
w
E
b
M
&
7
F
b
m
A
b
M
Clarinet
w
B
bb
&
D
b
w
Bottom
Piccolo
30369

&
Order of Bass Buttons
ACCORDION WALL CHART

Additional Switches
E Counter Bass (Major 3rd above root)
R
“Authentic” (Root of all chords
C Bass
Musette in the diagonal row)
& www
M Major Chord
Master with Keyboard Grill Bellows
w
m Minor Chord
“Authentic”
Musette 7 Dominant 7th Chord
© 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
& wwww
Accordion photo courtesy of Titano Accordion Company MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A dim Dimished Chord

11/14/13 9:20 PM
30369_FULL_WORKING_CHART_C2.indd 1 7/30/13 3:44 PM
Mel Bay's Banjo and Chord Reference Wall Chart
By Janet Davis G Tuning = G D G B D – strings 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. 5th string stays on open G and is not included in the diagrams. = Open string. Fret numbers are on the left side of each diagram.

Strings Left-Hand Chords using sharps (s) move along right side of the Circle of 5ths Chords using flats (f) move along left side of the Circle = Circle of 4ths
4 3 2 1 G – D – A – E – B – Fs – Cs (C has no sharps or flats) F – Bf – Ef – Af – Df – Gf – Cf
D G B D T In 1st position Formed from "F" position . . . root "C" on 4th string
C F "F" position shape
1 C Cminor Codim C+aug C7 CMaj7 C6 Cm7 Cm6 C9 F Fm Fodim F+aug F7 FMaj7 F6 Fm7 Fm6 F9
F I 1 I 1 I M R 1 I I 1 I M 1 I 7 7 I 7 7 I 9 I 1 I 1 I I 1 I 1 1 I I 1 I 1 I 1 I I I 1 I M 2 I
r 2 2 M R 2 2 M 2 R P 2 M R 8 I 8 M 8 I I I 8 M R 10 M 2 M 2 2 2 I M 2 M 2 M R 2 M 2 2 3 M
M
3 3 3 3 3 P 9 M R 9 R 9 9 11 R 3 R P 3 R P 3 R P 3 R P 3 R 3 P 3 R 3 R 3 P 4 R
e 3 12 4 4 4 4 5
4 4 4 P 4 4 10 P 10 P 10 R 10 P P 4 4 4 4 4 P

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 3
R Root (C note) o +
t 4 Play 2nd string open Diminished = Augmented = symbol 7th on 3rd string Maj 7th on 1st string 6th on 1st string Flat 7th on 1st string 6th on 1st string 9th on 1st string This is a movable shape Root on 4th string Play open 1st for dim7 6th on open 1st string Play 1st string open Includes root, 7th, 9th
P is on 2nd string

G "F" shape All G chords are formed from "F" shape, with root on the 4th string Bf "Barre" shape "F" shape "Barre" shape "F" shape . . .
Each major chord will be the basis for forming other chords with the
G Gm Godim G+aug G7 GMaj7 G6 Gm7 Gm6 G9 Bf Bfm Bfodim Bf+aug Bf7 BfMaj7 Bf6 Bfm7 Bfm6 Bf9
same letter name. 1 1
2 2 2 I 2 2 2 2 I 2 2 4 I 2 I I I 2 3 I I I 6 I 3 I I I 6 I I I 5 I I 7 I
3 I 3 I I 3 M 3 3 I I 3 I 3 M 3 I I I 3 I 5 M 2 2 I 3 M 3 I M 4 7 M R 4 7 6 M R 8 M
Each chord position will be formed from one of the three basic chord
4 M 4 4 4 I M 4 M 4 M R 4 R 4 4 6 R 3 I I I I 3 M R P 4 4 R P 5 8 P 5 R 8 R 7 9 R
shapes: "F" shape, "D" shape or "Barre" shape.
5 R P 5 R P 5 R P 5 R P 5 R 5 P 5 P 5 R 5 R P 7 P 4 4 5 P 5 6 P 9 6 9 8 P 10 P
Each chord to the right will include its root note and/or the Root (G note) Barre index finger Dim (o) = lower Aug = raise 2nd string 7th on 3rd string Maj 7th on 1st string 6th on 1st string f7th on 1st string Play 1st string open 9th on 1st string Root on 3rd string Minor = lower 2nd string Optional: pinky Aug raises 1st and 7th on 4th string Root on 4th string Root on 3rd string Root on 4th string Root on 1st string
is on 4th string 2nd and 3rd strings from F shape from Barre forms dim7th 4th strings
characteristic note which determines its name.
D "D" position shape Optional: play the 4th string open for all D chords Ef "D" position shape
D Dm Dodim D+aug D7 DMaj7 D6 Dm7 Dm6 D9 Ef Efm Efodim Ef+aug Ef7 EfMaj7 Ef6 Efm7 Efm6 Ef9
1 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 I 1 1 I 2 2 2 I 2 1 I M 3 I 8 I I I 1 I 1 I I I 1 I
2 I 2 I 2 2 2 M 2 I I 2 I 2 M 2 M 2 M R 3 I 3 I 3 3 2 R 4 M 9 2 M 2 2 R
3 M 3 M R P 3 M R P 3 I M 3 3 3 3 P 3 P 3 4 M 4 M R P 4 M R P 4 I M 3 5 R 10 R 3 R 3 R 3 P
4 R P 4 4 4 R P 4 P 4 R 4 P 4 4 4 5 R P 5 5 5 R P 4 6 11 4 P 4 4
Circle of 5ths Root (D) is on 2nd string Root on 2nd string Or play 4th string open Pinky note is optional Maj 7th on 2nd string 6th on 2nd string f7th on 2nd string 6th on 2nd string 9th on 1st string Root on 2nd string Root on 2nd string Root on 4th string Play open 1st string Root on 3rd (barre) Root on 1st string Root on 4th string
C A "Barre" shape Uses the "F" shape "Barre" shape Formed from "F" shape From "F" shape From "F" shape Af "Barre" shape Uses "F" shape Uses "F" shape Uses "Barre" shape Uses "F" shape
F G
A Am Aodim A+aug A7 AMaj7 A6 Am7 Am6 A9 Af Afm Afodim Af+aug Af7 AfMaj7 Af6 Afm7 Afm6 Af9
1 1 I 1 I I I 1 2 I I I 5 I 1 5 I I I 4 I I 6 I 1 I I I I 1 I M R 1 I 1 I M 4 I I 4 I 1 I I I 4 I I I 3 I I 5 I
Bf D 2 I I I I 2 M R P 2 M 2 I M 3 6 M R 2 I I I 6 5 M R 7 M 2 2 2 2 R P 5 M 5 M R 2 5 4 M R 6 M
3 3 3 3 R P 4 7 P 3 7 R 6 8 R 3 3 3 R 3 6 R 6 P 3 R 6 R 5 7 R
4 4 4 P 4 5 P 8 4 R 8 7 P 9 P 4 4 4 4 7 7 4 7 6 P 8 P
Ef A Root (A) is on 3rd string Minor = lower 2nd string Pinky note is optional Aug raise 1st 6th on 4th string 7th on 1st string Root on 4th string Root on 1st string Root on 4th string
and 4th strings
E In the "F" shape Df and Cs The following are enharmonic chords – they use the same notes Based on "F" shape
o o + +
E Em Eodim E+aug E7 EMaj7 E6 Em7 Em6 E9 Df/Cs Dfm/Csm Df dim/Cs dim Df aug/Cs aug Df7/Cs7 DfMaj7/CsMaj7 Df6/Cs6 Dfm7/Csm7 Dfm6/Csm6 Df9/Cs9
Af E 1 I 1 2 I I I 1 I M 1 I 1 I M 1 I 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 I 2 I I I 1 1 9 I 8 I 9 I I I 5 I 1 I I
2 M R 2 M R 3 M 2 R P 2 M R 2 R 2 M R P 2 M 2 I M R 2 M 2 M 2 M R P 3 M 2 I M 2 I 10 M R 9 M 10 6 M R 2 M
3 3 4 3 3 P 3 3 3 3 3 R 3 R P 3 4 3 R P 3 M R 11 P 10 R 11 R 7 3 P
Df/Cs Cf/B 4 4 5 P 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 P 4 4 12 11 12 8 4
Gf/Fs P P P P
Play 2nd string open Pinky optional 9th on 1st string Root on 2nd string Root on 2nd string Aug (+5) on 3rd string 7th on 3rd string Root on 2nd string

• The order of chords follows the Circle of 5ths. B and Cf B and Cf use the same notes – these are called "enharmonic" chords Gf and Fs The following are enharmonic chords – they use the same notes
o o + + o o + +
B/Cf Bm/Cfm B dim/Cf dim B aug/Cf aug B7/Cf7 BMaj7/CfMaj7 B6/Cf6 Bm7/Cfm7 Bm6/Cfm6 B9/Cf9 Gf/Fs Gfm/Fsm Gf dim/Fs dim Gf aug/Fs aug Gf7/Fs7 GfMaj7/FsMaj7 Gf6/Fs6 Gfm7/Fsm7 Gfm6/Fsm6 Gf9/Fs9
• Each chord is 5 letters from the previous chord when going I I I 3
2 2 1 3 4 I I I 7 4 I I I 7 I I I 6 I I 8 I 2 I 2 I I 1 2 2 I I 2 1 I 1 1 I I
clockwise around the circle.
3 3 I 2 4 I M 5 8 M R 5 8 7 M R 9 M 3 M 3 2 M 3 I M 3 M 3 M R 2 M 2 I I I 2 M R 4 M
4 I I I I 4 M R P 3 I I I 5 R P 6 9 P 6 R 9 R 8 10 R 4 R P 4 R P 3 4 R P 4 R 4 P 3 R 3 3 5 R
• Each chord is 4 letters from the previous chord when going 5 5 4 R 6
counter-clockwise. This may be called the Circle of 4ths. M 6 7 P 10 7 10 9 P 11 P 5 5 4 R P 5 5 5 4 P 4 4 P P
"Barre" position shape Root on 3rd string Root on 3rd string Root on 3rd string Root on 3rd string Root on 3rd string Root on 4th string Root on 1st string Root on 4th string This is a movable shape "F" position minor "F" pos. diminished "F" pos. aug chord "F" pos. 7th chord "F" pos. Maj7th chord "F" pos. 6th chord "F" pos. minor 7th "F" pos. m6th chord "F" pos. 9th chord
• The chords on the right side of the circle use sharps; chords
on the left side use flats. CONTINUE TO THE RIGHT to complete the Circle of 5ths with the sharp keys (see Fs and Cs) CONTINUE TO THE LEFT to complete the Circle using flats (see Cf)

Fret: Open 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

A B C D E F G A B C
D E F G G
C D E F G A B C D E F A
B
G A B C D E F G A B C D E F
D E F G A B C D E F G A B C
G A B C D E F G A B C
MB20285
Fret: Open 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
w w
UPC

w #w w w #w w #w w #w
w #w w #w w w #w
R
w #w
R
w #w w
D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G A As/Bf B C
1 &
ISBN 0-7866-6837-7
w #w w w #w w #w w
w #w w #w w w #w
w w #w
EAN

w w #w w #w
2 &
B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A
w #w w #w w w
w #w w #w w #w w
w w #w w #w w
3 & w #w w #w
G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F
MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.
#4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069 w #w w #w w #w w w
w w #w w #w w
Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229) 4 & w w w #w w #w w #w
#w
D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C
FAX (636) 257-5062
Open w #w w w
Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com w #w w w #w w #w
w #w w #w w w #w
E-mail us at email@melbay.com 5 &
©2003 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069. G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C Cs/Df D Ds/Ef E F Fs/Gf G Gs/Af A As/Bf B C BANJO AND CHORD
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A. REFERENCE WALL CHART
ment.
Chart
MB20285

by Janet Davis

notes on the fret-


Reference Wall

9, augmented and
diminished chords
Full-size wall chart

7th, maj7, min7, 6,

are shown. Chords


Banjo and Chord

proper finger place-


of 5ths progression.

