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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish

(0530)

Speaking Test Training Handbook

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2010


IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

CONTENTS
Page
I GETTING STARTED – HOW TO APPROACH THIS TRAINING HANDBOOK 4

II INTRODUCTION TO THE 0530 IGCSE SPANISH SPEAKING TEST 5

1 Introduction 5

2 General Principles 5

3 Administration of the Test 6


3.1 Recorded Sample 6
3.2 Preparation 6
3.3 Recording 7
3.4 Mark sheets 7
3.5 Despatch of samples 8
3.6 Dictionaries 8

4 Elements of the Speaking Test 8


4.1 Role Plays 8
4.2 Topic Conversation 9
4.3 General Conversation 10
4.4 Impression 11

5 Differentiation – Asking the Right Questions 12

III MAY/JUNE 2009 TEACHERS NOTES BOOKLET 14


Administrative Arrangements 17
Structure of the Examination 22
Marking Instructions 25
Role Play Situations 29

IV MAY/JUNE 2009 ROLE PLAY CARDS 37

V COMMENTARY AND ASSESSMENT OF RECORDED SPEAKING TESTS 57

APPENDIX A: DEFINED CONTENT TOPIC LIST 63

APPENDIX B: WORKING MARK SHEET 64

This Handbook is to be used with the accompanying CD of recorded material containing work
produced by candidates in the May/June 2009 Examination.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

I Getting Started – How to Approach this Training Handbook

When you have read Sections II and III of this Speaking Test Training Handbook you will be ready
to start the assessment of the accompanying CD which contains recordings of 6 speaking tests.
Only when you have completed the assessment of the CD should you consult Section V to
compare your assessment with that of the Principal Moderator.

If possible, you will find it helpful to carry out your first assessment with other teachers and then to
discuss your marking together before you read Section V. Do not worry too much if you are a few
marks too harsh/too lenient — try to aim for consistency. If your marks do differ from the agreed
ones, try to identify in which particular section this has occurred, then go back to that section on
the CD, listen again and re-read the Principal Moderator’s comments.

When you have completed Section V, you should conduct four Speaking Tests yourself, preferably
with candidates across a range of abilities (weak to strong). These should be conducted using the
June 2009 role play situations (provided in Sections III and IV) and recorded onto cassette or CD.
Please note that only recordings at normal speed and on standard size cassettes/CDs can be
accepted. The Speaking Tests should be marked according to the mark scheme provided and
marks recorded on the working mark sheet (see Appendix B). Marking should take place as you
conduct the test, that is you should mark the live performance and not a recording.

The completed working mark sheet should be returned to the PQAD Unit, CIE (see below for
contact details), together with the recordings. Feedback can then be given not only on the standard
of assessment but also on the questioning techniques used. Should you have fewer than four
candidates, please contact CIE for further advice.

We hope that after working through this Training Handbook and CD, the criteria and requirements
for the conduct and assessment of the 0530 IGCSE Spanish Speaking Test will be clear to you.
However, if you have any problems or if you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to
contact CIE, and we will do our best to help. Your sample tests (recordings and working mark
sheets) and any queries relating to this Training Handbook should be addressed to:

PQAD
ClE
University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate
1 Hills Road
Cambridge
CR1 2EU
United Kingdom

Telephone: International Code + 44 1223 553554


Facsimile: International Code + 44 1223 553558
E-mail: international@cie.orq.uk
Website: www.cie.org.uk

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

Introduction to the 0530 IGCSE Spanish Speaking Test II

1 INTRODUCTION

This Training Handbook provides guidance on the conduct and assessment of the 0530
IGCSE Spanish Speaking Test (Paper 3). It is being sent to you as the conducting teacher
directly concerned, to offer practical advice and support, and should be read in conjunction
with the Syllabus booklet.

The aim of the Handbook is to:

• clarify points of administration, marking and interpretation which have been brought up in
training sessions and enquiries made to ClE;
• offer advice and guidance on examination procedures;
• provide examples on CD of Speaking Test practice, together with suggested marks.

2 GENERAL PRINCIPLES

The 0530 IGCSE Spanish Speaking Test is aimed at Foreign Language candidates and its
main aim is to assess language used with a purpose. In all Speaking Test work you should be
seeking to mark positively what the candidate is able to communicate in a foreign language
rather than what the candidate is unable to achieve. Try to put yourself in the position of a
well-disposed native speaker who does not know the candidate’s mother tongue. Your role is
to draw out the candidate by giving him/her opportunities to speak rather than by seeking to
show what s/he cannot do. Therefore, the fundamental principle when assessing is to reward
what is right and not to penalise what is wrong.

The mark scheme for the 0530 IGCSE Spanish Speaking Test makes use of marking bands
which feature specific descriptions of levels of performance. Many teachers have commented
on how easy it is to use these bands after a little practical experience. This system aims to
reward candidates (a) for the successful transmission of messages in tasks which are related
to real life and (b) for the varying degrees of linguistic complexity they achieve in the process.
It should be stressed, yet again, when referring to communication, that errors of language
should not be taken into account unless they obscure meaning.

If you find yourself in the position of examining for the first time you may feel that a scheme
which attempts to mark the productive skill of speaking cannot be an objective one, given that
your assessment may differ from that of other teacher/examiners. One can only reiterate that
the bands of performance can be applied well with a little experience and that one of the most
important factors in successful examining is for the teacher/examiner to be consistent in
his/her marking. Moderation procedures allow for adjustments to be made to consistently
harsh or consistently generous marking. Therefore, if you are unsure of the mark to award, err
on the side of generosity, and be consistent in so doing.

An important criterion for successful assessment is that of the amount of teacher/examiner


input. To what extent can the candidate manage, unaided? The extent to which your candidate
can cope without your help is a useful indicator of how successful s/he is. As the Speaking
Test is the only examination common in its a entirety to both Core and Extended level
candidates, it is the teacher/examiner’s task to adjust his/her level of questioning according to
the ability of the candidate in order to a give the candidate adequate and appropriate
opportunity to respond.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

Prompting (but not feeding of answers in which the candidate’s own input is nil) and help can
be given by you, but obviously the extent of your input has to be borne in mind when allocating
marks.

Finally, it is important to remember that it is not necessary for a candidate to be of native


speaker standard in order to be given maximum marks within any single category of the
Speaking Test. You are urged to use the full range of marks and to bear in mind that the
candidate who has a level in the target language more typical of a working language or
first language will be off the top of the scale according to the bands of performance for
Foreign Language candidates.

3 ADMINISTRATION OF THE TEST

Please refer also to Section III of this Guide, the May/June 2009 Teachers’ Notes Booklet
(pages 14–36). The following comments are matters raised at training sessions.

3.1 Recorded sample

In order to allow CIE to check accurately the standard of assessment, each


teacher/Examiner must record and send to CIE a sample from each Centre at which he or
she examines.

• Centres entering 1–16 candidates must send the recordings of all the candidates
• Centres entering 17 or more candidates must send:

(i) the recordings of the first 10 candidates according to candidate number

and

(ii) the recordings of 6 candidates across the ability range, e.g. 2 good, 2 middling, 2
weak.

