You are on page 1of 24

 

C0297‐S0164‐E0000 

Success, in all of its many forms, is used in society frequently and describes many different outcomes and scenarios. 

After watching the Marshmallow Experiment and reading the article “Don’t! The secret of self‐control” written by John 

Lehrer, it was apparent that there were certain traits linked to a successful life. These traits were represented in the 

“high‐delayers”, or the subjects who succeeded when participating in the marshmallow experiment performed by Dr. 

Walter Mischel. But being a high‐delayer does not necessarily mean that you will succeed and vice versa. Success can be 

interpreted in many ways, so there must be many ways to achieve it. Personal definitions of success are evident 

throughout the world, but it is hard to be sure which one is correct. This leads to the fact that different forms of 

attaining success must be used when facing different situations resulting in a personal success. Involving both logic and 

spontaneity is the way that I see fit when working to achieve success. When facing the winding road to success, choices 

must be made concerning the methods chosen to attain it, but contrary to John Lehrer’s article, being a high‐delayer will 

not always ensure your definite success.      Being a high‐delayer is not the only option given to make sure that you 

will succeed in life. Although in the article “Don’t! The secret  of self‐control” John Lehrer explains how in Dr. Walter 

Mischel’s “marshmallow experiment” children who waited for a second marshmallow were more likely to succeed later 

in life (Lehrer n pag), the ability to wait is not the only way to make success possible. Spontaneity is also an important 

part of reaching success. There are times when waiting for something better to come along will not be beneficial and 

accepting what is handed to you will, in turn, be helpful. Even though the term “settling” tends to refer to giving up and 

just accepting undesirable things, it can be used complimentarily to a situation. At times, settling for what is before you 

in the present is the better choice when compared to waiting for something more desirable to appear. There will always 

be opportunities to achieve a higher level of success so, in a sense, accepting present opportunities and later working for 

better ones is equivalent, if not more beneficial, than being a high‐delayer.      Aside from this one example, there are 

other events where being a high‐delayer is not always coveted. In a “suppression task” given to an equal amount of both 

high‐ and low‐delayers in “Don’t! The secret of self‐control”, subjects were given four random words, two printed in red 

and two in blue. The subjects were told to remember the red words and were then given “probe words” and asked 
 
 

whether they were the words they were asked to remember (Lehrer n pag). Although high‐delayers tended to perform 

better on this task, the low‐delayers showed a trait that will help them to achieve success in certain situations. The low‐

delayers tended to believe that words they were told to forget were words that they should remember, and this 

suspicion can be very useful. Trusting everything that is told to you is not always beneficial. There will be times when 

being suspicious is helpful, especially when on the path to achieve success. People may attempt to distract you from 

your course and listening to them will not show you in the direction of the obtainment of success. This example proves 

that low‐delayers can have traits more beneficial than those possessed by high‐delayers.       All things considered, 

being a low‐delayer does not condemn one to a life with an absence of success. John Lehrer even mentions in “Don’t! 

The secret of self‐control” that Mischel is excited by the people who failed the marshmallow experiment as four‐year‐

olds but eventually made their lives more successful as they became adults (Lehrer n pag). Low‐delayers can break the 

unfortunate chain of mishaps among their peers and become equally as successful as a high‐delayer would be. Although 

John Lehrer has shown in his article that out of all of the subjects who participated in the marshmallow experiment the 

high‐delayers tended to be more successful later in life, given the traits that many low‐delayers possessed, being a high‐

delayer is not the only way to succeed in life.      The word success has the potential to be interpreted in various ways. It 

is a term generally associated with a positive outcome, so people usually have different ideas about what is considered a 

success. Some may say that it concerns the amount of money or material items you possess while others view it as an 

honorable rank among society. Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary provides four possible definitions for the 

word success and although they are all logical definitions, the true definition of success does not lie in a simple phrase 

that is easily understood by many.       Success represents a light at the end of a tunnel, the end to many obstacles or 

troubles that have been faced. A portion of success can only be achieved through hard work, self‐control, and patience, 

yet there are times when it also entails spontaneity. It calls for both logic and what, at the time, may seem unreasonable 

actions. Success can be as simple as receiving a reward after a task is completed or as complicated as receiving a sought 

after occupation after completing many challenging years of school. Success is similar to an award you may be presented 

with for competing in sports or academics. You may struggle or complain when striving to achieve the award, but once it 

 
 

is finally in your hands, nothing but bliss can be felt.       This seven‐letter word may appear fairly simple, but in reality it 

holds a meaning that consequently makes people work extremely hard and attempt to control the urge to make 

thoughtless decisions. Success is the moment when you receive the reward, materialistic or not, that you have been 

striving for during all of the labor and mindless work you have endured. This miniscule word, that cannot even cover a 

page of paper in size 72 font, is packed with emotions such as happiness and content. The possibility of success supplies 

a reason to work hard for what you desire and use many different methods to try to achieve it. When asked the 

question, “What’s your definition of success?” it is hard to describe one’s answer using a brief sentence. So, in 

conclusion, I must say that my definition of success is not the act of getting what you desire, but the joyous feeling that 

accompanies the desirable result attained through hard work and labor.      In the article “Don’t! The secret of self‐

control”, the strategies used to achieve success discussed by John Lehrer are both similar and different from personal 

strategies that I currently use to try to become successful. The strategies described in the article focus on being a high‐

delayer, which proved to be helpful when trying to achieve success later in life (Lehrer n pag). I agree with this method 

of attaining success, but I also use other methods depending on the situation that I am facing. It is quite important to 

maintain a strong level of self‐control and patience when working your way towards a specific goal. Some outcomes can 

only result from periods of waiting, so having the traits of a high‐delayer can being greatly beneficial when facing these 

situations.      On the contrary, there are times when quick decisions must be made and everything that you may have 

followed when previously trying to acquire success must be forgotten. It is in times such as these that I use a method of 

achieving success that differs from those mentioned in “Don’t! The secret of self‐control”. This method refers to the 

ability of surprising others as well as yourself with your actions. When choices have to be made in a short period of time, 

taking a chance and trusting your instincts may be the smartest route to choose. Although the outcome is not always 

preferred, it still provides a way to obtain success, whether it takes days or years.       These two methods of 

achieving success may contrast greatly, but they both can be extremely effective. The strategies that are included in the 

article “Don’t! The secret of self‐control”, are very logical and can work to one’s advantage, but my own personal 

method also has benefits. Using a combination of these forms of obtaining success I have managed to have various 

 
 

successes within the short period of time that I have lived.       In conclusion, the forms used to achieve the 

complicated thing that is success may vary, but there is no limit to the types of people that are able to succeed. “Don’t! 