R
board for banjo in G
tuning. Major, minor,

Chord fingerings are


color coded to show
featuring chords and

are shown in a Circle


Banjo
3

11/14/13 9:20 PM
4
Banjo
MB30343 BLUEGRASS rim and tone ring head, tension hoop and flange peghead and nut Peghead

banjo
The central component of the pot (body) is the rim, which the rest of the banjo The banjo head fits onto the tone ring and stretches across the rim. It transfers vibrations from the The peghead (headstock) is located at the end of the neck, and houses the tuners. It is usually carved
stems from. The rim is a round piece of wood or metal that vibrates when the bridge to the rim, acting as an integral part in the production of the instrument’s sound. Most modern from the neck blank, but can also be made separately and attached with a scarf joint. The peghead is
instrument is played. Most wooden rims are made from maple, mahogany or banjos have mylar heads, but many older ones have heads made from animal skin. A tension hoop angled backward so the strings exert downward pressure on the nut. A peghead overlay
walnut. The rim can be constructed from laminated pieces of wood, or many in- keeps the head under tension, and is held in place with brackets (hooks) that are placed around the (veneer) is often included on higher quality banjos, and is usually made from ebony. The

Bluegrass Banjo
dividual “blocks”. A certain amount of flexibility in the rim is desired so the sound rim. The brackets are then attached with bracket nuts (hex nuts) to the flange, a metal component brand name is usually inlaid into the overlay. The nut is located at the base of
is not stifled. Steel coordinator rods reinforce the rim and can be adjusted to fitted to the rim. The head must be held under a certain amount of tension to transfer energy efficiently the peghead, and controls string spacing and height at the zero fret for the
change the neck angle and string action. A tone ring, often made from metal, from the strings to the rim. This amount is often determined by the tension hoop’s crown height: the top four strings. Most nuts are made from bone or plastic,
is seated onto the rim to enhance, project, and add sustain to the instrument’s distance from the top of the head to its mounting band. Most heads are fairly firm under tension, and which is slotted with precision to ensure the string travels Nut

Anatomy and
sound. Together, the rim and tone ring form the basis for the rest of the instru- are tuned to a specific note just like a drum head. Tightening or loosening the head (adjusting crown through easily.
ment. height) is done via the bracket nuts. This changes the sharpness of the instrument’s tone, making it
Coordinator Rod brighter or warmer.
D G B D
Tone Ring

Mechanics Wall
4 3 2 1
Head Tension Hoop
Tension Hoop Head

ANATOMY
Peghead Overlay

Chart
Bracket
Truss Rod Cover
Crown Height 5th String Tuner
Rim Rim Tuner
5th String Nut

AND MECHANICS tuners


Flange Mounting Band

Bracket Nut On the 5-string banjo, four tuners are housed in the peghe-
Rim

by Charlie
ad, and a tuner for the 5th string is located just above the
5th string nut, on the side of the neck. A variety of tuners are

tailpiece bridge armrest used, including tapered tuning pegs, frictions tuners, and
planetary geared tuners. Tapered wood tuning pegs are

Lee-Georgescu
the simplest kind and fit into the peghead just with friction.
The tailpiece anchors the strings at the bottom end of the banjo and maintains The bridge is located on the head and is held in place only by the strings. Most bridg- The armrest is situated above the pot. It provides ergonomic support for
A friction tuner is similar to a tapered peg but has a screw
their tension. Most are made from metals such as brass, bronze or steel. Many es are made from maple, and contain an ebony saddle. The saddle can be compen- the arm and prevents it from touching the head. Armrests are
that can be tightened to maintain friction between two metal
tailpieces can be adjusted via a tension screw. This allows the front edge to be sated to improve intonation by adjusting string lengths individually. Slots in the saddle usually made from either metal or wood, and come in
collars. Planetary geared tuners look like friction pegs, but
raised or lowered, changing string pressure on the bridge. By lowering the front determine string spacing. The bridge is usually shaped with a perpendicular back and many varieties. Some are attached to the pot Neck Friction Tuner Planetary Geared house a set of concealed gears.
edge closer to the head, the string angle behind the bridge increases. This in- an angled front to provide greater stability by offsetting string tension. Most bridges with clamps that secure onto the brackets,
Tuner
creases pressure on the bridge and results in a sharper sound. Conversely, a mel- have three “feet”, which transfer vibrations to the head. Bridge height correlates to the while others attach directly to the
lower tone can be achieved by raising the front edge to a more neutral position. angle of the heel cut, and affects string action. tension hoop. neck
Saddle Fretboard (“Fingerboard”) The neck is often made from woods such as maple, mahogany or walnut. It is attached to the pot with lag bolts,
Front Saddle Bridge which the coordinator rods screw into. These rods can be adjusted to change the instrument’s neck angle. The
Bridge String
Tailpiece Edge String heel cut determines the factory neck angle and forms a precise connection with the rim. Within the neck is a
truss rod: an adjustable steel rod with a bolt on one end. It works opposite string tension and controls the curva-
ture of the neck. Forward curvature in the neck is called relief, and a certain amount is usually required for proper
Perpendicular Angled String string action. A neck with an up-bow (too much relief) can be fixed by tightening the truss rod with a clockwise
Tension Back Edge Front Edge turn. Conversely, a neck with a back-bow can be fixed by loosening the truss rod (counterclockwise). The truss
Screw Fret rod is usually accessed at the base of the peghead underneath a truss rod cover, and usually requires a socket or
Feet
Head (Pot) Fretboard Binding Allen wrench.

“Bluegrass Banjo Saddle


fretboard
Neck

Anatomy and Mechan- Bridge The fretboard (“fingerboard”) is glued to the neck and houses the frets. It is often made
from ebony. Its surface is traditionally flat, but can also be radiused. Most banjos have
about 17-25 frets, which are spaced in intervals that provide equal temperament. They Coordinator Rods
Heel

ics” is a comprehen-
are often made of nickel silver or stainless steel. Inlaid position markers are usually Lag Bolts
Position Marker
found at the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th and 12th frets, and repeat past the octave. The 5th string
is often held in place with a small round bone nut at the 5th fret. A spike can also be
used to hold the string in place.

sive visual map of the Armrest


Binding 5th Fret
5th String Nut
Heel Cut
Heel

5-string resonator banjo.


Heel
Fretboard
Heel Neck

The poster includes a


Cut (Top)

Truss Rod

large diagram of the Up-Bow


Socket

instrument and detailed


Wrench
resonator Relief Allen
The resonator functions as a soundboard and projects the banjo’s sound forward. It Wrench

views of its components.


can be attached in different ways. Often, brackets are screwed onto the rim, which
attach to wall lugs on the resonator via four thumb screws. The resonator creates a
sound chamber that alters the character of the instrument’s sound. Depth and shape Straight
of a resonator affect the tone and response of the instrument. Most are made from

Descriptions of all the


woods like maple, mahogany and walnut, and feature binding or other types of inlays.

Back-Bow

major parts explain their


Head Curved Back Resonator

ANATOMY AND MECHANICS


BLUEGRASS BANJO
functions. This poster is

MB30343
Thumb Binding Inlay
Tension
Bracket Nut Screw Rim strings
Screw

a great visual for anyone


For bluegrass, strings on the 5-string banjo are usually tuned to
Bracket G-D-G-B-D (G tuning). The 5th string is tuned an octave above the
3rd string (G) and is the highest pitched string. This tuning configura- R
Tailpiece tion is known as re-entrant tuning. Light to medium gauge strings
Binding

interested in the banjo.


are typically used, which are measured in thousandths of an inch.
Resonator Most modern banjos are strung with steel strings, and the fourth
Back (thickest) string is usually wound in steel or bronze-phosphor alloy.
Wall
Older banjos had strings made from gut, which is often simulated
Lug
Rim today with nylon.
Bracket (Hook)

Tension Hoop Resonator


Flange © 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069
Resonator Thumb Screw ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

30343_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 5/17/13 1:49 PM

MB30348 OPEN-BACK rim and tone ring head AND TENSION HOOP peghead and nut

BANJO
The central component of the pot (body) is the rim, which the rest of the banjo The banjo head fits onto the tone ring and stretches across the rim. It transfers vibrations from The peghead (headstock) is located at the end of the neck, and houses the tuners. It is usually carved
Peghead
stems from. The rim is a round piece of wood or metal that vibrates when the the bridge to the rim, acting as an integral part in the production of the instrument’s sound. from the neck blank, but can also be made separately and attached with a scarf joint. The peghead is
instrument is played. Most wooden rims are made from maple, mahogany or Most modern banjos have mylar heads, but many older ones have heads made from animal angled backward so the strings exert downward pressure on the nut. A peghead overlay
walnut. The rim can be constructed from laminated pieces of wood, or many in- skin. A tension hoop keeps the head under tension, and is held in place with brackets (hooks) (veneer) is often included on higher quality banjos, and is usually made from ebony. The

Open-Back Banjo
dividual “blocks”. A certain amount of flexibility in the rim is desired so the sound that are placed around the rim. The brackets are then attached with bracket nuts (hex nuts) to brand name is usually inlaid into the overlay. The nut is located at the base of
is not stifled. Steel coordinator rods reinforce the rim and can be adjusted to metal components screwed into the rim called bracket shoes. The head must be held under a the peghead, and controls string spacing and height at the zero fret for the
change the neck angle and string action. A tone ring, often made from metal, certain amount of tension to transfer energy efficiently from the strings to the rim. This amount top four strings. Most nuts are made from bone or plastic,
is seated onto the rim to enhance, project, and add sustain to the instrument’s is often determined by the tension hoop’s crown height: the distance from the top of the head which is slotted with precision to ensure the string travels

Anatomy and
sound. Together, the rim and tone ring form the basis for the rest of the instru- to its mounting band. Most heads are fairly firm under tension, and are tuned to a specific note through easily.
ment. just like a drum head. Tightening or loosening the head (adjusting crown height) is done via the
Nut
bracket nuts. This changes the sharpness of the instrument’s tone, making it brighter or warmer.
Coordinator Rod D G B D

Mechanics Wall
Tone Ring
4 3 2 1

ANATOMY
Head Tension Hoop
Tension Hoop Head

Chart
Peghead Overlay

Bracket Truss Rod Cover


Rim 5th String Tuner
Crown Height

AND MECHANICS
Tuner
Rim 5th String Nut

tuners
by Charlie
Bracket Shoe Mounting Band

Bracket Nut On the 5-string banjo, four tuners are housed in the peghe-
Rim
ad, and a tuner for the 5th string is located just above the
tailpiece bridge
Lee-Georgescu
5th string nut, on the side of the neck. A variety of tuners are
used, including tapered tuning pegs, frictions tuners, and
The tailpiece anchors the strings at the bottom end of the banjo and maintains The bridge is located on the head and is held in place only by the strings. Most bridges are made planetary geared tuners. Tapered wood tuning pegs are
their tension. Most are made from metals such as brass, bronze or steel. Many from maple, and contain an ebony saddle. The saddle can be compensated to improve intonation Fret the simplest kind and fit into the peghead just with friction.
tailpieces can be adjusted via a tension screw. This allows the front edge to be by adjusting string lengths individually. Slots in the saddle determine string spacing. The bridge is A friction tuner is similar to a tapered peg but has a screw
raised or lowered, changing string pressure on the bridge. By lowering the front usually shaped with a perpendicular back and an angled front to provide greater stability by off- that can be tightened to maintain friction between two metal
edge closer to the head, the string angle behind the bridge increases. This in- setting string tension. Most bridges have three “feet”, which transfer vibrations to the head. Bridge Neck collars. Planetary geared tuners look like friction pegs, but
creases pressure on the bridge and results in a sharper sound. Conversely, a mel- height correlates to the angle of the heel cut, and affects string action. Friction Tuner Planetary Geared house a set of concealed gears.
lower tone can be achieved by raising the front edge to a more neutral position. Tuner

Front
Saddle String
Saddle Bridge neck
Tailpiece Bridge The neck is often made from woods such as maple, mahogany or walnut. It is attached to the pot with lag bolts,
Edge String
which the coordinator rods screw into. These rods can be adjusted to change the instrument’s neck angle. The
Fretboard (“Fingerboard”)
heel cut determines the factory neck angle and forms a precise connection with the rim. Within the neck is a
Perpendicular Angled truss rod: an adjustable steel rod with a bolt on one end. It works opposite string tension and controls the curva-
Back Edge Front Edge ture of the neck. Forward curvature in the neck is called relief, and a certain amount is usually required for proper
Tension
Screw Feet string action. A neck with an up-bow (too much relief) can be fixed by tightening the truss rod with a clockwise

“Open-Back Banjo Anat-


Head (Pot) turn. Conversely, a neck with a back-bow can be fixed by loosening the truss rod (counterclockwise). The truss
rod is usually accessed at the base of the peghead underneath a truss rod cover, and usually requires a socket or
Allen wrench.

omy and Mechanics” is Saddle Fretboard Binding String Neck

a comprehensive visual
Bridge
Heel
Coordinator Rods
Position Marker
armrest Lag Bolts

map of the 5-string The armrest is situated above the pot. It provides ergonomic support for the arm
and prevents it from touching the head. Armrests are usually made from either
metal or wood, and come in many varieties. Some are attached to the pot with

open-back banjo.
Armrest clamps that secure onto the brackets, while others attach directly to the tension
hoop. Heel Cut
Heel

The poster includes a


Heel

fretboard Heel
Cut
Neck
(Top)

large diagram of the


The fretboard (“fingerboard”) is glued to the neck and houses the frets. It is often
Truss Rod
made from ebony. Its surface is traditionally flat, but can also be radiused. Most
banjos have about 17-25 frets, which are spaced in intervals that provide equal
temperament. They are often made of nickel silver or stainless steel. Inlaid position

instrument and detailed


markers are usually found at the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th and 12th frets, and repeat past Up-Bow
the octave. The 5th string is often held in place with a small round bone nut at the
Socket
5th fret. A spike can also be used to hold the string in place.
Wrench

views of its components. Head


Binding 5th Fret
Relief Allen
Wrench

Descriptions of all the


5th String Nut
Straight
Fretboard

major parts explain their


ANATOMY AND MECHANICS

Back-Bow
OPEN-BACK BANJO

functions. This poster is


Tension Hoop
MB30348

Tailpiece

a great visual for anyone Tension Bracket Nut R


Screw
strings
interested in the banjo. Open-back banjos are used mainly for clawhammer and old-time style music.
Popular tunings include “open G” (G-D-G-B-D) and “double C” (G-C-G-C-D). The
5th string is tuned an octave above the 3rd string and is the highest pitched string.
This tuning configuration is known as re-entrant tuning. Light to medium gauge
Bracket (Hook) strings are typically used, which are measured in thousandths of an inch. Most
modern banjos are strung with steel strings, and the fourth (thickest) string is usu-
Rim ally wound in steel or bronze-phosphor alloy. Older banjos had strings made from
gut, which is often simulated today with nylon. © 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
Bracket Shoe MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

30348_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 8/13/13 9:48 AM

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 4 11/14/13 9:20 PM


5
Banjo
MB20768
Tenor Banjo
Wall Chart

by Joe Carr

Mel Bay’s New Tenor


Banjo Wall Chart with
Fingerboard Note
and Master Chord
BY JOE CARR reference features
Place “R” on chosen note for desired chord. 30 clearly labeled
Example: Form One at the fifth fret = “F” chord. chords placed around
a large photograph
of an attractive tenor
banjo. Featured are
major, minor, seventh,
sixth, minor seventh,
major seventh, ninth,
diminished and aug-
mented chord forms.
Each form includes
left hand fingering and
identifies the chord
number of each note.
The Fingerboard Note
diagram locates every
note on the 19 fret
tenor banjo neck! This
beautiful reference is
a great learning tool, a
convenient reference
and an attractive ad-
dition to any wall.

R
R

Tenor Banjo Wall Chart ISBN 0-7866-7252-8 MB20768 $5.95 U.S.

MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.


UPC
EAN

#4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069


Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229)
PHONE (636) 257-3970 • FAX (636) 257-5062
Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com
E-mail us at email@melbay.com

Photo courtesy of Rick Gardner

©2005 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. PACIFIC, MO 63069.


