Matthew Cale Morgan Professor John Summerfield English 1102 : 3:00 26 April 2007 Society, Urbanism, and A Raisin in the

Sun Loraine Hansbury's play “A Raisin in the Sun” is a work of art that has a sense of depth that truly stimulates the mind of a scholar. Hansbury's drama is far more than an entertaining read, it is also a social commentary of American society in mid 1900s. During this volatile time, people of minority races continued to be treated as second-class citizens, notably so in the city of Chicago. Racial prejudices undoubtedly influenced Hansbury's story about the struggles of the Younger family. “A Raisin in the Sun” is also a parallel of other works about African Americans during this time period, such as urban poetry and works from the Harlem Renaissance. Other interesting aspects that “A Raisin in the Sun” brings to light are the various themes that the play exudes. Hansbury's play also uses symbolism to further enrich the meaning of her work. Loraine Hansbury's play “A Raisin in the Sun” is a work of art that has a sense of depth that truly stimulates the mind of a scholar. Hansbury's drama is far more than an entertaining read, it is also a social commentary of American society in mid 1900s. During this volatile time, people of minority races continued to be treated as second-class citizens, notably so in the city of Chicago. Racial prejudices undoubtedly influenced Hansbury's story about the struggles of the Younger family. “A Raisin in the Sun” is also a parallel of other works about African Americans during this time period, such as urban poetry and works from the Harlem Renaissance. Other interesting aspects that “A Raisin in the Sun” brings to light are the various themes that the play exudes. Hansbury's play also uses symbolism to further enrich the meaning of her work. Loraine Hansbury's play “A Raisin in the Sun” is a work of art that has a sense of depth that truly stimulates the mind of a scholar. Hansbury's drama is far more than an entertaining read, it is also a social commentary of American society in mid 1900s.

During this volatile time, people of minority races continued to be treated as second-class citizens, notably so in the city of Chicago. Racial prejudices undoubtedly influenced Hansbury's story about the struggles of the Younger family. “A Raisin in the Sun” is also a parallel of other works about African Americans during this time period, such as urban poetry and works from the Harlem Renaissance. Other interesting aspects that “A Raisin in the Sun” brings to light are the various themes that the play exudes. Hansbury's play also uses symbolism to further enrich the meaning of her work. he Montreal Screwjob refers to the real-life double-crossing of the defending WWF Champion Bret Hart by Vince McMahon, the owner of the World Wrestling Federation (now World Wrestling Entertainment) during the main event match of the professional wrestling pay-per-view event Survivor Series held on November 9, 1997 at the Molson Centre (now Bell Centre) in Montreal, Canada. A secretive change of the match's pre-determined finish (known as a "screwjob" in professional wrestling parlance) was devised by McMahon and Hart's match opponent, Shawn Michaels. The plan was executed when the match referee, Earl Hebner, under orders from McMahon, called for the bell to ring and ended the match as Michaels held Hart in the sharpshooter submission hold, even though Hart had not submitted. Michaels was declared the victor by submission and the new WWF Champion, even as Hart and the audience were outraged. The screwjob was rooted in Hart's decision to leave the company for its chief competitor, World Championship Wrestling. Hart had offered to lose (referred to as "dropping the strap" in wrestling parlance) the WWF Championship at any event and to any wrestler save his slated opponent, Shawn Michaels, with whom he had an acrimonious relationship. Exercising "reasonable creative control" as granted in his WWF contract, Hart was particularly steadfast in his refusal to lose to Michaels in a match hosted in his home country, Canada. McMahon remained insistent that Hart lose to Michaels in Montreal, fearing that his company's business would suffer if WCW announced Hart as its latest entrant while he still held the WWF Championship. Although Hart and McMahon agreed to a compromise on the match ending that allowed Hart to retain the title, McMahon was determined to take the title off

Hart without his consent. The event's widespread impact led to its adoption in future matches and storylines of the WWF's Attitude Era and the creation of the widely popular character of the evil boss, "Mr. McMahon." Hart remained ostracized from WWF, while McMahon and Michaels continued to receive angry responses from audiences for many years. However, the relationship between Hart and McMahon healed to a great degree in recent years and culminated with Hart's induction on April 1, 2006 into the company's Hall of Fame. The Boston Molasses Disaster, also known as the Great Molasses Flood or The Great Boston Molasses Tragedy, occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. A large molasses treacle tank burst and a wave of molasses ran through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150. The event has entered local folklore, and residents claim that on hot summer days the area still smells of molasses. The disaster occurred at the Purity Distilling Company facility on January 15, 1919, one day before the 18th Amendment (which mandated prohibition of alcohol production) was ratified. January 15, 1919 was an unusually warm day. At the time, molasses was the standard sweetener in the United States; it has now been supplanted by high fructose corn syrup. Molasses can also be fermented to produce ethyl alcohol, which is used in making liquor and was a key component in the manufacturing of munitions. The stored molasses was awaiting transfer to the Purity plant situated between Willow Street and what is now named Evereteze Way in Cambridge, Massachusetts. At 529 Commercial Street, a huge molasses tank 50 ft (15 m) tall, 90 ft (27 m) in diameter and containing as much as 2,300,000 US gal (8,700,000 L) collapsed. Witnesses stated that as it collapsed there was a loud rumbling sound like a machine gun as the rivets shot out of the tank, and that the ground shook as if a train was passing by.[2] The collapse unleashed an immense wave of molasses between 8 and 15 ft (2.5 to 4.5 m) high, moving