The secret of self‐control” may say that high‐delayers usually performed better than low‐delayers in various categories 

of life (Lehrer n pag), but it also presents the fact that there were low‐delayers who eventually succeeded. This proves 

that the feeling of pure joy representing success can be obtained by different type of people in many ways, whether it is 

by logic or luck. 

Comments: You advance the claim that being a high delayer is one of many possible ways of achieving success in life.  

This is accomplished effectively by your use of textual evidence from Johan Lehrer’s essay.  Rather than merely stating 

that something is a certain way, you link your claims or ideas to specific quotes and then go on to analyze how the 

quote adds to your own position in the essay.  You make some original and interesting claims by pointing out how 

being suspicious may also be an asset in the development of success in life.  What would have been interesting to see 

in your essay was a challenge or critique of the ways in which success is being approached by the marshmallow tests.  

You begin to do this in your paper, but you do not develop this beyond the point of quickly raising it in the essay.  

Your essay is well thought out and enjoyable to read. 

Grade: B+ 

Grade  Thesis  Work with Assigned Text  Organization  Presentation 


A  Complex interpretive  Student centered connective  Clear, fluid, logical  Minimal or no errors 
thesis clear from the  thinking  Strong use of topic  Likely to exhibit 
start  Thesis cuts across readings in  sentences and other  eloquence or an 
Independent ideas  unanticipated ways or finds a  guideposts for the reader  elegant writing style 
developed and  larger context for the 
presented throughout  conversation 
B+  Independent thinking  Uses textual evidence with  Generally well organized   
consistently developed  confidence and authority  May develop a secondary 
Engages more complex  Student’s ideas in control  emerging thesis which 
ideas in the readings  throughout paper  complicates the original 
Begins to grasp  Text evidence used well to  argument 
complexity of own  both support and complicate 
position or develops  the thesis 
secondary emerging 

 
 

thesis 
B  Thesis articulated from  Takes some interpretive risks  Sustained meaningful  Minimal errors 
the outset  with text  structure  Minimal or no 
Advances independent  Works with a variety of textual  Reasonable coherence in  mechanical, citation 
ideas  evidence  presentation  or formatting errors 
Thesis more coherent  Texts used in service of project  Controlled development 
than C‐level  and to provide support for it  of thesis 
Thesis may be somewhat  Smoother transition and 
limited or developed in a  topic sentences than C‐
repetitive way  range 
C+  Has a thesis but not  Moments of solid work with  Has relationships between  Sentence level 
clearly articulated from  texts and use of adequate  paragraphs  errors under control 
outset  textual evidence  Transitions and topic  May have some 
Moves toward  Engages in more complicated  sentences begin to  mechanical, citation, 
independent thesis,  ideas in readings  emerge  or formatting errors 
showing an emerging  Connective thinking may be  Has some coherence but 
coherence of ideas  implicit  lacks meaningful structure 
found in B‐range papers 
C  Thesis emerges at end of  Works with more than one  Some coherent  Sentence level 
paper from discussion of  source  relationships between  errors do not 
the text  Vague sense that student’s  paragraphs  significantly impede 
Takes clear position at  voice is contributing to the  Paragraphs may exhibit  meaning 
least once  conversation  “emerging topic  Some mechanical, 
Thesis may be vague or  Adequate reading  sentences”  citation, and/or 
general  comprehension and use of  formatting errors 
textural evidence 
NP  No thesis in evidence  Poor reading comprehension/  Little coherence from  Sentence level 
Thesis buried in  misinterpretation  paragraph to paragraph  errors impede 
summary  Lacks meaningful connection  Lacks organizational  meaning 
Little or no relationship  between texts or with  structure  Patterns of error 
between texts and thesis  student’s own position  Weak use of paragraphs,  Failure to proofread 
Privileges student’s ideas  with few or no clear topic  Serious errors in 
Weak use of textual evidence  sentences  citation conventions 
Over‐generalizes about the 
text 
 
Source:  http://wp.rutgers.edu/courses/courselisting/60‐course‐listing/55‐355101

 
 

C0213‐S0097‐ETS30 

High Delayers: The only path to success?  

     Is being a "high delayer" the only way to achieve "success" in life? In Jonah Lehrer’s article “Don’t! The secret to 

self control,” we see how Dr. Walter Mischel’s famous marshmallow experiment can tell apart disciplined children from 

their mischievous peers. The ones who demonstrate self control usually do better in school and are more likely to 

succeed in their adult life. However, is self discipline the only way to become successful? Actually, my beliefs are quite 

the contrary, and for many reasons. Success can be achieved in recognition of any talent or uniqueness of the person, 

such as a rock star. Such people are not usually dependent on self control in order to prosper and make a fortune, if that 

is what being “successful” really is. Prevalence has its own definition to an individual. Someone may reflect upon their 

self image, relationships, and economical disposition and conclude that they are successful. Another in the same spot, 

having different ideology, might be disappointed with their current state and shall strive to become prosperous. In this 

way, one can be successful. Majorities of people make the word "success" synonymous with "rich" and "famous". 

