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Faculty of Education & Arts

School of Humanities and Social Science

SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural


Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online
Semester 2 - 2018

The School of Humanities and Social Science is committed to providing an inclusive


environment in which all cultures are accorded respect and all students and staff are
expected to act with honesty, fairness, trustworthiness and accountability in dealings with
others. The School recognises and respects the unique histories and cultures of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their unbroken relationship with the lands and the
waters of Australia over millennia, and the validity of Aboriginal ways of knowing. We are
dedicated to reconciliation and to offering opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples to access and succeed in higher education.

OVERVIEW
Course Description This course introduces students to the history of anthropology and
anthropological thought; the nature of anthropological fieldwork,
and theoretical, empirical, and methodological debates within the
discipline. The course examines how the study of other cultures
and societies can help us deal with urgent problems confronting
the contemporary world.

Contact Hours Callaghan


Lecture
Face to Face On Campus
2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term starting Week 1

Tutorial
Face to Face On Campus
1 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks starting Week 2

Ourimbah
Lecture
Face to Face On Campus
2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term starting Week 1

Tutorial
Face to Face On Campus
1 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks starting Week 2

Online
Lecture
Online
2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term starting Week 1

Tutorial
Online
1 hour(s) per Week for 11 Weeks starting Week 2

Unit Weighting 10

Workload Students are required to spend on average 120-140 hours of CRICOS Provider 00109J
effort (contact and non-contact) including assessments per 10
unit course. This includes time for the required readings (which
SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online, Semester 2 - 2018

are to be done prior to the tutorials each week), research for


assignments, essay planning, outlining, drafting and writing, and
attendance in lectures and tutorials.

CONTACTS
Course Coordinator Callaghan, Ourimbah and On-Line from Callaghan

Dr Daniela Heil
Email: Daniela.Heil@newcastle.edu.au
Phone: (02) 4921 6790
Consultation: Mondays, Ourimbah, weeks 1-4 and weeks 10-12.
Please email me for an appointment, so you do not have to wait.
The Ourimbah office: HO107
 , Mondays in the weeks mentioned above

Tuesdays, Callaghan, Weeks 1-4 and 9-12. My office is W343 in the


Behavioural Sciences Building (W).

Teaching Staff Lecturers


Dr Daniela Heil, Email: Daniela.Heil@newcastle.edu.au (Weeks 1-4, and 10-12)
Dr Sascha Fuller, Email: Sascha.Fuller@newcastle.edu.au (Weeks 5-8)

Tutors:
Dr Daniela Heil, Email: Daniela.Heil@newcastle.edu.au
Dr Sascha Fuller, Email: Sascha.Fuller@newcastle.edu.au
Dr Victor Quirk, Tutor, Callaghan, weeks 2-12, Email: Victor.Quirk@newcastle.edu.au

PASS (Peer Assisted Study Sessions), non-compulsory:


Amanda Falconer, Ourimbah, CC: Email: Amanda.Falconer@newcastle.edu.au
Jessica Sabbatini, Callaghan, Email: Jessica.Sabbatini@newcastle.edu.au

School Offices School of Humanities and Social Science, Callaghan


McMullin Building
Humanities-SocialScience@newcastle.edu.au
+61 (0)2 4921 5155/7318

School of Humanities and Social Science, Ourimbah


H01.43
ASU-Ourimbah@newcastle.edu.au
+61 (0)2 4349 4962 / 4934

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SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online, Semester 2 - 2018

SYLLABUS
Course Content The course introduces the history of anthropology and of anthropological thought, and the nature
and practice of anthropological fieldwork. Specific topics vary from year to year, but may include:
1. The historical development of modern social and cultural anthropology.
2. Basic theoretical and analytic models applied in anthropology.
3. The relationship between society and environment.
4. The impact of global economic and cultural processes on societies around the world.
5. The variety and transformations of forms of social and political organisation, and cultural
expression among non-western societies.
6. Anthropology of urban societies, the variety and form of ethnic and cultural expression in post-
colonial and cosmopolitan settings in a rapidly changing world.
7. Questions of gender and sexuality in a cross-cultural context.
8. The relevance of the study of other cultures to urgent problems confronting today's world, such
as the accelerating environmental crisis.

Course Learning On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
Outcomes
1. Provide an introduction to the discipline of social and cultural anthropology as a reflexive,
critical mode of research into contemporary society.