The candidates selected should be representative of the range of marks awarded by the
Centre and should be spread as evenly as possible across that range. If possible, the
recordings of the strongest and the weakest candidates at the Centre should be included,
with the other recordings spaced at equal intervals in between.

Note Centres entering 17 or more candidates must send a total of 16 recordings. The
category (ii) candidates must be chosen from candidates who do not fall into category (i).
In Centres with just over 17 candidates, CIE accepts this may mean that the category (ii)
candidates are not fully representative of the range.

The recording must be sent to CIE together with the Moderator copy of the completed
MS1 mark sheet and copies of the completed Speaking Examination Working Mark Sheet
and Cover Sheet for Moderation Sample (see pages 35 and 36).

NB Please check the quality of recordings prior to despatch. Please label all tapes clearly.

3.2 Preparation

You should give candidates a practice examination using a previous examination paper
well ahead of the live examination. This will enable both you and the candidates to feel
more confident and will give you the opportunity to familiarise yourself with the marking
criteria. Candidates should be recorded as it will then be less of an ordeal for them on the
actual day of the live test.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

For the live examination, confidential test materials are despatched approximately 2–3
weeks before the assessment period (which is 1 March to 30 April for the May/June
session). If you are the person who will be conducting and assessing the tests you can
open these materials up to 4 working days prior to the first live test in order to familiarise
yourself with the role play material to be used and the marking criteria. This preparation is
vital as examiners who have prepared their own roles fully and are confident in what they
are doing are better able to help candidates who experience any difficulty. Once the
materials have been opened, they must remain in the examination centre – their contents
must not be disclosed to candidates. After the tests have taken place, the test materials
remain confidential and must be kept in a secure place by the Centre until the end of the
Speaking Test period.

All recording equipment should also be tested in situ before (and occasionally in between)
recording candidates. If testing in between candidates, it is important not to forget to press
the Record button before the next candidate’s test! In areas prone to electricity cuts, a
supply of batteries should be kept handy. If external microphones are used, you should
check they are switched on. If the internal microphone is used, the position should favour
the candidate.

3.3 Recording

For the purpose of moderation, Speaking Tests may be recorded onto CD or cassette, but
these must be standard size and all recordings must be at normal speed. Where Centres
make use of digital recording software, each candidate's file must be saved individually
and saved as .mp3 so that it can accessed for the purposes of moderation.

For effective and efficient moderation to take place, it is essential that good quality
recordings are provided to CIE.

Recording of a candidate’s test should be continuous, once started. Please do not stop a
recording between different sections of a candidate’s test.

3.4 Mark sheets

A copy of the working mark sheet is provided each year at the back of the Teachers’
Notes booklet, and should be photocopied as required (Oral Examination Working Mark
Sheet). A further copy is provided in Appendix B for use with this Handbook.

Marks for each section for each candidate must be entered with care on the working mark
sheet as this enables moderators to identify specific sections of the test in which under- or
over-marking may have occurred. Such information can be included in the report on
moderation and can help you in preparing students for future examinations. Do not enter
Total Marks only.

Ideally, one teacher/examiner only should be used per Centre. However, Centres with
large numbers of candidates may apply to the Languages Group at CIE for permission to
use more than one teacher/examiner. This permission must be sought on an annual
basis, well before the start of the oral examination period, in order to allow CIE to allocate
the correct amount of work to each moderator. If more than one teacher/examiner is used,
internal moderation must take place at the Centre to ensure that all its speaking tests are
marked to the same standard. The recorded sample should include the work of each
teacher/examiner and a working mark sheet should be submitted for each
teacher/examiner, with candidate names and numbers clearly entered.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

Once the Oral Examination Working Mark Sheet is completed, you should check all
additions carefully, The total marks for each candidate must then be transferred to the
computer-printed Internal Assessment Mark Sheet (MS1) or to CAMEO for Centres
submitting marks electronically.

All transferred marks must be checked carefully: it is the Centre’s responsibility to ensure
that all marks are transferred correctly.

3.5 Despatch of samples

You must ensure that you despatch your moderation sample in good time to meet ClE
deadlines. For the live examination, moderation samples from Centres must be with CIE,
for onward transmission to moderators, by 15 May for the May/June session and 15
November for the October/November session. Late submission of samples can cause
great problems in the moderation procedure and delay the final process of grading
candidates. Please pack cassettes and CDs carefully.

3.6 Dictionaries

Dictionaries are not allowed. They may not be used during preparation time immediately
prior to the examination nor in the course of the examination.

4 ELEMENTS OF THE SPEAKING TEST (see also Section III of this Guide)

The Speaking Test lasts for approximately 15 minutes for all candidates (during which time the
next candidate prepares his/her role plays) and has three distinct sections:

(i) 2 role play situations of 5 tasks each (each task with a maximum of 3 marks) = 30 marks
(ii) Topic Conversation = 30 marks
(iii) General Conversation = 30 marks

Impression: at the end of the test an Impression mark is awarded out of 10 marks.

Total available marks = 100

It is crucial that all three sections of the test are examined. Marks cannot be awarded for parts of
the test which are not examined. It is also very important that a clear distinction is made for the
candidate between the end of the Topic Conversation and the start of the General Conversation.
Examiners should indicate on the recording that the test is moving from the Topic Conversation
to the General Conversation.

4.1 Role Plays (5 minutes approximately)


(see also Section III)

You will examine each candidate in two role play situations. The first of the two role plays
(Role Play A) on each card is more straightforward, the second (Role Play B) is more ‘open’.
Role Play A will test material taken from Areas A, B or C of the Defined Content in terms of
topics and vocabulary. The teacher/examiner prompts and/or responses printed in the
Teachers’ may be altered in conversation as appropriate, but the overall framework of the
original set tasks must be adhered to. Teacher/examiners must remember that the set
testing points are the ones which earn the marks and candidates can only be awarded
marks for completing the speaking tasks which are printed on the role play cards.

Should a candidate miss out a task, then try to guide him/her back to it, in as natural a
way as possible. It does not matter to moderators that tasks may occur in a different order
as long as they are all attempted. Remember that if a task on the role play card is not
attempted or is omitted by you, marks cannot be awarded.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

A mark of 1 is awarded if some relevant meaning is transmitted, but the message remains
incomplete. A candidate with an initial mark of 1 may well be helped to work for a mark of
2, if the situation allows it to be done appropriately.

A mark of 2 is awarded if the response communicates and transmits the message of the
set task. The quality of language only plays a part if the level of language used obscures
the meaning. If the meaning is obscured then a mark of 2 would not be appropriate.

In order for a mark of 3 to be awarded, perfection is not sought. Minor errors are tolerated. A
mark of 3 is, in essence, a bonus quality mark which goes beyond the basic transmission of
the message. Remember, however, that a short response can be worthy of 3; quantity does
not always equal quality.

Should a task require the completion of two elements (e.g. indication of a time and place)
then both elements must be completed for a mark of 2 or 3 to be scored. If one element
only is completed, award a mark of 1.

Remember that you may also break your responses into two parts or prompt each item
individually e.g. When? Where?