However, success is only definable by what an individual perceives it to be.    As stated, success is one’s personal 

standard of self content/fulfillment. I define success as being happy with who you are and what you do. Feeling good 

about yourself and your place in the world is the key to success. If you are always miserable and anti‐social, how can you 

consider yourself content? You could be the richest, most acknowledged person in the world, and still consider yourself 

unsuccessful if you feel something is missing from your life. Money can’t buy happiness. As long as the individual has a 

positive attitude and stays open minded he/she can be successful doing odd jobs for a lifetime. For example, the film 

“The Bucket List” tells the story of two old men who have months to live, due to a fatal illness. One is rich, and the other 

is a common mechanic. They go on having fun, but when their time is drawing near, they separate and return home. The 

rich man is constantly depressed because he is single and has no one, while the common man resides in peace alongside 

his vast loving family. Success truly is self satisfaction.     As for me, the strategies used to achieve success differ greatly 

from those that Dr. Mischel had discovered. Dr. Mischel’s method relies solely upon distraction. “Instead of getting 

 
 

obsessed with the marshmallow—the “hot stimulus”—the patient children distracted themselves by covering their eyes, 

pretending to play hide‐and‐seek underneath the desk, or singing songs from “Sesame Street.” Their desire wasn’t 

defeated—it was merely forgotten,” writes Ms. Lehrer. However, my methods consist of stimulating oneself by using 

scare tactics. I dwell upon the problem, let it really get inside me and drive me insane with guilt and agony, for what 

worse pain than being driven into the ground and brutally dismayed by your own stress! Then, will all these feelings of 

anxiety upon me, I tell myself that it will all just disappear if I do what I must, and do it properly. Then, with such feelings 

still upon me, I set out and pour all of my effort and focus my thought onto completing the task at hand. Whether you 

simply distract yourself or knowingly drive yourself into blinding rage and agony, if there is a will, there is a way. 

Comments: In your essay you describe success as something that is different for each person.  This is a bit of a 

problematic position, since it essentially puts the topic of success outside of the realm of discussion since the 

definition and importance of success varies greatly from one person to another.  Your essay does not engage directly 

with the essay question.  You do state that you do not belief that being a high delayer is the only way of achieving 

success, but you do not go much further beyond this claim.  Another issue in your essay is that you do not engage 

with Johan Lehrer’s essay.  You provide the reader with a generalized summary of what the marshmallow tests were, 

but then drift away from Lehrer’s essay to talk about success in a generalized way.   Remember that writing at the 

college level means engaging directly with the texts that you are using.  Locating and using key quotes as textual 

evidence is an important and sophisticated way of developing your own position in dialogue with the positions and 

claims of the texts that you are utilizing. 

Grade: NP  

Grade  Thesis  Work with Assigned Text  Organization  Presentation 


A  Complex interpretive  Student centered connective  Clear, fluid, logical  Minimal or no errors 
thesis clear from the  thinking  Strong use of topic  Likely to exhibit 
start  Thesis cuts across readings in  sentences and other  eloquence or an 
Independent ideas  unanticipated ways or finds a  guideposts for the reader  elegant writing style 
developed and  larger context for the 
presented throughout  conversation 

 
 

B+  Independent thinking  Uses textual evidence with  Generally well organized   


consistently developed  confidence and authority  May develop a secondary 
Engages more complex  Student’s ideas in control  emerging thesis which 
ideas in the readings  throughout paper  complicates the original 
Begins to grasp  Text evidence used well to  argument 
complexity of own  both support and complicate 
position or develops  the thesis 
secondary emerging 
thesis 
B  Thesis articulated from  Takes some interpretive risks  Sustained meaningful  Minimal errors 
the outset  with text  structure  Minimal or no 
Advances independent  Works with a variety of textual  Reasonable coherence in  mechanical, citation 
ideas  evidence  presentation  or formatting errors 
Thesis more coherent  Texts used in service of project  Controlled development 
than C‐level  and to provide support for it  of thesis 
Thesis may be somewhat  Smoother transition and 
limited or developed in a  topic sentences than C‐
repetitive way  range 
C+  Has a thesis but not  Moments of solid work with  Has relationships between  Sentence level 
clearly articulated from  texts and use of adequate  paragraphs  errors under control 
outset  textual evidence  Transitions and topic  May have some 
Moves toward  Engages in more complicated  sentences begin to  mechanical, citation, 
independent thesis,  ideas in readings  emerge  or formatting errors 
showing an emerging  Connective thinking may be  Has some coherence but 
coherence of ideas  implicit  lacks meaningful structure 
found in B‐range papers 
C  Thesis emerges at end of  Works with more than one  Some coherent  Sentence level 
paper from discussion of  source  relationships between  errors do not 
the text  Vague sense that student’s  paragraphs  significantly impede 
Takes clear position at  voice is contributing to the  Paragraphs may exhibit  meaning 
least once  conversation  “emerging topic  Some mechanical, 
Thesis may be vague or  Adequate reading  sentences”  citation, and/or 
general  comprehension and use of  formatting errors 
textural evidence 
NP  No thesis in evidence  Poor reading comprehension/  Little coherence from  Sentence level 
Thesis buried in  misinterpretation  paragraph to paragraph  errors impede 
summary  Lacks meaningful connection  Lacks organizational  meaning 
Little or no relationship  between texts or with  structure  Patterns of error 
between texts and thesis  student’s own position  Weak use of paragraphs,  Failure to proofread 
Privileges student’s ideas  with few or no clear topic  Serious errors in 
Weak use of textual evidence  sentences  citation conventions 
Over‐generalizes about the 
text 
 
Source:  http://wp.rutgers.edu/courses/courselisting/60‐course‐listing/55‐355101

 
 

C0266‐S0089‐ETS15 

The Secret of Success      

Judging from the marshmallow experiment, we can conclude that “high delayers” are usually more successful in life. 

