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APPLICATION

1. Observe your instructor/professor as he teaches the class.

Find out which guidelines in the selection of instructional materials did he


observe? Not observe?

In his use of instructional material, write down evidence of:

 Preparation of self – she is well-prepared to report/discuss/teach her


lesson with instructional materials including book, outline of her
report/lesson, creative visual aide and herself as an educational
technology.
 Preparation of students – warming up us by reviewing our last lesson
that we tackle, ask questions and ask again what we learn on our last
lesson.
 Preparation of material – well-prepared and very creative materials
and also very informational.
 Follow up – she gives us an activity by pair to evaluate our learning in
the lesson she taught to us if we understand it.

2. Accomplish this Learning Log

What I learned? (Deposit) How I apply what I learned (Dividend)


 I learned how to use  Using the PPPF, the lesson I
instructional material using must teach should be
PPPF (prepare yourself, prepare productive and informative. I
your students, present the learned also how to
materials, follow up) choose/select the right
material for my upcoming
lesson/report.
APPLICATION

1. Apply the concept of direct experiences to the college courses


you have taken. Why do you have Field Study Courses and
Practice Teaching? If yes, what are they?

 We must have Field Study Courses and Practice Teaching


because by this courses, we encounter the direct,
purposeful experience, we really apply and test our
learning, and it is more or best learning than we
learned/discussed from our teachers/professors.

2. Go over the K to 12 Curriculum Guide. Find out which


competencies can be taught through direct experience.

 These are the competencies can be taught through direct


experience from K to 12 curriculum guide:

o measuration and calculation


o use of tools and equipment
o interpretation of plans/drawing
o occupational health and safety in the workplace
o maintenance of tools and equipment
APPLICATION

1. Present contrived experiences and their various forms by means of a


graphic organizer.

MODELS

OBJECT
MOCK UP

SPECIMENS

CONTRIVED
EXPERIENCES

SIMULATION ARTIFACTS

GAMES

2. Compare a model and a mock up by the use of a Venn diagram.


3. Illustrate with examples the five (5) reasons why we make use of
models, mock ups, specimens, and objects given above.

overcome limitation and space

• e.g. planetarium

to 'edit' reality for us to be able to focus


on parts or a process of a system that
we intend to study

• e.g. atom

to overcome difficulties of size

• e.g. terrarium

to understand the inaccessible

• e.g. human brain in a specimen jar

help learners understand abstractions

• e.g. plant and animal cell (under microscope)


4. Go over the K to 12 Curriculum Guide. Identify objectives and topics
which can be taught with contrived experiences – models, mock ups,
specimens and objects, simulation and games.
Content Content Standards Performance Performance
Standards Standards

Parts and Functions


Levels of demonstrates employs differentiates organ
organization understanding of the appropriate systems, organs,
Microscopy different levels of techniques using tissues, cells from
Animal and plant organization standard tools or each other
cells demonstrates equipment to gather identifies parts of
Microorganisms: understanding that data about very small the microscope and
Fungi, Protists, and aside from plants and objects their functions
Bacteria animals, there are differentiates plant
other much smaller recognizes that and animal cells
organisms that can many organisms, according to presence
only be seen through including humans, or absence of certain
the microscope; many have organ systems organelles
of which consist of that work together to
only one cell carry out essential describes the
processes of the body structures of
microorganisms using
engages in a microscope
activities that promote identifies beneficial
proper nutrition and and harmful
healthful habits to microorganisms
maintain proper explains why the
functioning of the cell is considered the
organ systems basic structural and
functional unit of all
organisms

Interactions
Components of an demonstrates initiates and/or identifies which of
ecosystem: biotic and understanding that participates in the things found in the
abiotic organisms interact activities that protect environment are biotic
with each other and and preserve or abiotic
Ecological with their environment ecosystems in the describes the
relationships to survive locality different ecological
- Producers and relationships found in
consumers an ecosystem
- Symbiotic describes how
relationships: energy is transformed
parasitism, mutualism through the feeding
relationships
predicts the effect
of changes in one
population on other
populations in the
ecosystem
predicts the effect
of changes in abiotic
factors on the
ecosystem
APPLICATION

1. So that the pantomime and tableau will not be merely visual


presentations, what can you add to enhance them?

