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100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

Abstract
This document provides recommendations on all aspects of planning,
administration, and management of system integration testing of subsea field
developments and production systems.
It is first step towards establishing SIT guidelines that can be used throughout
Chevron, and as such, should be considered a “living” document that will be
reviewed periodically and revised to reflect improvements as it is applied to
subsequent SIT activities. The appendices will be open to review on a much more
frequent basis.
This guideline is applicable to worldwide projects. It describes considerations that
must be given to SIT organization and provides governing instructions for work
execution and site administration.
This document assists subsea field development project teams to take a common
approach to SIT and help them to develop their own project specific SIT program,
procedures, and activities.
As the SIT process is developed with the help of this document, new and better
examples may be produced that can replace or supplement sections of the
appendices.
Users of this guideline are therefore encouraged to submit their own examples (and
especially lessons learned) for inclusion in future versions of this document.

Contents Page
1.0 General ........................................................................................... 4
1.1...... Introduction ........................................................................... 4
1.2...... Objective ............................................................................... 5
2.0 Definitions ....................................................................................... 6
2.1...... General ................................................................................. 6
2.2...... Performance Verification Testing (PVT) ............................... 6
2.3...... Factory Acceptance Testing (FAT) ....................................... 7
2.4...... Extended Factory Acceptance Testing (EFAT) ..................... 7
2.5...... System Integration Testing (SIT) .......................................... 7
2.6...... Site Received Test (SRT) ..................................................... 8

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3.0 Acronyms ........................................................................................ 9


4.0 SIT Planning and Scheduling ...................................................... 11
4.1...... General ............................................................................... 11
4.2...... Test Location(s) .................................................................. 11
4.3...... Facilities and Fixtures ......................................................... 11
4.4...... Site Preparation .................................................................. 12
4.5...... Time Schedule and Logistics .............................................. 12
4.6...... Environmental Factors ........................................................ 13
5.0 SIT Project Management .............................................................. 13
5.1...... SIT Site HES Management ................................................. 13
5.2...... Project Management Structure ........................................... 17
5.3...... Daily Site Control and Supervision ..................................... 17
5.4...... Interfaces with Chevron Project Personnel ......................... 20
5.5...... Verification and Acceptance of Testing .............................. 20
5.6...... Reporting ............................................................................ 20
5.7...... SIT Completion and Closeout ............................................. 21
6.0 Personnel ...................................................................................... 21
6.1...... General ............................................................................... 21
6.2...... Main Contractor Equipment Engineers and Designers ....... 21
6.3...... Manufacturers Service Personnel ....................................... 22
6.4...... Other Suppliers' Personnel ................................................. 22
6.5...... Installation Contractor Personnel ........................................ 22
6.6...... Chevron Operations Personnel .......................................... 22
7.0 Responsibilities ............................................................................ 23
7.1...... General ............................................................................... 23
7.2...... SIT Lead Contractor(s) ....................................................... 23
7.3...... Equipment Manufacturer Input to SIT ................................. 23
7.4...... Installation Contractor Input to SIT ..................................... 24
7.5...... Other Contractor Inputs ...................................................... 24
7.6...... Chevron (Project) Role in SIT ............................................. 24
7.7...... SIT Site Team ..................................................................... 25
8.0 Methodology and Execution of SIT ............................................. 25
8.1...... Overall SIT Requirements .................................................. 25
8.2...... Representative SIT Layout ................................................. 26
8.3...... Tree and Tubing Hanger Integration Testing ...................... 28
8.4...... Mechanical Equipment SIT Requirements ......................... 28
8.5...... ROV Installations ................................................................ 29
8.6...... Control System SIT Requirements ..................................... 31
9.0 Training ......................................................................................... 33
9.1...... General ............................................................................... 33
9.2...... Operator Awareness ........................................................... 34
9.3...... Extended Operator Training ............................................... 34

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10.0 Documentation and Deliverables ................................................ 34


10.1.... General ............................................................................... 34
10.2.... Site Received Procedures and Testing ............................... 34
10.3.... Fluid Cleanliness Certificates .............................................. 35
10.4.... Transmittals and Control of Equipment Movements ........... 35
10.5.... SIT Procedure Completion and Signoff .............................. 35
10.6.... Punchlists ............................................................................ 35
10.7.... Photography ........................................................................ 36
10.8.... Lessons Learned Report ..................................................... 37
10.9.... SIT Closeout Report ........................................................... 37
Appendix A Overview of SIT Considerations in CPDEP Phases ......... 38
Appendix B SIT Considerations in CPDEP Phase 2 .............................. 39
Appendix C SIT Development in CPDEP Phase 3 ................................. 47
Appendix D SIT Execution in CPDEP Phase 4 ....................................... 64

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1.0 GENERAL

Figure 1: System Integration Testing (SIT) Overview

1.1 Introduction

1.1.1 Increasing Costs


1. As offshore oil exploration moves into ever greater water depths
and there is an increasing use of subsea field development
techniques, cost of installation and hookup of these projects can
equal or exceed capital cost of building subsea system
equipment.
2. Offshore day rates for installation vessels run into hundreds of
thousands of dollars, and any delays caused by ill fitting or non
functioning components can greatly affect project budgets and
profitability.

1.1.2 Integration Testing


Integration testing to prove interfaces between various equipment
components becomes a very important element within the project
execution plan, especially if these equipment components can be
built by different manufacturers, very often in different parts of the
world.

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1.1.3 Benefits of SIT


1. System Integration Test (SIT) will bring vital system
components and interfaces together for the first and possibly
only time before the project enters its offshore installation
phase.
2. The intention is that any mistakes or anomalies in the way the
system fits and functions together (inclusive of additional
tooling or specific equipment needed for installation,
commissioning and operation) can be found and corrected at the
onshore location.
3. It can easily be demonstrated that onshore testing can save
significant cost of offshore installation time.

1.1.4 Common Approach to SIT


1. With many projects progressing through the Chevron Project
Development and Execution Process (CPDEP), Chevron has
identified a need to develop a common approach to the way in
which each project should address SIT requirements.
2. This document therefore gives guidance to project managers
and project teams.
3. The document may also be used as a guide to those preparing
Request for Tender packages, so they can better inform
equipment manufacturers and EPIC contractors of what will be
required from them during system integration testing.

1.2 Objective
1. The primary objective of SIT is confirmation of equipment fit and
function.
2. Throughout factory and system integration test programs, the common
objective shall be to:
a. Identify and resolve interface problems.
b. Ensure pressure integrity.
c. Identify functionality weaknesses.
3. Important secondary objectives of the SIT are:
a. More reliable equipment performance.
b. Reduced installation time (and therefore costs).
c. Better installation procedures.
d. Training of personnel.
4. This SIT Recommended Practice will bring focus and definition to what
is required from each project for integration testing of subsea systems
before they can be deployed offshore.

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2.0 DEFINITIONS

2.1 General
1. The definitions is this section are included for the purposes of this SIT
guideline only and are intended to provide guidance to where certain
types of factory testing stop and System Integration Tests (SIT) may
start.
2. The information in this section is not intended to define performance
verification, factory acceptance, or extended factory acceptance testing,
as these will be more fully defined and contractually explained in other
Chevron project documentation.

2.2 Performance Verification Testing (PVT)


1. PVT is a set of test procedures used to verify equipment designs.
2. Equipment or fixtures used for performance verification testing shall be
representative of production models in terms of design, dimensions, and
materials.
3. If product design undergoes changes in fit, form, function, or material,
manufacturer shall evaluate impact of such changes on performance and
integrity of product.
4. Design undergoing a substantial change that is identified by
manufacturer as affecting performance of product in intended service
becomes a new design and requires retesting.
5. Change in material may not require retesting if suitability of new
material can be confirmed by other means.
6. If applicable, performance verification testing may include:
a. Qualification of materials performance.
b. Component verification testing.
c. Hydrostatic pressure cycling.
d. Load testing.
e. Testing at extremes of temperature (maximum and minimum).
f. Temperature cycling.
g. Life cycle/endurance testing.
h. Hydro pressure strength test.
i. Gas leak testing.
7. PVT shall be performed by equipment manufacturer and shall comply
with applicable regulatory specifications.

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2.3 Factory Acceptance Testing (FAT)

2.3.1 General
1. FAT shall be performed by equipment manufacturer in
accordance with manufacturer's own FAT procedure(s).
2. Manufacturer procedures shall be reviewed and agreed with
Chevron project personnel prior to commencement of testing.
3. FAT on subsea trees and related equipment (including
manifolds, jumpers connectors and control systems) shall also
comply with applicable regulatory specifications.

2.3.2 Assembled Equipment


1. FAT of assembled equipment shall be performed at
manufacturer/fabrication work site.
2. Tests shall demonstrate and verify that finished equipment
complies with requirements of contract specifications and
applicable regulations governing functionality and performance.
3. If appropriate, tests may incorporate simulated test jigs and
fixtures.

2.4 Extended Factory Acceptance Testing (EFAT)


1. EFAT shall be performed by equipment manufacturer.
2. The objective of EFAT is to give added confidence that internal and
external interfaces are correct before equipment leaves the
manufacturing plant.
3. EFAT may also be undertaken on equipment that must be delivered to
schedule but where interfacing equipment is not available (e.g., if a tree
is required for early installation or if interfacing equipment has already
been deployed offshore).
4. Typically, EFAT incorporates many or all of the components being
issued to the project by one of the equipment suppliers.
5. EFAT shall ensure that all equipment provided by that supplier meets or
exceeds expectations toward fit, form, and functionality before it is
incorporated into SIT.
6. EFAT procedure may be undertaken with proven simulated equipment
jigs and fixtures replacing critical components to be interfaced. Use of
such simulated equipment jigs should, however, be considered method
of last resort.

2.5 System Integration Testing (SIT)


1. SIT shall be the most comprehensive set of tests to prove function, fit,
and interchangeability of subsea system and confirm its readiness for
offshore installation.

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2. SIT procedures should be structured in a manner similar to expected


installation and commissioning activities. An outline of installation and
commissioning procedures should be obtained prior to establishing SIT
procedures.
3. SIT shall assemble as many of the subsea system components as
possible to verify that equipment interfaces and system functionality
have been achieved. A good representative sample of project equipment
and subsea layout should be achieved, e.g., tree, manifold, jumpers,
flying leads, running tools, ROV tooling, control system components,
and PLETs (pipeline end termination).
4. SIT will also give an opportunity for installation contractor to gain
familiarity with equipment and develop final installation procedures.
5. Operator familiarization and training can also be achieved at SIT, the
final opportunity to see many of the subsea equipment items together
before they are deployed to seabed. Therefore, it is highly recommended
that installation crews and operations personnel participate in the SIT.

2.6 Site Received Test (SRT)

2.6.1 Equipment
1. Equipment that leaves the manufacturing plant after completion
of FAT, EFAT, and/or SIT and is transported to new site shall be
subjected to SRT procedures to verify continued integrity and
functionality.
2. Equipment reported as damaged or the functionality found to be
compromised may be repaired locally and retested in
accordance with appropriate procedures, as agreed between
manufacturer and Purchaser. Any such incidents will likely be
reviewed on a case by case basis, with option to return
equipment for repair to original equipment manufacturer.

2.6.2 Final SRT


1. Equipment that arrives at pre loadout site shall be subjected to
final SRT prior to offshore installation.
2. Final SRT is typically the last time that warranty items can be
identified and corrected. Cost of recovery and repair will grow
substantially beyond this point.
3. It is likely therefore that final SRT will incorporate full function
and integrity testing.
4. If equipment will be loaded out immediately to installation site,
consideration should be given to performing pre loadout and
predeployment testing at this time to reduce offshore scope of
work and save on installation time.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

3.0 ACRONYMS
These acronyms are commonly used throughout the oil industry and
throughout this document.
BOP—Blow Out Preventer
CPDEP—Chevron Project Development and Execution Process
CHK—Choke
CVX—Chevron
DHPT—Down Hole Pressure/Temperature
DVD—Digital Video Disk
EFAT —Extended Factory Acceptance Test
EFL—Electrical Flying Lead
EPIC—Engineering, Procurement, Installation, and Construction
EPU —Electrical Power Unit
ESD —Emergency Shut Down
ESS—Emergency Security System
ETU—Electrical Test Unit
FAT —Factory Acceptance Test
FEC—Facility Equipment Contractor
FEED—Front End Engineering Design
FLET—Flowline End Termination
FLOT—Flying Lead Orientation Tool
HCR—High Crush Resistance (hoses and umbilical tubes)
HAZID—Hazard Identification.
HAZOP—Hazard and Operability.
HFL—Hydraulic Flying Lead
HPA—High Pressure A
HPB—High Pressure B
HPU —Hydraulic Power Unit
HES —Health, Environment, and Safety
ICSS—Integrated Controls Sensor System
IWOCS—Installation and Workover Control System
IWC—Intelligent Well Control

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IWV—Installation Workover Vendor


JRA—Job Risk Analysis
LPA—Low Pressure A
LPB—Low Pressure B
MCS —Master Control Station
MDC—Mobile Drilling Contractor
MODU—Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit
MSCM—Manifold Subsea Control Module
MSDS —Material Safety Data Sheet (usually applies to chemicals)
PAT—Performance Acceptance Test
PDU —Power Distribution Unit
PETU—Portable Electronic Test Unit
PIV—Production Isolation Valve
PLEM—Pipeline End Manifold
PLET—Pipeline End Termination
PPE—Personal Protective Equipment
PTFE—Teflon
PVT—Performance Verification Test
QA/QC—Quality Assurance/Quality Control
QS—Quality Surveillance
ROV—Remote Operated Vehicle
SAM—Subsea Accumulator Module
SAU—Subsea Accumulator Unit
SCITT—Subsea Controls Installation and Test Tree
SCM—Subsea Control Module
SCMRT—Subsea Control Module Running Tool
SCSSV—Surface Controlled Sub-surface Safety Valve
SCV—Subsea Control Vendor
SDU—Subsea Distribution Unit
SEM—Subsea Electronics Module
SEV—Subsea Equipment Vendor

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

SIC—Subsea Installation Contractor


SIM—Simulator
SIT—System Integration Test
SMCS—Subsea Master Control Station
SRT—Site Received Test
SSTT—Subsea Test Tree
TH—Tubing Hanger
THRT—Tubing Hanger Running Tool
TRRT—Tree Running Retrieval Tool.
TRT—Tree Running Tool
UTA—Umbilical Termination Assembly
VCCS—Vertical Connection and Cleaning System
VCCT—Vertical Connection and Cleaning Tool
VPI—Visual Position Indicator
WI—Water Injection

4.0 SIT PLANNING AND SCHEDULING

4.1 General
1. SIT test plan shall be formulated early in project life cycle, allowing
designers and equipment engineers to work their equipment production
schedules into SIT plan.
2. Tooling and test equipment shall also be considered, if these may be
used at other sites as part of FAT.