2. Develop an understanding of the nature of social research.

3. Develop a systematic, critical and sympathetic understanding of the nature of the contemporary
world society, its pattern of inequality and its ongoing transformations.

4. Enhance their scholarly skills including capacity for effective research and critical appraisal of
relevant literature, and skills in critique, logical debate, oral presentation and written
communication.

COURSE RATIONALE
The purpose of this course is to contribute to the School of Humanities and Social Science's fundamental objective of
facilitating students’ understanding of how societies and cultures are organised, how they develop and how they change. It
also contributes to the Faculty of Education and Art’s objectives of developing in graduates:

 depth and breadth of knowledge;


 critical and creative thinking;
 communication skills; and,
 responsiveness to the demands of the community and profession.

The course contributes to these goals through its teaching and assessment program and its encouragement of critical
reflection.

This course contributes to the School's courses that may count towards a major in the disciplines of Sociology and/or
Anthropology in the degrees of the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Social Science and Bachelor of Development Studies. It
also contributes to the knowledge and skills necessary for students to progress to Honours, MA and PhD levels in the
disciplines of Sociology and/or Anthropology. The course is available as an elective for students enrolled in degrees other
than the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Science.

The course does not preclude students from enrolling in other courses, but students who have successfully completed
SOCA102 Introduction to Sociology and Social Anthropology or SOCA1020 Introduction to Sociology and Social
Anthropology may not enrol in SOCA1020 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology.

Assumed Knowledge
None

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SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online, Semester 2 - 2018

Learning Materials/Texts
In the course, we use a textbook which is available through the Coop Bookshops at the Callaghan and Ourimbah
campuses.

The textbook to be purchased for this course is:


Eller, Jack David (2016) [3rd edition]. Cultural Anthropology: Global Forces, Local Lives. London:
Routledge.

Additional Information and Learning Materials


Additional information will be provided on Blackboard as applicable. Recommended, additional readings and ethnographic
illustrations will be made available through the Course Readings heading on the course blackboard site

Course Evaluation
This course will be evaluated in line with University policy, using approved University measures

TIMETABLE
OURIMBAH CAMPUS TIMETABLE
SOCA1020 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Enquires: School of Humanities and Social Science
Semester 2 – 2018
Lecture Monday, weeks 1-12 9am-11am CS219
Tutorial Monday, from week 2 11am-12pm CS207
Tutorial Monday, from week 2 2pm-3pm CS207
PASS session, non-mandatory Monday, weeks 2-12 12pm-1pm CS202
PASS session, non-mandatory Tuesday, weeks 2-12 1pm-2pm CS202

CALLAGHAN CAMPUS TIMETABLE


SOCA1020 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Enquires: School of Humanities and Social Science
Semester 2 – 2018
Lecture Tuesday, Weeks 1-12 12:00pm-2:00pm GP101
Tutorial Wednesday, from week 2 9:00am – 10:00am W238
Tutorial Wednesday, from week 2 10:00am – 11:00am W238
Tutorial Wednesday, from week 2 11:00am – 12:00pm W243
Tutorial Wednesday, from week 2 2:00pm – 3:00pm MCLG59
Tutorial Wednesday, from week 2 3:00pm – 4:00pm W243
PASS session, non-mandatory Tuesday, Weeks 2-12 11:00am – 12:00pm W238
PASS session, non-mandatory Wednesday, Weeks 2-12 12:00pm – 1:00pm W219

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SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online, Semester 2 - 2018

ONLINE TIMETABLE
SOCA1020 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Enquires: School of Humanities and Social Science
Semester 2 – 2018
Lecture Sunday 8:00am-10:00am Online, please start with
(pls disregard time as the weekly echo links
scheduled) provided on your
Blackboard site
Tutorial Sunday 10:00am-11:00am Online: Discussion
(pls disregard time as board forum and
scheduled) collaborate sessions,
from week 2

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SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online, Semester 2 - 2018

SCHEDULE
Week Week Lecture Tutorial

1 30 Jul What is anthropology? Lecture only; no tutorials this week.