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 5 11/14/13 9:21 PM


6

paper.
Reference
MB94403

by William Bay
Electric Bass
Bass

& Master Chord

Presents chord ar-

R
Guitar Wall Chart

peggio diagrams for

24”” durable coated


root. Also includes a

4-string bass. 35”” x


from each chromatic
fourteen chord types

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 6
through fret 15 for the
bass note finder chart
with Fingerboard Note

ISBN 1-56222-827-7

EAN
UPC
MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.
Electric Bass #4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069
Chord Reference Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229) • FAX (636) 257-5062
& Note Finder Chart
Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com
MB94403 E-mail us at email@melbay.com
©1990 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.

11/14/13 9:21 PM
Untitled-3 1 9/16/08 9:03:59 AM
bridge pickups fretboard tuning machines
The bridge transfers string vibrations to the body While an acoustic bass imparts vibrations to the surrounding The fretboard (“fingerboard”) is the piece Frets are positioned on the Tunings machines are housed in the headstock. They determine string pitch by controlling
Tuning Machine
and is often screwed directly onto its face. On most air via a soundboard, an electric bass uses magnetic pickups of wood glued to the neck into which frets fretboard in intervals that pro- string tension. The combination of a pinion and worm gear provides accurate and stable
modern basses, the bridge also functions as a tail- to generate sound. A simple pickup consists of a bar mag- are seated. Most fretboards are made from vide equal temperament. The tuning. Some tuning machines contain a metal housing that encloses the gears.
piece. Individual saddles support each string, and net wound in a coil of wire. In the presence of a permanent hardwoods such as rosewood, maple or position and shape of a fret
can be adjusted to change string height and effective magnet, a string will become magnetized. When plucked, its ebony, each with unique tonal character- affects intonation. Frets come
ELECTRIC length. When coupled with a truss rod, this design vibration creates a current in the coil of wire. Many pickups istics. Radiused fretboards have a cross in different widths and heights,
allows for easy control of intonation and action. Most contain separate magnetic pole pieces for each string. Several section derived from a circle. Many players and are typically made from an
bridges and saddles are made from metal, which types of pickups are used on electric basses today. Single coil prefer them because they follow the curve alloy. Many fretboards contain
helps to increase sustain. pickups contain only one coil of wire. Humbucking pickups in the fretting hand. Flat fretboards can inlaid position markers at
(“humbuckers”) consist of two magnets wrapped in coils of make playing chords more difficult, but offer the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th and 12th
wire. Single coils sound brighter and usually have lower out- advantages for single-note playing. Com- frets. These usually repeat past
puts than humbuckers. Because a coil also acts as an antenna, pound radius fretboards have different the octave. They can also be
a single coil will generate hum from electromagnetic radiation. radiuses on each end, and usually flatten in found on the side of the fret-
In a humbucker, this interference is canceled by orienting the the higher register. board.
magnets in each coil in opposite directions. Split coil pickups
contain two pole pieces per string, with the winding “split” into
two coils (each wrapped around two pole piece pairs). The
coils are wound in opposite directions, which helps to cancel

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 7
hum. Many players prefer split coils because they provide the
tonal qualities of a single coil, without the characteristic hum. Headstock
Common
Fretboard Radii
Single Coil Pickup
BASSANATOMY
AND MECHANICS
Ball End Saddle

Beginning
Base Plate End of
7.25”

9.5”
Nut
String Tree

of Winding Winding
nut
body Coil Magnetic Pole Piece 12.0”
The nut is located at the top of the fretboard and controls string height and
Most electric basses have wooden solid or semi-hollow bodies, often made of Fret spacing. It is usually made from bone, plastic, or graphite. Slots are made
Ball End Saddle
alder, ash, maple or mahogany. In addition to their visual characteristics, each in it so the strings follow the curvature of the fretboard (in radiused fret-
type of wood has unique resonance properties that affect the tone and sus- boards). A nut is constructed with precision to prevent tuning issues and
tain of the bass. On some instruments, a body top is glued on top of the body provide optimal sound quality.
blank, composed of bookmatched pieces. There are many types of body de-
signs, but a typical body has an upper and lower bout separated by a waist.
A cutaway is carved out to allow for easier access to higher fret positions. Neck headstock
Finishes are applied to protect and enhance the wood. These range from oils to
thick high-gloss lacquers. The headstock is located at the top of the
bass and houses the tuning machines. Its
design is often a distinguishing characteris-
Strap Button Fretboard tic for a brand. After passing the nut, strings
are fed into tuning machines screwed to the
Upper Bout headstock, which is often angled backward
so the strings exert pressure on the nut.
Straight headstocks have string trees to in-
Position Marker crease pressure. “Headless” electric basses
Truss Rod Nut do not have headstocks and incorporate the
tuning machines into the tailpiece instead.

neck
Body Electric bass neck construction is similar to that for an electric guitar, but with a longer scale
length (the distance between the nut and the saddle). Necks also come in a range of widths
String for basses with more than four strings. A neck can be attached to the body in different ways.
Bolt-on necks are attached with a set of bolts. A Set-in neck is attached via a tight-fitting joint.
strings
Waist Strings are measured by diameter (roughly 0.035 to 0.055 inches for the G string). This
Neck-through construction incorporates part of the body into the neck, forming a piece of
is known as string gauge. Most strings are made from steel or other metals. Lighter
wood that extends through the entire length of the instrument. Embedded within the neck is an
gauge strings have less tension than heavier ones when strung. At the end of a string
Heel adjustable steel rod called a truss rod. It works opposite string tension and controls the cur-
is a small cylinder (“ball end”) used to anchor it to the bridge-tailpiece. The string is
Magnetic Pole Piece vature of the neck. Adjustments are usually made with an Allen or hex wrench to turn a nut on
then wound into a tuning machine. Electric bass strings are wound, consisting of a
the end of the rod. Forward curvature in the neck is called relief, and a small amount is ideal. A
core wrapped in wire. Usually the core is made of steel, and winding wire is made of
Cutaway neck with an up-bow (too much relief) can be fixed by tightening the truss rod with a clockwise
Lower Bout nickel-plated steel. Roundwound strings consist of a string wound in round wire. Flat-
turn. Conversely, a neck with a back-bow can be fixed by loosening the truss rod (counter-
wound strings are wound in wire that has a rounded square cross section. Ground-
clockwise). A saddle adjustment can raise or lower string action, but often requires a truss rod
wound strings are a hybrid of the two, made by winding the core in round wire that is
adjustment to correct intonation.
ground and polished. Pressure wound strings are similar to groundwounds, and are
flattened with compression. Many strings are coated in a polymer to reduce corrosion.

Bolt-on Neck Roundwound Flatwound Groundwound

Set-in Neck

Neck-through

volume and tone controls


Adjustments in volume and tone are made via
Scratch Plate control knobs attached to potentiometers (“pots”). U Shape D Shape C Shape Soft V Medium V Hard V
They can increase or decrease resistance, chang- Ball End
ing output. The change in resistance in a pot from
one end to the other can vary to produce a linear
Pickup or logarithmic change in output. This is called pot
taper. Logarithmic volume pots are often preferred Truss Rod
MB30383

because they mimic how the ear perceives chang-


Hex
ELECTRIC BASS

es in volume.
Up-Bow Wrench
Saddle Volume Control Knob
ANATOMY AND MECHANICS

Output vs. Resistance in Allen R


Linear and Logarithmic Taper Potentiometers Wrench
Relief
Strap Button
Tone Control Knob

Bridge Linear Straight


¼” Output Jack Output

SCRATCH PLATE Logarithmic Back-Bow


A bass often has a plastic scratch plate (“pickguard”), designed to prevent © 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069
damage to the body. Most are attached directly to the body, or secured ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
with a bracket, and vary in thickness from roughly one to three plies. Resistance MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

30383_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 8/5/13 11:58 AM


by Charlie
MB30383

Wall Chart
Mechanics
Electric Bass

Lee-Georgescu
Anatomy and

the electric bass.


visual map of the

parts explain their


a large diagram of

of necks, pickups,
the instrument and

functions, covering
is a comprehensive

electric bass guitar.


The poster includes

detailed views of its

R
“Electric Bass Anat-

anyone interested in
tions of all the major

topics such as types


omy and Mechanics”

er is a great visual for


strings etc. This post-
Bass

components. Descrip-
7

11/14/13 9:21 PM
8
Bass
MB30083
Upright Bass
Wall Chart Upright Bass Wall Chart Scroll

Peg Box
Symbols
nut open string open string is
Tuning
The Upright Bass Scale Note
not in key root or tonic
Pegs
Wall Chart presents
Root of scale (in the key of E, the root or Nut
innovative scale pat- tonic note is E). finger on
F A# D# G#
tern drawings for all
root/key imaginary
frets Bb Eb Ab

Open string is NOT in scale. Don’t play.


twelve major scales (no symbol above the
nut indicates the open
F# B E A

in first position and


Gb
string is part of
the scale.)

Major Scales in 1st Position


E A D G

movable patterns for F#/Gb Major G C F A#


Bb

higher positions. It C Major G Major D Major A Major E Major B Major


# ##
# #
also includes a note
A D G C

# # # ## # ## b b Note Locations
finder chart and list of # # # # b bb b A# D# G# C#
Bb Eb Ab Db

articulation and bow-


ing terms. Printed on
B E A D

durable coated paper. C F


A# D#
Bb Eb

C# A#
F E
Db Bb

D G C F

Db Major Ab Major Eb Major Bb Major F Major


R C 2012 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC MO 63069
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
D# G# C# F#
Eb Ab Db Gb
Upper Bout
b b
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.
b b b
b bb b bb bb b b E A D G

Fingerboard
Middle
or “C”
Bout

Movable Scale Patterns


Movable Movable Movable Movable Movable Movable
Middle
Pattern 1 Pattern 2 Pattern 3 Pattern 4 Pattern 5 Pattern 6 or “C”
Bout Belly

EADG

Articulation and Bowing Terms


Down Bow Staccato: Short separated bow strike, shortens written
note value

Up Bow Spiccato: Short bouncing bow stroke in which the hair


leaves the string.
Hooked Bow: Two or more notes
bowed in the same direction but with Sautillé: Bow stick also bounces but the hair remains
separation. on the string

Bridge
Detaché: One note played with one
Martelé: Sharply accented “hammered” bowing.
bow stroke.
F hole
Louré (or Portato): Slightly separated
slurred notes. Tremolo: Many rapid bow strokes.

Sul ponticello: Bowing close to the bridge for a nasal, brittle effect.
Sul tasto: Bowing slightly over the fingerboard for a soft, flutelike effect.
Col legno: striking the strings with the stick of the bow.
Lower
Legato (or slur): Two or more notes smoothly connected.
Bout
Tip
Stick
Bow Bowgrip Screw

R Hair Ferrule Frog


Tailpiece
French Grip French Grip (Thumb) German Grip

Endpin
MB30083
UPRIGHT BASS
WALL CHART

30083_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 10/9/12 10:41:54 AM

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 8 11/14/13 9:22 PM


9

20152 Bass Scale chart.qxd 4/30/08 10:42 AM Page 1


Bass
Mel Bay's Bass Scales Wall Chart MB20152
Bass Scales
Wall Chart

by Corey Christiansen

Presents the most


commonly used
scales and modes
with fretboard dia-
grams for four-string
E A DG Open bass. A beautiful
Strings
photo of a four-
string electric bass
is labeled with string
F I Fret numbers, open string
Number names, and the fret
location of all the nat-
ural notes on the fret-
BEA board. A must-have
for every bassist’s
studio, practice room,
GCF III
or bedroom wall.

ADGC V

B E A D VII
C F
B E IX

D G C F

E A D G XII
F
B E A
G C F XV
B R

A D G C XVII ISBN 0-7866-6716-8


MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.
Bass Scales
Wall Chart
#4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069 R
R
EAN

Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229) • FAX (636) 257-5062


B E A D XIX Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com
E-mail us at email@melbay.com
C F
UPC

©2002 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069.


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A. MB20152

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 9 11/14/13 9:22 PM


10
Drums 20213 Drumming Wall Chart Rev.qxd 2/16/12 9:46 AM Page 1

MB20213 BASICS OF DRUMMING WALL CHART


Basics of
Drumming
Wall Chart Basic Rhythms
All basic rhythms are represented in drum notation by notes placed on three lines.
1. Cymbal-line

2. Snare-line
hi-hat/ride cymbal

snare drum/rim-shot/cross stick


HH/RC or CYM
SD/RS/CS
Interpretation
There are many possible ways to interpret drumming. Here are some examples.
Stickings
The different stickings (by hand swapping or by irregular placement of accents, or with
bass drum BD
3. Bass-line
hi hat(foot)
The top line shows the notes for the cymbal, the middle line shows the notes for the snare drum, and the bottom HHF Have a lot of fun playing the drums. rudiments in a simple form such as all rolls, paradiddles, and multiple-beats) form finger-
line shows the notes for the bass drum and the high hat (foot) ("combined notation"). or stick control exercises for modern drummers.

by Siegfried
The entrance of the hi-hat (foot) can be notated when "4-way Coordination"
and/or "hi-hat integration" is included.
R = right hand, L = left hand, > = accent mark, bpm = beats per minute Play the basic rhythm:
Play slowly at first, then at medium and fast speed. a) with three- or four-way coordination (Tip: see "The Left-Handed Drummer")

Hofmann
There are two main types of rhythmic divisions: 1. the even, binary rhythms (straight), based on the division of note values into groups of two; and 2. the triple, ternary b) in 4-, 8-, 12-, or 16-beat patterns 1. 17 Binary hand movements (without accents)
rhythms (triplets), based on the division of note values into groups of three. c) with fills on the last beat of the pattern being played, for instance: with four beats per measure (3/1) or with a sequence of four hits
2. Ternary basic rhythms in 4/4 time 8 beats per measure (7/1).
1. Binary basic rhythms in 4/4 time
q = 60/112/152 / h = 80-104 q = 60/92/126 Each of the 17 variations is a different exercise, with the key difference lying in the use
1. 4-Beat (quarter notes) 1. 6-beat (quarter-note triplets)
Play the sticking: of the right or left hand.
Count Count (&) a & (a) (&) a (&) a a) with quarter notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes, and eighth-note triplets, on the SD, HH or Tom.
Count and and Hand movement, or stick work, is one of the most important advanced techniques
Always play slowly at first. for drummers.