4.2 Test Location(s)


1. Potential test locations shall also be identified early in project life.
2. Locations may be reconsidered as project progresses and final SIT test
site selected well in advance of commencement of SIT such that
planning and scheduling may be finalized as early as possible.

4.3 Facilities and Fixtures


1. SIT site shall be well equipped with major facilities and fixtures that are
likely to be required to conduct test programs.
2. It is likely that test site to be selected will already be used for fabrication
and/or handling of largest components within subsea production system
(such as manifold or tree).

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3. Access to machine shop and welding facilities may be required if


modifications to jigs or equipment are found to be necessary during
testing.
4. Port or jetty facilities may also be advantageous to load out equipment
after SIT is complete.

4.4 Site Preparation


1. Ideal SIT sites will require minimum site preparation.
2. However, it is likely that a certain amount of site clearing activity will be
required to produce a suitably large flat area for SIT to be laid out.
3. Level concrete or tarred surface shall be preferred over rough sand or
graded surface. However, surface shall be able to withstand considerable
weight.
4. Easy access for cranes, forklifts, and other delivery vehicles shall be
required.
5. Onsite supply of utilities, such as electricity, water, and compressed air,
would be desirable.
6. SIT site should contain office and workshop facilities or at least have
sufficient space for such facilities in the form of portable cabins.

4.5 Time Schedule and Logistics


1. As the last step before offshore installation, the importance of SIT is
emphasized throughout this document.
2. The objective to ensure that all equipment interfaces have been
thoroughly tested at SIT before shipping offshore is intended to prevent
delays and reduce installation time. To accomplish this, time allocated to
SIT shall not be compromised.
3. SIT phase of project occurs between completion of manufacturing phase
and start of installation phase. Pressure to reduce SIT program may arise
from late manufacturing completion or early installation opportunities,
but this shall be resisted to avoid compromising SIT program objectives.
4. One way to ensure that a realistic time window will be allowed for
conducting SIT program is to put in a contingency between FAT/EFAT
and SIT. This would allow for overrun in either FAT/EFAT or for
additional testing time that may be required for completion of SIT.
(Refer to Figure 2.)
5. Time and resources shall also be made available to perform equipment
refurbishment and remedial work, post SIT and before handover of
equipment to installation contractor.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

Figure 2: Example of Use of Contingency

Factory
Acceptance

Extended Factory
Acceptance
Testing

Contingency

System
Integration

Mobilization and
Offshore
Installations

4.6 Environmental Factors


1. Effect of SIT work on local environment is governed by HES policies
(Refer to Section 5.1).
2. Environmental factors to be considered in this section are effects that
SIT site environment may have on equipment under test and whether it
may give unrealistic or unrepresentative influences to test program.
3. An exercise is required to examine SIT site environmental factors likely
to be encountered (cold climates, hot climates, high rainfall, or
dry/dusty) and decide on precautionary measures to protect equipment
under test.

5.0 SIT PROJECT MANAGEMENT

5.1 SIT Site HES Management

5.1.1 General
1. All work at SIT site shall be performed in accordance with
governing instructions and programs in place for HES
management at host site.
2. Site audits may be performed prior to commencement of SIT
and at regular intervals for duration of testing to ensure that site
HES policy and policy execution is in accordance with project
HES requirements and prevailing Chevron HES strategy.

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3. Host site HES policy shall govern all work performed during
SIT work and shall be understood and adhered to by all
personnel in SIT project team.
4. The specific steps in Section 5.1.3 through 5.1.11 should be
performed as a minimum to address SIT health, safety, and
environmental issues.

5.1.2 HES Introduction for SIT Site Team


1. SIT site team personnel shall undergo training and introduction
exercise pertaining to governing HES requirements at each SIT
site location and to relevant test equipment and procedures.
2. Prior to start of SIT, the SIT manager shall arrange SIT site HES
introduction for site team, at which the following agenda items
will be addressed:
a. Introduction to SIT site manual and applicable procedures.
b. Organization.
c. Job descriptions.
d. Site HES management and applicable procedures.
e. Test site information (contacts and organization).
f. SIT equipment.
g. SIT procedures.
h. SIT hazard assessment.
3. SIT site HES introduction for site team personnel shall be
conducted as far in advance of start of SIT operations as
practical, given that relevant personnel must attend.
4. Records of SIT site HES introduction shall be kept.

5.1.3 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)


1. SIT site team personnel shall follow guidelines regarding
personal protective equipment as dictated by host site
regulations, in addition to project or test specific requirements.
Essentially, PPE as a minimum requires use of the following:
a. Hard hat.
b. Safety glasses.
c. Protective footwear.
d. Flameproof coveralls or equivalent.
2. Visitors shall follow same requirements but will be limited to
areas outside immediate work area, where the following PPE
will normally be considered sufficient:
a. Hard hat.
b. Safety glasses.
c. Protective footwear.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

5.1.4 Job Risk Analysis


1. Some test procedures may carry higher risk element than normal
test site activities. In such cases, SIT Engineer shall arrange for
Job Risk Analysis (JRA) to be performed in accordance with
relevant SIT procedures.
2. It is recommended that an overall JRA be performed with key
personnel on SIT Site Team well before SIT start.
3. Results and actions from early risk assessment exercises should
be maintained, reviewed, and updated at SIT startup and
throughout SIT program duration.
4. Value of early risk identification is that additional equipment or
training (an example is work at elevations) will be identified
that will, in turn, enable safe work planning.

5.1.5 HES Inspections


1. SIT manager shall ensure that regular work site inspections take
place throughout SIT program.
2. HES inspections shall be performed in accordance with host site
HES personnel.
3. Inspections shall cover, as a minimum:
a. General housekeeping.
b. Personnel safety.
c. Working environment.
d. Influence on external environment.
e. Waste disposal.
f. Handling of chemicals.
g. Sick bay/emergency evacuation procedures (if remote
location).
h. Lifting equipment.
i. Scaffolding/working at heights.
j. Safety logs.
4. Host site Test Supervisor shall be responsible for ensuring a safe
and tidy working environment.

5.1.6 Safety Delegate


1. Safety delegates are host site employees' representatives in
matters of health, safety, and environment.
2. SIT site team personnel should be aware of these safety
delegates and be prepared to seek their advice on host site HES
issues.

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5.1.7 Work with Chemicals


1. Host site safe working procedures shall govern work with
chemicals.
2. MSDS for all chemicals used at SIT site shall be present and
available to personnel working with chemicals.
3. Recommended safety precautions from chemical manufacturer
shall be followed, unless less stringent than governing
instructions have been approved by Purchaser for work in test
area.

5.1.8 HES Meetings


HES meetings for SIT site team personnel shall be held as deemed
necessary, based on results of HES Inspections.

5.1.9 Reporting of Incidents and Accidents


1. Accidents and incidents shall be reported using host site
reporting procedures.
2. In addition, accidents and personnel injuries may also be
reported through SIT project reporting procedures that are
deemed necessary by SIT project management and those
required to comply with Chevron HES accident reporting
policies.

5.1.10 Investigation after Accidents or Incidents


Accidents and high potential incidents shall be investigated as
deemed necessary by SIT project management and in accordance
with Chevron HES accident investigation policies.

5.1.11 Visitor SIT Site Access


1. Visitors to SIT site shall undergo a brief safety introduction
before entering any fabrication, manufacturing, or test facilities
at SIT site.
2. Introductions shall be conducted by SIT manager or his
designee.
3. Safety introduction will cover:
a. Safe areas, hazardous areas, and access routes.
b. Protective equipment requirements.
c. How/where to raise alarm in event of accident, fire, or
personal injury.
d. Muster station in case of accident or fire.
e. Ongoing hazardous operations.

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4. If applicable, visitors shall be given a guided tour of test


facilities to ensure familiarity with basic features of site.
5. Records of individual safety introductions shall be retained.

5.2 Project Management Structure

5.2.1 General
1. SIT project management team shall have a structured
organization.
2. SIT manager, appointed by lead SIT Contractor, will have
overall responsibility for safe and efficient operation of SIT test
site and its facilities.
3. SIT test engineer, also appointed by lead SIT Contractor, shall
report to SIT manager and shall be responsible for day to day
running of all test operations.
4. Additional SIT personnel, as deemed necessary for safe and
efficient operation of SIT test site, may include:
a. Equipment engineers (designers or project engineers
familiar with operation of specific parts of system).
b. Yard foremen.
c. Riggers.
d. Crane operators.
e. Supervisors.
f. Technicians.
g. Data recorders
h. Administration staff.

5.2.2 Typical Organization Chart


1. Figure 3 shows a typical organization chart for SIT site project
team.
2. This particular chart assumes that:
a. Main subsea equipment manufacturer will be Lead
Contractor.
b. SIT will be conducted at one of manufacturer's own sites.
3. Project input shall be provided from both Chevron and
Installation Contractor project teams.

5.3 Daily Site Control and Supervision

5.3.1 Daily Work Program Meetings


1. Daily work program meeting shall be used as means of
communicating daily test program to SIT site team personnel.

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2. The meeting will be run by the SIT test engineer (or his
nominated designee) and shall involve both SIT personnel and
all other personnel who will be involved with any aspect of that
day's testing.
3. As a minimum the meeting shall be held at the start of the day,
with additional meetings called when any of the following arise:
a. At the start of a new phase or test procedure.
b. When a significant change is made to the day's test program.
c. When personnel indicate that they are unsure of test
procedures or requirements.
d. Following any accident, incident or identified near miss.
e. Any change in shift personnel.

5.3.2 Daily Wrap-up Meeting


1. At the end of each day's testing, a wrap-up meeting should be
conducted between SIT site team personnel who have been
involved with the day's testing and SIT test engineer.
2. SIT manager and Chevron site representatives may also attend
this meeting.
3. Although an informal meeting, the agenda will focus on:
a. HES.
b. The day's progress.
c. Problems or test failures.
d. Areas of concern.
e. Planned activities for next day.

5.3.3 Daily Log


1. Daily log is a chronological recording of events during the day.
2. Main purpose of daily log is to serve as handover information
between shifts and as a reminder for weekly report.
3. SIT test engineer or his designee shall be responsible for
maintaining daily log, which shall be completed and signed at
the end of each working day.
4. Format of daily log can either be long hand narrative in suitable
hard backed notebook or electronic file.
5. In either form, it is important that the daily log is available to
SIT manager and Chevron Site Representative to review history
and events.

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Figure 3: SIT Organization Chart (Example)

Chevron Energy Technology Co.

Subsea Operations
CVX CHEVRON PROJECT SUBSEA EQUIPMENT
SUPPLY PROJECT
Operations and Other Project Management
Project Groups Equipment Design Engineers (Equipment Supplier)
Planning & Scheduling

EPIC Site Representative SIT Site Representative SIT Project Manager Host Site Project Manager
(Installation Contractor) (Chevron)
(Equipment Supplier)

HES

EPIC SIT Team :


PROJECT ADMIN Workshop Team :
- Project Engineer(s) Third Party Inspection
- Secretary / Doc. Control - Punch List Work
- ROV Supervisor
(Independent Verification) - Cost Control
- Deck Foreman - Modifications
- Planning
- ROV Crew
- Logistics & Procurement - Refurbishment
100-19

QA / QC

SIT Lead Engineer Yard Team :


Offshore Service Teams :
- Cranes / Rigging
(Equipment Supplier)
SIT Test Engineers : - Forklifts
- Supervisors (Project Support as required) Data Recorder - Scaffolding
- Service Technicians : - Fuel & Utilities
- Tree
- Controls - Manifold / Foundations Fluid Cleanliness Supervisor
- Oil Tools (XT) - Jumpers
- Controls Other Suppliers and Sub-contractors :
- IWOCS - Umbilicals / Flying Leads
- Manifolds - Installation / Commissioning Test Team - ROV Tooling

- ROV Tooling Test Supervisor - Chemical Injection

100 System Integration Testing (SIT)


Service engineer
- Installations - Umbilicals
IWOCS operator
- Commissioning XT service tech - Jumper Fabrication
Controls tech
- Insulation
Fluid Cleanliness tech
- Flying Leads
- Fluid Testing

Shadow box outline denotes present on site

Plain box outline denotes support group or organization


______ Solid line shows direct control _ _ _ _ Broken line shows indirect contractual link
June 2006
100 System Integration Testing (SIT) Subsea Operations

5.4 Interfaces with Chevron Project Personnel


1. Chevron will appoint SIT site representative, who will be normally
present at SIT site daily.
2. Daily meeting between Chevron site representative and SIT manager
shall be set up. Meeting will primarily focus on:
a. HES.
b. Overall test schedule.
c. Progress last 24 hours.
d. Planned activity next 24 hours.
e. Areas of concern.
3. All other Chevron personnel, regardless of title or position, shall
coordinate their visits or activities on SIT site through Chevron site
representative, who shall first seek clearance for such visits from SIT
manager.