When awarding marks, it is essential to start at the bottom mark of 0 and work up the
marking bands. If one starts off marking with a notional 3 in mind, it is all too easy to mark
negatively, e.g. deducting marks for errors. Starting from a bottom mark of 0 or 1 is a
positive reinforcer of positive marking.

The extent to which the candidate is successful in assuming his/her own role often
depends on the extent to which the teacher/examiner assumes his/her role. It is,
therefore, vital that you study the role plays well in advance (see 3.2 Preparation)
and that you feel familiar with the situations and testing points. If you make a
genuine error and part of a task is omitted for a candidate, a covering note explaining
what has happened should be included with the recorded sample. A copy of the note
should also be sent to the Product Manager for 0530 IGCSE Spanish at CIE. If possible,
the recording of the candidate affected should be included as an extra sample.

4.2 Topic Conversation (5 minutes approximately)


(see also Section III)

2 marks out of 15 are awarded (total = 30) for:

(a) Comprehension/responsiveness
(b) Linguistic content.

This section is intended to be a conversation between the teacher/examiner and the


candidate on one topic of the candidate’s choice. The topic must be prepared by
candidates in advance, but must not be pre-Iearnt and delivered as a monologue. You
should allow the candidate to speak on their choice of topic for one to two minutes
uninterrupted and then follow this up with specific questions on the topic. Where a
candidate has been talking for two minutes and shows no sign of finishing their initial
exposition, you must interrupt and ask specific questions. It is the extent to which
candidates can manipulate their prepared material according to the needs of the
teacher/examiner that determines their marks. The use of illustrative materials is
welcomed, but candidates are not allowed to make use of written notes/cue cards.
Encourage candidates to talk clearly in their initial exposition minute.

Although teachers will offer guidance, it is important that candidates are given the freedom
to choose their own topic. Teachers should not encourage all candidates to prepare the
same topic. They should check that the choice of topic is not overambitious and that it is a

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

topic on which the candidate can do him/herself justice. Candidates should not be
allowed to choose a topic such as ‘Myself’ or ‘My family’, as this often leads to
over-generalised performances, leaving little new material to explore in the General
Conversation section. The Topic Conversation section of the test is intended to enable
candidates to talk about something in which they have a genuine interest. Suitable topics
include holidays, school, my country, life in another country, pastimes (general or
specific), my ambitions. Topics dealing with politics or social and economic issues
are ambitious for this level of achievement and may disadvantage candidates if they
do not possess the linguistic skills and maturity of ideas which such subjects necessitate.

When assessing the communicative content of a candidate’s topic discussion, refer to


Scale (a) of the Table on page 11 of the Teachers’ Notes. When assessing the linguistic
content, refer to Scale (b). It may be helpful to bear in mind that marks in Scales (a) and
(b) usually do not vary by more than one band. Please do not confuse the two scales of
marking. In Scale (a), we are looking for the successful transmission of messages in
terms of comprehension of, and response to, the teacher/examiner. In Scale (b), Linguistic
content, please note that for a mark of 7+ to be awarded, candidates must be able to
display control over structures which convey past and future meaning. Please remember
therefore to ask questions which will allow candidates to demonstrate the extent to which
they can use these structures (see pages 11–12 for further guidance).

It is the role of the. teacher/examiner here to probe and go into depth wherever possible,
adjusting the level of questioning according to the level of ability of the candidate. A
variety of interrogative forms will help to elicit good performances. Candidates who are
allowed to present a series of pre-learnt answers and who do not demonstrate the ability
to deal with unexpected questions will not score high marks.

You should indicate the end of the Topic Conversation section by the use of a general
comment such as ‘Let’s talk about something else’ in the appropriate language, and must
not try to examine the Topic and General Conversation sections simultaneously
over ten minutes. The two sections must appear as distinct sections of the test.

4.3 General Conversation (5 minutes approximately)


(see also Section III)

2 marks out of 15 are awarded (total = 30) for:

(a) Comprehension/responsiveness
(b) Linguistic content.

The discussion of the Topic will have paved the way for the General Conversation. Any
point of interest can be developed, and you are free to cover any number of subjects
according to the ability of the candidate. However, topics chosen by you for discussion in
the General Conversation should be different from the topic discussed in the Topic
Conversation. A greater number of subjects covered at a superficial level is frequently the
hallmark of the less able candidate. It is here that the role of the teacher/examiner, to
extend and probe, is so important. You should try to give the candidate the opportunity to
display his/her level of linguistic sophistication. Questions never asked cannot be
answered, and, if you avoid the more demanding questions, able candidates may not
have adequate opportunity to do themselves justice. Avoidance of error does not always
equal positive quality of language. You should aim to cover at least two or three of the
Defined Content Topics in this section of the test (these are listed in Appendix A).

If candidates are clearly out of their depth with a certain level or type of questioning, then
be ready to pass on to another subject or rephrase the question. Likewise, if the candidate
presents you with something of interest, be prepared to follow it up.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

The style of questioning is also important: you should avoid the use of closed questions
which only elicit yes/no answers. In order to extend candidates, use a variety of
interrogative forms (see pages 12–13 for further guidance).

You need to be careful, when awarding marks, that you do not reward your own
performance! Wherever possible, teacher/examiner input should be kept to a minimum
and the candidate given the opportunity to work for the marks. Try to use the full range of
marks and if you have any bilingual students, remember that their performance does
not equal a ‘30 mark student’ by which all other Foreign Language candidates are
to be judged.

4.4 Impression
(See also Section III).

10 marks are awarded.

The marking criteria featured on the Impression table give the opportunity for an overall
Impression mark to be awarded. Here, the main criteria are pronunciation, accent and
fluency. Again, candidates do not have to be of native speaker standard to score 9 or 10
marks.

Above all, in all sections of the Speaking Test, be consistent in your marking and if in
doubt between two marks go for the higher one. Also, if you are examining a full range of
ability, try not to be harsh/lenient at one end of the range.

The whole approach to the Speaking Test should be a positive one. The test is meant to
reflect and sample classroom practice, so please ensure that candidates have sufficient
preparation so as not to feel unnerved by the format of the test itself. Candidates will also
benefit from the opportunity to ‘perform’ to a tape/CD, prior to the Speaking Test.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

5 DIFFERENTIATION – ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

The Speaking Test is common in its entirety to all candidates. In the Topic and General
Conversation sections, differentiation is by outcome. Successful differentiation depends on the
teacher/examiner asking the right questions, thus enabling each candidate to show what s/he
knows and can do – whatever his or her ability. The level of questioning must therefore be
adjusted according to the ability of the candidate.

It is sometimes useful to use closed questions which demand only yes’ or ‘no’ answers as
starter questions, but generally it is wiser to use a variety of question types, from a basic level
of simple questions which demand simple short responses, to more searching questions such
as ‘Why?’ or ‘Tell me more about...’ or ‘What do you think about..?’. If candidates are clearly
out of their depth on a certain question then you should feel free to rephrase it or pass on to a
different kind of question. Likewise, if the candidate presents you with something of interest, it
should be pursued. Questions never asked cannot be answered and, if you avoid asking the
more stretching questions, the more able candidates may not have adequate opportunity to do
themselves justice.