4 œ œ œ œ ..
b) using two instruments, for instance: R = low tom, L = high tom, or R = RC, L = SD.

4
Accent (>) only the right-hand stroke, then only the left! Quarters
c) with BD and/or HH (foot) ostinato

This wall chart gives 2. 8-beat (eighth notes)

Count
2. 12-beat (eighth-note triplets)
Count & a & a & a & a
Play the stroke sequences:
a) one-handed with R or L on the SD / both hands simultaneously, e.g.: SD plus Crash Cymbal / from hand
2
4 œ œ œ œ .. Eighths

an overview of the im- to hand, RL or LR on the SD. Accompany with the HH (foot) ostinato.

1 œ œ œ œ ..
b) first each beat separately / then practice them together / use different combinations

portant fundamentals 4
c) as fills in continuous rhythms / distributed around the drum set / as BD figures.
Sixteenths

3. 8-off-beat (eighths on the "ands") 3. 12-beat (eighth-note triplets, "right-left") Play accents:

and technical foun- Count


Count & a & a & a & a a) from hand to hand leading with the right or the left on the SD, with HH (foot) ostinato.
b) divided on the drum set, e.g. right-accent on the deep tom, left-accent on the high tom, unaccented
1.
2.
3.
L
R
L
L
L
R
L
L
L
L
L
L
only L
once R, three times L
single paradiddle (first half)

dations of drumming.
notes on the SD. 4. L L R L single paradiddle re-arranged
c) on the HH with BD-ostinato. 5. L L L R three times L, once R
6. R R L L Double stroke (roll) - two R, two L

Topics include: Basic 7. R L R L single stroke (roll), interchanging RL


Play the foot-ostinato: 8. R L L R inward paradiddle (here: double stroke re-arranged)
4. 16-beat (16th notes "right") 4. Shuffle (original phrasing)
a) as shown 9. L R R L inward paradiddle (here: double stroke re-arranged)

rhythms (counting, 3-
Count (&) a (&) a (&) a (&) a
Count b) with various (basic) rhythms with the hands. 10. L R L R single stroke (roll), interchanging LR
11. L L R R double stroke (roll) - two L, two R
c) with soloistic (improvised) or fixed (rehearsed) patterns in the hands on the drum set.
12. R R R L three times R, once L

and 4-way coordina-


13. R R L R single paradiddle re-arranged
14. R L R R single paradiddle (second half)
15. L R R R once L, three times R

tion), stickings, strike


5. Swing/Jazz beat 16. R R R R only R
5. 16-beat (16th notes "right-left") 17. L/R L/R L/R L/R LR or RL simultaneously
Count (&) a (&) a
Count Count and and

sequences (notation Hi-Hat Integration


figures, fills), accents/
(opening and closing)
2. 9 ternary hand movements (without accents)
The integration of the hi-hat is achieved by coordinating hi-hat foot pedal technique and developing motor with a sequence of three strikes in eighth-note triplets
Bass drum and Hi-hat (foot) Ostinatos
accent dynamics, The regular (ostinato) kick of one or both pedals while playing with the hands at the same time is part of elementary drum technique.
skills between the arms and legs. With coordinated interaction of the hands and feet, the possible rhythmic
figurations are exceptionally numerous. Each of the 9 variations is a different exercise, with the essential difference being in the

bass drum and hi-hat 3-way coordination: Play the hi-hat, snare drum and bass drum.
The open (o) hit hi-hat (R or L) is closed with the (foot) pedal.
1. Binary 2. Ternary
use of the left or right hand.

(foot) ostinato, hi-hat 4-way coordination: Play the ride cymbal, snare drum, bass drum and hi-hat (foot).

L
1. On-beat Hi-Hat (quarter notes)
L
6. Swing Hi-Hat
> 3 1
3

4 œ œ œ œ .. 4 4 œ œ œ ..
œ ‹ œ ‹ œ ‹ œ ‹ .. ‹ Å ‹ ‹ ‰ ‹ .
1. Bass drum quarter notes (four beat) 5. Bass drum/Hi-hat eighth note alternation

integration (opening 4 4 2
4 .. 2
4 .
triplet of eighths

Œ ‹ Œ ‹
and closing), and the 4
2. 1/3 bass drum (downbeat)
œ Œ œ Œ .. 4 ‹
6. Hi-hat quarter notes (rock drumming)
.. L L 3 L 3 L
1. L L L only L

4 ‹ ‹ ‹
2. Off-beat Hi-Hat (eighth notes) 7. Shuffle Hi-Hat (a)
4
2. R L L once R, twice L

International Drum 2 Å ‹ Å ‹ . ʼn ‹ Å ‰ ‹ .
3. L R L Left-Right-Left

. 2
.
4. L L R twice L, once R

4 4 ‹ ‹ 4 ‹ ‹
5. R R L twice R, once L

4 œ ‹ œ ‹ ..
3. Bass drum/Hi-hat quarter note alternation 7. And-Hi-hat (double time feeling)

Rudiments. Both bina- ‰ ‹ ‰ ‹ ‰ ‹ ‰ ‹ ..


6. R L R Right-Left-Right

4 4 J J J J
7. L R R once L, twice R

L L L 3 L 3
8. R R R only R
3. On beat Hi-Hat (eighth notes) 8. On-Beat Hi-Hat (Shuffle)

ry and ternary rhythms


9. L/R L/R L/R LR or RL simultaneously

4 œ ‹œ œ œ‹ .. 4 Œ ‹ Œ ‹ .. 2 ‹ Å ‹ Å . 2 ‹ ‰ Å‹ ‰ Å.
4. Bass drum (four-beat) / 2/4 Hi-hat 8. 2/4 Hi-hat (Jazz drumming)

4 4 4 ‹ ‹ . 4 ‹ ‹
.
are included. At home,
L L
9. Eighth-Note Triplets Hi-Hat The Left-Handed Drummer
in the studio, or in L3 L 3 L
4. "e" Hi-Hat (16th notes)
International Drum Rudiments (shifted quarter-note triplet feeling!)

2 ‹ ‹ Å‹ ‹ ‹ Å‹ . Å ‹ Å‹ Å ‹ .
. 2
With a left-handed set (mirror image set-up), we turn all the basic rhythms, as well
4
the classroom, this ‹ ‹ 4 ‹ ‹ ‹ .
The "International Drum Rudiments" form the basis of drum technique. The National Association of Rudimental Drummers (N.A.R.D.), a drummers' group, for- as the rhythm patterns and accents, around. Right becomes left and left becomes right.
mulated the original "26 Standard American Drum Rudiments," which have since been expanded to 40 Rudiments, and have been arranged in With a right-handed set (BD = right foot, HH = left foot) you play the hi-hat or

L L
ride-cymbal with the left hand. Advantages: 1. You don’t cross over your hands and

is an indispensable
a new order.
5. "a" Hi-Hat (16th notes) 10. Eighth-note Triplets – Hi-Hat 2. You have more freedom of movement for the toms and cymbal!
L 3 L
All rudiments should be practiced:
3L
2 Å‹ ‹ ‹ Å‹ ‹ ‹ .
(quarter-note triplet feeling)
1. open (slow) - closed (fast) - open (slow), thereby developing sensitivity, dynamics, and a feeling for drum technique. The right-handed drummer should also get accustomed to the left-handed way as it is

tool for all drummers 2. in various, fixed tempos (for example 120 bpm), thereby promoting accurate timing and precision.
4 ‹ ‹ . 2 ‹ Å ‹ Å ‹ Å.
described and played.

* Also play the "inversion" of the shown stickings (R as L, L as R). This way both hands will be developed at the same time. 4 ‹ ‹ ‹.
and drum teachers. Roll Rudiments Accents
In easy-to-read large
Single Stroke Roll Single Stroke 4 Single Stroke 7 Multiple Bounce Roll Triple Stroke Roll
3 3 6 3 3 3 3
Rhythm Patterns The placement of accents is one of the most important parts of drum technique. The

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœ ˙Z œœœœœœœœœœœœ


emphasis of one or more strikes is called an accent. Accents make drumming come to life.

format.
Accent symbol = >
Notation figures
Double Stroke Roll
> > Double
Double Stroke 5
> 6> > Double Stroke
> Stroke > 7 > Double Stroke
>
9
> The elementary rhythm patterns, or notation figures, form a major foundation for all drummers, Stick strikes: a) on the drum head

˙æ œ@ œ œ@ œ œ œ@ œ œ œ@ œ œ@. œ œ@. œ œæ œ œæ œ
and can be applied to the drum set in a wide variety of ways. b) as a rim shot (RS) at the same time on the skin and the rim.

>> >>
1. 15 Binary Accent Patterns
>> >> > > > > > >
Double Stroke 10 Double Stroke 11 Double Stroke 13 Double Stroke 15 Double Stroke 17
1. 15 Rhythm Patterns (binary, without accents)
œæ œ œ ‰ œæ œ œ ‰ œæ œ! œ ‰ œæ œ! œ ‰ œæ œ@ œ œæ œ@ œ œæ œ@. œ œæ œ@. œ ˙æ œ ˙æ œ
in a series with four 16ths per measure in 1/4-time
in a series with four 16ths per measure in 1/4-time
When we consider all binary accent possibilities in a sequence with four 16ths, we will
A quarter note corresponds with two eighth notes or four sixteenth notes.

> > > >


have 15 different accent patterns.
When we consider all the binary subdivisions that are possible when we use four 16th notes per

1
Paradiddle Rudiments measure, we will get 15 different rhythm patterns (without accents).

> > Double


>
Paradiddle
Single Paradiddle
> > > > >
Triple Paradiddle Single Paradiddle-Diddle
4 œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ
œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ >> >> >> > >
œœœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ
Flam Rudiments >>> >>> > >> > > >
> > > > > > > œœœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœœ œ
Flam Flam Accent Flam Tap Flamacue

œ
j
œ j
œ j
œ œ œ œj œ œ œ j
œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ j
œ œ œ œ œj œ
> > > > > >>>
œ œ œ œ œ

> > > > > > œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ..


Flam Paradiddle
œ
Single Flammed Mill Flam Paradiddle-Diddle

œ
j
œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ
j
œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ
j
œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ
> > > > >3 >3 > > > > > >
Pataflafla Swiss Army Triplet Inverted Flam Tap Flam Drag

œ
j
œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œ œ
j
œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ 2. 7 Rhythm Patterns (ternary, without accents) 2. 7 Ternary Accent Patterns
in a series of eighth-note triplets in 1/4 Time in a series of eighth-note triplets in 1/4 Time
Drag Rudiments
> > > > > >
Drag Lesson 25
A quarter note corresponds with a triplet of eighth notes. When we look at all the ternary When we look at all the ternary accent possibilities in a sequence of eighth-note triplets,
Single Drag Tap Double Drag Tap
All Rights Reserved • Exclusive Sales Agent, Mel Bay Publications, Inc., Pacific, MO 63069

subdivisions that are possible in a sequence of eighth-note triplets, we get 7 different

œ œ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ


we get 7 different accent patterns.

> >3 > > >3


rhythm patterns (without accents).
œœ œœ 3 3
R 1
> > > > > > 4 œ œ œ œ œ
© 2002 Voggenreiter Publishers, Viktoriastr. 25, D-S3173 Bonn, Germany

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Single Dragadiddle Drag Paradiddle No. 1 Drag Paradiddle No. 2

œ! œ œ œ œ! œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Single Ratamacue
> 3 >
Double Ratamacue
> >
Triple Ratamacue
> > >3 > > 3
> > 3> > 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ..
3 3 3 3 3

œœ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. MB20213

Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229) • FAX (636) 257-5062 Basics of


Drumming
Visit us on the web at www.melbay.com Wall Chart

E-mail us at email@melbay.com

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 10 11/14/13 9:22 PM


11
Drums
MB30359

LEARN TO BURN Learn to Burn®:


Drum Set Wall
Chart
drum set
by Jason Prushko
by Jason Prushko

This drum set wall


chart provides all the
basic information
3
6 needed to under-
stand the instrument.
Included are ten
standard beats, five
7 8 2 hand warm-ups that
challenge your stick-
1 ing, and five hand-
to-feet warm-ups
5 that prepare you for
playing difficult fills. A
4 9 diagram of the drum
set’s parts is also dis-
played. This wall chart
is a great addition for
the bedroom or prac-
tice space.
Drum Key parts
Crash
Hi-Hat Cymbal
High-Hat Closed
Ride Rack Open [1] Snare Drum [3] Ride Cymbal [5] Floor Tom [7] Middle Tom [9] Hardware
Cymbal Tom
Snare Drum [2] Hi-Hat [4] Bass Drum [6] Crash Cymbal [8] High Tom
Floor Tom
Bass Drum
Hi-Hat Foot Snare Rim Ride
Drum Click Bell

Beats Warm-Ups
Beat 1 High-Hat closed
Snare Drum 4 R R R R R R R R L L L L L L L L

Bass Drum 4 Warm-Up 1 Snare Drum 4


4

Beat 2 Hi-Hat closed R L R R L R L L R L R R L R L L


Snare Drum 4 4
Bass Drum 4 Warm-Up 2 Snare Drum
4

R R L L R R L L R R L L R R L L
Beat 3 Hi-Hat closed
4 Warm-Up 3 Snare Drum 4
Snare Drum
4 4
Bass Drum

Hi-Hat Hi-Hat Hi-Hat Hi-Hat


Open Open Open Open R L R L R R L L R L R L R R L L
Beat 4 Hi-Hat closed 4
Snare Drum 4 Warm-Up 4 Snare Drum
4
Bass Drum 4

Hi-Hat
Open > > > > > > > > >
Beat 5 Hi-Hat closed 4
Snare Rim Click 4 Warm-Up 5 Snare Drum
4
Bass Drum 4