5.5 Verification and Acceptance of Testing


1. In addition to Chevron project personnel participation at SIT site, it is
likely that some form of inspection personnel will be required to attend
SIT site to witness and verify that testing has been performed in
accordance with procedures and validate recorded results.
2. SIT procedures should be reviewed and verified for accuracy by SIT test
engineer for verification by inspector and for acceptance by Chevron
site representative.

5.6 Reporting

5.6.1 General
1. SIT reporting requirements will vary between different projects,
depending on scope, location and project organizations.
2. As a minimum, reporting will likely be performed daily, weekly,
and monthly.

5.6.2 Daily Reporting


1. HES Report.
2. Progress last 24 hours.
3. Schedule and logistics.

5.6.3 Weekly Reporting


1. Weekly HES Summary.
2. Weekly Progress Summary.
3. Schedule and logistics look ahead.

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5.6.4 Monthly Reporting


1. Monthly HES Incident and Actions Summary.
2. Monthly Progress Summary and Schedule Review.
3. Monthly Cost Report.

5.7 SIT Completion and Closeout

5.7.1 General
On completion of SIT program, test site can start to be demobilized,
equipment will be made ready for repairs, preservation or
dispatched to installation mobilizing site (or other agreed location),
and key personnel will start to relocate to next phase of project.

5.7.2 SIT Completion


1. When all SIT scopes of work have been successfully performed,
there will be joint declaration between Chevron SIT Site
Representative and SIT project manager that SIT work is
complete.
2. If Chevron and Contractor SIT site teams do not reach
agreement that SIT work is indeed complete, arbitration should
be requested from both Chevron and Contractor Project
Management.

5.7.3 SIT Closeout Report


1. On completion of SIT work, a formal closeout report shall be
compiled by SIT project manager or SIT Lead Engineer(s).
2. Report will outline strategy and approach taken to conducting
SIT scopes of work, in addition to highlighting successes and
failures experienced during SIT program.
3. Comprehensive summary of lessons learned during test program
shall also be an important part of closeout report, as will be
updated list showing status of punchlist items and actions.
4. Information given in SIT closeout report may be used to assist
in future updates of this SIT guideline.

6.0 PERSONNEL

6.1 General
This section summarizes all expected main groups of personnel who may be
required to visit or work on SIT site.

6.2 Main Contractor Equipment Engineers and Designers


1. Equipment engineers and designers shall be seconded from main
contractor or equipment supplier's project teams whose specialist

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100 System Integration Testing (SIT) Subsea Operations

knowledge is required to evaluate component performance, resolve


problems, or take control of complex parts of SIT test procedures.
2. These individuals are also likely to be required for risk analysis,
HAZID, or HAZOP assessment meetings, which may be required prior
to commencement of SIT work.

6.3 Manufacturers Service Personnel


1. Service personnel employed by main contractor shall be used to go
offshore during equipment installation and commissioning.
2. These personnel may be familiar with complete range of equipment
suppliers' products, but their participation at SIT gives them the chance
to gain experience with particular project equipment and setups that may
be different from previous projects.
3. Service personnel to be used for SIT work should be same crew that will
be deployed during offshore installations and commissioning.

6.4 Other Suppliers' Personnel


1. If equipment components are supplied by sources other than main
equipment supplier (for example, subsea chemical injection unit or ROV
tooling package), it is likely that they will be asked to supply an
engineer to SIT site for specific sections of test procedures to give
training in use and operation of their equipment.
2. Supplier personnel may also be required to be present at offshore
installation site.

6.5 Installation Contractor Personnel


1. One of the main features of SIT process is that it allows Installation
Contractor personnel to see actual equipment components that they will
be required to install subsea.
2. Supervisors, engineers, deck crew, and ROV operators will all benefit
from exposure to equipment components and installation requirements.
3. As with service personnel, it is important that those attending SIT
should be same crew that will be deployed during offshore installation.

6.6 Chevron Operations Personnel


1. As with service and installation crews, SIT gives a unique opportunity
for operations crews to see subsea equipment before it is deployed to
seabed.
2. Chevron operations personnel will ultimately be tasked with operating
subsea production system. It is important for as many as possible to gain
familiarity with equipment and field layouts through SIT process.
3. Consideration should be given to assigning operations personnel to key
SIT roles to:
a. Ensure that their participation is meaningful.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

b. Capture operational input.

7.0 RESPONSIBILITIES
7.1 General
1. This section will examine input required from various contractors to SIT
process.
2. Transfer of ownership of equipment will be defined in formal contract
and is not addressed as part of this document.
3. Ownership changes may occur after FAT, EFAT, or SIT, depending on
project contracting strategy. SIT engineers shall clearly understand these
relationships when planning SIT and allocating material movement
responsibilities.
7.2 SIT Lead Contractor(s)
7.2.1 Selection
1. One of the main project contractors will be selected as Lead SIT
Contractor and assigned the task of performing SIT.
2. Such contractor will usually be supplier of main subsea system
equipment hardware (trees, control system, and manifolds), but
SIT may jointly be performed by the Installation Contractor.
3. In certain circumstances, another local contractor may be
selected to perform SIT, due to availability of a suitable site and
equipment to perform the work.
7.2.2 Lead Contractor Responsibilities
1. Lead Contractor shall be responsible for all aspects of
scheduling and preparing for SIT.
2. Lead Contractor shall provide site, equipment, and personnel
required to conduct testing.
3. Lead Contractor shall be responsible for HES, site management,
and control of SIT process (as outlined throughout this
document).
4. Finally, Lead Contractor shall be responsible for completion of
SIT procedures.

7.3 Equipment Manufacturer Input to SIT


1. Equipment manufacturer shall take lead role in writing test procedures
to be executed at SIT.
2. Equipment manufacturer and, in particular, equipment design engineers
are those who best know equipment requirements for fit and function.
3. There should be close cooperation between equipment manufacturer and
installation contractor to produce outline installation procedures that
will, in turn, dictate some of the installation sequence testing that will be
performed at SIT.

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7.4 Installation Contractor Input to SIT


1. Subsea Installation Contractor shall be given draft SIT procedures for
review and comment.
2. In particular, Installation Contractor shall ensure that critical parts of
equipment installations are understood, simulated, and adequately
addressed in SIT.
3. Additional testing of critical interfaces may be requested by Installation
Contractor and agreed by equipment manufacturer (or SIT Lead
Contractor).
4. If agreement cannot be reached, arbitration process will be lead by
Chevron project team to resolve issues and finalize SIT program
requirements.

7.5 Other Contractor Inputs


1. Since only one equipment supplier or installation contractor will be
selected as SIT Lead Contractor, all other contractors and suppliers
involved with project should be prepared to play supporting roles in
conducting SIT work.
2. Extent of other contractor input requirements shall be defined and
agreed prior to commencement of SIT.

7.6 Chevron (Project) Role in SIT

7.6.1 General
1. Chevron will play a leading role in SIT daily operations.
2. Typically, a Chevron representative will be responsible for final
acceptance of successful SIT work, assist equipment suppliers
to seek solutions to failed tests or equipment components, and
act as arbitrator in disputes between equipment suppliers,
installation contractors, and/or other project groups.

7.6.2 Chevron Site Representative


1. Chevron shall have regular presence at SIT site through
Chevron SIT Site Representative, to be nominated by Chevron.
2. In addition to witnessing key testing milestones and directing
efforts of third party inspectors, Chevron SIT Site
Representative shall be responsible for coordinating with SIT
Contractor project manager on all issues of site safety and day to
day management of SIT schedule.
3. Chevron SIT manager will also be sole point of contact for all
Chevron personnel wishing to visit SIT site and will have
primary responsibility for control and coordination of Chevron
visitors.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

4. Chevron SIT Site Representative will provide regular reports to


Chevron project management and coordinate company
requirements for schedule and logistics between SIT site and
other project locations.

7.6.3 Site Inspection


Verification of all testing work performed by SIT Contractor(s) will
be the responsibility of Chevron Site Representative or his
designate, who will be required to witness and sign off completed
test procedures before acceptance by Chevron.

7.7 SIT Site Team


1. SIT site team shall be integrated team, consisting of personnel from
some or all contracting groups mentioned above.
2. Team shall:
a. Support parent project organization throughout SIT phase of project.
a. Provide skills, functions, and resources to perform SIT test proce-
dures as produced by project organization.
a. Execute and record results of SIT.
3. Most importantly, team shall assess suitability of subsea production
system to be installed and to fulfill service for which it is intended.

8.0 METHODOLOGY AND EXECUTION OF SIT

8.1 Overall SIT Requirements

8.1.1 General
1. In an ideal situation, all subsea production system equipment
components are brought together at SIT site to be systematically
assembled into complete subsea field layout. In this way, all
connections and interfaces can be joined together and fully
tested for fit and function before equipment is deployed to field
location.
2. Due to reasons of logistics, schedule, and cost, project team may
elect to split SIT into more manageable packages (e.g., tree,
control system, manifold, and mechanical equipment). It must
be realized that split SITs increase risk of missed interface
testing or result in significant duplication testing of overlaps to
ensure that all interface, fit, and functional requirements have
been fully evaluated.
3. Equipment interfaces that do not fit or function as expected shall
be identified, documented, and corrected onshore before final
equipment acceptance. These modifications will be a fraction of
the cost that would be incurred if problems were allowed to
occur at a critical stage of offshore installation.

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4. If possible, efforts shall be made to mimic actual installation


and/or operating conditions for equipment prior to delivery and
installation.
5. While it is not the intention to damage actual production
equipment, it must be recognized that some damage and even
failures may be inevitable due to nature of testing and
overriding requirement to catch potential failure modes before
they get to offshore installation phase.
6. In all cases, SIT should identify key elements in installation,
hookup, testing, and recovery of equipment being delivered.
7. Lessons learned from past projects should be carefully reviewed
to ensure that previous errors or omissions are not repeated. (See
Appendix D.2.)
8. Any compromise or changes to SIT scope shall be carefully
evaluated for increased project risk and shall only be undertaken
with written consent of Chevron project management.

8.1.2 Equipment Fit and Interfaces


1. Main objective of SIT phase of project is to prove that
individual equipment components (such as trees, manifolds,
jumpers, flying leads, and control system components) will fit
together and function as intended for all modes of installation,
commissioning, and operation.
2. Interfaces and interconnections between tree and manifold may
be simulated during individual equipment FAT but are only fully
tested if actual equipment is connected together using actual
interface (jumpers, flying lead connectors, etc.).

8.2 Representative SIT Layout

8.2.1 General
1. To realize goals of SIT process, it is important that a good
representative sample of subsea field equipment be selected for
replication at SIT site.
2. Main drill center, production drill center, and/or most complex
drill center should be chosen or, alternatively, some combination
of drill center features that will fully evaluate the most difficult
interfaces.
3. Unproven equipment interfaces shall be incorporated in some
way into SIT plan.

8.2.2 Integrated Testing vs. Partial Testing


(Requirements vs. Practical Limitations)
1. SIT requirements that bring as much of project equipment
together for integration testing shall clearly stated. Large

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

international projects will very often run into difficulties if


equipment is built in different locations and comes from several
different suppliers (or if suppliers split production among
manufacturing plants in Europe, North America, or other
worldwide locations).
2. There are many reasons why it can be difficult to bring
equipment together in one location for SIT. It cannot be
overstated that extra logistical costs of SIT will be small if
compared to cost of delays to offshore installations and first oil
because an untested interface cannot be made up.
3. Partial Testing
a. If project team is unable to bring all equipment together for
a single SIT, comprehensive EFAT or partial SIT programs
may be considered.
b. Project teams shall carefully examine partial SIT strategy to
ensure that the most comprehensive testing possible will be
provided.
c. It is recommended that partial or split SIT programs only be
considered as a last resort.