Course introduction to what
There will be a comprehensive lecture and introduction to
the discipline and
the course this week.
anthropologists aim to do

2 6 Aug Intellectual Ancestry of Tutorial – What is culture and related societies? Cultural
Anthropology and Key relativism and ethnocentrism
Concepts
Cultural relativism and
ethnocentrism

3 13 Aug Understanding and Studying Tutorial – Anthropological fieldwork, the role of being
Culture there and participant observation
Writing culture and
ethnography

4 20 Aug Theorising Culture Tutorial – Why study culture and working with theory?
Functionalism and structural-
functionalism

5 27 Aug Kinship Organisation, Then Tutorial – Why study kinship and considering social
and Now groups?
Social groups and inter-
Week 5 presentations in tutorial classes / online for
subjectivity
online students

6 3 Sep Symbols, Identity and Tutorial – Symbols and identity


Rituals
Symbolic, interpretive
anthropology

7 10 Sep Structuring Power: Making Tutorial – Power, control and meanings of being
Difference empowered
Social constructivism and
post-colonialism

Essay option 1 due Friday 14 September 2018 by 23:59, Topics 1-3

8 17 Sep Contested Domains and Tutorial – Suffering, ‘indigeneity’, colonialism and


Marginalisation migration

Mid Semester Break

Essay option 2 due Friday 5 October 2018 by 23:59, Topics 4-6

9 9 Oct (Tue) Because of equity between student cohorts (e.g. Ourimbah, Callaghan and Online) and the
Monday public holiday, there will be no classes this week. The course coordinator will be
available in a Collaborate session. The session will be recorded. The details regarding the
session for each student cohort will be announced on your course blackboard site.

10 15 Oct Cultural Constructions of Tutorial – Personhood, gender and the ‘muting’ debate
Gendered Persons (cf. Ardener 1972)
Gender, social groups and

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SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Callaghan, Ourimbah & Online, Semester 2 - 2018

cultural dynamics

11 22 Oct Anthropology of Tutorial – The local-global nexus


Globalisation
Global and systems theory

12 29 Oct Biomedical Knowledge and Tutorial – Body, health and illness


the Body
Phenomenology and feminism

13 5 Nov Exam preparation There are no lectures or tutorials this week. The course
summary and exam preparation slides will be posted on
the SOCA1020 Blackboard site

SOCA1020 Exam: The exam will be facilitated through the course blackboard site.
In other words, you will be completing the multiple choice questions exam from a place where you feel
comfortable and, thus, can be focused.

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SOCA1020: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
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ASSESSMENTS
This course has 3 assessment items. Each assessment item is described in more detail in the sections below.

Assessment Name Description Weighting Due date

1 Tutorial exercises Group assessment (5%); and 5% Weeks 3-5


Class participation (10%). Further details are 10% Ongoing
provided below, and will be explained in class and
the online collaborate sessions.

2 Essay 1500 words. Essay topics will be provided on 40% Topics 1-3, Friday,
Blackboard in Week 3. 14 Sept 2018, due
by: 23:59pm.
Further instructions are provided below.
Topics 4-6, Friday, 5
Oct 2018, due by:
23:59pm.

3 Exam Multiple-choice examination at the end of the 45% Sem 2 Exam Period,
semester, facilitated through the course TBA by the course
blackboard site. coordinator later in
the semester

Late Submissions The mark for an assessment item submitted after the designated time on the due date,
without an approved extension of time, will be reduced by 10% of the possible maximum
mark for that assessment item for each day or part day that the assessment item is late.
Note: This applies equally for week and weekend days.

You are entitled to apply for special consideration if adverse circumstances have had an
impact on your performance in an assessment item. This includes applying for an
extension of time to complete an assessment item. Prior to applying, you must refer to
the Adverse Circumstances Affecting Assessment Items Procedure, available at
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policy/000940.html. If you require an extension, please
contact the Course Coordinator (Daniela.Heil@newcastle.edu.au) and lodge an application
for adverse circumstances the online Adverse Circumstances system, along with
supporting documentation.

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Assessment 1 – Tutorial exercises: Group assessment and class participation