Hi-Hat R L L R R L L R
Open
Beat 6 Hi-Hat closed
4
Warm-Up 6 Snare Drum 4
Snare Rim Click
4 Bass Drum 4
Bass Drum

R L R L R L R L

Beat 7 Hi-Hat closed


Warm-Up 7 Snare Drum 4
Snare Rim Click 4 Bass Drum 4
Bass Drum 4

Warm-Up 8 Ride Cymbal


Beat 8 Ride Bell Snare Drum 4
Ride Cymbal 4 Bass Drum 4
Snare Drum 4
Bass Drum

Warm-Up 9 Ride Cymbal R


Beat 9 Ride Bell
Snare Drum 4
Ride Cymbal 4 Bass Drum 4
Snare Drum 4
Bass Drum

Warm-Up 10 Rack Tom


Beat 10 Hi-Hat closed
4
Snare Tom 4
Snare Rim Click
4
Floor Tom
Bass Drum
4
Bass Drum

MB30359 © 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069


LEARN TO BURN ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
DRUM SET WALL CHART MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

30359_REPRINT.indd 1 8/8/13 10:29 AM

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 11 11/14/13 9:23 PM


CT C

CT
3

R L
CT
R L R

L
R L R L

CT CT

R L
Hastiness

CT
Cr
12

4
4

4
4

4
4

4
4

4
4

4
4
1

6
Drums

1/15/13 2:59:01 PM
WALL CHART
AQUILES PRIESTER
30054

MB30054

CH w/ foot
Crash China Hi-hat
Aquiles Priester

Tom 1

music transcribed by Pedro Jr.

photos courtesy of Tim Shahady

c 2013 Aquiles Priester. All rights reserved


Exclusive Sales Agent: Mel Bay Publications, Inc., Pacific, MO 63069
International Copyright Secured. B.M.I. Made and Printed in the U.S.A.
R
Wall Chart

Snare

Cr
Ride
Drum 2
Bass
by Aquiles Priester

Floor
Tom
Notation Key

Drum 1
Bass

Tom 3
Hi-hat

Tom 2
Aquiles Priester is releasing his
first “wall chart” where you can
find some of his best fills and

O
grooves. This is the best way to

CT
understand his drumming and

Cr
his ideas. You can also check
the DVD The Infallible Reason of

Cr
my Freak Drumming, where you
can see all these examples and
much more!Aquiles Priester was
born in Otjo, South Africa. At the

Cr
Œ
age of four he heard drum set
playing for the first time. It was a

The Infallible Emperor (1956)

O
transforming event. In November
1997 after playing drums for 12

Cr
years, Aquiles formed the band,
Hangar, which played heavy
metal cover songs before making

3
their own music. Their first album

Cr
was well received by critics and

3
Cr
was promoted with a national

Cr

Cr
tour. In 2001, Aquiles became the

4
4
4
4

4
4

4
4
4
4

4
4
drummer for Angra and recorded

6
the albums Rebirth (2001), Hunt-
ers and Prey (2002), Live in Sao
Paulo (2003), Temple of Shadows
(2004) and Aurora Consurgens
(2006).In 2004, Aquiles released

CH
(L)
his first instructional DVD, Inside

Œ
O

My Drums, and promoted it by

CH
(L)

Œ
performing over 80 drum clinics
and workshops. In 2006, Aquiles

CH
(L)
participated at the Drummer Live
Festival, in London, and conduct-

E
CH

D
(L)
ed his first workshops outside

Cr

E
Brazil throughout Colombia, Por-

Cr
tugal and Spain. In 2007 he re-
CH
(L)

Cr
leased his first instructional book
Some Light to Find My Way

Cr

E
called: Inside my PsychoBook

D
CH
(L)

- 100 Double Bass Patterns). At


O
3

Cr

E
the end of 2010, Priester record-
ed a new instructional DVD, The
CH
(L)
CT
R

E
Infallible Reason of My Freak
(Choke)

Cr
L

D
Drumming, where he emphasized
Cr
CH
(L)

E
his double bass technique
(L)
Cr
R
Cr

and also presented a series of


Ride...

4
4
4
4

4
4
4
4

4
4
4
4

exercises that are the foundation


1

of his evolution on the drums.


And he also had the privilege of
being one of the seven drummers
chosen throughout the world to
audition for the post of Dream
Theater’s new drummer.In 2011,
( (

Aquiles performed at the Modern


Drummer Festival, and was rec-
CH
( (

ognized in the Modern Drummer


CH

Readers Poll. He was ranked as


Œ
( ( ( ( ( (
Œ

5th best Prog Drummer and his


CH

CH

DVD, The Infallible Reason of My


Freak Drumming, ranked 3rd as
best instructional DVD.
( (

CH
( (

R
CH
Œ
Œ

( ( ( ( ( (
R L
R L
Colorblind

R L

Cr
12

12

12

12
12

12
8

8
8

30054_WORKING_CHART_2.indd 1
1

6
2

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 12 11/14/13 9:23 PM


13

20291 Harmonica Wall Chart.qxd 2/2/06 1:01 PM Page 1


Harmonica
Mel Bay's

Diatonic Harmonica
Harmonica Wall Chart By David Barrett
MB20291
Harmonica
Wall Chart

by David Barrett

A reference chart for


the 10-hole major dia-
tonic harmonica and
chromatic harmoni-
ca. Includes for the
diatonic harmonica: 1)
A chart of notes for all
major keys and rela-
tive positions; 2) Note
layout for standard
draw and blow bend-
ing; 3) Note layout for
over-bending; 4) Lee
Oskar Altered Tun-
ings; and 5) The most
common scales. For
chromatic harmonica,
the chart shows 1)
Note layout for 10, 12
and 16 hole chromatic
Chromatic Harmonica harmonicas; and 2)
Complete major and
minor scales along
with common modes.

ISBN 0-7866-6756-7
R
R
UPC
EAN

HARMONICA WALL CHART

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 13 11/14/13 9:24 PM


14

paper.
MB20624

Wall Chart

dulcimer students
user-friendly chart

dulcimer stringing,
provides mountain

diagrams of typical
both DAA and DAD
on the fretboard for

tunings, a compari-

and explanations of

R
ment. Included are a
and teachers with an
by Madeline MacNeil

playing tools such as


son of DAA and DAD,

x 35”” durable coated


Visually attractive, this

overview of the instru-

noters and picks. 24””


Mountain Dulcimer

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 14
chart of note locations
Dulcimer

Mel Bay’s Mountain Dulcimer Wall Chart by Madeline MacNeil

Fretboard Sound Hole Strum Hollow


Tuning Peg
Fret Bridge/Saddle
Peghead Nut
Tailpiece

1 2 3 4 5 6 6  7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 18
or or

6+ 13+
R
R

Choose Your Fingering Dulcimer Stringing Mountain Dulcimer Capo


NOTER Most of today’s dulcimers come with extra notches in the nut and saddle for individualized stringing. An optional tool, the capo is usually placed at the
The most common string set-ups on a dulcimer with four tuning pegs are as follows: 4 strings with double 1st, 3rd or 4th fret to change the playing key.
The dulcimer traditionally was played melodically with a noter. melody, 3 individual strings (one of the double melody strings can be removed), and 4 equidistant strings.
Dulcimer

Some dulcimer players today still use this style. Held in the left
Mountain
Wall Chart

hand, the noter is rolled along the melody string(s) while all
the strings are strummed.
Noter

FINGERING
Using the left-hand fingers
instead of a noter you can NUT FRETBOARD NUT FRETBOARD NUT FRETBOARD
play both melodies and chords. DOUBLE MELODY THREE STRING 4 EQUIDISTANT

DAA and DAD Tuning Comparisons Mountain Dulcimer Note Locations Pick Your Pick
Although they are not the only ones used, DAA and DAD are the most
typical tunings for today’s dulcimers. The 6-1/2 (or 6+) fret, which began to DAA and DAD Tunings Shop around and borrow to find picks that suit
appear in the 1970’s is used for the D-major scale in DAD tuning.
you best for strumming.
Strumming a D-major scale in DAA tuning
In this example, the D-major scale is played on the melody string(s) beginning at the 3rd fret
while the other strings (bass and middle) are strumed open (unfretted).
# œ œ
œ œ œ œ
Note Names:
œ
s s s s s s s s s
& # œ
D E Fs G A B Cs D
B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.

Bass String:
Bass String
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Middle String 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle String:
Melody String(s) 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Melody String, DAA Tuning:
Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com
©2005 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. PACIFIC, MO 63069.

Melody String, DAD Tuning:


TOLL FREE: 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229)
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED.

Strumming a D-major scale in DAD tuning


PHONE: (636) 257-3970 • E-MAIL: email@melbay.com

In this example, the D-major scale is played beginning on the open (unfretted) melody string(s).
MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.

The bass and middle strings are strummed open.


#4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069 • FAX: (636) 257-5062

Credits and Special Thanks


##
œ œ œ
John Burns, graphic artist
& œ œ œ œ
œ
D E Fs G A B Cs D Lauri Bridgeforth (Full Frame Photography), photographer
$5.95 U.S.

Dulcimer built by Blue Lion (www.bluelioninstruments.com) Fingerpicking is also a wonderful way to play
Bass String
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
the dulcimer.
Middle String 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Capo built by Ron Ewing (www.ronewingdulcimers.com)
ISBN 0-7866-7330-3

Melody String(s)
MB20624

0 1 2 3 4 5 6+ 7 UPC EAN
Thanks to Janita Baker

11/14/13 9:24 PM
20624-MntDulcimerWC_2.indd 1 7/29/05 2:40:41 PM
Mel Bay’s Hammered Dulcimer Wall Chart
Hitch Pins Side Bridges Treble Bridge Bass Bridge Tuning Pins
Left Treble Bridge Right Treble Bridge
Hammers f
E B s

G s D Tuning Wrenches
D

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 15
String C
C F Courses f
B T-Handle Wrench

Double-Sided Hammers
B E
A
A D
G
G C Goose Neck Wrench
s
F
F B
Single-Sided Hammers
E
E A
D
D G
s s
C
C F
B
B E
A
A D White Marks
s s
G
G C s
Note Where
Sound s
F Major Scales
Holes F B Begin
E
E A
s s
D
D G
By Madeline MacNeil
Hammered Dulcimer Sizes Right Treble Bridge to Left Treble Bridge Transition
Large ones, small ones; extra notes here and there. This description is needed for dulcimers as builders work creatively and players develop their styles and Two ways to play a melody with a smooth transition from the right treble bridge to the left treble bridge.
musical interests. The 12/11 (twelve courses on the melody bridge, eleven on the bass bridge) dulcimer is still widely used, although possibly more common is
the 15/14 or 16/15. As dulcimers enlarge, perhaps with an added bass bridge on the right or left of the instrument—or both—the names often change to such
descriptions as Chromatic or 4-Octave. Our example is just over three octaves of range in a 16/15 playing configuration.
Begin with the right hammer and alternate
R
R John Burns, graphic artist
Strike the C in the second measure with your right hammer. Play the D (third note from the end) on the
Lauri Bridges (Full Frame Photography), photographer
left side of the treble bridge with your left hammer and continue.
Hammered Dulcimer built by Dusty Strings Instruments, Seattle, Washington
Hammers by Sam Rizzetta and Dusty Strings
Thanks to Daryl Bryarly
Name of Note
Note Location
Hammer

ISBN 0-7866-1377-7
Note Name D E Fs G Gs
A B C D E F Cs Ds Fs G Gs A Bf
B C D Cs Ds E F Fs G A Bf B C D E
Begin with the left hammer and alternate
MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.
Note Location B B B B RT B B B RT B LT B B RT B L B B RT B LT RT B RT RT LT RT LT RT LT LT LT LT #4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069
MB20625
EAN

Strike the C in the second measure with your left hammer. Continue on the right side of the treble bridge, Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229)
Note Location RT RT RT RT LT RT RT LT RT LT LT B striking the D with your right hammer. Your left hammer is ready for Fs, on the left side of the treble bridge.
LT LT FAX (636) 257-5062
Note Location Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com
E-mail us at email@melbay.com
Wall Chart

Name of Note
UPC

©2005 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069.


Note Location
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I.
Hammer
$5.95 U.S.
Hammered Dulcimer

MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.


Dulcimer
MB20625

Wall Chart
Hammered

diagram and pho-


string courses and
ment with bridges,
contains a detailed

are presented both


Dulcimer Wall Chart

R
tos of hammers and
tuning wrenches are
picture of the instru-

notes on the sample

by music and in text.


by Madeline MacNeil

included. 35”” x 24””


A hammering pattern
Mel Bay’s Hammered

Locations of all of the


notes clearly outlined.

durable coated paper.


Dulcimer

16/15 course dulcimer


15

11/14/13 9:24 PM
16
Guitar

9/16/08 8:19:50 AM
MB94401
Guitar Master
Chord Wall Chart
with Fingerboard
Note & Master Chord
Reference

by William Bay

E1
B2
G3
D4
A5
E6
Presents major, minor,
7, Ma7, Ma6, m7,
m6, diminished and

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
augmented chords in
diagram form on all
root notes

Also includes a note


finder chart for the
first 20 frets of the
guitar. 35”” x 24”” du-

12
rable coated paper
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

Mel Bay Publications, Inc.

©1990 Mel Bay Publications, Inc,

R
Chord Reference &

Pacific, MO 63069
Note Finder Chart

All Rights Reserved.