However that is not always the case. “High delayers” don’t necessarily achieve more success, and their “success” may 

seem like failure in other people‘s eyes.. The result of an experiment done at childhood does that determine the 

outcome of that child’s future. Success is not always defined by monetary wealth or how socially adept you are. So in 

that “success” people are trying to achieve can mean many different things. “Success” can mean to have a stable life 

while not having that much money, while other may interpret it in that you have a by a measure of monetary wealth. In 

a way all “successes” have means in which to acquire them no matter what they be. And as the methods differentiate 

between certain people’s interpretations of success, they can range greatly. So is being a “high delayer” the only way to 

achieve success?                  The experiment supposedly tests a child’s level of self‐control and from these results 

they determine the success level of that child. Supposedly, children who can restrain themselves from eating the 

marshmallow are more successful. The children who chose immediate gratification by eating the marshmallow before 

the man comes back with another are supposedly less successful. The marshmallow test represents the choices in life. 

One choice, to eat the marshmallow first is the choice that offers immediate satisfaction, while the other offers a greater 

reward, at the price of waiting longer. One example of this is the system of stocks. When the chance comes to sell your 

stocks at a high price, and you take it, then you took the path to immediate gratification. If you wait and bide your time 

for the long term gain, you ultimately gain more in the long run.                  Even still, “high delayers” with their 

higher chances of success may not appear successful in other people‘s eyes. My definition of success is having a stable 

job, no matter how much the pay as long as I have a high chance of keeping it throughout my life. Also, in addition of a 

stable profession, other aspects of my definitions of “success” are having a family, and the most important part of 

success is being happy with it. One person’s definition might be a more down to earth goal of success might be having a 

stable job and a family while another person might have a more far‐fetched goal of earning a billion dollars. The latter 

 
 

might look upon the first’s “success” and think that that person is still not successful. So in that sense, due to the varying 

standards of success, “high delayers” may not appear successful to others.                   As with the different 

“successes” there are varying ways of achieving them. The article “Don’t! The Secret of Self Control.” states that the best 

way to achieve success is being a “high delayer” and by having a degree if self‐control, you will be more successful. That 

all depends that that person’s definition of success. In certain scenarios, being a high delayer can be your downfall. For 

example, a young man could be looking for a job. Then, a he is offered a job in a very prestigious company. As many 

people are applying for the job, he has a very limited time to decide. However, the man does not think he is up for the 

job and spends too much time pondering over his decision. In that time, the job is already taken and the man loses a 

major chance at success. A situation like this would require a decisive, quick‐thinking person. The factor of being a “high 

delayer” can be harmful, as the path to success is full of choices. “The secret of success in life is for a man to be ready for 

his opportunity when it comes." by Benjamin Disraeli, magnifies on the importance of being quick and decisive in 

decisions. While that person is deciding what road to take, it may already be taken by a person who is more decisive in 

his actions. My method of achieving success would be to be quick and decisive in my choices, as you have to take as 

many chances that life throws at you, even if you cannot get all of them.                   The marshmallow experiment 

may give an idea of how a child may perform later in life. However, it does not determine the level of success that child 

will have in life. The experiment does not determine your success level, it just tests your degree of self‐control. Even so, 

if “high delayers” feel successful themselves, other people may see them as not yet successful. Also, being a “high 

delayer” does not guarantee success. It just gives that person an edge, as you need to pick a good method in which to 

achieve success. So is being a high delayer the only way to achieve success? The answer is no. It all depends on that 

person and the situation for them to achieve the goal of their lives. 

Comments: In your essay you claim that being a high delayer is not a guarantee that one will become a success in life, 

but rather that success is gained by those who know how to respond to any situation that arises in life.  Couldn’t this 

be identified as a high delayer?  Within the context of the marshmallow tests the high delayers are able to restrain 

themselves from eating the marshmallow in order to receive two marshmallows.  You are identifying this as 
 
 

hesitation, or simply as being too concerned with thinking things over.  However, is it not possible to identify a high 

delayer as someone who is capable of making solid decisions based upon the expected outcome?  If this is true, then 

your claim that a high delayer would be more likely to hesitate and miss an opportunity to take an incredible job is 

not very convincing.  Also, you do not engage with Johan Lehrer’s essay at all.  You summarize certain information 

from the essay, but you fail to incorporate quotes that can be analyzed and used as a spring board for the 

development of your own position.  Writing at the college level requires you to actively engage with the texts that 

you are using, and to be able to develop your own position in a conceptual dialogue that develops between the 

position and claims of the texts that you are using and those claims or positions which you are developing within your 

essay. 

Grade: NP 

Grade  Thesis  Work with Assigned Text  Organization  Presentation 


A  Complex interpretive  Student centered connective  Clear, fluid, logical  Minimal or no errors 
thesis clear from the  thinking  Strong use of topic  Likely to exhibit 
start  Thesis cuts across readings in  sentences and other  eloquence or an 
Independent ideas  unanticipated ways or finds a  guideposts for the reader  elegant writing style 
developed and  larger context for the 
presented throughout  conversation 
B+  Independent thinking  Uses textual evidence with  Generally well organized   
consistently developed  confidence and authority  May develop a secondary 
Engages more complex  Student’s ideas in control  emerging thesis which 
ideas in the readings  throughout paper  complicates the original 
Begins to grasp  Text evidence used well to  argument 
complexity of own  both support and complicate 
position or develops  the thesis 
secondary emerging 
thesis 
B  Thesis articulated from  Takes some interpretive risks  Sustained meaningful  Minimal errors 
the outset  with text  structure  Minimal or no 
Advances independent  Works with a variety of textual  Reasonable coherence in  mechanical, citation 
ideas  evidence  presentation  or formatting errors 
Thesis more coherent  Texts used in service of project  Controlled development 
than C‐level  and to provide support for it  of thesis 
Thesis may be somewhat  Smoother transition and 
limited or developed in a  topic sentences than C‐
repetitive way  range 
C+  Has a thesis but not  Moments of solid work with  Has relationships between  Sentence level 
 