Scale (a) (Comprehension/responsiveness) makes reference to a hierarchy of questions which


move up from (i) simple predictable questions to (ii) predictable questions with some
unpredictable or unexpected elements to (iii) unexpected questions which may require
candidates to give reasons, explain and/or justify their opinions. Candidates’ responses are
judged in terms of the readiness of response to such questions, and the need (or not) for
rephrasing.

Scale (b) (Linguistic content) assesses the complexity and accuracy of structures and
vocabulary used, together with the extent to which the candidates can use different tenses.
Candidates must be able to express past and future meaning for a mark of 7 or more to be
awarded.

You should keep your input to an appropriate minimum and aim to provide a ‘framework’ that
allows candidates to achieve spontaneity of performance.

Although it is a good idea for teachers to have banks of questions which can be used to
practise eliciting performance at certain levels, it is not recommended that such lists of
questions are used in the examination, as the spontaneity of the situation is removed and
candidates can sound very pre-rehearsed. It is far better to familiarise candidates on topic
areas during the course of study beforehand and then to approach things more freely
on the day. You need to give the candidate the opportunity to shape his/her response not just
to the expected question, but also, at a higher level, to the less predictable question.

The kinds of questions which could be used to elicit performance are ones which use a variety
of interrogative forms, pitched at different levels of candidate ability.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

A suggested hierarchy of questions could be as follows.

For example, at a low level:

¿Dónde vas de vacaciones?


¿Por cuánto tiempo vas?
¿Qué atracciones hay en xxx?
¿Te alojas en un hotel?
¿Con quién vas?
¿Qué haces cuando estás de vacaciones?
¿Cómo viajas?

¿Qué te gusta hacer los fines de semana?


¿Qué se puede hacer cerca de donde vives?
¿Te gusta vivir allí? ¿Por qué (no)?

At a slightly higher level, different tenses can be used alongside slightly more open question
forms which are ‘an invitation to respond’.

¿Dónde pasaste tus vacaciones el año pasado?


Háblame un poco de…
¿Cómo viajaste?
¿Con quién fuiste?
¿Qué hiciste allí?
¿Estuviste en un hotel? Cómo era?
¿Dónde quieres ir el año que viene?
¿Qué quieres hacer allí?

¿Qué hiciste el fin de semana pasado?


¿Qué vas a hacer este fin de semana?
¿Qué clase de música te gusta escuchar?
¿Tienes un cantante favorito? ¿Cómo es?

These questions could be used at a higher level still and could include more ‘invitations to
respond’ and more short questions of the ‘Why?’ variety which demand explanations and
justifications.

¿Te gustaría volver a xxx? ¿Por qué (no)?


¿Te gustó la vida en xxx?
¿Qué diferencias has notado entre la vida en xxx y en tu país?
¿Cómo serían tus vacaciones ideales?
¿Con quién te gustaría pasar tus vacaciones? ¿Por qué?

In general, more able candidates often respond well to the ‘Tell me about...’ kind of question,
but this should not be allowed to develop into a monologue.

You could try building up such banks of questions on topics such as sport, free
time/entertainment, my home/country, school, work and future plans, life in another country.
These can then be used in class, in pair work or indeed as starting points for candidates
preparing Topic Conversation subjects.

Remember, it is helpful to start candidates off with an easy question or two to ‘warm them up’.
It is also helpful to ask a series of questions in the same topic area – do not change topics
without telling the candidate as s/he can lose the train of thought very easily. The best
performances from candidates of all abilities come from situations in which the
teacher/examiner listens to the candidate.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

III May/June 2009 Teachers’ Notes Booklet

14
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Cards One – Nine
TEACHERS' NOTES
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Each candidate's Speaking Examination must consist of the following three parts:

Part One of the examination is two role plays. The role play situations are set out on pages 16–21 of this
booklet and must be followed carefully by the teacher/Examiner. The teacher/Examiner must play his/her
role as prescribed by CIE in order that candidates are given the opportunity to attempt all tasks. Extra tasks
must not be created. Candidates should study the situation for fifteen minutes and then be prepared to act
the roles assigned to them and respond to the parts played by the teacher/Examiner.

Part Two of the examination starts with a presentation by the candidate on a topic of his/her choice. The
teacher/Examiner must allow the candidate to speak for 1–2 minutes on his/her prepared topic and then
follow this up with specific spontaneous questions related to the topic. This section of the examination must
last about five minutes in total.

Part Three of the examination is a spontaneous conversation of a more general nature and must last about
five minutes.

In the interests of fairness to candidates, Centres must adhere to the stipulated timings for the Topic
Presentation/Conversation and General Conversation.

The Speaking Examination must be marked by the Centre according to the instructions and a sample
recorded for external moderation.

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN [Turn over


15
2

Contents

Page
ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS 3
1 Examination period 3
2 Appointment of teacher/Examiner 3
3 Materials for the Speaking examination 3
4 Recorded sample 4
5 Two types of mark sheet are provided 4
6 Despatch of materials to CIE for External moderation 4
7 Arrangements for the examination 5
8 Conduct of the examination 5
9 Recording of candidates 6
10 Internal moderation 7

STRUCTURE OF THE EXAMINATION 8


Test 1: Role Plays 8
Test 2: Topic Presentation/Conversation 8
Test 3: General Conversation 9
Impression 9

MARKING INSTRUCTIONS 11
Table A – Test 1: Role Plays 12
Table B – Tests 2 and 3: Topic Presentation/Conversation and General Conversation 13
Table C – Impression 14

ROLE PLAYS 15
Each candidate role play card contains two role plays. The list below gives details of the pages
on which the role play cards appear in this booklet.

Role Play A Role Play B

CARD ONE Page 15 Page 18

CARD TWO Page 15 Page 19

CARD THREE Page 15 Page 20

CARD FOUR Page 16 Page 18

CARD FIVE Page 16 Page 19

CARD SIX Page 16 Page 20

CARD SEVEN Page 17 Page 18

CARD EIGHT Page 17 Page 19

CARD NINE Page 17 Page 20

THE WORKING MARK SHEET 21

THE COVER SHEET FOR MODERATION SAMPLE 22

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ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS

1 Examination period

The Speaking examination takes place before the main examination period: between 1 March
and 30 April for the June examination. Each Centre decides on a convenient period within
these dates for its Speaking examinations.

It is important that dates given for the completion of the Speaking examination and the
despatch of recordings and mark sheets to CIE (see paragraph 6) are adhered to in order to
allow sufficient time for moderation.

2 Appointment of teacher/Examiner

Each Centre selects its own teacher/Examiner to conduct and assess the Speaking
examination for its candidates. This is normally a teacher from within the Languages
department, but could be someone local from outside the Centre. CIE is not responsible for
any fees agreed.