Assessment Type Group assessment and class participation


Description Weekly participation in tutorial discussions and contribution to class activities (10%):
Weekly tutorial participation and contribution to class activities will count for 10% of your final
course mark. This mark will be based upon systematic and ongoing evaluation of your participation
in tutorial discussions and activities.
If you are unable to attend a tutorial, please notify your tutor. If you miss more than two tutorials
during the semester, you need to submit an application for adverse circumstances with supporting
documentation to avoid your absence affecting your mark.
Group assessment (5%): An additional 5% of your final mark will be based on the successful
completion of a group assessment. Subsequent to the Ethnography lecture (Week 3), students will
begin the group exercise. You will have two weeks to complete it.
The exercise is related to course objective 1 (introduction not discipline as a reflexive discipline); 2
(develop students’ understanding of the nature of social research); and, 4 (enhance scholarly skills
including capacity for research).
 The exercise requires students to work in groups of 4. You will have to meet on campus
where you will place yourselves in a strategic spot (e.g. Union; outside any of the libraries;
by the coffee cart, or other).
 As a group, you will spend ten minutes observing the movement of people.
 Each group member has to write up individual field notes (max. 200 words).
 As a group, you will have to identify one overarching theme of your group’s practical
(observarion) exercise. There will be four particular tasks associated with this theme, which
you (as a group) will have to split between the group members:
Sub-tasks for the different individual group members (1-4):
Task 1 Write a short synopsis of what the theme is about (max. 200 words)
Task 2 Identify an online, scholarly, social science article that is about this theme: the full
reference and the link to it is to be submitted, with a short statement (max. 200 words) about how
this article is seen relevant).
Task 3 Write a short synopsis about the observation exercise that the group did and how you
decided on the theme (max. 200 words)
Task 4 Present your group results in the tutorial / online / through turnitin submission for online
students in Week 5.
Each group participant will be awarded with up to 5 points for the completion of this assessment
item.

If you are sick and thus unable to participate in the group assessment, you must contact both the
course coordinator and your tutor so that you can be placed in a group. The student is in these
circumstances responsible to make contact with the group to ensure that the required work is done.
Failure to do so will mean that the student fails the group assessment.
Purpose The purpose of this assessment is twofold:
Class participation – The purpose of this assessment item is to support your learning and help
you develop the skills to critically evaluate theories and empirical material. It provides an
opportunity to engage with the course content regularly, building on the previous week’s course
content and extending it, and a means by which you can develop an informed and critical
understanding of theories, empirical material and key course concepts.
Group assessment – The purpose of this exercise is to become familiar with the practice of
participant observation, the library and learning how to effectively find resources. It also functions
as an exercise during which you will get to know other students in the course and students who are
new to the university can learn from those who have already studied at the UON.
Weighting 15% = 10% (class participation) + 5% (group assessment)
Length N/A
Due Date Class participation: ongoing; Group assessment: Week 5

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Assessment 2 – Essay

Assessment Type Essay


Description Essay of 1500 words.
Essay topics and assessment criteria will be posted on the SOCA 1020 Blackboard site by
the end of Week 2.
Choose only ONE (1) essay topic. Clearly identify the topic question you are examining.
If you chose to respond to essay topic 1-3, your essay is due on Monday, 14 September 2018,
23:59pm.
If you respond to essay topic 4-6, your essay is due on Friday, 5 October 2018.
Purpose The purposes of this assessment are for the student to critically engage with the course material, to
develop their critical understanding of anthropological theory and ethnographic realities, advance
their ability to evaluate and engage analytically with theory.
Weighting 40%
Length 1500 Words

Due Date Topics 1-3: Friday, 14 September 2018, 23:59pm; or, if you decide to address one question of
Topics 4-6: Friday, 5 October 2018, 23:59pm.
Submission The essay must be submitted electronically through Turnitin (located in Blackboard in the
SOCA1020 ‘Assessments’ section) as a .doc or .docx file (not pdf).
Please ensure that you keep a back-up copy of your essay. You should always keep at least one
electronic copy of your work on a memory stick or a cloud-service (e.g. Dropbox). Ensure that you
continuously update your essay when you work on it. The School of Humanities and Social
Science will take no responsibility for an essay that goes astray.
Assessment criteria Generic assessment criteria as well as a more detailed marking rubric (feedback sheet) for the
essay will be made available on Blackboard.
Referencing Full academic referencing is required for your essay. In this course, it is recommended that you use
the Harvard system for documenting sources. The Harvard system involves noting author, date
and page number/s for in-text citations that refer readers to a list of references. An in-text citation
names the author of the source, gives the date of publication and specifies the page numbers (e.g.
Heil 2013: 9). Direct quotes that are shorter than 30 words should be in ‘quotation marks’; direct
quotes that are longer than 30 words are to be indented (no italics). All direct quotes must include
author, date and page number/s. At the end of the essay, a list of references that provides
publication information about the sources cited in the essay is to be included. This list needs to
include all publication information about the source and should be alphabetised by authors’ last
names.
If you are unsure about how to reference or are familiar with the Harvard system, please consult
with your tutor.
Useful library sources on referencing:
Referencing: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/library/learn/referencing
Style Manuals & Guides: http://libguides.newcastle.edu.au/content.php?pid=113294&sid=861145
Resources/Guides on academic writing:
http://libguides.newcastle.edu.au/content.php?pid=113294&sid=861145
Essay tips Essay tips – available in Blackboard under Assessment/ Assessment HELP
English: Grammar and Style Modules – available in Blackboard under Resources