Master Guitar

MB94401
9
ISBN 1-56222-825-0

96279 00883
7

EAN UPC
Untitled-1 1

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 16 11/14/13 9:25 PM


STRINGS 1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E RIGHT HAND FINGERS

1 3 2
4 1
2
FRET#
LEFT 3
= OPEN STRING = DO NOT PLAY = DEADEN STRING

HANDED 4
o o o
b G b m7 G b m6 G b aug
C Cm C7 Cma7 C6 Cm7 Cm6 C Caug or F #m6 or F #aug
Gb or F #
# G ma7 # #
Gb m or F #m G b 7 or F 7 or F ma7 G b 6 or F 6 or F #m7 G b or F #
1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1
2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 4 2 4 2 2 4 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 4 3 3 3 2
3 3 5 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 4
4 6 4 4 4 6 6 4 4 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5
GUITAR o D b ma7 D b m7 D b m6 o o D b aug
G Gm G7 Gma7 G6 Gm7 Gm6 G Gaug Db or C # D b m or C #m D b 7 or C# 7 #
or C #ma7 D b 6 or C 6 or C #m7 or C #m6 D b or C# or C #aug
1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 1 4 1 1 2 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 17
2 2 4 2 2 3 2 4 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 4 3 2 2 2 5 2 3 2 5 2 3 3 2 5 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 3 2
3 4 3 5 4 3 3 3 4 3 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 5 4 3 3 6 4 3 4 4 3 6 4 3 4 4 6 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 4
WALL 4 6 4 5 4 6 4 4 4 6 4 4 7 5 7 5 7 5 4 4

o o
A Am A7 Ama7 A6 Am7 Am6 A Aaug Ab Abm Ab 7 A b ma7 Ab 6 A b m7 A b m6 Ab Ab aug
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2
by William Bay 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 4 1
2 4 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 3 2 2 4 3 2 3 2 5 2 5 5 2 4 2 2 3 3 1 2 5 3 2
CHART 3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
4 6
7
4 3 6
7
4 3 6
7
3 5
6
3
4
3
4
4 3
5
3 3 3 2 4 3
5
3 3 2 3
4
6
7
4

o o
D Dm D7 Dma7 D6 Dm7 Dm6 D Daug Eb E bm Eb7 E b ma7 Eb6 E b m7 E b m6 Eb Eb aug
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 6 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1
2 2 1 2 2 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 4 2 7 2 2 2 4 2 7 2 2 2 2 4 3 4 3 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 3 8 4 3 3 4 3 5 3 3 4 3 8 3 3 3 3 5 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 6 4 9 4 6 4 4 9 4 4 6

o o
E Em E7 Ema7 E6 Em7 Em6 E Eaug Bb Bbm Bb 7 B b ma7 Bb 6 B b m7 B b m6 Bb Bb aug
1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1
2 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 5 2 4 3 2 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 3 3 2
3 3 3 6 3 3 4 1 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 4
4 4 4 7 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5

o o
B Bm B7 Bma7 B6 Bm7 Bm6 B Baug F Fm F7 Fma7 F6 Fm7 Fm6 F Faug
2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 2 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 1
3 3 2 2 4 3 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 2
4 4 3 2 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 4
5 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
E1

B2

G3

D4

A5

E6

Fret Numbers: OPEN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

# b # b # b
# b # b # b
# b
1

E F F# Gb G G# A b A A# Bb B C C # Db D D# E b E F F# Gb G G A# b A A# Bb C
# b # b #B b
# b # b
2
# b # b # b
B C C# Db D D# E b E F F# Gb G G# A b A A# Bb B C C # Db D D# E b E F F# Gb G
# b # b # b
# b # b
3 # b # b # b
# b
G G# A b A A# Bb B C C # Db D D# E b E F F# Gb G G# A b A A# Bb B C C # Db D D# E b
MB30046
WALL CHART
LEFT-HANDED GUITAR

# b # b
4
# b # b # b
# b # b # b
F G B C D E F G A
# b
D D# E b E F# Gb G# A b A A# Bb C # Db D# E b F# Gb G# A b A# Bb

5 # b # b # b
# b # b
F G A B C D E F
# b
E
# b F# Gb G# A b A# Bb C # Db D# E b
B C D
# b
A A# Bb C # Db D# E b
R

6 # b
# b # b # b
c 2012 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC MO 63069 B C
# b
E F A
# b
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I. C D F# Gb G G# A b A# Bb
# b # b C # Db D# E b
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A. E F F# Gb G G# A b A A# Bb B

30046_CORRECTED_CMYK.indd 1 7/23/12 9:32 AM


root notes
MB30046

Wall Chart

by William Bay

coated paper”

board diagrams
frets of the guitar

presented for the


35” x 24” durable
7, Ma7, Ma6, m7,

Chords and finger-


diagram form on all

chart for the first 20


m6, diminished and

Includes note finder

R
left-handed guitarist
augmented chords in
Guitar

Presents major, minor,


Left-Handed Guitar
17

11/14/13 9:25 PM
18
Guitar

7/19/12 4:30:42 PM
WALL CHART
CHILDREN’S GUITAR

MB30050
MB30050

c 2012 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC MO 63069


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.
Children’s Guitar
Wall Chart

by William Bay

A handy reference
chart showing
“E-Z Form” chords
grouped by key. Full
chord forms are also
shown. An added
feature is a note finder
chart showing the
location of every note
on the first five frets.
Ideal for student, stu-
dio or classroom.

R
30050_CORRECTED_CMYK.indd 1

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 18 11/14/13 9:25 PM


19
Guitar

9/28/12 3:12:31 PM
GUITAR WALL CHART

MB30066
LEFT-HANDED CHILDREN’S
MB30066

Left-Handed
Children’s Guitar
Wall Chart

by William Bay

A handy left-handed
reference chart show-
ing “E-Z Form” chords
grouped by key. Full
chord forms are also
shown. An added
feature is a note finder
chart showing the
location of every note
on the first five frets.
Ideal for student, stu-
dio or classroom.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
C 2012 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC MO 63069

R
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.

30066_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 19 11/14/13 9:26 PM


20

by Charlie
MB30342

Wall Chart
Mechanics

Lee-Georgescu
Anatomy and

large diagram of
visual map of the

poster includes a

parts explain their


Acoustic Guitar
Guitar

is a great visual for


the instrument and

the acoustic guitar.


is a comprehensive

acoustic guitar. The

detailed views of its

R
anyone interested in
tions of all the major
omy and Mechanics”

functions. This poster


components. Descrip-

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 20
“Acoustic Guitar Anat-
saddle and bridge headstock tuning machines Headstock
The saddle supports the strings and determines string height and spacing. The headstock is located at the top of the guitar and houses the tuning machines. The Modern acoustic guitars use tuning machines to provide precise and stable tuning. They are
Most saddles are made from bone or plastic. Vibrations from the strings are neck and headstock can be fashioned from a single piece, or made separately and at- screwed into the headstock and anchor the strings at the top end of the guitar. A tuning machine
transferred from the saddle to the bridge, and then the soundboard. A saddle tached with a joint. After passing over the nut, strings are fed into tuning machines. The operates with a pinion and worm gear, which are available in various gear ratios. String tension
can be compensated to intonate individual strings by adjusting their effective backward angle of the headstock causes the strings to exert pressure on the nut, and can be adjusted by turning the knob at the end of the tuning machine, altering string pitch.
lengths. The bridge anchors the strings and is adhered to the soundboard. prevents them from slipping. Most headstocks are designed with three tuning machines
ACOUSTIC
Bridges are typically made from dense hardwoods such as ebony or rose- on each side. On slotted headstocks, strings are wound into rollers located within the Nut
wood, which help to accurately transmit tone from the strings to the body. slots. While more fragile than a standard headstock, a slotted one is lighter in weight
Wing ramps on either side of the bridge help transfer the string tension to the and provides a greater string break angle over the nut. The headstock affects the sound
soundboard. Strings are fed through holes in the bridge that extend through of the guitar and vibrates in conjunction with the neck. Its weight affects the balance of
the soundboard. Individual bridge pins are inserted to secure the strings in the instrument and its overall feel. Often a hardwood veneer is glued on the headstock
place. These are usually made from bone, ebony or plastic. The two most to enhance its appearance and cover up grain ends. Decorative inlays can also be
common types of bridges are belly bridges and pyramid bridges. Many of found on the face of the headstock, and the brand name is usually inlaid. The outline of Veneer
today’s acoustic guitars feature belly bridges, while pyramid bridges are often the headstock is often a distinguishing characteristic for the brand or luthier, and many
found on older and smaller-bodied instruments. The extra mass at the bottom shapes have become iconic. The shape also alters the string paths over the nut. Some
Tuning Machine
of a belly bridge allows it to be fitted with heavier gauge strings than a pyramid players prefer a headstock shape that allows the strings to travel straighter over the nut
bridge. for string bends.
Fret
Saddle
GUITAR Belly
Bridge Fretboard (“Fingerboard”)
Neck

Bridge Pin
ANATOMY
Pyramid
AND MECHANICS
Bridge
String
nut
body Bridge Pin
The nut is located at the top of the fretboard. Most are made from bone or plastic. Slots
are made in the nut and guide the strings into their respective tuning machines. The slots
Vibrations from the strings are transferred to the body, which resonates to produce sound. While
determine string spacing and height at the zero fret. They are made with precision to en-
size and dimensions vary greatly, the body is often shaped with an upper and lower bout sepa-
Standard Slotted sure that the strings travel over the nut properly. A well slotted nut also allows strings to
rated by a waist. The main parts of the body are the soundboard, sides and back. The sound- Upper Bout move easily during bending, and prevents tuning problems. The nut is the only other part
board transmits vibrations into the surrounding air, and has the greatest effect on the instrument’s
of the guitar besides the saddle which directly touches the strings. The two determine
tone and projection. Soundboards are often made from woods such as spruce, cedar and mahog-
effective string length and affect intonation.
any, and each has certain tonal characteristics. High quality soundboards are usually constructed
from book-matched pieces of wood. A sound hole is cut out of the soundboard to help project
Sound Hole
sound outwards. Its shape, size and location can help emphasize certain frequencies of the gui-
Fretboard
tar’s sound. Most are circular and located directly below the fretboard. Bracing on the underside
Radii fretboard
of the soundboard adds strength and enables it to withstand string tension. Bracing configura- Rosette
tions affect the guitar’s tone and volume, and a variety are used. Like the soundboard, the back of The fretboard (“fingerboard”) is the playable surface on the neck that houses the frets. It
the guitar also vibrates, but to a lesser extent. It is also strengthened with bracing. The sides join Position Marker is often made from hardwoods such as rosewood or ebony. The width of the fretboard is
the soundboard and back and can be made from laminated or solid pieces of wood. thinner at the nut and increases towards the body, and the fretboard is usually radiused
Waist to allow for easier chord fretting. Fretboard width and radius are contributing factors in
Heel 12.0”
Soundboard overall comfort and playability. Frets are seated in the fretboard in intervals that provide
Saddle equal temperament. Fretwire comes in a variety of sizes and is usually an alloy. Some
Bridge fretboards are bound to conceal the fret ends.
15.0”

Lower Bout
Neck Dovetail Neck
The neck spans from the heel to the headstock
and supports the fretboard. Most are made U Shape
from hardwoods such as mahogany or ma- Dovetail
Body Neck
ple. A neck can be made from a solid piece of Joint
wood, or laminated to provide increased stiff-
ness and decoration. The width and profile of Heel
a neck are important characteristics that affect
D Shape
the playability of an instrument. The base of
the neck is joined to the body via a tight-fitting
joint. Dovetail joints are the most common
form of connection on modern acoustic gui- Truss Rod
tars between the heel and heel block, although
some guitars feature bolt-on necks that allow Up-Bow C Shape
for easier neck adjustment and repair. Within Hex
the neck is a truss rod: an adjustable steel Wrench
rod with a bolt on one end. It works opposite
string tension and controls the curvature of the Allen
Relief Wrench
neck. Forward curvature in the neck is called
relief, and a small amount is ideal. A neck with Soft V
an up-bow (too much relief) can be fixed by
tightening the truss rod with a clockwise turn.
Conversely, a neck with a back-bow can be Straight
fixed by loosening the truss rod (counterclock-
wise). A bridge adjustment can raise or lower Medium V
string action, but often requires a truss rod
adjustment to correct intonation. Adjustments Back-Bow
Bracing
are made with an allen or hex wrench, and
should be made carefully to avoid breaking the
Pickguard truss rod.
Hard V

Binding
strings Roundwound Flatwound Groundwound
Strings are measured by diameter (roughly 0.010 to 0.013
inches). This is known as string gauge. Most strings are
made from steel or other metals. Lighter gauge strings
have less tension than heavier ones when strung. At the
end of a string is a small cylinder (“ball”), which the bridge
Bridge Pin pin anchors beneath the bridge. The string is then wound
MB30342

into a tuning machine. Lower pitch strings are wound,


ACOUSTIC GUITAR

consisting of a core wrapped in wire. The most common


Strap Button string wind is called roundwound, and consists of a string
ANATOMY AND MECHANICS

wound in round wire. Flatwound strings are wound in wire R


that has a rounded square cross section. Groundwound
(halfwound, pressure wound) strings are a hybrid of the
two, made by winding the core in round wire that is ground
Side and polished. Oils from the hand cause strings to corrode
Ball End
over time. Most strings are either metal plated or coated in
a polymer for protection.

Back

© 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

11/14/13 9:26 PM
30342_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 5/1/13 2:18 PM
MODERN GUITAR METHOD GRADE 1 WALL CHART by Collin Bay
How to Hold the Guitar and Pick the rudiments of music rests / the time signature tone
Music is written on a STAFF consisting of FIVE LINES and FOUR SPACES. A REST is a sign used to designate a period of silence. This period of silence will be of
The Staff: The lines and spaces are numbered upwards as shown: the same duration of time as the note to which it corresponds. Music is composed of sounds pleasant to the ear.

The correct way to 1. 5TH LINE SOUND may be made from NOISE or TONE.
4TH SPACE
hold the guitar. 4TH LINE
3RD SPACE This is an eighth rest. This is a quarter rest. NOISE is made by irregular vibrations such as would be caused by striking with a ham-
3RD LINE
2ND SPACE mer, the shot of a gun, or slapping two stones together.
2ND LINE
1ST SPACE
1ST LINE TONE is produced by regular vibrations as would be caused by drawing a bow over
Half rest Whole rest the strings of a violin, striking the strings of a guitar, or blowing through a wind instru-
The lines and spaces are named after letters from the alphabet. ment such as a trumpet.
Half rests lie on the line. Whole rests hang down from the line.