8.2.3 Simulators/Computer Models


1. Simulators
a. In some instances, equipment simply cannot be made
available for SIT (e.g., if it is already installed offshore).
b. In such cases, certain parts of SIT test procedure may have
to be undertaken with proven simulated equipment jigs and
fixtures replacing critical equipment.
c. Other simulators may be used to represent umbilical power
and signal lines or to generate instrument signal inputs.
2. Computer Models
a. There is a software program developed by Oceaneering
(with similar products available from other suppliers) that
generates a computer model of subsea equipment and field
layout.
b. The program can be used to give a rough simulation of
subsea equipment installations and operating conditions,
establish ROV accessibility, and give ROV operators hands
on training on drill center layout on which they will be
working.
c. As with any computer generated model of this type, it is
only as good as the data that it is given.
d. Computer programs are constantly being developed and
improved and can be considered useful for operator
training.

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e. Computer simulation should not be used as a replacement


for any part of SIT process.

8.3 Tree and Tubing Hanger Integration Testing


1. Integration of tree with its internal components (tubing hanger, bore
protectors, wear bushings, plugs, running tools, etc.) onto wellhead,
BOP, subsea test tree, and other external components are specialized
operations that are not well suited to an outdoor SIT work site.
2. Some of these interfaces are therefore best evaluated as part of EFAT
program at tree manufacturer's base, where specialized personnel and
handling equipment will be available.

8.4 Mechanical Equipment SIT Requirements

8.4.1 General
Mechanical equipment part of SIT refers to need to set up major
mechanical equipment components, such as subsea trees, manifolds,
foundations, distribution units, and umbilical termination, and make
up connections between them using jumpers, flying leads, and their
connectors to prove connectability and installability of system.

8.4.2 Mechanical Stackup


1. Stackup of equipment (such as manifold with pile top or tree
with tree running tool) shall form a significant part of test
program.
2. Even if these interfaces were tested at FAT (where simulated
fixture or jig may have been used), it is important to
demonstrate repeatability of fit and that real system components
can be interfaced in a manner that is representative of the actual
installation process.

8.4.3 Installation Offsets


1. Equipment should always be positioned in conditions that are as
near to field like as possible, including height, horizontal
separation, and angles.
2. Installation specifications will contain limiting offsets in terms
of position and angular tolerances that shall be achieved by
Installation Contractor.
3. Such maximum offsets shall be combined to produce “worst
case” scenarios for equipment installations that can be
replicated on SIT test site.
4. Typically, longest and shortest distances between equipment
shall be used to fabricate jumpers to ensure that both extremes
will work for proposed installation procedure.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

5. If angular offsets are specified for trees or foundations, test


stands may have to be fabricated in advance of testing to allow
subsea equipment to be mounted at maximum angular offset,
again proving that installation will be possible.

8.4.4 Installation Rigging


1. If possible, actual installation rigging should be used. If
verification of calculated center of gravity and weight of
equipment components with installation rigging in place has not
been performed at FAT, SIT may be final opportunity to verify
this.
2. Rigging certification dates shall be noted in case they run out in
period between SIT and offshore installations.

8.4.5 Pigging
1. Requirements for pigging of manifold(s) and/or jumpers shall
be clearly defined and planned for during SIT program.
2. Individual systems may be gage pigged as part of FAT.
However, there is also a need for SIT pig run through assembled
PLET, flowline jumper, manifold pipework, hubs, and
connectors to verify that pig may pass through without
interference or restriction.
3. Operations group should be consulted to establish exact type (or
range) of pigs to be used in production phase.
4. Pig to be used at SIT should be representative of “worst case”
production pig in terms of diameter and length.
5. An aluminum gage plate may be attached to front of pig to
record minimum internal diameter.

8.5 ROV Installations

8.5.1 General
1. Deepwater subsea equipment is installed and hooked up with
extensive use of ROV systems and specialized ROV tooling
packages that are required to perform complex underwater
tasks.
2. Interfaces of ROV tooling components with subsea equipment
are therefore a vital part of SIT program.

8.5.2 ROV Tooling Package(s)


1. Complete set of actual ROV installation tooling shall be made
available for duration of SIT program.
2. All tools should be tested as part of SIT, where they will be used
to perform actual tasks required during offshore installations.

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100 System Integration Testing (SIT) Subsea Operations

3. Details of ROV tooling performance and interfaces, including


grab handle positions and identification markings shall be
recorded and passed onto operations group to assist with
maintenance and to support future interventions.

8.5.3 Observations by ROV


1. In addition to operating specialized tooling and equipment,
ROV crew shall also perform observation tasks throughout
installation process to confirm equipment functions during
testing and commissioning.
2. Clearly visible indicators display status of functions as they are
performed, which ROVs underwater camera(s) shall be able to
detect.
3. Location, identification, and suitability of these devices shall be
confirmed as an important deliverable of SIT program.

8.5.4 “Dummy” ROV Systems


1. “Dummy” ROV system shall be used to check that there is
enough space between system components for ROV to gain
access to perform its work tasks.
2. Wooden or plywood box that is built to approximate dimensions
of an ROV is often used, but it should be remembered that this
is a very crude representation of the ROV system, and access
limitations can easily be missed.
3. A better solution is to use a purpose built ROV frame,
preferably with working manipulators, which will give a much
more accurate indication of how much space is required for
ROV to not only gain access but also to have enough space to
get its manipulator into place to operate interface or tooling
package.

8.5.5 ROV Operated Running Tools


1. Other running tools may be included in project scope of supply.
2. Such tools shall also be included in scope of SIT program so
they can be properly interfaced to both subsea equipment
components and ROV tooling package.

8.5.6 ROV Access and Interfaces


1. Whichever type of “dummy” ROV or tooling packages is used,
it is important that experienced ROV supervisor and operator(s)
are present to perform assessment of ROV accessibility and its
ability to correctly function equipment interfaces.
2. Every effort should be made to ensure that ROV personnel are
part of actual crew who will be sent on offshore installations, so
that they can gather experience from SIT test program.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

3. If more than one ROV contractor is to be used on project (e.g.,


Drill Rig ROV Contractor may not be same as Installation
Contractor), both contractors should be encouraged to attend
SIT.

8.6 Control System SIT Requirements

8.6.1 General
1. Control system part of SIT refers to need to set connectivity
through as many system components as possible to prove that
functionality is maintained.
2. Electrical power, signal, hydraulics, and chemical injection can
all be considered part of control system, although chemical
injection part is more usually included in mechanical section of
SIT.

8.6.2 Electrical Interfaces


1. Electrical power supply shall be required to run system such that
control system interfaces and functionality can be tested.
2. Electrical power system components (such as EPU and PDU)
shall be fully tested in relevant sections of control system
component FATs.
3. Electrical interfaces to be checked at SIT shall concentrate
mainly on makeup and positioning of electrical flying leads.
4. However, instrument signals should be tested, as far as is
possible during SIT, to verify that accuracy and signal levels are
not lost if passing through EFLs and connectors.

8.6.3 Signal Interfaces


1. Signal interfaces shall be tested at FAT on individual component
basis. Objective during SIT is to prove that continuity and
accuracy are maintained if signals are transmitted back through
combination of EFLs, connectors, and system components.
2. Opportunist signal testing may be performed during other SIT
test procedures, such as pigging or pressure testing.

8.6.4 Instrument Interfaces


1. Instrument interfaces may previously have been tested in
isolation. SIT may be first opportunity to test these as part of
complete system.
2. As with signal tests, instrument interfaces may be checked
during other SIT test procedures (such as pigging or pressure
testing) to ensure that correct continuity is achieved throughout
SIT sample components.

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8.6.5 Hydraulic Interfaces


1. Proving hydraulic interfaces throughout SIT equipment sample
is an important part of SIT program.
2. Hydraulic functions will already have been tested and proved at
FAT, but combination of bringing together various system
components interfaced through hydraulic flying leads and
distribution system equipment will give higher level of
continuity test to prove that combined hydraulic system will
function correctly.
3. If dealing with hydraulic equipment that has completed FAT and
is ready for delivery after SIT is complete, great care shall be
taken to guard against contaminating the fluid being introduced
into any system components. As a result, requirements in
Section 8.6.6 shall be strictly observed.

8.6.6 Fluid Cleanliness


1. Establishing and maintaining hydraulic fluid cleanliness is
perhaps one of the most important aspects of the SIT program
and one that is easily overlooked.
2. Prior to arrival at SIT site, hydraulic equipment components
have been assembled, tested, and flushed to required fluid
cleanliness level. Such cleanliness level shall be maintained to
ensure continued system integrity and reliability of subsea
production control system.
3. Because of the importance of clean hydraulic fluid, it is
considered good practice to assign one individual with
responsibility of testing and maintaining fluid cleanliness
throughout SIT program. Lead control system technician or
someone similarly experienced with hydraulic fluid testing shall
be responsible for testing and verifying fluid cleanliness levels.
4. If equipment does not meet required cleanliness level, program
of flushing and retesting shall be put in place until cleanliness
levels fall within project specification.
5. Fluid sampling and test results shall be recorded in an overall
SIT fluid cleanliness log for duration of the SIT, with records of
samples documenting cleanliness of:
a. Equipment components delivered to test site.
b. Test equipment prior to test.
c. Equipment components after test/prior to shipping.
6. In addition, intermittent hydraulic samples shall be taken to
document trends and upkeep of standards during test program.
7. Records shall, as a minimum, contain the following
information:
a. Equipment identification.
b. Name.
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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

c. Serial no.
d. Tag no.
e. Line no. (if applicable).
f. Sample information.
g. Name of operator.
h. Date and time.
i. Cleanliness requirement.
j. Sample result.
Note: During sampling of hydraulic fluid, care shall be taken to
ensure that sample is representative of system, e.g., samples
from “dead areas” should be avoided, and samples shall be
taken at operating temperature.

8.6.7 Chemical Injection Interfaces


1. Unless specifically requested by system designers or equipment
engineers, use of actual injected chemicals should be avoided
during SIT, as chemical handling issues would further
complicate test site operations.
2. In general, chemical injection interfaces that need to be tested
under SIT program should be tested using potable water.
3. If water based hydraulic control fluids are used to test chemical
lines, their compatibility with intended chemicals shall first be
established to avoid subsequent contamination problems.

8.6.8 Umbilical Interfaces


1. Due to size of integrated controls umbilical, it is unlikely that
this component will be made available to SIT program.
2. However, umbilical termination assembly (UTA) should be
made available for SIT prior to it being sent to umbilical
manufacturer.
3. The most complete and realistic way of testing control system
interfaces shall be to connect all hydraulic, electrical, and signal
lines through umbilical termination assembly, where they will
then be distributed to rest of subsea system.

9.0 TRAINING

9.1 General
1. Though training is not used as a justification for conducting SIT, the fact
that so much of subsea production system is brought together (and
function tested as though it were in operation on the seabed) provides
ideal platform on which training courses could be run.

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2. This training can prove valuable to:


a. Designers (understanding equipment functions and limitations).
b. Installation crews (gain understanding of how system can be
installed).
c. Operations personnel (perhaps the only time they will see equipment
they are required to operate).
3. Training videos and photographic material should also be gathered at
SIT to supplement later training requirements.

9.2 Operator Awareness


1. Operator on an offshore facility may never see subsea production system
equipment that he is operating daily.
2. Attendance at SIT site (in addition to attending FAT and EFAT) should
be used to familiarize operators with the subsea equipment.
3. Consideration should be given to assigning operators to key SIT
positions, particularly for controls part of SIT, to ensure that their
participation is meaningful and their input can be implemented.

9.3 Extended Operator Training


1. Occasionally, it is possible to extend operator training opportunities at
SIT site.
2. By constructing fully functional control cabin that simulates central
control station to be located on offshore facility, training courses may be
given that allow operators to perform real hands on functioning of
subsea equipment.
3. This type of training can be used to supplement other training simulators
and has been shown to greatly reduce operator learning curves on
offshore facility and subsea well startup.

10.0 DOCUMENTATION AND DELIVERABLES

10.1 General
1. Documentation and recording of test results is a very important part of
SIT program, as it provides record of work performed and system
performance that can be referenced throughout field operations or by
future projects.
2. Such documentation includes lessons learned, root cause analyses, other
failure investigations, and remedial work that could be relevant to later
field operational issues.

10.2 Site Received Procedures and Testing


1. Equipment arriving on SIT test site will typically come from variety of
sources and/or suppliers.

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2. Site received test procedure shall be put in place (typically by lead SIT
engineer) to establish equipment integrity on arrival, whether it has been
damaged in transport and whether it is fit for service as part of SIT.
3. Site received procedures shall apply to project equipment, test
equipment, and rented equipment to be used on SIT site.
4. Rented Equipment
a. Particular attention should be given to rented HPU or other tempo-
rary hydraulic equipment intended for use at SIT.
b. Rented equipment presents a high risk of contamination.
c. Rented equipment may use PTFE tape or other banned substances
and should be closely inspected and tested before use.

10.3 Fluid Cleanliness Certificates


Standard format test record sheet shall be completed for each fluid cleanliness test
and record kept in SIT fluid cleanliness log (Refer to Section 8.6.6).

10.4 Transmittals and Control of Equipment Movements


1. SIT test site is likely to have a large number of equipment components
being delivered from many different sources, with possibility of
equipment being returned for repairs or shipped separately to installation
sites.
2. Adequate procedures shall be in place to ensure that all equipment and
component transmittals recorded can be quickly tracked and identified.

10.5 SIT Procedure Completion and Signoff


1. There will be strict procedural control of SIT procedures completion and
signoff.
2. No project equipment shall be removed from SIT site or shipped out to
installation site(s) without full signoff of relevant SIT procedures or
without written consent of Chevron SIT site representative.