In the interests of standardisation there will be only one teacher/Examiner per Centre.
Where a Centre wishes to use additional teacher/examiners because it has a large number of
candidates, permission to do so must be sought from the IGCSE Languages Group at CIE
before the start of each Speaking examination period. Permission to use more than one
teacher/Examiner will only be granted on the understanding that teacher/Examiners at
the Centre work together to ensure a common approach to the conduct of the Speaking
examination and the application of the mark scheme. The sample the Centre submits to
CIE should include the work of each teacher/Examiner and a Speaking Examination Working
Mark Sheet should be submitted for each teacher/Examiner, with candidate names and
numbers clearly entered. Please see paragraph 10 (Internal Moderation) for further details.

3 Materials for the Speaking examination

Confidential test materials (Teachers' Notes Booklet and Role Play Cards) are despatched by
CIE approximately two to three weeks before the assessment period. These should be
opened four working days before the Centre’s assessment starts and studied carefully by the
teacher/Examiner before conducting his/her first Speaking examination. Teacher/Examiners
who have prepared their own roles fully and are confident in what they are doing are better
able to help candidates who experience any difficulty. Once the materials have been opened,
the Speaking examinations must be completed as soon as is realistically possible. Once the
Centre has completed its Speaking examinations, the materials remain confidential and must
be kept in a secure place by the Centre until the end of the examination period (e.g. until 30
April for the June examination).

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4 Recorded sample

In order to allow CIE to check accurately the standard of assessment, each teacher/Examiner
must record and send to CIE a sample from each Centre at which he or she examines.

• Centres entering 1–16 candidates must send the recordings of all the candidates

• Centres entering 17 or more candidates must send:

(i) the recordings of the first 10 candidates according to candidate number

and

(ii) the recordings of 6 candidates across the ability range, e.g. 2 good, 2 middling, 2
weak. The candidates selected should be representative of the range of marks
awarded by the Centre and should be spread as evenly as possible across that range.
If possible, the recordings of the strongest and the weakest candidates at the Centre
should be included, with the other recordings spaced at equal intervals in between.

Note Centres entering 17 or more candidates must send a total of 16 recordings. The
category (ii) candidates must be chosen from candidates who do not fall into category (i). In
Centres with just over 17 candidates, CIE accepts this may mean that the category (ii)
candidates are not fully representative of the range.

The recording should be carried out in accordance with the instructions headed ‘Recording of
Candidates’ (see paragraph 1.9). The recording must be sent to CIE together with the Moderator
copy of the completed MS1 mark sheet and copies of the completed Speaking Examination
Working Mark Sheet and Cover Sheet for Moderation Sample (see pages 22 and 23).

5 Two types of mark sheet are provided

(a) The Speaking Examination Working Mark Sheet is provided in this booklet (see page 22)
and should be photocopied as required. It is a working document to be completed during
each candidate's Speaking examination. Candidates must be marked as they are being
examined and not afterwards from a recording. The marks for each section of the
examination must be entered in detail as specified in the Marking Instructions. All
additions must be carefully checked.

(b) The total marks must then be transferred to the computer-printed Internal Assessment
Mark Sheet (MS1) or to CAMEO for Centres submitting marks electronically.

6 Despatch of materials to CIE for External moderation

(a) Mark sheets and recordings must be returned to CIE as soon as all the Speaking
examinations have been completed. The deadline for receipt by CIE of these items is
15 May for the June examination. Centres must not wait until the end of the assessment
period before despatching them.

(b) (i) The Board copy of the completed Internal Assessment Mark Sheet (MS1) must be
returned to CIE in the separate envelope provided.

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(ii) The following items must be sent, to reach CIE by no later than 15 May for the June
examination.
• the Moderator copy of the completed Internal Assessment Mark Sheet (MS1) or a
signed print-out of the marks file for Centres submitting marks using CAMEO
• a copy of the completed Speaking Examination Working Mark Sheet
• a copy of the completed Cover Sheet for Moderation Sample
• the recorded sample.
• details of Internal Moderation procedures (only for Centres permitted to use more
than one teacher/Examiner).

(c) Copies of both types of mark sheet are to be retained by the Centre in case of postal
losses or delays.

7 Arrangements for the examination

(a) Quiet conditions: Centres should ensure well in advance of the Speaking examination that
a suitably quiet room will be available. Rooms which are too close to a playground,
recreation room or noisy classroom are to be avoided. It is essential to exclude unnecessary
background noise, e.g. lawn-mowers, phones. Notices must be displayed to prevent
interruptions from people entering the room unaware that an examination is in progress.

(b) Invigilation: examination conditions must prevail in the area where the Speaking
examination takes place, including the space set aside for a candidate to study the role
play situations. Adequate supervision must be provided to ensure that each candidate can
study alone and in silence and that candidates leaving the interview room do not
communicate with those waiting to enter. Candidates are not allowed to bring any notes
for use during their preparation time. Nor are they allowed to make notes.

(c) The examination room: Centres should ensure that a suitably-sized, e.g. not too big,
room will be available. Candidates must be examined singly. No other person should be
present during the examination with the exception of another teacher/Examiner or an
Officer from CIE. In those cases where it is necessary for a second teacher/Examiner to
be present during the Speaking examination, only one teacher/Examiner must conduct
each examination.

The teacher/Examiner should be positioned so that they face the candidates when they
enter the room, with a table between themselves and the candidates. Candidates should not
be positioned where they can see what the teacher/Examiner is writing on the mark sheets
as this can be distracting.

Teacher/Examiners must not smoke in the interview room or in the presence of


candidates. Smokers should arrange for breaks in the timetable as necessary.

8 Conduct of the examination

(a) Teacher/Examiners should do their best to put candidates at their ease, e.g. by smiling
when they enter the room, and indicating where they should sit. A good teacher/Examiner
will usually send a candidate out of the interview room smiling, no matter how good or bad
the performance has been. However, the use of expressions such as ‘very good’, which
candidates may interpret as a comment on performance, should be avoided.

(b) In addition, teacher/Examiners should not walk about or distract candidates in any way
(e.g. by doodling or fiddling with papers, etc.); should always appear interested, even in
mundane matters; should never show undue surprise, impatience or mockery; and should
never correct a candidate.

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9 Recording of candidates

The Centre is responsible for supplying blank cassettes/CDs for the recording of its
moderation sample: these will not be supplied by CIE. The Centre is also responsible for
supplying recording equipment (e.g. cassette recorder and microphone). All recording equipment,
including cassettes/CDs, must be of as high a standard as possible to ensure that moderation
samples are clearly audible. In order to ensure that recording levels are satisfactory for both
candidates and teacher/Examiner, the equipment to be used must be tested in situ some time
before the actual examination, ideally with one of the candidates.

If at all possible, external microphones should be used so that separate microphones can be
used for the candidate and the teacher/Examiner. If only one microphone is used it should be
placed nearer to the candidate than to the teacher/Examiner. With a softly-spoken candidate
the microphone should be placed even nearer to the candidate before the start of the
examination.

Moderation samples must be recorded at normal speed onto either C90 audiocassettes or
standard format CDs. Mini cassettes and mini CDs must not be used. Where Centres make
use of digital recording software, each candidate's file must be saved individually and saved
as .mp3 so that it can accessed for the purposes of moderation.

If C90 cassettes are used, these are 45 minutes per side and therefore 6 Speaking
examinations should fit on each cassette, 3 on each side. A CD will record approximately 80
minutes of sound/5 candidates.