 

clearly articulated from  texts and use of adequate  paragraphs  errors under control 


outset  textual evidence  Transitions and topic  May have some 
Moves toward  Engages in more complicated  sentences begin to  mechanical, citation, 
independent thesis,  ideas in readings  emerge  or formatting errors 
showing an emerging  Connective thinking may be  Has some coherence but 
coherence of ideas  implicit  lacks meaningful structure 
found in B‐range papers 
C  Thesis emerges at end of  Works with more than one  Some coherent  Sentence level 
paper from discussion of  source  relationships between  errors do not 
the text  Vague sense that student’s  paragraphs  significantly impede 
Takes clear position at  voice is contributing to the  Paragraphs may exhibit  meaning 
least once  conversation  “emerging topic  Some mechanical, 
Thesis may be vague or  Adequate reading  sentences”  citation, and/or 
general  comprehension and use of  formatting errors 
textural evidence 
NP  No thesis in evidence  Poor reading comprehension/  Little coherence from  Sentence level 
Thesis buried in  misinterpretation  paragraph to paragraph  errors impede 
summary  Lacks meaningful connection  Lacks organizational  meaning 
Little or no relationship  between texts or with  structure  Patterns of error 
between texts and thesis  student’s own position  Weak use of paragraphs,  Failure to proofread 
Privileges student’s ideas  with few or no clear topic  Serious errors in 
Weak use of textual evidence  sentences  citation conventions 
Over‐generalizes about the 
text 
 
Source:  http://wp.rutgers.edu/courses/courselisting/60‐course‐listing/55‐355101

 
 

C0252‐S0171‐ETS74 

Dr. Walter Mischel’s famous "marshmallow experiment” which was designed to test the self control of toddlers, caused 

scientists to stumble upon a few interesting discoveries; children that couldn’t wait to eat the marshmallow often had 

behavioral problems in school and received lower S.A.T. scores than those who had waited. In the countless recreations 

of this experiment, scientists have found that the children who waited the fifteen minutes and got a second 

marshmallow were more successful in life. What exactly do they call success though, and who are they to judge it? I do 

believe that being a high delayer is the only way to achieve success in life, whatever you may define success as.   I 

believe that being a high delayer, meaning you have a high amount of self control, is the only way to be successful in life. 

For instance if your boss assigns you a report on one of the company’s products and you have no self control, this may 

be what happens: You leave work to go home, but you decide that you’re hungry (though you really know that you just 

don’t want to go home and work quite yet) so you stop at the nearest McDonald’s (which is the farthest fast food 

restaurant from your house) and you buy a cheeseburger. (even though you despise them) On the way home you get 

stuck in rush hour traffic (it’s extra slow today) and when you finally get home at seven ’o’ clock you make dinner and 

help your kids with homework. When the kids are in bed you are so tuckered out you wouldn’t even think about working 

on it now, so you go to bed. Now you have no report to present to your boss and he’ll remember that when a chance 

comes along to promote someone. However, if you had self control and immediately went home to work on the report 

you could have had in done in less than an hour! Then your boss would have been happy and you would have been 

happy. This is a win‐win situation. Most cases will occur like this, where if you have good self‐control than you’ll most 

likely be successful. Whereas if you do not have good self‐control than you will most likely end up in some type of 

situation that will not lead you to success.     Being a high delayer, which means you have a high amount of self‐

control, means you’ll be successful, but what is successful? My definition of the word successful, is that you’re happy 

with your life and what you do as a career , but success can be measured in other ways as well. Such as how much 

money you make, what style house you live in, or even what kind of clothes your children wear. The only true definition 

of successful, I believe, is how you feel about yourself.    The strategies I use to achieve success are different than  those 
 
 

in the article. For example, I do not watch videos on how to improve my self‐control, and that is one of the methods 

described in the article. Another method that was described in the article, is mental tricks such as imagining the candy 

only as a picture. Again, I don’t use this method. All these methods are to improve your self control, and I do develop my 

self control in other ways, such as saving my allowance instead of spending it.    In conclusion, everyone’s definition of 

success may be different but you must have self control to be successful. If you don’t have good self control,  you might 

want to start working on one now, you’ll be better suited for later in life. If we began developing a good sense of self 

control in our children now, we will have a generation of nothing but progress! Perhaps, someday this marshmallow test 

will no longer be needed to decide if a kid has self control, they all will! 

Comments: You advance the claim that being a high delayer plays an important role in achieving success in life, which 

is attributed to maintain a high level on self – control.  You provide a fictional example which is intended to 

demonstrate how this is true, although it is not as effective as bringing in quotes from Johan Lehrer’s essay would 

have been. Being able to actively engage with other texts, as well as developing your own position through a 

conceptual dialogue that develops over the course of an essay between your own positions or claims and those of the 

texts that you are using is a sophisticated technique that is often employed in college level writing.  Another issue 

that arises from your essay is the complete absence of quotes from Lehrer’s essay.  Bringing in complex quotes and 

using those quotes as a spring board to develop your own position more clearly or strongly is a necessary element of a 

successful college essay.  Remember that critical analysis and development is always preferable to basic 

summarization and opinion driven writing. 

Grade: NP 

Grade  Thesis  Work with Assigned Text  Organization  Presentation 


A  Complex interpretive  Student centered connective  Clear, fluid, logical  Minimal or no errors 
thesis clear from the  thinking  Strong use of topic  Likely to exhibit 
start  Thesis cuts across readings in  sentences and other  eloquence or an 
Independent ideas  unanticipated ways or finds a  guideposts for the reader  elegant writing style 
developed and  larger context for the 
presented throughout  conversation 

 
 