10.6 Punchlists
1. Equipment Ready for SIT
a. Equipment ready for SIT in general shall not have punchlist items.
b. If this is not the case, punchlist should be included with equipment
delivery to SIT and added to SIT punchlist for clearing prior to final
acceptance.
c. An evaluation shall be required to decide if equipment can be tested
with punchlist items outstanding to ensure there are no conse-
quences for relevance of SIT test.
2. Governing philosophy for all Chevron projects is that neither complete
systems nor individual components thereof shall be accepted from
Supplier until all remedial work has been cleared. Nevertheless,

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100 System Integration Testing (SIT) Subsea Operations

requirement for on time delivery and knockon effect of delays


necessitates that minor work can be listed as punchlist items that shall be
corrected at a later date.
3. During SIT, any punchlist items or site queries shall be logged.
4. Equipment manufacturers shall be responsible for correcting
outstanding punchlist items or site queries after completion of SIT.
5. Project specific contractual terms shall be considered to ensure that
Supplier will clear punchlist items prior to system acceptance.
6. In general, equipment may not be sent from SIT site to offshore
mobilization or installation sites if there are any outstanding punchlist
items without written authority of Chevron Project Management.

10.7 Photography

10.7.1 General
1. Subsea production system SIT offers a unique opportunity for
photographic recording of equipment, as so much of the subsea
production system has been brought together and is being
function tested as though it were in operation on seabed.
2. Photographic material should be gathered such that it can
provide permanent record of SIT test work performed and also
be used to supplement training requirements or as an aid to
problem solving later in field life.

10.7.2 Video Photography


1. Video record should be made of all important function or lifting
interfaces (such as manifold being lifted onto its pile top).
2. Video footage may be edited and used to compile summary or
training DVD to show equipment features.

10.7.3 Still Photography and Photo Logs


1. Though video footage is a very powerful tool in recording and
displaying equipment details, still photographs are still preferred
in many applications that require examination of equipment
details.
2. Comprehensive stills photo log (particularly digital
photographs) should be compiled such that copies can be held
for reference at offshore facility or operations support base or
for future intervention contracts.

10.7.4 Digitalization and Compilation of DVD Records


1. Digitalization of both video footage and still photographic
material provides an easy means of storing and transferring
photographic records.

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Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

2. Records should be compiled on DVD for future reference.

10.8 Lessons Learned Report


1. Lessons learned from SIT program can be extremely useful for
operation of subsea equipment throughout life of field.
2. Lessons learned on equipment performance and behavior can play a part
in problem analyses and formulation of remedial action plans.
3. Lessons learned from successful or unsuccessful SIT test procedures can
be used to streamline and give guidance to future project SIT programs.
4. Recording and distribution of lessons learned are an important
deliverable of SIT.

10.9 SIT Closeout Report


1. Upon successful (or otherwise) completion of SIT program, detailed SIT
closeout report shall be compiled and delivered to Chevron.
2. SIT closeout report shall contain descriptions of preparation and
execution of SIT program, including details of site layout and equipment
selection philosophy.
3. Lessons learned from SIT test program may be included in conclusions
section of closeout report, while copies of completed SIT procedures
should be included as appendix to report.
4. Producing SIT closeout report should be last duty to be completed by
SIT manager and SIT test engineer before they leave SIT project team.

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APPENDIX A OVERVIEW OF SIT CONSIDERATIONS IN CPDEP PHASES

SIT program may be developed in phases of Chevron Project Development and


Execution Process (CPDEP) as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4: SIT Development in Phases of CPDEP

Phase 2
Phase 3 Phase 4
Generate and Select
Develop Preferred Alternative Execute
Alternatives
(Refer to Appendix C) (Refer to Appendix D)
(Refer to Appendix B)

Define SIT Requirements Develop SIT Requirements Execute SIT


• Define installation philosophy. • Develop installation proce- • Consider lessons learned from
• Define commissioning philoso- dures. past projects.
phy. • Develop commissioning proce- • Execute tree SIT (EFAT) scope.
• Define SIT philosophy for dures. • Execute control system SIT
major components. • Develop SIT procedure. scope.
• Develop checklists. • Execute mechanical equipment
• Develop quality assurance SIT scope.
plans for manufacturing and
SIT.
• Develop SIT roles and respon-
sibility matrix.
Note: CPDEP Phase 1, Identify and Assess Opportunities, and Phase 5, Operate and Evaluate, have been
omitted for clarity since no SIT activities are associated with these phases.

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APPENDIX B SIT CONSIDERATIONS IN CPDEP PHASE 2

B.1 GENERAL
1. This Appendix defines SIT issues that need to be considered during
CPDEP Phase 2 - Generate and Select Alternatives.
2. Although this is usually pretender/conceptual stage of project, due
consideration shall be given to extent of integration testing that will be
required, allowances made in project budgets, and instructions on SIT
requirements included in invitation to tender documents.

B.2 TECHNOLOGY AND EQUIPMENT

B.2.1 General
This section identifies technology and equipment factors that need
to be considered to determine scope and extent of system integration
testing.

B.2.2 Technology
1. Will development of this field require equipment components or
installation techniques that can be considered to be new
technology?
2. Particular considerations may be given to:
a. Water depth.
b. Operating conditions (temperature/pressure, etc.).
c. New to industry.
d. New to Chevron.
e. New application in this part of the world.

B.2.3 Equipment Design


Will development incorporate new designs or require use of
materials or manufacturing processes that are not previously field
proven for this application, these operating conditions, and this
manufacturer?

B.2.4 Equipment Interfaces


Will design bring together equipment components that have not
previously been interfaced or if changes have been made to material,
dimensions, quantity, complexity, and operating envelopes?

B.2.5 Contractors and Subcontractors


1. How well do main contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers
know and understand each others' products?

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2. Specific issues include:


a. Familiarity with this type of equipment (trees, manifolds,
jumpers, connectors, etc.).
3. Main contractors have/have not worked together before.
4. Main contractors have/have not worked in this water depth.
5. Main contractors have/have not worked in this part of the world.

B.2.6 Operator Knowledge


1. Are operators familiar with design and operation of this type of
equipment?
2. Specific issues include:
a. Training requirements.
b. Operations input.

B.3 INSTALLATION PHILOSOPHY

B.3.1 General
1. In determining scope and extent of system integration testing to
be performed, due consideration shall be given to methods
likely to be used for installation of subsea equipment, in
particular, if there are new or unusual features of design that will
require unique approach to offshore installations.
2. Some factors that may affect SIT and will therefore need to be
considered may be:
a. Diver assisted or diverless.
b. Guidelines or guidelineless.
c. Heave compensation.
d. J-lay, S-lay, or other configurations.
e. Pipe in pipe or other insulation properties.
f. Weather conditions (seasonal?).
g. Installation vessel types (and number of vessels).
h. Drill rig based installations.
i. Installation sequence.
j. Simultaneous operations.
k. Early/late installation methods (drill rig, supply/utility
vessels).
l. Other factors unique to this installation campaign.

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B.3.2 Example

B.3.2.1 Subsea Drill Center


1. Six wells shall be drilled and completed at the A subsea drill
center prior to seafloor equipment installation.
2. Six horizontal subsea trees on these wells shall be installed by
the MODU sequentially as wells are drilled and completed.
3. MODU shall install the A center subsea manifold and tree to
manifold flexible jumpers prior to leaving field.
4. Installation vessel shall install the A center 10-inch production
line PLET first end connected to 10-inch insulated and reeled
flowline.
5. The 10-inch insulated flowline shall be reel laid 15 miles back
to host.
6. Second end of 10-inch insulated flowline installation shall be set
down in east target area next to host.
7. Installation vessel shall install the A center UTA connected to
6-inch hydraulic/electric umbilical.
8. Umbilical shall be reel laid back to host.
9. Second end shall be lowered and hoisted through host east side
I-tube and hung off at host.
10. Installation vessel shall pick up the 10-inch insulated flowline
second end and hang off at host.
11. Service vessel shall install flowline jumper from the 10-inch
PLET to the A center manifold.
12. Service vessel shall install hydraulic and electric flying leads
from the UTA to subsea trees and manifold at the A center.
13. Center flowline, manifold, umbilical, jumpers, and flying leads
shall be pressure tested and function tested.
14. A center installation is complete.

B.3.2.2 B Center Manifold


1. Installation vessel shall install the B center manifold.
2. Installation vessel shall install the B center 8-inch production
line PLET first end connected to 8-inch insulated and reeled
flowline.
3. The 8-inch insulated flowline shall be reel laid 25 miles back to
host.
4. Second end of 8-inch insulated flowline installation shall be set
down in west target area next to host.

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5. Installation vessel shall install the B center UTA connected to


4-inch hydraulic/electric umbilical.
6. Umbilical shall be reel laid back to host.
7. Second end shall be lowered and hoisted through host west side
I-tube and hung off at host.
8. Installation vessel shall pick up 8-inch insulated flowline second
end and hang off at host.
9. Service vessel shall install flowline jumper from 8-inch PLET to
the B center manifold.
10. B center flowline, manifold, umbilical, and flowline jumper
shall be pressure tested and function tested.
11. B center installation is complete. Installation and service vessels
shall depart field.

B.3.2.3 B Center Wells


1. MODU shall return to field and sequentially drill and complete
the four B center wells.
2. MODU shall install the four B center horizontal trees
sequentially.
3. MODU shall sequentially install hydraulic and electric flying
leads from UTA to subsea trees and manifold at the B center.
4. Manifold jumper and flying leads shall be pressure and function
tested sequentially upon installation.
5. B center installation is complete.
6. MODU shall depart field.

B.4 COMMISSIONING PHILOSOPHY

B.4.1 General
1. In determining scope and extent of system integration testing to
be performed on project, due consideration shall be given to
methods and sequences likely to be used for commissioning
subsea equipment, in particular, if there are new or unusual
features of design that will require unique approach to offshore
commissioning.
2. Some factors that may affect SIT and shall therefore need to be
considered may be:
a. Commissioning sequence.
b. Well availability.
c. Control system availability.
d. ROV assistance and availability.

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e. Manual overrides and isolations.


f. Equipment identification.
g. Commissioning fluids.
h. Preservation and chemical treatment.
i. Commissioning pigging requirements.

B.4.2 Example

B.4.2.1 A Center Wells


1. All A center wells shall be cleanup flow tested to MODU upon
completion.
2. Manifold shall be installed filled with inhibited fresh water.
3. A center flowline shall be installed dry.
4. A center manifold jumper and tree jumpers shall flood with
seawater during installation.
5. Umbilical shall be installed filled with hydraulic fluid in
hydraulic lines and fresh water in chemical injection lines.
6. Umbilical shall be pressure tested against UTA.
7. Umbilical and flying leads shall be pressure tested against pods.
8. After installation of the A center is complete, service vessel
shall rig up on PLET flood valve assembly.
9. Flowline shall be filled with fresh water from host and out
PLET flood valve assembly.
10. Flowline shall be pressure tested to PLET.
11. Flowline, jumpers, and manifold shall be tested against closed
tree wing valves.
12. Nitrogen assembly shall be rigged up at host.
13. Flowline to PLET shall be dewatered through flood valve
assembly.
14. Pigs shall be used as appropriate.
15. Pigs shall flow out of flowline and be caught in pig bag atop
PLET flood valve assembly.
16. Flood valve assembly shall be closed.
17. Chemical lines in umbilical shall be circulated to remove fresh
water.
18. Methanol shall be started at subsea trees and manifold for
12 hours prior to opening first well.
19. In step fashion, all A center wells shall be opened to host.
20. Continuous methanol injection shall be maintained until flow
and temperatures are completely stabilized.

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B.4.2.2 B Center Wells


1. B center wells shall be cleanup flow tested to MODU upon
completion.
2. Manifold shall be installed filled with inhibited fresh water.
3. B center flowline shall be installed dry.
4. B center manifold jumper and tree jumpers shall flood with
seawater during installation.
5. Umbilical shall be installed filled with hydraulic fluid in
hydraulic lines and fresh water in chemical injection lines.
6. Umbilical shall be pressure tested against UTA.
7. After installation of the B center is complete, service vessel
shall rig up on PLET flood valve assembly.
8. Flowline shall be filled with fresh water from host and out
PLET flood valve assembly.
9. Flowline shall be pressure tested to PLET.
10. Flowline, flowline jumper, and manifold shall be tested against
outside manifold valves.
11. Nitrogen assembly shall be rigged up at host.
12. Flowline shall be dewatered to PLET through flood valve
assembly.
13. Pigs shall be used as appropriate.
14. Pigs shall flow out of flowline and be caught in pig bag atop
PLET flood valve assembly.
15. Flood valve assembly shall be closed.
16. Flying leads shall be pressure tested against pods sequentially as
installed.
17. Tree jumpers shall be pressure tested against tree.
18. Chemical lines in umbilical shall be circulated to remove fresh
water.
19. Methanol shall be started at first B center subsea tree and
manifold for 12 hours prior to opening well.
20. Subsequent B center wells shall be opened to host after seafloor
equipment has been installed and tested.
21. Continuous methanol injection shall be maintained until flow
and temperatures are completely stabilized.