The recording must not be stopped once a candidate's examination has started.

Each cassette/CD must be introduced by the teacher/Examiner, as follows:

'Cassette/CD number
Centre number e.g. ES215
Centre name e.g. King's College, Madrid
Examination number 0530
Examination name IGCSE Spanish
Name of Examiner e.g. Mr R Peters
Date e.g. March 2nd 2009'

Each candidate must be introduced by the teacher/Examiner, as follows:

'Candidate Number e.g. 047


Candidate Name e.g. Jane Williams
Role Play Card e.g. Number 4'

After the last recording on side A of a cassette the teacher/Examiner must announce 'No more
recordings on this side. Recording continues on side B'. Cassettes must be wound on to the
end before turning over or starting a new cassette.

After the last candidate on each cassette/CD, the teacher/examiner must announce 'end of
cassette/CD no. ...'; and after the last candidate on the last cassette/CD 'end of examination'.

Cassettes
Each cassette box must be clearly labelled with syllabus name, syllabus/component number,
Centre name/number and candidate name/number in recording order. Labels are provided by
CIE for this purpose. In addition each cassette must be labelled with syllabus/component
number and Centre number.

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CDs
Each CD sleeve must be labelled with syllabus name, syllabus/component number, Centre
name/number and candidate name/number in recording order. Each CD must be labelled with
syllabus/component number and Centre number. CD friendly marker pens must be used to
label CDs as the use of biro, for example, may make the contents of the CD unreadable.

Each recorded file on the CD must be clearly named using the following convention:

Centre number_candidate number_syllabus number_component number.

Before cassettes/CDs are despatched, spot checks must be made to ensure that every
candidate is clearly audible. Cassettes must then be rewound to the start of side 1.

If for any reason the cassette/CD has failed to record or there are problems with the audibility
of the recordings, the Centre must contact CIE Customer Services immediately to seek
advice.

10 Internal moderation

Where Centres with large numbers of candidates request permission from CIE to use more
than one teacher/Examiner to conduct and assess the Speaking examination for their
candidates, this will be granted on the understanding that the following procedures are put in
place. The purpose of these procedures is to ensure that marks submitted by the Centre are
consistent for all candidates, irrespective of which teacher/Examiner conducted and assessed
the examination:
• The teacher/Examiners conducting and assessing Speaking examinations at the Centre
must work together to ensure a common approach to the conduct of the Speaking
examination and the application of the mark scheme.

• One teacher/Examiner at the Centre must take responsibility for the standardisation of
the marking of teacher/Examiners at the Centre. This person must ensure that all
candidates taking the 0530/3 Speaking test at the Centre are judged against the same
standards and that a valid rank order of candidates for the Centre as a whole is
produced. Standardisation can take various forms, but the initial marking of each
candidate must be done as the test is being conducted and not on the basis of a
recording.

• The Speaking tests of all candidates at the Centre must be recorded. A recorded sample
for External Moderation should then be produced according to the instructions in
paragraph 4 (Recorded sample), with the additional requirement that the sample shouId,
as far as possible, include equal numbers of recordings from each teacher/Examiner
used at the Centre. A Speaking Examination Working Mark Sheet should be submitted
for each teacher/Examiner, with candidate names and numbers clearly entered.

• The final column on the Working Mark Sheet (Internal and/or External Moderation) must
be used to record the results of Internal Moderation, and details of the Centre’s Internal
Moderation procedures must be enclosed with the materials for External Moderation.

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STRUCTURE OF THE EXAMINATION

Test 1: Role Plays (about 5 minutes) 30 marks

(a) A number of alternative role play cards are supplied by CIE, and these should be used at
random during each session of examining. The teacher/Examiner gives each candidate one
card containing two role play situations (Role Play A and Role Play B). Each of these
situations consists of five tasks (numbered 1–5 on the Role Play Cards). Candidates must be
examined in both role play situations on the card they have been given and must complete all
the tasks specified on their card. Having given the first candidate 15 minutes to prepare
his/her two situations, the teacher/Examiner should hand a different card to the second
candidate to prepare while the first candidate is being examined.

Candidates may not make written notes during their preparation time. They may take the Role
Play Card they have prepared into the examination room. However, they may not take the
Role Play Card away with them once the Speaking examination is over

Teacher/Examiners should note that although the timing for the role plays is given as 5
minutes, the actual time it takes to complete them will often be less and will vary from
candidate to candidate.

(b) For each role play situation, the role of the teacher/Examiner is specified on pages 16–21 of
this booklet. Usually, the teacher/Examiner has to initiate the dialogue. The teacher/Examiner
is to assume the role of a well-disposed native speaker with no knowledge of the candidate’s
first language.

Teacher/Examiners must prepare the situations carefully and ensure that they play their role
as prescribed by CIE in order that candidates are given the opportunity to attempt all the
required tasks. The teacher/Examiner must not create extra tasks, nor must s/he omit tasks.

(c) Each situation must be carried out in full. If the candidate cannot handle one of the tasks set,
the teacher/Examiner should not leave too long a pause, but should lead the candidate on to
the next task.

(d) Should a candidate miss out a task, the teacher/Examiner should try to guide him/her back to
it, in as natural a way as possible, e.g. by repeating or rephrasing a question if the candidate
fails to complete the task at the first attempt or gives an ambiguous response. It does not
matter to Moderators that this may lead to tasks occurring in a different order, as long as they
are all attempted. However, teacher/Examiners must ensure that when rephrasing a task they
do not change its nature, e.g. if the task requires the candidate to produce a particular
vocabulary item and this is in fact supplied by the teacher/Examiner, no credit can be given.

For mark scheme, see Table A of the Marking Instructions.

Test 2: Topic Presentation/Conversation (about 5 minutes) 30 marks

(a) This part of the examination starts with a one to two minute presentation by the candidate on a
topic of their choice which they will have prepared in advance, though it should not be pre-
learnt. The teacher/Examiner will follow up the presentation with specific questions on the
topic bringing the total time for the Topic Presentation and Topic Conversation to
approximately 5 minutes.

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(b) It is not expected that all candidates within a Centre will prepare the same topic. Candidates
must be encouraged to choose a topic in which they have a personal interest. Suitable
subjects might be, for example: 'School life', 'Hobbies and pastimes' (general or specific), 'My
country', 'Life in another country', 'My ambitions', 'Holidays'. Topics dealing with politics or
social and economic issues are ambitious for this level of achievement and may disadvantage
candidates if they do not possess the linguistic skills and maturity of ideas which such topics
necessitate. Candidates should not be allowed to present 'Myself' or 'My life' as topics as
these can often pre-empt the General Conversation section.

(c) Candidates may use illustrative material, e.g. photographs, if this seems appropriate to their
topic, but are not allowed to use written notes of any kind.

(d) The teacher/Examiner must allow the candidate to speak for one to two minutes uninterrupted
on their chosen topic before starting the Topic Conversation. Where a candidate has been
talking for two minutes and shows no sign of finishing their Topic Presentation, the
teacher/Examiner must interrupt and start the Topic Conversation.