B+  Independent thinking  Uses textual evidence with  Generally well organized   


consistently developed  confidence and authority  May develop a secondary 
Engages more complex  Student’s ideas in control  emerging thesis which 
ideas in the readings  throughout paper  complicates the original 
Begins to grasp  Text evidence used well to  argument 
complexity of own  both support and complicate 
position or develops  the thesis 
secondary emerging 
thesis 
B  Thesis articulated from  Takes some interpretive risks  Sustained meaningful  Minimal errors 
the outset  with text  structure  Minimal or no 
Advances independent  Works with a variety of textual  Reasonable coherence in  mechanical, citation 
ideas  evidence  presentation  or formatting errors 
Thesis more coherent  Texts used in service of project  Controlled development 
than C‐level  and to provide support for it  of thesis 
Thesis may be somewhat  Smoother transition and 
limited or developed in a  topic sentences than C‐
repetitive way  range 
C+  Has a thesis but not  Moments of solid work with  Has relationships between  Sentence level 
clearly articulated from  texts and use of adequate  paragraphs  errors under control 
outset  textual evidence  Transitions and topic  May have some 
Moves toward  Engages in more complicated  sentences begin to  mechanical, citation, 
independent thesis,  ideas in readings  emerge  or formatting errors 
showing an emerging  Connective thinking may be  Has some coherence but 
coherence of ideas  implicit  lacks meaningful structure 
found in B‐range papers 
C  Thesis emerges at end of  Works with more than one  Some coherent  Sentence level 
paper from discussion of  source  relationships between  errors do not 
the text  Vague sense that student’s  paragraphs  significantly impede 
Takes clear position at  voice is contributing to the  Paragraphs may exhibit  meaning 
least once  conversation  “emerging topic  Some mechanical, 
Thesis may be vague or  Adequate reading  sentences”  citation, and/or 
general  comprehension and use of  formatting errors 
textural evidence 
NP  No thesis in evidence  Poor reading comprehension/  Little coherence from  Sentence level 
Thesis buried in  misinterpretation  paragraph to paragraph  errors impede 
summary  Lacks meaningful connection  Lacks organizational  meaning 
Little or no relationship  between texts or with  structure  Patterns of error 
between texts and thesis  student’s own position  Weak use of paragraphs,  Failure to proofread 
Privileges student’s ideas  with few or no clear topic  Serious errors in 
Weak use of textual evidence  sentences  citation conventions 
Over‐generalizes about the 
text 
 
Source:  http://wp.rutgers.edu/courses/courselisting/60‐course‐listing/55‐355101

 
 

C0426‐S0133‐ETS78 

Success is a Virtue    I vehemently oppose being a high delayer is the only way of achieving success in life.  There are 

many other ways that work amazingly.  Being a high delayer is just one of the million ways.  It depends on what the 

situation is.    If you delay doing your homework until the last possible second it is a horrible idea.  If you delay eating the 

marshmallow to receive a better prize, as in the article “Don’t!” by Walter Mischel, it is a fantastic idea.  Being a high 

delayer can help you or hurt you, when trying to achieve success in life.  Success has endless meanings.  One of the most 

important meanings is being yourself.  I do what I think is right.  If I do my best I know I am achieving success in life.  

Being myself will let success come in naturally.    My strategies have an immense amount of things in common with 

those stated in the article.  In school I always wait my turn. If we are taking foul shots in gym, my well behaved friends 

and I wait our turns patiently, much like Carolyn waited for her second marshmallow in the article.  Some people in my 

class act like animals.  They just can’t wait to get their hands on the basketball.  With evidence from the marshmallow 

experiment, they probably will not succeed in life.  Carolyn and I on the other hand, will probably succeed at most things 

in life.    I've talked about different qualities being a high delayer has.  The best quality is being able to think before you 

act.  By delaying, you give yourself a chance to analyze the situation at hand.  Without delaying, you start to jump to 

conclusions without looking at the whole picture.  Delaying and thinking is what made Einstein so brilliant. 

Comments: You open up your essay by stating that being a high delayer is only one many ways to achieve success in life, 

however, you go on to state that being a high delayer is one of the best chances of achieving success because it causes 

people to be patient and to think clearly about what the consequences of a situation may be.  This seems to be 

contradictory and confusing.  Another issue that emerges from your essay is that you are focusing on your own beliefs as 

opposed to developing compelling evidence that will support the claims that you are making.  An excellent source of 

evidence for your essay would have been to incorporate and critically analyze quotes from Johan Lehrer’s essay.  By 

doing this you would be developing your own position in dialogue with the claims and positions of the texts that you are 

utilizing.  This is a stylistically sophisticated writing technique that is often employed in college level writing. 

 
 

Grade: NP 

 
 

Grade  Thesis  Work with Assigned Text  Organization  Presentation 


A  Complex interpretive  Student centered connective  Clear, fluid, logical  Minimal or no errors 
thesis clear from the  thinking  Strong use of topic  Likely to exhibit 
start  Thesis cuts across readings in  sentences and other  eloquence or an 
Independent ideas  unanticipated ways or finds a  guideposts for the reader  elegant writing style 
developed and  larger context for the 
presented throughout  conversation 
B+  Independent thinking  Uses textual evidence with  Generally well organized   
consistently developed  confidence and authority  May develop a secondary 
Engages more complex  Student’s ideas in control  emerging thesis which 
ideas in the readings  throughout paper  complicates the original 
Begins to grasp  Text evidence used well to  argument 
complexity of own  both support and complicate 
position or develops  the thesis 
secondary emerging 
thesis 
B  Thesis articulated from  Takes some interpretive risks  Sustained meaningful  Minimal errors 
the outset  with text  structure  Minimal or no 
Advances independent  Works with a variety of textual  Reasonable coherence in  mechanical, citation 
ideas  evidence  presentation  or formatting errors 
Thesis more coherent  Texts used in service of project  Controlled development 
than C‐level  and to provide support for it  of thesis 
Thesis may be somewhat  Smoother transition and 
limited or developed in a  topic sentences than C‐
repetitive way  range 
C+  Has a thesis but not  Moments of solid work with  Has relationships between  Sentence level 
clearly articulated from  texts and use of adequate  paragraphs  errors under control 
outset  textual evidence  Transitions and topic  May have some 
Moves toward  Engages in more complicated  sentences begin to  mechanical, citation, 
independent thesis,  ideas in readings  emerge  or formatting errors 
showing an emerging  Connective thinking may be  Has some coherence but 
coherence of ideas  implicit  lacks meaningful structure 
found in B‐range papers 
C  Thesis emerges at end of  Works with more than one  Some coherent  Sentence level 
paper from discussion of  source  relationships between  errors do not 
the text  Vague sense that student’s  paragraphs  significantly impede 
Takes clear position at  voice is contributing to the  Paragraphs may exhibit  meaning 
least once  conversation  “emerging topic  Some mechanical, 
Thesis may be vague or  Adequate reading  sentences”  citation, and/or 
general  comprehension and use of  formatting errors 
textural evidence 
NP  No thesis in evidence  Poor reading comprehension/  Little coherence from  Sentence level 
Thesis buried in  misinterpretation  paragraph to paragraph  errors impede 
summary  Lacks meaningful connection  Lacks organizational  meaning 
Little or no relationship  between texts or with  structure  Patterns of error 
 