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B.5 SIT PHILOSOPHY FOR MAJOR COMPONENTS

B.5.1 General
The example in this section is taken from the Agbami project and
shows how philosophy and objectives for SIT were set out at a fairly
high level at CPDEP Phase 2.

B.5.2 Objectives for System Integration Test (SIT)


The following general objectives for SIT have been identified:
1. SIT shall ensure that all subsea equipment interfaces and
functions are proven onshore prior to offshore installation.
2. Results of SIT shall be used to determine whether adjustments
are necessary prior to shipment.
3. Interfaces
a. Equipment interfaces shall be tested with its intended
mating component and available alternatives.
b. ROV interfacing and handling shall be simulated to verify
accessibility and functionality.
c. Tests shall use dummy ROV and be witnessed by
Purchaser's MDC and SIC ROV operators.
4. Performance of SIT shall demonstrate complete
interchangeability using all equipment available at each
respective SIT.
5. SIT shall verify and optimize installation, intervention, retrieval,
commissioning, and emergency/contingency procedures
(including those previously undertaken at tree EFAT). This is
achieved by using test procedures that are as close as practically
possible to offshore installation and operating procedures.
6. SIT shall include full function test of controls and monitoring
system.
7. SIT shall verify and optimize operational procedures. This is
achieved by simulating operational procedures, such as, well
startup, controlled well shutdown, emergency well shutdown,
and valve testing.
8. Activities performed during SIT shall generate system baseline
performance data.
9. Through planning and attendance of appropriate personnel, SIT
shall provide training for Purchaser and Supplier installation
and operational personnel.
10. SIT results shall be documented, including pass/fail results
against test objective, observation on equipment installation and
operational procedures, numeric results, and photographic and
video records.

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11. In case of failure of equipment under test or of system


containing equipment, test shall be considered interrupted and
following complete rectification, test shall be allowed to restart
from beginning. Use of punchlist shall not be allowed except for
purpose of observations during testing regarding items that do
not affect outcome of testing.
12. In case of failure of other equipment not under test (e.g., test
equipment), test may, at Purchaser's discretion, restart from
point just prior to equipment failure.

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APPENDIX C SIT DEVELOPMENT IN CPDEP PHASE 3

C.1 GENERAL
1. This Appendix defines SIT issues that will be developed throughout
CPDEP Phase 3-Develop Preferred Alternatives.
2. Although this is usually FEED stage of project, due consideration shall
be given to planning for system integration test program.
3. Assessment should be made of impact that various manufacturers and
manufacturing site locations will have on cost, schedule, logistics, and
successful execution of SIT program(s).

C.2 DEVELOPING SIT REQUIREMENTS THROUGH CPDEP PHASE 3

C.2.1 General
1. The list in Section C.2.2 shows an example from the Tahiti
project of how SIT requirements were developed for one major
component of subsea production system (in this case, a
manifold).
2. The list identifies specific features, observations, or tests that
will need to be developed and performed during SIT.
3. Similar listings can be compiled for all major system
components, and these will eventually form the basis for
detailed test procedures.

C.2.2 Example Manifold SIT Philosophy (Tahiti Project)


1. Simulate landing of manifold structure on foundation pile
inclined at maximum allowable offset from true vertical.
2. Verify operation of lockdown system, using ROV torque tool or
other intended tool(s).
3. Verify ROV access and release of installation rigging.
4. Install and retrieve pigging loop at maximum allowable offset
from true vertical.
5. Verify ROV access, hot stab, and function for hub pressure cap
operation/removal.
6. Simulate and perform full sequence of taking metrology
measurements for manifold to tree and manifold to PLET hubs.
7. With all flowline connectors and pigging loop(s) in place, verify
that ROV can access and activate jumper connector tools on any
connector position.
8. Verify ROV access to perform well jumper installation using
connector running tool (install, activate, test, lockdown, and
removal/recovery of running tool).

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9. Verify clearance requirements for spreader beams, used to


install well or flowline jumpers, if manifold is fully populated
with jumpers (note rigging hawser or chain position if slack and
review potential snagging points).
10. Verify ROV access and interface with gasket changeout tools,
and change out well jumper gasket.
11. Verify ROV access to install/remove dog house or other
insulating system.
12. Verify dog house operation, function, and fit.
13. Verify ROV access to install and operate valve override tools.
14. Verify and install/remove valve override locking caps if
applicable (install at least two overrides, then remove).
15. Retrieve and reinstall manifold SCM using appropriate project
supplied running tool.
16. Retrieve and reinstall manifold accumulator module (SAM), if
applicable.
17. Verify continuity of compensation system to protect instrument
tubing during installation.
18. Verify ROV access to install and retrieve all hydraulic,
chemical, and electrical flying leads.
19. Verify ROV assess, function, and operation of any other
equipment packages or systems that may be incorporated into
this manifold design (e.g., chemical distribution panels, HFL
parking plates).
20. Review all manifold identification markings (on jumper hubs,
flying lead connectors, parking plates, valves, and valve
position indicators), and verify that these are clearly legible,
secure, and logical for ROV to observe.

C.3 DEVELOPING INSTALLATION PROCEDURES

C.3.1 General
1. Way in which piece of subsea equipment is intended to be
installed shall be an important factor in conducting SIT test
procedures.
2. To extent that is physically possible at SIT site, installation
methods and techniques should be simulated as part of SIT to
prove that installation procedures are achievable.

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C.3.2 Outline Procedure Example—Hydraulic Flying Lead


As an example, outline installation procedure for hydraulic flying
lead will be agreed between equipment manufacturer and
installation contractor and may involve the following steps:
1. Survey and ROV preparation.
2. Transfer first end from reel to moonpool.
3. First end rigging and preparation in moonpool.
4. Transfer second end from reel to moonpool.
5. Second end rigging and preparation in moonpool.
6. First end laydown and normal lay.
7. Stab plate connection.
8. Stab plate disconnection (contingency).

C.3.3 Detail Procedure Example - Stab Plate Connection


1. Installation Contractor shall then take steps in outline procedure
and break them down into more detail. Stab plate connection is
shown as an example in Figure 5.
2. Installation Contractor and SIT Contractor shall then decide
how best to replicate these steps to achieve a meaningful test as
part of SIT program.

Figure 5: Stab Plate Connection

Item HOLD Activity Check

1 Using ROV with API 17D Class 4 rotary-torque tool (1-1/2 inches across
flats), install torque tool into stab plate ROV bucket with identification
depending on which HCR Hose is being installed.
Install stab plate into desired fixed stab plate.
HOLD Ensure that guide pin engages correctly in its receptacle, driveshaft engages
in driveshaft receptacle, and there are no hangups or clashes.
HOLD: Equipment Manufacturer to verify that FLOT is fully engaged.
HOLD Apply clockwise torque to driveshaft to 400 ft-lb. Once torque tool stalls,
visually inspect that plates are mated.
HOLD: Equipment Manufacturer to verify that makeup is complete.
Prior to unlatching ROV, pull back slightly.
ROV to unlatch FLOT and thrust away from stab plate. While doing so, use
FLOT to lightly bump rim of stab plate bucket and observe that bucket is
tight.
Repeat steps above for stab plate on opposite end of HCR hose.

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C.4 DEVELOPING COMMISSIONING PROCEDURES

C.4.1 General
1. The way in which a piece of subsea equipment is intended to be
commissioned should also be considered when defining SIT test
procedures.
2. To extent that is physically possible at SIT site, commissioning
methods and techniques should be simulated as part of SIT to
prove that commissioning procedures are achievable.
3. ROV Monitoring of Valve Operations
a. Issues here that may be most relevant to SIT are
requirements for ROV monitoring of valve operations
during commissioning.
b. ROV contractor(s) shall familiarize themselves with various
types of valve indicators and where to position ROV to best
observe these indicators, in addition to recognizing valve
identification markings.
c. Good photographic records of valve indicators and
markings will also be useful for later field operations.
4. The example in Section C.4.2 shows commissioning guidelines
set out by Agbami project.

C.4.2 Example Subsea Commissioning Scope (Agbami Project)


1. Commissioning of subsea facilities shall be conducted in a
sequential manner as follows:
a. Methanol system shall be commissioned to provide a
pressure source that is safe to flow into production tubing -
especially in well and tree area.
b. Diesel (or dead oil if available) shall be used for filling and
introducing pressure to main flowlines of production
system.
c. First subsea commissioning shall function and observe
pressure movements of each well/tree/SCM assembly
associated with manifold. The size of the Agbami
development shall require that field segments be brought
into production in phases, with production systems leading
water and gas injection systems (in fact, gas injection will
only be possible once sufficient wells are producing enough
gas to charge compressors).
d. Commissioning tree/flowline jumper and manifold wellbay
subsystem for all available trees supplying manifold. Each
well, as it is tied into its respective manifold, shall be
visually inspected by SEV representative using ROV and
proven that it can be controlled and monitored from ICSS

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by operating valves and observing changes in sensor


readings. All operations shall continue to be observed
subsea by SIC ROV.
e. Commissioning drill center (manifold/flowline/riser and all
available wells) as a whole. Once available wells related to
particular manifold system have been tested, manifold itself
shall be function tested and monitored from ICSS, with
local visual confirmation subsea by ROV. Successful
completion of these tests will qualify for Mechanical
Completion (MC-2) certificate for both SEV and SIC for
tested equipment.
f. Purging production system (or filling injection system) and
leaving it in a condition ready for startup by Purchaser.
2. Startup and introduction of process fluids will be responsibility
of Purchaser, with assistance from SIC and SEV. Upon
completion of startup procedure, Performance Acceptance Test
(PAT-1) period, as defined in document AGB-CVX-GN-SPC-
OP-0135, shall begin.
3. Commissioning testing requirements and startup of production
system is specified in detail in document AGB-CVX-GN-SPC-
OP-0130.

C.5 TYPICAL SIT PROCEDURE—TAHITI SIT

C.5.1 General
This section shows examples of comprehensive system integration
test requirements developed by Tahiti project during CPDEP
Phase 3.

C.5.2 Objectives of SIT


1. SIT objective is to simulate installation and operation of a fully
installed subsea production system, as closely as practical.
2. SIT shall ensure that all subsea equipment interfaces and
functions are proven onshore prior to offshore installation.
3. Results of SIT shall be used to determine whether adjustments
are necessary prior to shipment.
4. Interfaces
a. All equipment interfaces shall be tested with mating
components and any available alternatives.
b. ROV interfacing and handling shall be simulated to verify
accessibility and functionality.
c. Tests shall use dummy ROV and be witnessed by
Purchaser's drilling contractor and ROV operators.

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5. Performance of SIT shall demonstrate functional


interchangeability using all equipment available at each
respective SIT.
6. SIT shall verify and optimize installation, intervention, retrieval,
commissioning, emergency/contingency, and operational
procedures. Activities performed during SIT shall generate
system baseline performance data.
7. Through planning and attendance of appropriate personnel, SIT
shall provide training for Chevron operational and Contractor
installation personnel.
8. SIT results shall be documented to include pass/fail results
against test objectives, observation on equipment installation
and operational procedures, numeric results, and photographic
and video records.
9. Failures during testing shall require thorough investigation,
explanation of root cause for failure, proposed corrective action,
and regression testing plan to validate rectification in a timely
manner shall be subject to Purchaser approval prior to retesting.
10. Retesting shall follow approved regression test plan.
11. SIT activities shall be planned, managed, and executed by
Contractor, with participation of third party contractors as
required.
12. SIT shall include tests in Appendix C.5.3 through
Appendix C.5.11.

C.5.3 Subsea Tree SIT


1. Pick up tree with TRT and lock tree on subsea wellhead test
stump.
2. Install well jumper.
3. Function TH functions and lockdown with SSTT control
system.
4. Verify Tree SCM control of all manifold isolation valves.
5. ROV access and operation.
6. Verify slick joint and SSTT/BOP stack space out and
measurements.
7. Verify interface and clearance between tree and BOP.

C.5.4 Subsea Manifold and Jumpers SIT


1. Simulate landing of manifold structure on foundation pile
inclined at 5 degrees from true vertical.
2. Verify manifold lockdown.
3. Install and retrieve pigging loops at 5 degrees from true vertical.

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4. ROV access and valve override verification.


5. Retrieve and reinstall SCM.
6. Retrieve and reinstall all HFLs / EFLs.

C.5.5 Well and Flowline Jumpers SIT


1. Interface well jumpers with manifolds and production subsea
trees.
2. Interface water injection well jumpers with WI PLEM and WI
subsea trees.
3. Interface inter PLET jumpers with production manifolds and
flowline PLET.
4. Interface flowline jumpers with production manifolds and
flowline PLETs.
5. All jumpers shall drift a gage pig.
6. All jumpers shall interface with ROV and ROV tooling.
7. Interface manifold and tree hubs with pressure caps.
8. Test landing and locking tolerance ranges of jumpers and
connectors in vertical, horizontal, and angular offsets.

C.5.6 Subsea Controls System Testing SIT

C.5.6.1 Required Equipment


1. MCS, EPU, and HPU.
2. SDU(s).
3. Trees (3).
4. Manifold.
5. Assorted flying leads and test plates.

C.5.6.2 General Test Setup


1. Interconnect the MCS, EPU, and HPU.
2. Connect electrical power and communication lines to SDU via
test electrical cables that interface with input electrical
connectors on SDU.
3. Connect hydraulic power from HPU to SDU via hard pipe or
hose to back of a test plate. Test plate will then mate to
hydraulic/chemical flying lead that will carry hydraulics to
SDU.
4. Connect injection chemicals from CIU to SDU via hard pipe or
hose to back of same test plate. Test plate will then mate to
hydraulic/chemical flying lead that will carry chemicals to SDU.