(e) In the Topic Conversation, candidates should be able to respond to the teacher/Examiner's
questions in a spontaneous and natural manner. It is the extent to which candidates can
manipulate their prepared material according to the needs of the teacher/Examiner that
determines their marks: candidates must not be allowed to deliver a prepared monologue or a
series of obviously prepared replies.

(f) The teacher/Examiner must try to extend the candidate as far as possible by giving them the
opportunity to provide opinions and justifications and use a variety of tenses. Candidates who
do not show that they are able to convey past and future meaning cannot be awarded a mark
in the Satisfactory band or above on Scale (b) (see Table B of the Marking Instructions). In
order to extend the candidate as far as possible, the teacher/Examiner should probe, explore,
ask for explanations, enlargements, descriptions (how? when? why? tell me a bit more
about…etc.).

For mark scheme, see Table B of the Marking Instructions.

Test 3: General Conversation (about 5 minutes) 30 marks

(a) The teacher/Examiner must indicate to the candidate the point of transition from Topic
Conversation to General Conversation.

It can be helpful to ease the candidate into the General Conversation either by starting out
from a point of interest noted earlier, or by asking a couple of general 'starter' questions
relating to the candidate’s everyday life.

Questioning in the General Conversation must not cover the same material as the Topic
Conversation, e.g. if the candidate has talked about Sport in the Topic Conversation, it is not
appropriate for the teacher/Examiner to return to this topic in the General Conversation

The General Conversation must last the stipulated 5 minutes for each candidate. Some
candidates may dry up after a few minutes, but it is important to persevere with the
conversation (e.g. by complete changes of subject), so that they are given every opportunity to
do themselves justice

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(b) The teacher/Examiner should aim to cover at least two or three of the Defined Content
Topics in this section of the examination (these are listed in the Curriculum Content section of
the syllabus booklet). Examples of suitable topics are school (subjects, number of periods,
times, games, etc.), home, town, journey to and from school, free time (evenings, weekends),
holidays, hobbies. All candidates can reasonably be expected to have the command of
vocabulary and idiom necessary to discuss these topics.

Precise factual information or knowledge is not required, and candidates should not be
penalised for lack of such knowledge. The teacher/Examiner should be ready to pass on quickly
to another topic if candidates are obviously out of their depth. Care should be taken to avoid
questions which might cause embarrassment, e.g. where a candidate has only one parent.
(Centres are requested to supply such information to the teacher/Examiner in advance.)

(c) Candidates are expected to give natural replies to questions so their answers need not be in
the form of complete sentences. However, candidates whose conversation consists largely of
monosyllabic or disjointed replies cannot gain much credit for such a performance, and it is
therefore the teacher/Examiner's responsibility to avoid questions inviting answers of simply
‘yes’ or ‘no’. Instead, the teacher/Examiner must use a variety of question types and
interrogative adverbs, ranging from a basic level of simple questions which demand short
predictable responses, e.g. when? how many? how long? with whom? with what? how? etc. to
more searching questions such as why? tell me about… what do you think about?

(d) Questions should be adjusted to the candidate's ability. However, as in the Topic Conversation,
the teacher/Examiner must try to extend the candidate as far as possible by giving them the
opportunity to provide opinions and justifications and use a variety of tenses (themes could be
past visits to other countries, plans for the future, etc.). Candidates who do not show that they
are able to convey past and future meaning cannot be awarded a mark in the Satisfactory band
or above on Scale (b) (see Table B of the Marking Instructions). More able candidates may not
be able to do themselves justice if the more stretching questions are avoided.

(e) Candidates should be prompted and encouraged where necessary and long silences should
be avoided. However, a candidate should not be interrupted unless it is clear that he or she
cannot complete the answer. Incorrect answers should never be corrected, nor answers
supplied when none are given. Questions should be rephrased (rather than repeated) in an
attempt to maintain the dialogue.

(f) The use of vocabulary or phrases from the candidate’s first language should be avoided,
except in the case of particular institutions e.g. names of examinations, types of school, etc.

(g) The teacher/Examiner must avoid talking too much themselves and limiting the amount of time
available to the candidate to show what they can do. The onus is on the candidate to show
that he or she can converse adequately in the language, but at the same time it is up to the
teacher/Examiner to make sure that the candidate is given every opportunity to do so by
following up any opening given.

For mark scheme, see Table B of the Marking Instructions.

Impression 10 marks

At the end of the examination, the teacher/Examiner must make an assessment of the candidate’s
pronunciation, accent and fluency based on the candidate's overall performance in the Speaking
examination.

For mark scheme, see Table C of the Marking Instructions.

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MARKING INSTRUCTIONS

Use the Speaking Examination Working Mark Sheet (see page 22: to be photocopied as required).

Test 1 Role Plays. 30 marks. Use Table A.

Enter the mark for each task in the ten columns 1–10 of the Speaking Examination Working
Mark Sheet.

Test 2 Topic Presentation/Conversation. 30 marks. Use Table B.

(i) A mark out of 15 on Scale (a) Comprehension/responsiveness.


Enter the mark in column 11.

(ii) A mark out of 15 on Scale (b) Linguistic content.


Enter the mark in column 12.

Test 3 General Conversation. 30 marks. Use Table B.

Mark as for Test 2 using Table B.


Enter marks out of 15 in columns 13 and 14.

Impression. 10 marks. Use Table C.

Enter the mark (maximum 10) in column 15.

Add the marks and enter the total, in large figures, in the column headed Total Mark. Please
double check the addition as even small errors create problems.

Marking: General Principles

1 Teacher/Examiners are urged to use the full range of marks, bearing in mind that it is not
necessary for a candidate to be of native speaker standard in order to be given maximum
marks within any single category.

2 The general approach is a positive one and marks should be awarded based on what the
candidate can do rather than deducted for errors.

3 Above all else, teacher/Examiners should be consistent in their marking. The moderation
process allows for adjustments to be made to consistently harsh or consistently generous
marking. Where teacher/Examiners are unsure of the mark to award, they should err on the
side of generosity.

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TABLE A – Test 1: Role Plays (30 marks)

In this part of the examination the teacher/Examiner plays the part of a patient and well-disposed
foreigner with no knowledge of the candidate's first language.

The role plays test the ability of the candidates to communicate needs, information, requests, etc.,
in plausibly life-like situations. Intelligibility is therefore more important than grammatical or
syntactic accuracy. However, verbal communication only is assessed: credit is not given for
gestures, facial expressions or other non-verbal forms of communication.

Candidates are required to give natural responses, not necessarily in the form of full sentences.
The use of appropriate register and correct idiom is rewarded.

Each of the ten tasks to be performed in the role plays will be assessed on the scale below. Marks
may not be awarded for the completion of tasks other than those specified by CIE in the Role Play
Cards/Teachers’ Notes Booklet, or for tasks that are omitted.

An accurate utterance which not only conveys the meaning but which is expressed in
native idiom and appropriate register. Minor errors (adjective endings, use of
3
prepositions, etc.) are tolerated. The utterance is intelligible and the task of
communication is achieved.