Assessment 3 – Exam, available through the course blackboard site

Assessment Type Exam


Description Two-hour multiple-choice exam at the end of the semester. The complete course content will be
addressed in the course-related exam. Please ensure that you either attend or listen to the weekly
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lectures, that you are prepared for the weekly tutorials prior to attending class face-to-face or
online, that you attend each of the tutorials and that you are familiar with all the course material
(lectures, readings and films).
Purpose The purpose of this assessment item is to test your knowledge of the course material.
Weighting 45%, multiple choice questions
Due Date Availability for a period of 7 days, through the course blackboard site. TBA by the Course
Coordinator, later in semester 2, 2018. The exam will be scheduled in the UoN examination period.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Grading Scheme This course is graded as follows:

Range of
Grade Description
Marks

85-100 High Outstanding standard indicating comprehensive knowledge


Distinction and understanding of the relevant materials; demonstration of
(HD) an outstanding level of academic ability; mastery of skills*; and
achievement of all assessment objectives.

75-84 Distinction Excellent standard indicating a very high level of knowledge


and understanding of the relevant materials; demonstration of
(D)
a very high level of academic ability; sound development of
skills*; and achievement of all assessment objectives.

65-74 Credit Very Good standard indicating a high level of knowledge and
understanding of the relevant materials; demonstration of a
(C)
high level of academic ability; reasonable development of
skills*; and achievement of all assessment objectives.

50-64 Pass Satisfactory standard indicating an adequate knowledge and


understanding of the relevant materials; demonstration of an
(P)
adequate level of academic ability; satisfactory development of
skills*; and achievement of most assessment objectives.

0-49 Fail Failure to satisfactorily achieve assessment objectives or


compulsory course requirements. A fail grade may also be
(FF)
awarded following disciplinary action.
*Skills are those identified for the purposes of assessment task(s).

Communication This course uses Blackboard and NUmail to contact students, so you are advised to keep your
Methods email accounts within the quota to ensure you receive essential messages.

NUmail: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/email/student-email/
Blackboard: https://uonline.newcastle.edu.au/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp

To receive an expedited response to queries, post questions on the Blackboard discussion


forum, or if emailing staff directly use the course code (SOCA1020) in the subject line of your
email. Students are advised to check their NUmail and the course Blackboard site on a weekly
basis.

Course Evaluation Each year feedback is sought from students and other stakeholders about the courses offered
in the University for the purposes of identifying areas of excellence and potential improvement.
Please feel free to offer feedback to the course coordinator during the semester:
Daniela.Heil@newcastle.edu.au

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Academic Misconduct All students are required to meet the academic integrity standards of the University. These
standards reinforce the importance of integrity and honesty in an academic environment.
Academic Integrity policies apply to all students of the University in all modes of study and in
all locations. For the Student Academic Integrity policy, refer to
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policy/000608.html.

Adverse You are entitled to apply for special consideration because adverse circumstances have had
Circumstances an impact on your performance in an assessment item. This includes applying for an
extension of time to complete an assessment item. Prior to applying you must refer to the
Adverse Circumstances Affecting Assessment Items Procedure, available at
http://www.newcastle.edu.au/policy/000940.html. All applications for Adverse Circumstances
must be lodged via the online Adverse Circumstances system, along with supporting
documentation.
For further information and detail, please see Other Useful Information, and under that
menu heading, Assessment and Exam Information, and Late Submission of
Assessment Items and Adverse Circumstances on the course Blackboard site.

Important Policy The 'HELP for Students' tab in UoNline contains important information that all students should
Information be familiar with, including various systems, policies and procedures.

This course outline has been approved by the Head of School. No alteration of this course outline is permitted without Head of School
approval. If a change is approved, students will be notified and an amended course outline will be provided in the same manner as
the original.

© 2018 The University of Newcastle, Australia

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