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(If CIU is not available, test unit using either chemicals or


hydraulics will be used.).

C.5.7 Controls System SDU/Manifold SIT


1. Connect SDU to fixed plate on manifold via hydraulic/chemical
flying lead.
2. Connect SDU to manifold SCM via electrical flying leads.
3. Check fluid continuity through system.
4. Check electrical continuity through system.
5. Check SEM A housekeeping data.
6. Verify manifold mounted monitoring devices are reading
ambient pressure/temperature, as appropriate.
7. Verify communication with acoustic sand monitors.
8. Cycle all SCM control valves, and verify transmitter readings.
9. Verify all valve interlocks.
10. Verify all shutdown sequences.
11. Check communication error rates to SEM A.
12. Switch to SEM B.
13. Check SEM B housekeeping data.
14. Verify manifold mounted monitoring devices are reading
ambient pressure/temperature, as appropriate.
15. Verify communication with acoustic sand monitors.
16. Cycle all SCM control valves, and verify transmitter readings.
17. Verify all valve interlocks.
18. Verify all shutdown sequences.
19. Check communication error rates to SEM B.

C.5.8 Control System SDU for 8 Well Tree SIT

C.5.8.1 General Test Setup


1. Connect (PS) S01 well slot on SDU to fixed plate on Tree 1 via
hydraulic/chemical flying lead and to SCM on Tree 1 via
electrical flying leads.
2. Connect downhole gage to DHPT cable leading to SCM on all
three trees.
3. Check fluid continuity through system.
4. Check electrical continuity through system.
5. Check SEM A housekeeping data.

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6. Verify all tree mounted monitoring devices are reading ambient


pressure/temperature, as appropriate.
7. Verify operation of downhole gage.
8. Cycle all SCM control valves, and verify transmitter readings.
9. Verify all valve interlocks.
10. Verify all shutdown sequences.
11. Check communication error rates to SEM A.
12. Switch to SEM B.
13. Check SEM B housekeeping data.
14. Verify all tree mounted monitoring devices are reading ambient
pressure/temperature, as appropriate.
15. Verify operation of downhole gage.
16. Cycle all SCM control valves, and verify transmitter readings.
17. Verify all valve interlocks.
18. Verify all shutdown sequences.
19. Check communication error rates to SEM B.

C.5.8.2 Additional Setups and Tests


1. Switch flying leads from (PS) S01 to (PS) S02. Repeat tests.
2. Switch flying leads from (PS) S02 to (PS) S03. Repeat tests.
3. Leave flying leads from (PS) S03 to Tree 1 in place. Connect
(PS) S04 well slot on SDU to fixed plate on Tree 2 via
hydraulic/chemical flying lead and to SCM on Tree 2 via two
electrical flying leads. Repeat tests.
4. Switch flying leads from (PS) S04 to (PS) S05. Repeat tests.
5. Switch flying leads from (PS) S05 to (PS) S06. Repeat tests.
6. Leave flying leads from (PS) S06 to Tree 2 in place. Connect
(PS) S07 well slot on SDU to fixed plate on Tree 3 via
hydraulic/chemical flying lead and to SCM on Tree 3 via two
electrical flying leads. Repeat tests.
7. Switch flying leads from (PS) S07 to (PS) S08. Repeat tests.
8. Leave flying leads from (PS) S08 to Tree 3 in place.

C.5.9 Controls System Tree/Manifold SIT

C.5.9.1 General Test Setup


1. Connect Tree 1 to first manifold slot via hydraulic/chemical
flying lead.
2. Cycle all manifold mounted control valves, and verify
transmitter readings.

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3. Verify all valve interlocks.


4. Verify all shutdown sequences, if required.
5. Switch to SEM B.
6. Cycle all manifold mounted control valves, and verify
transmitter readings.
7. Verify all valve interlocks.
8. Verify all shutdown sequences, if required.

C.5.9.2 Additional Setup and Tests


1. Switch flying lead from first manifold slot to second manifold
slot. Repeat function tests.
2. Switch flying lead from second manifold slot to third manifold
slot. Repeat tests.
3. Leave flying lead from Tree 1 to third manifold slot in place.
Connect Tree 2 to fourth manifold slot via hydraulic/chemical
flying lead. Repeat tests.
4. Switch flying lead from fourth manifold slot to fifth manifold
slot. Repeat tests.
5. Switch flying lead from fifth manifold slot to sixth manifold
slot. Repeat tests.
6. Leave flying lead from Tree 2 to sixth manifold slot in place.
7. Connect Tree 3 to seventh manifold slot via hydraulic/chemical
flying lead. Repeat tests.
8. Switch flying lead from seventh manifold slot to eighth
manifold slot. Repeat tests.
9. Disconnect all flying leads.

C.5.10 IWOCS SIT

C.5.10.1 Test Setup


1. Interconnect entire IWOCS system.
2. Connect primary IWOCS system to fixed plate on Tree 1 via
hydraulic/chemical flying lead.
3. Connect primary IWOCS system to SCM via electrical flying
leads.
4. Connect downhole gage to DHPT cable leading to SCM.
5. Check fluid continuity through system.
6. Check electrical continuity through system.
7. Check SEM A housekeeping data.

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8. Verify all tree mounted monitoring devices are reading ambient


pressure/temperature, as appropriate.
9. Verify operation of downhole gage.
10. Cycle all SCM control valves, and verify transmitter readings.
11. Verify all valve interlocks, if required.
12. Verify all shutdown sequences, if required.
13. Check communication error rates to SEM A.
14. Switch to SEM B.
15. Check SEM B housekeeping data.
16. Verify all tree mounted monitoring devices are reading ambient
pressure/temperature, as appropriate.
17. Verify operation of downhole gage.
18. Cycle all SCM control valves, and verify transmitter readings.
19. Verify all valve interlocks, if required.
20. Verify all shutdown sequences, if required.
21. Check communication error rates to SEM B.

C.5.10.2 Additional Setups and Tests


1. Switch flying leads from Tree 1 to Tree 2. Repeat function tests.
2. Switch flying leads from Tree 2 to Tree 3. Repeat tests.
3. Switch flying leads on IWOCS side from primary to secondary
system. Repeat tests.
4. Switch flying leads from Tree 3 to Tree 1. Repeat tests.
5. Switch flying leads from Tree 1 to Tree 2. Repeat tests.
6. Disconnect flying leads from Tree 2 and coil out of the way.

C.5.11 IWOCS Umbilicals SIT


Details of IWOCS Umbilical SIT are in Section 11 of Document
TAH-TOI-SBS-SP-ZZ-206-00052 “IWOCS Umbilicals - Functional
Specification”.

C.6 TYPICAL CHECKLIST


1. Checklists can be useful in a variety of applications, perhaps to show
overall completion status of part of test program or to ensure that all
appropriate precautions have been taken for a particular action.
2. Checklist may be applied to single equipment component or cover
whole system or scope of testing.
3. Two example checklists from AXS-2 project are shown in Figure 6 and
Figure 7.

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4. Figure 6 was used for SIT for one of the manifold slots.
5. Figure 7 refers to mechanical handling.

Figure 6: Example Checklist — Manifold Slot Test

C.7 QUALITY ASSURANCE THROUGH MANUFACTURING AND SIT


1. Quality Assurance (which includes QA/QC and quality surveillance,
QS) shall be strictly applied to equipment components during
manufacturing processes.
2. Typically, QA testing and acceptance requirements in this plan shall
have occurred prior to SIT and have well defined pass/fail criteria.

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Figure 7: Example Checklist — Mechanical Handling

3. Figure 8 shows QA Plan/Matrix used for fabrication and testing of a


typical manifold.

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Figure 8: QA Plan/Matrix for Fabrication and Testing Typical Manifold

4. SIT follows manufacture. Therefore, SIT does not show up in


component QA/QC plan. However, SIT is separate hold and witness
process for operators to verify performance, function, and fit of
equipment components and interfaces between them. Contractor shall
have a good understanding of equipment's intended end use and specific
issues involved with installation, hookup, and operation.
5. Quality Assurance activities during SIT process are project specific and
allow for certain amount of “trial and error” that may be required to
establish best way of installing and hooking up subsea equipment.
6. Each step of SIT shall be witnessed and signed off by operator's
representative. Failures occurring during SIT process may require
equipment modifications, changes to offshore installation procedures, or
changes to SIT procedures. If changes have been made, retesting may be
required.
7. After SIT is complete, no further modifications or adjustments should be
made if performance, function, and fit of equipment could be affected.

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C.8 SIT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITY MATRIX


1. In developing SIT plan through CPDEP Phase 3 part of project, Roles
and Responsibility Matrix is a useful tool that can be used to define
responsibilities and functions for various parties involved with planning,
execution, and approval of SIT process.
2. Example SIT rules and responsibility Matrix are shown in Figure 9.
3. Roles and responsibility matrix is also known as “RACI” chart.

Figure 9: SIT Roles and Responsibility Matrix (1 of 3)


Consult /
Role Responsible Approval Inform Comments
Contributor

1. SIT Planning and Preparation

Define SIT Requirement EPC1 CVX CVX EPC2


Compile SIT Plan EPC1 CVX CVX EPC2
Select SIT Test Site EPC1 CVX CVX EPC2
Set SIT Schedule EPC1 CVX CVX EPC2
Compile SIT Master Procedure EPC1 CVX CVX EPC2
Write SIT individual equipment test proce- EPC1 CVX EPC2
dures
EPC1 Personnel Logistics SITPM CVX EPC2
Select SIT Personnel EPC1 SITPM
Write Outline Installation Procedures EPC2 CVX EPC1
Write Outline Commissioning Procedures EPC2 CVX EPC1
Organize/Plan CVX Site Team CVX CVX EPC1 EPC2
Organize/Plan EPC2 Site Team EPC2 CVX EPC1 EPC1

2. SIT Execution

Integrated Project Schedule Management SITPM CVX


• Invoice Processing SITPM
• Cost Control Support SITPM
• Weekly/Monthly Reporting SITPM
• Document Control SITPM
Site Preparation HSM SITPM CVX
• Craneage and Heavy Lifts HSM SITPM CVX
• Other Site Equipment (Fork Lift, Per- HSM SITPM CVX
sonnel Hoists, Scaffolding, Safety
Harnesses, etc.)
Site Approved PPE All Parties HSHES CVX CVX /
EPC2

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Figure 9: SIT Roles and Responsibility Matrix (2 of 3)


Consult /
Role Responsible Approval Inform Comments
Contributor

Shipping and Logistics HSM SITPM CVX


• Goods-in Receipt and Inspection HSM SITPM
• Site Received Testing HSM SITPM
• Return Shipping HSM SITPM
Schedule of Testing SITPM CVX HSM / HSHES TPI /
EPC2
Perform Risk Assessment SITPM HSHES HSM CVX
• Job Risk Analysis SITPM HSHES HSM CVX
• Daily Meetings SITPM HSHES HSM CVX
Perform Test Program(s) SITPM CVX EPC2 HSM
• Record Test Results SITPM TPI / CVX EPC2
• Record Failures and Punch List SITPM CVX EPC2
Items
• Accept/Signoff Test Results TPI CVX
Video and Photo Logs SITPM CVX EPC2
• Record Stills Photographs and Logs SITPM CVX EPC2
of all Tests and Equipment
• Record Video of all relevant opera- SITPM CVX EPC2
tions and heavy lifts (Such as plac-
ing trees and manifolds on their
foundations, installing jumpers and
flying leads, intervention tooling
operations, etc.)
• Edit Video and compile photo EPC1 CVX EPC2
records on CD
Demobilize Test Site and Equipment SITPM CVX EPC1
• Prepare Equipment for return ship- SITPM EPC1 CVX
ping
• Perform remedial work that can be SITPM / HSM EQM / CVX EPC1
performed on site
• Write Work Instructions for remedial SITPM / EPC1 EQM / CVX
work to be performed offsite
• Ship Equipment out of SIT site SITPM / HSM EQM / CVX EPC2
HES Reporting HSHES HSM EPC1 CVX
• Record all Accidents, Incidents, and HSHES HSM EPC1 CVX
Near Misses
• Followup HES Investigations HSHES HSM EPC1 CVX
• Emergency Response HSM EQM / HSHES CVX

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Figure 9: SIT Roles and Responsibility Matrix (3 of 3)


Consult /
Role Responsible Approval Inform Comments
Contributor

3. SIT Closeout and Reporting

Record all Test Results SITPM


• Have completed test procedures SITPM TPI / CVX
signed off and approved
• Store all test procedures (signed off SITPM
originals) in master SIT register
• Compile final list of punchlist Items, SITPM CVX
highlighting those that have already
been closed out and those that still
need to be addressed
• Approve Punchlist Item List
Write SIT Closeout Report SITPM CVX EQM
• Compile and Distribute SIT Lessons SITPM CVX EQM
Learned Report

Legend:
CVX: Chevron Project Management
EPC1: Subsea Equipment Manufacturer/Supplier (Project Team)
EQM: Subsea Equipment Manufacturer Project Management
EPC2: Subsea Installation Contractor
TPI: Third Party Inspection
HSM: Host Site Management
HSHES: Host Site HES Management
SITPM: SIT Project Management

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APPENDIX D SIT EXECUTION IN CPDEP PHASE 4

D.1 General
1. This Appendix defines execution of SIT during CPDEP Phase 4 -
Execute.
2. During this project phase, detailed procedures to be performed out at
SIT shall be compiled. This will be done initially by equipment design
engineers, with review and input from Chevron project team, installation
contractors, operations groups, and/or other subcontractors and
suppliers.
3. Execution of SIT program comes at critical time between completion of
equipment manufacture and before start of offshore installation phase.
Close control of logistics, planning, and scheduling issues shall be
essential to ensure successful and timely completion of integration test
program.
4. Equipment failures, rework, and repairs may be an inevitable outcome
of SIT. However, this requirement for remedial work (with any minor
schedule delays that it may cause) is greatly preferable to having these
failures occur at offshore installation phase, where recovery and repair
costs will be many times greater.