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 21
The LINES are named as follows:
2.
5 E A tone has four characteristics...PITCH, DURATION, DYNAMICS, and TIMBRE.
4 D Fine Notes
Place your
3 B Does PITCH: the highness of lowness of a tone.
fingers FIRMLY 2 G
on the strings Boy Whole Half Quarter Eighth
1 E 4 Counts 2 Counts 1 Count 2 for 1 Count
Good DURATION: the length of a tone.
DIRECTLY
BEHIND THE The letters can easily be remembered by the sentence: Every Rests DYNAMICS: the force or power of a tone (loudness or softness).
FRETS
The letter-names of the SPACES are:
TIMBRE: quality of tone.
4 E
3 C
= Down stroke of the pick. 2 A
1 F They spell the word F-A-C-E.
THE Time signature A note represents the pitch and duration of a tone.
1. This is the pick.

The musical alphabet has seven letters: A B C D E F G


2.
The STAFF is divided into measures by vertical lines called BARS. Dynamics are indicated by words such as:
44 34 24

Hold it in this Bar Bar


DOUBLE BARS mark The above examples are common types of time signatures. Pianissimo.....................................................(pp).................................................... very soft
manner firmly Piano..............................................................(p)............................................................. soft
the end of a section
between the Mezzo piano.................................................(mp)............................................ medium soft
or strain of music.
thumb and Measure Measure Measure The number of beats per measure. Beats per measure. Mezzo forte....................................................(mf).......................................... medium loud
first finger Forte................................................................(f)............................................................ loud
The type of note receiving one beat. A quarter note receives one beat.
4
3.
The Clef:
Signifies so-called “common
4
Timbre depends upon the skill of the performer plus the quality of the instrument
The second line of the treble time” and is simply another way
This sign is the treble which is being played.
clef is known as the G line. of designating 4/4 time.
c
or G clef. All guitar
Many people call the treble
music will be written
clef the G clef because it
with this clef.
circles around the G line.

tuning the guitar notes steps Mel Bay’s Modern Guitar Method is the world’s premier
method for learning modern plectrum style guitar, time-test-
The six open strings of the guitar will be of the same pitch as the six notes shown in the
This is a NOTE: ed and proven successful in building the theoretic and
illustration of the piano keyboard. Note that five of the strings are below the middle C A half-step is the distance from a given tone to the next higher or lower tone. On the
the HEAD technical foundation needed to play in any style. All seven
of the piano keyboard. guitar, the distance of a half step is one fret.
A note has three parts. They are... the STEM grades of this method are written in standard notation only
the FLAG to encourage better sight reading. In Grade 1, the student
A whole step consists of two half steps. The distance of a whole step on the guitar is
guitarist will learn to play solos, duets, scales, and chords in
two frets.
the keys of C, A minor, G and E minor. Even in Grade 1, the
Notes may be placed in the staff, above the staff, student is already exposed to the chord/melody concept
The C scale has two half-steps. They are between E-F and B-C. Note the distance of
of guitar performance. A supplementary study book entitled
one fret between those notes. The distances between C-D, D-E, F-G, G-A, and A-B are

MIDDLE C
E A D G B E Grade 1 Studies, two different play-along CD recordings
whole steps.
(pop version and traditional), and a DVD are available. The
companion recordings feature Tommy Flint and William Bay
and below the staff. Whole steps and half steps are also referred to as whole tones and half tones.
playing in split-track format, with the solo parts performed
on the right channel, and the accompaniment or second
Piano Notation E A D G B E Guitar Notation A note will bear the name of the line or space it occupies on the staff. duet parts played on the left. The student can play along
The location of a note in, above, or below the staff will indicate the pitch. with the full recording, or tune out either channel and play
the missing part.
PITCH: the height or depth of a note. TONE: a musical sound.
Melbourne E. Bay (1913-1997) was born in the tiny Ozark mountain town of Bunker, Missouri. He
Half-Step Whole Step moved to St. Louis in the early 1930’s, right after high school. He bought his first guitar at the age
E A D G B E of 13 and several months later played his first “gig.” He wanted to be an engineer but could not
E A D G B E Types of Notes afford to go to college.

In 1933 Mel Bay moved to St. Louis and began his professional career. He played with
THE TYPE OF NOTE WILL numerous local and traveling bands. Additionally, he landed staff guitar jobs on several
6 5 4 3 2 1 INDICATE THE LENGTH OF radio stations. Mel fronted his own trio (piano, bass and guitar) and played steadily for
another method of tuning E A D G B E
ITS SOUND 25 years. He was equally adept on most fretted instruments and played mandolin, uke,
Hawaiian guitar, and tenor banjo professionally. While Mel was actively pursuing his play-
1. Tune the 6th string in unison with the E or 12th Frets ing career, he continued to teach as many as 100 students a week. He decided to begin
white key to the LEFT of MIDDLE C on the piano. This is a whole note. = 4 Beats writing instructional material due to the difficulty encountered by guitar students at play-
1 The head is hollow. A whole note will receive ing good-sounding chord forms as necessary in classical, rock, blues, jazz and folk styles.
2. Place the finger behind the fifth fret of the 6th It does not have a stem. four beats or counts.
2
MB30409

string. This will give you the tone or pitch of the After World War II the U.S. Government contracted Mel to write instructional materials on
5th string (A). This is a half note. = 2 Beats guitar for GI’s wanting to learn music under the “GI Bill.” In 1947 Mel formed his own pub-
3 The head is hollow. A half note will receive lishing company and wrote his landmark initial book titled The Orchestral Chord System.
GRADE 1 WALL CHART

B
MODERN GUITAR METHOD

3. Place finger behind the fifth fret of the 5th It has a stem. two beats or counts. His Modern Guitar Method was written in 1948. For years Mel traveled from town to town
string to get the pitch of the 4th string (D). 4 talking to guitar teachers and players and showing them his books. At one time, Mel
A D G E This is a quarter note. = 1 Beat claimed to have known virtually every guitar teacher in America on a first-name basis.
4. Repeat same procedure to obtain the pitch 5 The head is solid. A quarter note will receive The guitar and Mel Bay books became popular in the 1950s and have continued to
of the 3rd string (G). It has a stem. one beat or count. grow ever since.

5. Place finger behind the fourth fret of the 3rd This is an eighth note. = ½ Beat Mel Bay changed the world of guitar instruction beginning
Electric Guitar Tuners are avail- R
string to get the pitch of the 2nd string (B). The head is solid. An eighth note will receive with his cornerstone Modern Guitar Method. He established
able at your local music store.
It has a stem and a flag. one-half beat or count. the structure for modern guitar education and by so doing,
They are a handy device and
6. Place finger behind the fifth fret of the 2nd (2 for 1 beat) helped create the foundation for the continued growth and
highly recommended
string to get the pitch of the first string (E). advancement of the instrument.

© 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

30409_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 8/19/13 1:43 PM


MB30409

of all ages.
Wall Chart

by Collin Bay

technique, basic
Guitar Method is
Modern Guitar

some of the most

serves as an ideal
Mel Bay’s Modern

wall chart features


Method Grade 1

the world’s premier


method for learning

teaching studio, the

R
proven successful in

have at hand: proper

chords, note-reading
building the theoretic

Modern Guitar Meth-


crucial information to

od Grade 1 wall chart


tion needed to play in

for a practice room or


and technical founda-
Guitar
21

tips and more. Perfect


any style. This elegant

visual aid for guitarists


guitar, time-tested and

11/14/13 9:26 PM
22
Guitar
MB20165
Classic Guitar
Reference
Wall Chart

by William Bay
and Richard Pick

A valuable wall chart


for student and teach-
er. Shows major and
minor three-octave
scales, right hand
arpeggio patterns,
arpeggiated cadences
in major and minor
keys and a complete
fingerboard/notation
diagram.

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 22 11/14/13 9:27 PM


BODY HEADSTOCK AND TUNING MACHINES
The body of a classical guitar is made of many components, each affecting the sound and tone of the instrument. The three main The headstock is located at the top of the neck, just past the nut, and contains the tuning machines. The neck and headstock are often carved from Headstock
parts are the soundboard, sides, and back. The soundboard imparts vibrations to the surrounding air to produce sound, and is a single piece of wood. They can also be made separately and attached together with a scarf joint. The weight and length of the headstock affect
constructed from book-matched pieces of woods such as spruce, cedar and redwood. Soundboard woods have their own tonal the sound of the guitar. It is angled backward so the strings apply pressure on the nut. Classical guitar headstocks are slotted, exposing
characteristics, which even vary between pieces from the same tree. The soundboard is sanded or planed to two to three millime- the tuning machine rollers. The tuning machines are mounted on the sides and use pinion and worm gears to provide precise and
CLASSICAL ters thick. It requires bracing to keep the wood from breaking under string tension. The bracing is glued directly underneath the stable tuning. Often, tuning machines are paired in three on a single mounting plate. A hardwood veneer is often glued to
soundboard and influences the sound of the instrument. A wide variety of bracing patterns have been developed to achieve differ- the face of the headstock to enhance its appearance and cover up any exposed grain ends.
ent types of sounds. Traditionally, a single circular sound hole is cut out of the soundboard to project sound outwards. Surrounding
it is a decorative rosette, which is inlaid into the soundboard. The sides and back of the guitar are often constructed from woods
such as rosewood, mahogany and walnut. A flexible slotted strip of wood called kerfing is used to attach the back to the sides. The Nut
soundboard is attached to the sides with wooden pieces called dentellones. At the end of the guitar, a tail block is attached inside Mounting Plate Veneer
to add reinforcement where the two sides meet. Binding on the completed body protects the edges of the guitar, and purfling is in-
laid alongside as decoration. Most classical guitarists prefer a French polish finish, which is applied in many thin “coats” of shellac
dissolved in alcohol using an oil-lubricated pad. The resulting finish is thin enough to not inhibit tone and can be repaired easily.

Soundboard Top Purfling Binding


GUITAR

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 23
Tuning Machine
Roller String
Side
Rosette Purfling
ANATOMY
AND MECHANICS
Dentellone Side
Fret High E Low E
SADDLE AND BRIDGE
The bridge and saddle transfer vibrations from the strings to the soundboard. The saddle is made
from bone or plastic, and is compensated to provide proper intonation. It determines string height Soundboard Bracing Patterns NUT
and effective length. The bridge is usually made from a single piece of rosewood or ebony. It con-
The nut is located at the top of the fingerboard at the base of the headstock. It determines
sists of a saddle block that houses the saddle, and a tie block into which strings are tied. The tie
Upper Bout Neck string spacing and height at the zero fret. The nut is made from bone or plastic, and is slot-
block is often banded with bone on both sides to prevent the strings from damaging the wood and
ted with precision to ensure proper action and playability. The varying string widths require
often contains a decorative veneer. Wings on either side of the bridge transfer the pulling force from
that the slot spacings and widths be calibrated so string spacing feels even in the fretting
the strings to the soundboard. Sound Hole hand.

Saddle Purfling STRINGS


The highest three strings on the guitar are made from nylon. Traditionally, these strings were made from gut. The lowest
three strings are made from thin nylon filaments wound in bronze wire or silver plated copper wire. These were often made
Wing Wing Waist of silk wound in gut. Strings on classical guitars contain less tension when wound than metal strings, which require a coun-
Fingerboard
teracting truss rod.
Binding
Bone Saddle
Bone
Fingerboard Slot for Side
Heel
Tie Block Saddle Block

Neck with Spanish Heel


Lower Bout Neck

Foot
Heel

Side Side
Heel
Dovetail Neck with Dovetail Heel

Side
Heel
Block
Heel

NECK AND FINGERBOARD


The neck of the classical guitar greatly affects its sound. It is often constructed from hardwoods such as mahogany or Spanish cedar. The neck can be
Kerfing attached to the body in two ways. A neck with a Spanish heel is often constructed from a single piece of wood that extends into the body of the guitar.
The sides of the guitar are then fitted into slots in the heel/foot structure. This is the traditional method for attaching the neck to the body, and is often
Rosette preferred. Necks can also be joined to the body with a dovetail joint, connecting the heel to a separate block inside the body. A Spanish heel makes a
neck reset much more difficult than a dovetail heel. The fingerboard is made from hardwoods such as ebony, blackwood and rosewood. It houses the
frets, which are spaced in intervals that provide equal temperament. A classical guitar neck does not contain a truss rod because the string tension is
Bracing not as high as on a steel-string guitar. To create relief, most luthiers construct the neck with a slight angle. The fingerboard can also be planed thinner
towards the sound hole.

Soundboard
PREDECESSORS
Renaissance and Baroque guitars are
some of the closest ancestors to the mod-
ern classical guitar. They had four or five
string courses, and moveable gut frets.
The bodies of these guitars were smaller
MB30341

than today’s classical guitars, producing


CLASSICAL GUITAR

Saddle less volume. These guitars were highly


ornate, with many inlays and parchment
ANATOMY AND MECHANICS

rosettes. They often featured vaulted or R


ribbed backs, a design that was eventually
End Graft phased out for flatter-backed larger bod-
ies. Despite their visual differences, these
guitars were anatomically very similar to
Bridge the modern classical guitar. Baroque Guitar

Back Plate

© 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

30341_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 4/16/13 10:20 AM


by Charlie
MB30341

Wall Chart
Mechanics

Lee-Georgescu
Anatomy and

detailed views of
guitar. It includes
a large diagram of
This wall chart is a
Classical Guitar

is a great visual for


the instrument and

of the guitar’s con-


its parts. Each part

the classical guitar.


of the instrument is

R
map of the classical

anyone interested in
described, exposing
the elegant simplicity

struction. This poster


comprehensive visual
Guitar
23

11/14/13 9:27 PM
24

by Charlie
MB30078

Wall Chart
Mechanics

Lee-Georgescu
Anatomy and
Electric Guitar

a window into the


Detailed diagrams
omy and Mechan-

reveals the hidden


Guitar

ics Wall Chart” is a

and all its features.