It must be added with verbal communication so that it will understand


well by students/audiences but if we add verbal communication to
enhance them, it is not a pantomime and tableau anymore.

2. Go over the K to 12 Curriculum Guide. Identify competencies with which


you can use:

Tableau - occupational health and safety in the workplace competency

Pantomime - occupational health and safety in the workplace competency

Puppets
 use of tools and equipment competency
 interpretation of plans/drawing competency

Role-playing
 use of tools and equipment competency
 interpretation of plans/drawing competency
APPLICATION

1. “Less is more.” If you have too many steps to include in


demonstration, what should you do?

 If I have too many steps to include in demonstration, I will


summarize it and make it simple so that students/audiences will
understand what I demonstrate to them.

2. Is it better to entertain questions as you go along your demonstration


or postpone them till the end of demo to avoid disruption or possible
digression?

 It is better to postpone questions till the end of demo to avoid


disruption or possible digression. The person who demonstrates
will confuse on how her/his demo will be step by step in order
because asking questions make him destructed.

3. Is it sufficient to look for puzzled faces in your audience to find out if


your demonstration is clear?

 It is not sufficient to look for puzzled faces in your audience to


find out if your demonstration is clear because what is clear to
you might not clear to them about the demo. You must ask or
individually demo it to them if they really understand it and it is
clear to them the process.
4. Brown (1969) cites guide questions that can help us conduct effective
demonstrations. Find out if all these are covered in the steps given by
Dale (1969) in the ABSTRACTION phase of this Lesson.

1) Can students see and hear?


 This question is similar to Dale’s guiding question to evaluate the
classroom demonstrations “Could every person see and hear?”

2) Do you use chalkboard outlines or drawings?


 Summarize as you go along and provide a concluding summary.
It is also similar to Dale’s guiding question to evaluate the
classroom demonstration under “Did you follow the step-by-
step plan?”

3) Do you define unfamiliar terms, parts or processes?


 There is no similar phrase on Dale’s steps and Dale’s guiding
question to evaluate the classroom demonstration.

4) Do you note signs of confusion, disbelief, inattention?


 Check to see that your demonstration is being understood.

5) Do you use “good showmanship?


 Set the tone of good communication.

6) Do you intersperse film, transparency or other appropriate audio-


visual materials?
 Summarize as you go along and provide a concluding summary.
It is also similar to Dale’s guiding question to evaluate the
classroom demonstration under “Did you follow the step-by-
step plan?”

7) Do you move at the right pace?


 This guide question has no similarities on Dale (1969) steps. Dale
steps are too general.
8) Do you invite participation as appropriate?
 This question is similar to Dale’s guiding question to evaluate
the classroom demonstrations “Did your students participate in
what you were doing by asking thoughtful questions at the
appropriate time?”

5. Evaluate the evaluation questions for demonstration. Can you add or


delete or merge some items? Improve on them.
 For me, the evaluation questions of Dale for demonstration are
right but in addition, it must be added with “Do you define
unfamiliar terms, parts or processes?” and “Do you move at the
right pace?” to emphasize more the best, good and better demo
next time you demonstrate other topics.

6. Why is demonstration called audiovisual explanation?


 Demonstration is called audiovisual explanation because it is
both use audio or verbal and visual presentation. It is not
enough that the teacher talks. To be effective, his/her
demonstration must be accompanied by some visuals.

7. Go over the K to 12 Curriculum Guide. Find out which objectives and


competencies lend themselves to the demonstration method.

GRADE 7- Force, Motion and Energy


THIRD QUARTER/ THIRD GRADING
PERIOD
Content Content Standards Performance Learning
Standards Competencies

Sound
Characteristics of demonstrates recognizes the use uses the concepts
sound understanding of the of indigenous of wavelength,
characteristics of materials in creating velocity, and
sound such as pitch melodious music. amplitude to describe
and loudness characteristics of
sound such as pitch,
loudness and quality.
demonstrates
changes in pitch and
loudness using real or
improvised musical
instrument through
fair testing.
explains sound
production in the
human voice box and
how pitch, loudness
and quality of sound
vary from one person
to another.

describes how
organisms produce,
transmit and receive
sound of various
frequencies
(infrasonic, audible
and ultrasonic sound).
creates harmonious
music using
indigenous products.