 

between texts and thesis  student’s own position  Weak use of paragraphs,  Failure to proofread 


Privileges student’s ideas  with few or no clear topic  Serious errors in 
Weak use of textual evidence  sentences  citation conventions 
Over‐generalizes about the 
text 
 
Source:  http://wp.rutgers.edu/courses/courselisting/60‐course‐listing/55‐355101

 
 

C0423‐S0133‐ETS78 

“Now or later?”: The false perception        Words and gestures are actions that we use every day, and are the 

sources of the common reciprocations we receive regularly. As we would bump into something accidentally, we would 

cause a reaction from whatever or whomever it is that we bumped into. Any number of situations could be borne from 

just that ordinary happening. That situation for example, could be affected by the approach and attitude of the recipient 

towards you because of your own actions, which was the bump. That person could show anger, but there is also the 

possibility of regarding it with humor. How everything reacts and retaliates, like a domino effect that happens at every 

overlapping moment, fusing together to create an incomprehensible harmony, alongside with the question of what the 

origin of the actions on our part that sets these off are, is the result of a long search of answers for questions. Queries 

such as “why does she act that way?”, “what will he do?”, and “why does everybody present themselves in this way?”  

One cannot be blamed for wanting to know, by knowing these things, we would be able to accomplish and prevent more 

things than ever before. Spouses would be able to communicate with understanding, friends would be made with more 

ease and speed, and jobs could be fitted with even more appropriate employees since it would be simpler for the 

employer to analyze whether the person is fit for it or not. Most of all we would find a better understanding of 

ourselves, and a sense of how to find control by finding our own strengths. Most of all, by using these strengths, such as 

self control, we can manipulate it so that it becomes a key, an easier road, in finding success.      In order to find our 

place in this constant exchange of cause and effect psychologists have been, for the longest of time, searching for the 

perfect evaluation that clearly and accurately defines the character of an individual. One of these individuals is Walter 

Mischel. The “slight, elegant man with the shaved head” in John Lehrer’s essay “DON’T! The secret to self control” and 

the founder of the marshmallow experiment.      Just as interesting as its name, this experiment is quite unique, but has 

fundamental rules no more complex than a parent leaving their child for a moment, while a treat is also left behind.  This 

investigation was first held in the late nineteen‐sixties at the Bing Nursery School. Lehrer describes that “the room was a 

little more than a large closet, containing a desk and a chair”. Now, to this setting add a child around four years old. A 

researcher will first, before leaving the child the researcher will leave a treat of the child’s choice, and explain that they 
 
 

could eat the marshmallow right away, but if they were able to wait while they step out for a few minutes and not eat 

the marshmallow, they could have a second. If it were the child’s choice to eat the marshmallow without delay, they 

were to ring the bell on the table. The researcher would come hurrying back, but the second marshmallow would be 

forfeited.       The majority of the children “struggled to resist the treat and held out for an average of three minutes” 

as Lehrer says. Some ate the marshmallow without delay and didn’t even ring the bell. In Lehrer’s conclusion it was that 

“about thirty percent of the children . . . successfully delayed gratification until the researcher returned some fifteen 

minutes later. These kids wrestled with temptation but found a way to resist”. Walter Mischel was the professor of 

psychology at that time in Stanford who was in charge of the experiment. “The initial goal of the experiment,” Lehrer 

describes in his paper, “was to identify the mental processes that allowed some people to delay gratification while 

others simply surrendered.”     Over time, though, Mischel was able to make a connection to the “high delayers”, the 

children who were able to wait for the second marshmallow, the “low delayers”, the children who didn’t wait, and how 

their position in school as teenagers was affected by that. After gathering information about the teenagers who had 

participated in the Bing experiment back in nursery school, he observed that in the data   That low delayers . . . seemed 

more likely to have behavioral problems, both in school and at home. They got lower S.A.T scores. They struggled in 

stressful situations, often had trouble paying attention, and found it difficult to maintain friendships.” On the other 

hand, Lehrer also writes that “the child who could wait fifteen minutes had an S.A.T. score that was, on average, two 

hundred and ten points higher than that of the kid who could only wait thirty seconds.  It is only evident that data shows 

the high delayers as more successful, and that being a low delayer brings more disadvantages. Dr. David Walsh, featured 

in a video posted on YouTube.com called “Dr Walsh Marshmallow WCCO Segment”, after holding a marshmallow 

experiment modeled after Mischel’s, explains that “ a key success factor for [a] kid [is] the ability to say no to 

themselves”. The belief of Dr. Walsh and Mischel both concur with each other.  And that’s basically all that those kids in 

the Bing Nursery School needed to do in order to prevent themselves from eating the marshmallow, to say no to their 

selves.       So in order to refrain from eating the tempting marshmallow a child must know how to deny themselves 

that instant gratification of simply gobbling it up, but knowing how to do so is just as pertinent as having done it. 

 
 

Psychologists had been basing their predictions for a person’s success relying on that person’s raw intelligence, but 

Mischell believes that intelligence is not what should be focused. Lehrer emphasizes the point Mischel is making as he 

“argues that intelligence is largely at the mercy of self‐control: even the smartest kids still need to do their homework.” 