at 35 mph (56 km/h) and exerting a pressure of 2 ton/ft² (200 kPa).[3] The molasses wave was of sufficient force to break the girders of the adjacent Boston Elevated Railway's Atlantic Avenue structure and lift a train off the tracks. Nearby, buildings were swept off their foundations and crushed. Several blocks were flooded to a depth of 2 to 3 feet.The Boston Globe reported that people "were picked up by a rush of air and hurled many feet." Others had debris hurled at them from the rush of sweet-smelling air. A truck was picked up and hurled into Boston Harbor. More than 159 were injured; 21 people and several horses were killed - some were crushed and asphyxiated by the molasses. The wounded included people, horses, and dogs; coughing became one of the biggest problems after the initial blast. "War Eagle" is a battle cry and symbol of Auburn University. There are several stories about the battle cry, but the most popular myth was originally published in 1960 in the Auburn Plainsman and was conceived by then-Editor Jim Phillips. Phillips told the story of the first time Auburn met Georgia on the football field in 1892 and centered the story around a fictional spectator who was a veteran of the Civil War. In the stands with him that day was a golden eagle the old soldier had found on a battlefield during the war. He had kept it as a pet for almost 30 years. According to the story, the eagle suddenly broke free and began majestically circling the playing field. As the eagle soared, Auburn began a steady march toward the Georgia end zone for a thrilling victory. Elated at their team's play and taking the bird's presence as an omen of success, Auburn students and fans began to yell "War Eagle" to spur on their team ("war eagle" was once the common term for golden eagles). At the game's end, the eagle took a sudden dive, crashed into the ground, and died. But the battle cry "War Eagle" lived on to become a symbol of the proud Auburn spirit. The 1914 contest with the Carlisle Indians provides another story. The toughest player on the Indians' team was a tackle named Bald Eagle. Trying to tire the big man, Auburn began to run play after play at

his position. Without even huddling, the Auburn quarterback would yell "Bald Eagle," letting the rest of the team know that the play would be run at the imposing defensive man. Spectators, however, thought the quarterback was saying "War Eagle," and in unison, they began to chant the resounding cry. Another version of the War Eagle story comes from Indian lore. Legend says "War Eagle" was the name given to the large golden eagle by the Plains Indians because the eagle furnished feathers for use in their war bonnets. The rarest but most historically likely version of the origin of the "War Eagle" cry grew from a 1913 pep rally at Langdon Hall where students had gathered the day before the Georgia football game. Cheerleader Gus Graydon told the crowd, "If we are going to win this game, we'll have to get out there and fight, because this means war." During the frenzy, another student, E. T. Enslen, dressed in his military uniform, noticed something had dropped from his hat. Bending down, he saw it was the metal emblem of an eagle that had been loosened while he cheered. Someone asked him what he had found, and Enslen loudly replied, "It's a War Eagle!" History was made as the new cry echoed throughout the stadium the next day as Auburn battled Georgia. War Eagle, fly down the field. Ever to conquer, never to yield. War Eagle, fearless and true, Fight on you orange and blue. Go! Go! Go! On to vict'ry, strike up the band. Give 'em hell, Give 'em hell, Stand up and yell, Hey! War Eagle, win for Auburn, Power of Dixie Land! The Crips are one of the oldest, largest, and most notorious gangs in the United States. They originated in Los Angeles, California, and have been involved in murders, robberies and drug dealing in the area. The Crips are mostly identified by the blue color worn by their members. What was once a single gang is now a loose network of individual "sets" around the United States. The gang primarily (but not exclusively) comprises African Americans. The Crips have an intense rivalry with the Bloods, are also known to feud with Chicano gangs and have a conflict with the Vice Lords in Memphis. The Crips were founded in Los Angeles, California in 1969 by 15-year-old Raymond Washington. Washington initially called the gang the Baby Avenues in an attempt to emulate older

gangs and activities carried out by the Black Panthers, with which he was fascinated. This evolved to Avenue Cribs and then Cribs as nicknames for the age of the members.[1] The name Crips was first introduced in the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper in a description by crime victims of young men with canes, as if they were crippled (though there is some discussion that it may have initially been a simple spelling mistake). The name stuck. Stanley Tookie Williams, generally acknowledged as co-founder of the Crips,[2] started his own gang called the Westside Crips. The Crips became popular throughout southern Los Angeles as more youth gangs joined it; at one point they outnumbered non-Crip gangs by 3 to 1, sparking disputes with non-Crip gangs including the L.A. Brims, Athens Park Boys, the Bishops and the Denver Lanes. The Crips eventually became the most powerful gang in California. In response, all of the other besieged gangs, including the Pirus, formed an alliance that later became the Bloods. Along with friends, Williams and Washington created the initial intent of continuing the revolutionary ideology of the 1960s. These aspirations were unattainable because of a general lack of political leadership and guidance. Washington and Williams were never able to develop an agenda for social change within the community and instead became obsessed with protecting themselves from other gangs in the community. By 1971 the gang's notoriety had spread across Los Angeles. The gang became increasingly violent as they attempted to expand their turf. By the early 1980s the gang was heavily involved with drug trade. Columbus State University is a four-year public liberal arts university located in Columbus, Georgia. The university was established and is administered by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Under authority of the Board of Regents, the institution was originally called Columbus College when

it opened as a two-year junior college in the then newly renovated Shannon Hosiery Mill on Talbotton Road in 1958. The school opened with 15 faculty members and almost 300 students.