R
to the electric guitar

in the electric guitar.


stunning visual guide

for anyone interested


provides more than a
“Electric Guitar Anat-

and analyses provide

underlying physics of

instrument. Designed
the electric guitar and
the instrument and its

beauty of this popular


parts. This “blueprint”

working knowledge of

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 24
bridge pickups fretboard tuning machines
The bridge transfers string vibrations to the body. Magnetic pickups are used to generate sound. A The fretboard (“fingerboard”) is the piece of wood glued Frets are positioned on the Tuning Machines (“tuners”) are mechanisms used to adjust a string’s pitch. Electric guitars use machine
It can also function as a tailpiece. By adjusting the simple pickup consists of a bar magnet wound to the neck into which the frets are seated. Most fret- fretboard in intervals to produce gears to provide precise tuning, which consist of a pinion and worm gear. This gear combination allows the
bridge and the saddles (supports that control string in a coil of wire. In the presence of a permanent boards are made of hardwoods such as rosewood, notes in equal temperament. The string to maintain its tuning. Tuning machines come in left and right orientations. Many guitars use
length), string action and intonation can be con- magnet, a string will become magnetized. When maple or ebony, each with unique tonal characteristics. positioning and shape of a fret “enclosed-gear” tuning machines which contain the mechanism inside a metal housing.
trolled. Moving a saddle forward or backward chang- plucked, its vibration creates a current in the coil Radiused fretboards have a cross section derived from affects intonation. Frets come in
ELECTRIC es string length. Vibrato bridges allow the strings to of wire. Some pickups contain separate mag- a circle. Many players prefer them because they match different widths and heights, and
be detuned by tilting the bridge. A vibrato or “wham- nets for each string. Two basic types of pickups the curve of the fretting hand. Flat fretboards can make are typically made from an alloy.
my” bar is attached to the bridge to control tilt. Many are used on electric guitars today. Single coil playing chords more difficult, but offer advantages for Many fretboards contain inlayed
guitarists prefer a non-vibrato bridge because it pro- pickups contain only one coil of wire. Hum- single-note playing. Compound radius fretboards have position markers at the 3rd, 5th,
vides better contact with the body, resulting in better bucking pickups (“humbuckers”) consist of two different radiuses on each end, and usually flatten in the 7th, 9th and 12th frets. These
Tuning Machine
sound transfer. magnets wrapped in coils of wire. Single coils higher register. usually repeat after the 12th fret.
sound brighter and usually have lower outputs They can also be found on the
than humbuckers. Because a coil also acts as side of the fretboard.
an antenna, a single coil will generate hum from
Vibrato Bridge
electromagnetic radiation. In a humbucker, this
interference is canceled by orienting the magnets Headstock
in each coil in opposite directions.
GUITAR
ANATOMY Fret
Nut
String Tree

7.25”
Vibrato Bar
Beginning End of Fretboard NUT
AND MECHANICS Base Plate
of Winding Winding The nut is located at the top end of the fretboard. It is usually made of
9.5” plastic, bone, metal, or a synthetic material. It controls string spacing and
body Coil Magnetic Pole Piece height at the zero fret. Slots are made in it so the strings follow the curva-
Electric guitars come in many shapes, with few design limitations. A typical ture of the fretboard. A poorly slotted nut causes tuning issues and affects
body has an upper and lower bout with a waist in between. Solid body elec- Position Marker sound quality. Instruments with a vibrato bridge sometimes have a locking
tric guitars are usually constructed from wood. The body is often made from a 12.0” nut to help maintain tuning.
type of hardwood (“tonewood”). Common tonewoods include maple, agathis,
and mahogany. Many bodies are constructed from a single piece of wood,
while some have a body top (an extra top plate). This can be used for aesthet-
ic and tonal purposes. Most bodies are also sealed with a finish. These range
from oils to high-gloss lacquers. A finish affects the sound and appearance of
Upper Bout
headstock
the instrument. Stains can also be applied to the body prior to finishing. The headstock is located at the top of the guitar. Its shape is usually based
Neck
around one of two formats: “three plus three” (three tuners on each side) or “six
Neck Pickup (Single Coil) in line” (six tuners on one side). Headstock design is often a distinguishing char-
acteristic for a brand. After passing the nut, strings are fed into tuning machines
screwed to the headstock, which is often angled backward so the strings exert
pressure on the nut. Straight headstocks have string trees to increase pressure.
“Headless” electric guitars do not have headstocks. The tuning machines are
String incorporated into the tailpiece. 3+3 6 in line

Bridge Pickup (Humbucker)

Waist
NECK strings
Saddle Guitar necks vary in scale and shape. Scale length refers to the distance between the nut Strings are measured by diameter (roughly 0.008 to 0.013 inches). This is known as
and the saddle. Most electric guitar scale lengths are around 25 inches. A neck also has a string gauge. Most strings are made from steel or other metals. Lighter gauge strings
Lower Bout cross-sectional shape. Neck scale and shape affect playability. The neck can be attached to have less tension than heavier ones when strung. At the end of a string is a small cyl-
the body in different ways. Bolt-on necks are attached with screws. Set-in necks are attached inder (“ball”) used to anchor it to the tailpiece. The string is then wound into a tuning
Cutaway via a tight fitting joint. Neck-through construction incorporates part of the body into the neck, machine. Lower pitch strings are wound, consisting of a core wrapped in wire. Usually
forming a piece of wood that extends through the entire length of the instrument. Embedded the core is made of steel, and the winding wire is made of nickel-plated steel. The most
within the neck is a truss rod: an adjustable steel rod with a bolt on one end. It works opposite common string wind is called roundwound, and consists of a string wound in round
string tension and controls the curvature of the neck. Forward curvature in the neck is called wire. Flatwound strings are wound in wire that has a rounded square cross section.
relief, and a small amount is ideal. A neck with an up-bow (too much relief) can be fixed by Groundwound (halfwound, pressure wound) strings are a hybrid of the two, made by
tightening the truss rod with a clockwise turn. Conversely, a neck with a back-bow can be fixed winding the core in round wire that is ground and polished. Roundwound strings have
by loosening the truss rod (counterclockwise). A bridge adjustment can raise or lower string ac- a brighter tone than flatwound strings. Oils from the hand cause strings to corrode over
tion, but often requires a truss rod adjustment to correct intonation. Adjustments are made with time. Most strings are either metal plated or coated in a polymer for protection.
an allen or hex wrench, and should be made carefully to avoid breaking the truss rod.

Roundwound Flatwound Groundwound


Bolt-on Neck

Set-in Neck

Magnetic Pole Piece


Neck-through
Pickguard

volume and tone controls Ball End


Adjustments in volume and tone are made via U Shape D Shape C Shape Soft V Medium V Hard V
control knobs attached to potentiometers
Body Top (“pots”). Most guitars have at least two pots;
one for volume and one for tone. They can
increase or decrease resistance, changing out-
put. The change in resistance in a pot from one Truss Rod
Toggle Switch end to the other can vary to produce a linear or
Hex
logarithmic change in output. This is called pot Up-Bow Wrench
taper. Design by Charlie Lee-Georgescu
MB30078

Strap Button Bridge


Allen
ELECTRIC GUITAR

Wrench
Output vs. Resistance in Relief
Tailpiece
ANATOMY AND MECHANICS

Linear and Logarithmic Taper Potentiometers


R

Volume or Tone Control Knob


Straight
Linear
Output
¼” Output Jack Back-Bow
pickguard toggle switch Logarithmic
The pickguard (“scratch plate”) is a plastic surface designed to prevent the pick from scratching A toggle switch is used to select pickups. Guitars with
the body. It is attached directly to the body, or elevated with a bracket. Pickguards vary in thick- two pickups have three-way switches, and ones with
Resistance © 2013 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069
ness from roughly one to three plies. three pickups have five-way switches.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED, B.M.I.
MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A

11/14/13 9:27 PM
30078_FULL_WORKING_FILE.indd 1 3/5/13 10:52 AM
25
Guitar

9/16/08 9:45:00 AM
MB94404
Rock Guitar
Master Chord
Wall Chart
with Fingerboard
Note & Master Chord
Reference

by William Bay

Presents full chords


and power chords (5
& 7 format) from all
twelve roots. [major,
minor, dominant 7th
and major 7th]. Also
includes a note finder
chart for the first 20
frets of the guitar. 35””
x 24”” durable coated
paper.

R
94404.indd 1

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 25 11/14/13 9:27 PM


26
Guitar 20150 Wall Chart.qxp 8/1/11 1:56 PM Page 1

MB20150
Blues Guitar
Wall Chart

by Corey Christiansen

This chart provides


the basics of play-
ing the blues guitar.
Common scale and
chord diagrams as
well as blues chord
progressions are laid
out in fashion anyone
can understand. The
note and number of
each string and the
natural notes on the
fretboard are labeled
on a beautiful photo
of a solid-body elec-
tric guitar.

R ISBN 0-7866-6718-4
EAN
UPC

BLUES GUITAR
WALL CHART

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 26 11/14/13 9:28 PM


27

20154 Wall Chart.qxp 4/4/11 10:50 AM Page 1


Guitar
MB20154
Guitar Scale
Wall Chart

by Mike Christiansen

F CF I Fret
Number
Packed with informa-
tion, this wall chart
BEA contains a complete
fingerboard/notation
diagram and shows
GC F D G III fingering grid dia-
grams for major and
minor scales (har-
monic, melodic and
B Hungarian), pentaton-
ic and blues scales
and modes.
A DGCEAV

BEAD B VII

CF GC

BE IX

DGCFAD

EA DGBE XII

F CF
BE A
GC F DG XV
B
ADGCE A XVII
F
B E A D B XIX R
C F GC
B E XXI ISBN 0-7866-6714-1
MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. Guitar Scale
Wall Chart
DG C F AD #4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069
EAN

Toll Free 1-800-8-MEL BAY (1-800-863-5229) • FAX (636) 257-5062


Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com
E-mail us at email@melbay.com
UPC

©2002 BY MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., PACIFIC, MO 63069.


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A. MB20154

WALL_CHART_FLYER_A1.indd 27 11/14/13 9:28 PM


28
Guitar
MB20128
Jazz Guitar
Mel Bay's Jazz Guitar Wall Chart
EAD GBE by Corey Christiansen
Wall Chart Open Strings
Jazz Chart Terms
Fret Freddie Green Comping- Accompanying with four quarter notes per measure (in 4/4). Beats 2 and 4 are slightly
accented (see comping pattern number 1.)
Hard Bop- The style of jazz pioneered by Cannonball Adderley, Art Blakey, and Grant Green and other Blue Note recording
artists in the 1960s. This type of jazz is similar to bebop but with a more bluesy, earthy, raw feeling to it.

Number Bebop- The style of jazz pioneered by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Lester Young, Charlie Christian, Line- An improvised musical phrase or melody that is usually played with single notes.

by Corey Christiansen
Bud Powell, and Thelonius Monk in the early 1940s. Modal Jazz- Tunes and solos that are based (melodically or harmonically) on any of the modes of the major scale.
Blowing- To take a solo. Miles Davis pioneered this type of jazz in the late 1950s.
Quartal Harmony- Chord construction that is based on the interval of a fourth.

F CF
Comping- Accompaniment. To accompany another instrument or singer. This term can also mean to compliment.
Riff- A catchy phrase or musical line. Repeating this line over and over in a tune is sometimes called riffing.

I
Enclosing- See Targeting. The target chord tone is approached in a line by higher and lower scalar and/or chromatic
tones. The “unstable” non-chord tones emphasize the targeted tone. Substituting- To superimpose new chords in place of the original harmony.
Faking- To play standards tunes. Swing- This term can refer to many things. It can refer to two eighth notes that are played as a tied triplet. The term swing
can also refer to the style of jazz music that existed in the 1930s and 1940s.
Four-to-the-Bar- Accompanying with four quarter notes per measure (in 4/4) in the style of Freddie Green. Beats 2
and 4 are slightly accented. Targeting- A target tone is usually a chord tone that is emphasized in a jazz line by preceding the tone chromatically.

Free Jazz- Improvised music which is typically not based on any prescribed set of chord changes. Artists that Tertian Harmony- Chord construction that is based on the interval of a third.
perform this type of music rely heavily on their ears to help them play this spontaneous music as a group. Turnaround- Any set of chord changes that leads back to the beginning of a tune. These chords are typically played in the
last two measures of a tune. This term can also mean the single-note lines that are played over the harmony that leads back to
Fusion- The blending of funk, rock nʼ roll, and jazz. the beginning of a tune.
Guide Tones- These are any notes in a chord that lead strongly (usually moving in half steps) to the following ii-V- This refers to the chord progression that uses the ii chord and V chord of any key (Dm7-G7 in the key of C major). The
chord. The ii-V progression illustrates this very well. If the chords are Dm7-G7, the seventh of Dm7 (C) leads by term can also refer to the improvised lines that are played over these chords. A short ii-V takes one measure to execute; a

Sample improvised
BEA
half step to the third of G7 (B). Sevenths and thirds typically are the guide tones in chords that move in fourths. long ii-V takes two measures to execute.

Major ii-V-I Chords


lines, turnarounds,
comping patterns,
and much more are
provided with stan- GC F DG III
dard notation, tab and
diagrams in this easy
to read and under-
stand wall chart. The
B
basics and essentials Short ii-V Lines

of playing jazz guitar


are compiled in one ADGCEA V
chart for aspiring jazz
guitarists to learn
from each day. Pick F
a lick a day (or week)
and guitarists will be
playing authentic jazz BEAD B VII
ideas in no time at all. Long ii-V Lines

A stunning photo of a C F GC
beautiful archtop gui-
tar makes this chart
functional as well as B E IX
beautiful for hang-
ing where guitarists DGC FAD
Minor ii-V-i Chords

practice.

Short Minor ii-V Lines

E ADG BE XII

F C F Long Minor ii-V Lines

B E A
G C F DG XV
B Turnaround Chords

A DG B E A XVII
F Turnaround Lines

B E A D B XIX
C F G C
R

B E XXI
Comping Patterns

D G C F A D MB20128 $5.95 U.S.


MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. • #4 Industrial Drive • Pacific, MO 63069 ISBN 0-7866-6715-X