D.2 Past Projects Lessons Learned

D.2.1 General
1. The list in this section and lists in Appendix D.2.2 through
Appendix D.2.4 have been compiled from experience and some
of the main lessons learned from previous projects. These lists
are provided as a guide and checklists of issues that may or may
not require special consideration on future integration test
programs.
2. Use actual ROV tooling packages that will be used on the job.
Rental tools that are described as “identical” usually are not.
Use of actual tooling gives additional opportunity to test tools
and gain familiarization with their operation and maintenance.
3. Use same suite of torque tool end effectors at SIT and during
installation. This confirms that interfaces will match.
4. Review spares for each component during SIT. Spares that have
been used at FAT and/or SIT shall be replaced before equipment
is sent offshore.
5. Review labeling on all components for accuracy. Such labeling
will have been checked at individual FAT, but it is important to
recheck at SIT, particularly checking that identification labels
on flying lead end connectors are logical and match
corresponding connector position on equipment to which it is to
be attached.

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6. Operate all manual position indicators for operation and


accuracy. Position indicators shall adequately reflect valve
positions and not be susceptible to damage or inaccuracies
caused by badly fitting tools or rough usage.
7. Contracting Strategy
a. Contracting strategy for SIT participation shall be defined
early and then developed throughout the project to ensure
that all equipment suppliers and contractors are aware of
their responsibilities.
b. Contractual distinction between FAT and SIT is particularly
important, as FAT is usually included in lump sum for
equipment supply, while contractors typically require that
SIT be paid on time and materials basis.
c. SIT contracting strategy can be further complicated by
issues arising from equipment ownership transfer and
consequences of schedule impact caused by SIT delays.

D.2.2 Tree EFAT/SIT


1. Chose EFAT/SIT site that is covered, clean, and has good
craneage/lifting facilities.
2. During SIT, verify that tieback isolation sleeve will land in
casing hanger ID or receptacle as designed. Do not use mockup
for this test.
3. Tree EFL connectors need larger, more robust electrical
interface, with greater self aligning capabilities. Current ODI
plug is OK for diver assisted operations but is completely
inadequate for drill rig ROV operations.
4. VPI (visual position indicators) on tree valves are very
important. If possible, VPI that can be seen without having to
come out of ROV torque bucket is most useful. Markings should
be in paint or mechanical, not decals, which will deteriorate and
fall off in time.
5. Ensure ETU (electrical test unit) software is completely
configured for project trees before it is shipped offshore.
Chevron had errors in pressure transducer readings caused by
incorrect software settings in IWOCS ETU.
6. All VPIs on tree valves shall be visible during ROV valve
override operations and shall not require it to first release from
actuator. The ones Chevron had on 1A were hastily added on as
an afterthought. Ensure markings are permanent markings and
not decals. In addition, maximum operating torques for valve
actuators should be marked on tree to eliminate confusion.

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D.2.3 Control System


1. HFL Delivery to SIT Site
a. Clearly understand how HFLs will be delivered to SIT site.
b. These are often large, heavy, difficult to handle and can
create a safety hazard.
c. They may be supplied in wooden crates or on pallets.
d. If supplied on drums, suitable powered reelers may be
required for unreeling HFLs without damage or risk to
personnel.
2. Determine lifting capacity and minimum allowable bend radius
for each flying lead. In particular, find out if HFL can be picked
up entirely from one end and whether this can be done while
filled with fluid.
3. If HFL minimum bend radius is exceeded or if pinching or
twisting occurs, advice shall be obtained from appropriate
project control system engineer(s) on test and inspection
requirements to confirm or reestablish HFL integrity.
4. Closely examine proposed sequences for makeup, removal, and
parking of flying leads (hydraulic and electrical) to ensure that
this is physically possible and to avoid crossovers or
interference.

D.2.4 Manifold/Mechanical Equipment


1. Pump pigs through all piping intended for pigging, and record
pressures/volumes, particularly through interfacing flanges
connectors and hubs. Pumping pigs is a much more realistic
representation of operational conditions than pulling a pig with
a rope.
2. Use pigs with density greater than is planned for operations.
3. Run all pressure caps and connectors for each hub.
4. Pump through all hot stabs and ROV manifolds to ensure
continuity and remove debris.
5. Verify fit of metrology equipment (fittings, brackets, and
transponders) on all hubs. Because metrology transponders are
usually rental units, it is important to ensure that the same type
of transponder is used at SIT. Survey Contractor should attend
SIT.
6. Perform critical review of all snagging points that can trap ROV
umbilical, which may include snagging points that could trap
rigging lines and strops as they are released by ROV. All such
snagging hazards should be identified and corrected at SIT.

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7. HFL Delivery to SIT Site


a. Clearly understand how HFLs will be delivered to SIT site.
b. These are often large, heavy, difficult to handle and can
create a safety hazard.
c. They may be supplied in wooden crates or on pallets.
d. If supplied on drums, suitable powered reelers may be
required for unreeling HFLs without damage or risk to
personnel.

D.3 Tree SIT (OR EFAT) Scope

D.3.1 General
1. Typically, because of the intricate nature of tree internal
components, SIT will not be performed at main SIT site but will
instead be performed out at tree manufacturer's base as part of
EFAT.
2. The example in Section D.3.2 shows scope defined by Agbami
project for tree EFAT.

D.3.2 Example Tree EFAT (Agbami Project)


1. Tree EFAT shall be performed for one example of each type of
tree.
2. Tree EFAT shall include all tests necessary to confirm tree
design and function such that all Agbami trees may be installed
without further testing beyond FAT.
3. Tree EFAT shall include testing of tree with all respective
installation and test tools and all associated connection systems,
including flowline jumpers and flying leads, in a manner that
reflects all installation, operating, and intervention procedures.
4. All ROV access, interfaces, and operations shall be fully tested
and verified using dummy ROV and witnessed by Purchaser's
MODU ROV operators.
5. Maximum misalignment tolerances, including cumulative effect
of such tolerances, shall also be verified.
6. Test tasks shall include the following (refer to Figure 10):
a. Stackup and full function testing of tree system
subassemblies, including SCM, flying leads, subsea sensors,
IWOCS, and SCITT, including testing of all downhole
equipment interfaces via simulators or actual equipment.
b. Land and recover tree running retrieval tool (TRRT) onto
tree.
c. Land and recover tree onto wellhead simulator (test base).

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d. Install and retrieve wearbushing using respective


running tool.
e. Install and recover blowout preventer (BOP) test
tool.
f. Land and recover tubing hanger (TH) using tubing
hanger running tool (THRT).
g. Simulate landing tubing hanger using THRT/SCITT.
h. Function TH lockdown with SCITT control system.
i. Verify slick joint and SCITT/BOP stack spaceout and
measurements.
j. Install and retrieve debris caps, crown plugs, and
wireline sleeves using respective tools.
k. Install and retrieve choke insert and SCM using
respective tool(s).
l. Install and recover flowline jumper using running
tool in accordance with SIC procedures.
m. Install flowline jumper from temporary stump to tree
as for preinstalled jumpers.
n. Install and recover flying leads.
7. Complete interface testing using deliverable hardware to
verify fit, load, pressure, flow, and function testing of tree
system, all running tools, using primary control system
and PETU through flying leads, through Installation
Workover Control System (IWOCS) umbilical and
through mini IWOCS, including all associated ROV
operations.
8. Complete function testing of downhole equipment
through tree and tubing hanger, including monitor while
running function.

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Figure 10: Agbami Tree EFAT Scope

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D.4 CONTROL SYSTEM SIT SCOPE

D.4.1 General
1. Requirements for integration testing of control system
shall typically concentrate on performance of hydraulic
and electrical hardware, controlling software, and ability
of control system to interface with other software and
hardware components.
2. Because of the specialized nature of control system
hardware and software, this part of SIT will often be
performed at control system manufacturer's base so that
clean room facilities and software engineers are readily
available should modifications or repairs become
necessary.
3. The example in Appendix D.4.2 shows scope defined by
Agbami project for control system SIT.
4. Typical scope for control system SIT is shown in
Figure 11.

D.4.2 Example Scope for Control System SIT


(Agbami Project)

D.4.2.1 Main Equipment Components


1. Master Control Station (MCS) and software.
2. Electrical Power Unit (EPU).
3. Power Distribution Unit (PDU).
4. Hydraulic Power Unit (HPU).
5. Umbilical Simulator.
6. Subsea Umbilical Termination Assembly (UTA).
7. Subsea Distribution Unit (SDU).
8. Subsea Control Module (SCM).
9. Additional SCMs to simulate full drill center.
10. Production Tree (or simulator).
11. Hydraulic flying leads.
12. Electrical flying leads.
13. Subsea Accumulator Unit (SAU).

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Figure 11: Agbami Control System SIT Scope

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D.4.2.2 Main System Tests


1. Fully test all control system functions.
2. Simulate production startup.
3. Simulate controlled well shutdown.
4. Simulate all shutdown sequences, including ESDs.
5. Complete systems functional testing, including valve
open/close time via ICSS and SMCS.
6. Control system performance verification.
7. Simulate Surface Controlled Subsurface Safety Valve
(SCSSV) operation.
8. Simulate DHPT instrument operation, flowmeter, and
intelligent well functions.
9. Test interchangeability of main system components.
10. Test system hydraulic capacity and performance.
11. Provide accurate proof that there is sufficient subsea
accumulation throughout system.
12. Provide accurate indication of SMCS performance with
fully loaded base system.
13. Flying Lead System
a. Configuration/functionality checks.
b. Mechanical interface checks.
c. ROV flying lead manipulation and installation
testing.

D.5 Mechanical Equipment SIT Scope

D.5.1 General
1. This section shows scope for Lobito Tomboco SIT. Refer
to Figure 12.
2. This is typical of mechanical equipment SIT, centered
around production manifold.
3. The testing concentrates on interfaces between main
equipment components in Appendix D.5.2.

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Figure 12: Lobito Tomboco SIT Scope

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D.5.2 Main Equipment Components


1. Production Manifold.
2. Production Manifold Lifting Frame.
3. Injection Manifold.
4. Production Tree.
5. Injection Tree.
6. Subsea Distribution Unit.
7. Interconnecting Well and Flowline Jumpers.
8. Gooseneck Jumper Connectors.
9. Connector Running Tools.
10. IWOCS Control System.
11. IWOCS HPU.
12. IWOCS Umbilical Reel and UTA.
13. MCS Simulator.
14. ROV Tooling Package.
15. SCM Running Tool.

D.5.3 Main System Tests

D.5.3.1 Manifold/Manifold IWOCS Control Tests


1. Production Manifold to Manifold Lifting Frame.
2. Production Manifold to Well Jumper Connection System.
3. Pressure Caps/Hub Cleaning Tools/VCCS/SR Tooling.
4. Down Facing Assy and Goosenecks (various positions).
5. Production Manifold Valve Overrides/Position
Indicators.
6. Production Manifold to Manifold IWOCS.
7. Production Manifold to SCM and SCM Running Tool
(SCMRT).
8. Injection Manifold Leveling System.
9. Injection Manifold to Well Jumper Connection System.
10. Injection Manifold Valve Operations.
11. Tree (Production and Injection) to Well Jumper
Connection System.
12. Tree (Production and Injection) to Valve
Overrides/Position Indicators.
13. Tree (Production and Injection) to SCM and SCM
Running Tool (SCMRT).

June 2006 100-74 Chevron Energy Technology Co.


Subsea Operations 100 System Integration Testing (SIT)

14. SDU to Tree and Manifold Flying Leads.


15. IWOCS Supply Electric/Hydraulics to MSCM.
16. Manifold Valve Function/Profiling.

D.5.3.2 Test MCS Control Tests


1. MCS SIM/SDU/Production Manifold/Tree (Production
and Injection).
2. Supply Electric/Hydraulics to MSCM.
3. Manifold Valve Functioning/Profiling.
4. Supply Electric/Hydraulics to MSCM.
5. Choke Valve Operation, SCSSV Operation.
6. Methanol and Chemical Injection Operations and Sensor
Testing.

Chevron Energy Technology Co. 100-75 June 2006


100 System Integration Testing (SIT) Subsea Operations

June 2006 100-76 Chevron Energy Technology Co.