Which is true, you can be smart, but the only way you had attained that much knowledge was through studying, and 

surely there are other things we wish to do instead of studying, especially with children.     Lehrer reveals Mischel’s 

answer to self control “based on hundreds of hours of observation, was that the crucial skill was the “strategic allocation 

of attention”. Now, you won’t be able to approach a four‐year‐old and have them say that they used “strategic 

allocation of attention” in order to stop themselves from eating the marshmallow. Instead, Mischel observed that the 

children who did wait all had something in common. They did anything else other than acknowledging the scrumptious, 

savory, sugary little pillow of goodness that was sitting right in front of their eyes. Lehrer continues that  Instead of 

getting obsessed with the marshmallow‐the “hot stimulus” –the patient children distracted themselves by covering their 

eyes, pretending to play hide‐and‐seek underneath the desk, or singing songs from “Sesame Street”.  The children had 

never lost interest in the marshmallow in the first place. They had simply diverted their attention so that their appetency 

for eating the marshmallow right away was dismissed.      If we were all able to have fostered this knowledge in 

the beginning, we would have had a better sense of self control by now than we ever had. Not only would we be able to 

refrain from eating, like marshmallows, with that we could have done more and made use with the time we had to be 

more constructive. For a student, instead of plopping onto the bed as soon as you get home and snoozing until seven ‘o 

clock, ending up doing homework until midnight. This could easily avoided by changing the setting or point of view of 

the student so that he or she would not feel sleepy. Maybe the student could go to a café or library to homework so 

they won’t fall asleep, or invite a friend over for help. It’s the same thing as those little kids who started singing songs 

from “Sesame Street” so as to distract their attention from the marshmallow.  According to Mischel, this view of will 

power also helps explain why the marshmallow task is such a powerfully predictive test. “If you can deal with hot 

emotions, then you can study for the S.A.T. instead of watching television . . . It’s not just about the marshmallows.”  

Having this view and sense of self‐control can be applied to daily life and is a key for success.      If only we could 

 
 

physically grab onto this “key” to success, even though in reality there is nothing to lay your hands on, such a thing 

would make everything that much easier. Since denying oneself isn’t as simple as saying it. You need to turn words into 

actions. Just like Mischel says that “if you don’t practice then you’ll never figure out how to distract yourself.” But now 

the children of the modern day are at a disadvantage, making practice that much harder. Dr. Walsh says in the video 

that “prior generations had a culture that supported the message of no. What’s difficult today is that we have a culture 

that undermines that message.” Now the culture that the current generations are facing is one that doesn’t teach how 

not to eat the marshmallow, as Dr. Walsh puts it, “we have a culture that says more fast easy fun”. This way of life 

completely negates and ruins the lesson being taught with the marshmallow experiment, and having more sinister 

affects on all else. Everything depends on the people for the economy, politics, and things like the media. Whether the 

people fare well or poorly, it affects all of it.      The problem here is that people fail to see the distances between two 

essential things, and unfortunately this matter is not solvable by a prescription from an optometrist. Young adults for 

example, are challenged the most with this. In cases that happen every day, such as “should a I do homework now and 

do what I want later? or would it  more commendable for myself if I get the fun of whatever please before doing 

homework? Of course the ideal choice is to do the boring, harder work later, even though it doesn’t benefit them when 

looking at the bigger picture of their life. No one would think that saying “I never did homework first in all my life” is 

something to be proud of, but actually knowing that you did first your whole life is what people admire and find more 

appealing. This is where self‐control intervenes when you ask yourself the question “now or later?” how these two 

balance out, whichever is greater, on the scale depends on the self‐control that you already possess. If a child possessed 

the proper self‐control, that child would have no problem in  It is dishonorable to reason out that taking action now and 

taking action are corresponding, that is absent self‐control masked with reasoning, or excuses. This is when a person 

fails to see the true consequences, and the distance between supplying our own rewards now or earning them in the 

future. It’s the same as thing that those kids who participated in the marshmallow experiment had been asking 

themselves. “Should I eat the marshmallow?”     So the children who were followed for years after the marshmallow 

experiment in the Bing Nursery School by Walter Mischell, showed relations between the high delayers, low delayers 

 
 

and their own success, but the marshmallow test wasn’t created to predict the child’s future. This was disclosed by 

Lehrer when he wrote  “What we’re really measuring with the marshmallows isn’t will power of self control,” Mischel 

says. “it’s much more important than that. This task forces kids to find a way to make the situation work for them. They 

want the second marshmallow, but how can they get it? We can’t control the world, but we can control how we think 

about it.”   Mischel did not make a personality test that defined who we are. He created a test that helps us along the 

pathway that defines who we are, and that helps us make our way to success.     When people hear the word “success” 

they envision riches and amazing luxuries, but that’s not what success really is. That’s only the part that you could want.  

The truth to success is setting the goals. Just as the outcome of goals is success, the origin of a success is the goals set to 

achieve them, because without each other both words have a meaningless existence. Having gold and gems, expensive 

cars and clothing, fame and fortune all in your palm, these are not the things that first make us happy because there is 

something that comes before that.      I remember sitting down one night to watch a movie with my two siblings. It 

was Disney’s newest movie, The Princess and the Frog. I had been expecting another  typical love story that had 

something to with magic and wishing stars, but by the end I was crying and proclaiming it to be my most favorite and the 

best Disney movie I had ever seen. It was the story about a dark skinned woman, named Tiana, who lived in New 

Orleans. She was hardworking and never took the time to dance or have fun. Even though her mother too had told her 

to go find her prince charming and ease off of all the hard work and double jobs, she was too focused on her goal, the 

dream both her father and she had carried together until he had passed away. She wanted to run a restaurant, “Tiana’s 

Place”, where people would come from far away just to have a taste of her food. Nearing the end of the movie, in the 

hands of Tiana was the voodoo man’s talisman which held the power to turn the world over to the evil spirits. As the 

voodoo man purred in Tiana’s ears, telling her that he would give her that he would give her that restaurant she had 

always wanted if she handed over the talisman to him. He waved his hand and there appeared faces of all the people 

who had doubted her, and never understood why she worked so hard, and then her father, the man who told her that 

wishing on a star only takes her half of the way, that in order to get her happily ever after, she had to make it true by 

taking herself there. And yet, after all her father’s hard work, he had died without getting what he wanted. Tiana looked