The language used is not necessarily the most appropriate to the situation and may
2
contain inaccuracies which do not obscure the meaning.

Communication of some meaning is achieved, but the native speaker would find the
1
message ambiguous or incomplete.

The utterance is unintelligible to the native speaker. 0

NB 1 If there are two elements in a task and only one is completed, then a maximum of one
mark only may be awarded.

2 When awarding marks, teacher/Examiners should start at the bottom of the mark scheme
and work upwards:

0 = nothing of worth communicated


1 = partial communication
2 = all points communicated – but with some linguistic inaccuracies – meaning clear
3 = meaning clear and accurately conveyed.

3 Short utterances, if appropriate, can be worth three marks – especially true in Role Play A.

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TABLE B – Tests 2 and 3: Topic Presentation/Conversation and General Conversation


(2 × 30 marks)

Each of Tests 2 and 3 is marked on two scales:

Scale (a) Comprehension/responsiveness. This assesses the candidate’s response in terms of


comprehension of the teacher/Examiner, immediacy of reaction/response, fluency of
response, presentation of material in the topic.

Scale (b) Linguistic content. This assesses the linguistic content of the candidate’s answers in
terms of the complexity, accuracy and range of structures, vocabulary and idiom.

Category Mark
(a) A spontaneous interchange between candidate and Examiner.
Responds confidently to all question types. Fluent. Not necessarily
of native speaker standard.
Outstanding 14–15
(b) Very accurate use of structures, vocabulary and idiom with
occasional errors in more complex language. Not necessarily of
native speaker standard.
(a) Generally understands questions first time, but may require
occasional re-phrasing. Can respond satisfactorily to both
Very good straightforward and unexpected questions. 12–13

(b) Wide range of mostly accurate structures, vocabulary and idiom.


(a) Has no difficulty with straightforward questions and responds fairly
well to unexpected ones, particularly when they are re-phrased.
Good 10–11
(b) Good range of generally accurate structures, varied vocabulary.
(a) Understands straightforward questions but has difficulty with
unexpected ones and needs some rephrasing. Fairly fluent, but
hesitation.
Satisfactory 7–9
(b) Adequate range of structures and vocabulary. Can convey past
and future meaning; some ambiguity.
(a) Has difficulty even with straightforward questions, but still attempts
an answer.
Weak 4–6
(b) Shows elementary, limited vocabulary and faulty manipulation of
structures.
(a) Frequently fails to understand the questions and has great difficulty
in replying.
Poor 0–3
(b) Shows very limited range of structures and vocabulary.

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TABLE C – Impression (10 marks)

Very good pronunciation, intonation and fluency; an occasional slight mistake or


9–10
hesitation. Not necessarily of native speaker standard.
Good pronunciation and fluency; makes a fair attempt at correct intonation and
7–8
expression; some mistakes and/or hesitation.
A fair degree of fluency and accuracy in pronunciation despite quite a number of errors;
5–6
some attempt at intonation and expression.
Conveys some meaning despite a lack of fluency and many errors; pronunciation
3–4
strongly influenced by first language
Many gross errors; frequently incomprehensible. 1–2

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For Role Play Cards One, Two, Three. Role Play A.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de la estación de tren

Quieres comprar unos billetes para ir a Bilbao. Vas a la estación de tren.

P Salude al/a la estudiante y pregúntele qué desea.

E Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar unos billetes.

P Pregúntele adónde quiere ir y cuándo.

E Dile adónde quieres ir y cuándo quieres viajar.

P Hay dos posibilidades: un tren a las 10 en punto y otro a las 16:30.

E Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y escoge uno de los trenes y dile cuántos billetes quieres.

P Pregúntele qué tipo de billete quiere.

E Dile el tipo de billete que quieres (¿ ?/¿ ?).

P Pregúntele si eso es todo.

E Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y pregúntale el precio.

P Responda de forma apropiada y termine la conversación.

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For Role Play Cards Four, Five, Six. Role Play A.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a en la oficina de turismo

Quieres comprar entradas para un concierto. Vas a la oficina de turismo.

P Salude al/a la estudiante y pregúntele '¿En qué puedo servirlo/la?'

E Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar entradas para un concierto.

P Pregúntele para cuándo quiere las entradas: para el jueves, el viernes o el sábado.

E Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y elige el día que prefieres.

P Diga que ese día puede ser.

E Dile cuántas entradas quieres y pregúntale el precio.

P Dígale que hay descuentos para gente joven y pregúntele al/a la estudiante su edad.

E Contesta a la pregunta sobre tu edad.

P Dé un precio apropiado y pregúntele si es todo.

Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y haz una pregunta acerca del concierto (por ejemplo:
E
¿lugar? ¿aparcamiento? ¿horario?).

P Responda de forma apropiada y termine la conversación.

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN [Turn over

30
17

For Role Play Cards Seven, Eight, Nine. Role Play A.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): vendedor(a).

Quieres comprar una camisa. Entras a una tienda de ropa.

P Salude al/a la estudiante y pregúntele '¿En qué puedo servirlo/la?’

E Saluda al/a la vendedor(a) y dile que quieres comprar una camisa.

P Pregúntele al/a la estudiante su talla.

E Dile tu talla.

P Dígale que tiene la camisa en rojo, blanco y negro.

E Escucha lo que te dice el/la vendedor(a) y elige un color.

P Muéstrele la camisa al/a la estudiante y pregúntele '¿Qué le parece?'

E Te quieres probar la camisa. ¿Qué dices?

P El estudiante se ha probado la camisa. Pregúntele si quiere comprarla.

E Dile que quieres la camisa y pregúntale el precio.

P Responda de forma apropiada y termine la conversación.

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN [Turn over


31
18

For Role Play Cards One, Four, Seven. Role Play B.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de una farmacia

Ayer comiste en un restaurante y hoy no te encuentras bien, por eso vas a la farmacia.

P Salude al/a la estudiante y pregúntele qué desea.

E Explica que no te encuentras bien y describe lo que tienes (menciona 2 cosas).

P Pregúntele cuándo empezó a sentirse mal.

E Dile cuándo empezaste a sentirte mal.

P Pregúntele qué comió ayer.

E Explica adónde fuiste ayer y lo que comiste.

P Recomiéndele algún medicamento y dígale que tiene que tomarlo tres veces por día.

E Pregúntale lo que debes hacer (por ejemplo: ¿cama? ¿no comer? ¿médico?).

P Responda a la pregunta y pregúntele si está de vacaciones.

E Explícale que estás de vacaciones y dile cuándo vuelves a tu casa.

P Responda de forma apropiada y termine la conversación.

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN [Turn over

32
19

For Role Play Cards Two, Five, Eight. Role Play B.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): amigo/a español(a)

Estás en Madrid y quieres ir a Sevilla pero llegas tarde a la estación y pierdes el tren. Llamas a tu
amigo/a para explicarle la situación.

P Conteste el teléfono.

E Saluda a tu amigo/a y explícale dónde estás.

P Sorprendido/a, pregúntele qué le ha pasado.

E Explícale por qué perdiste el tren.

P Dígale que no tiene importancia y pregúntele cuándo va a llegar.

E Dile que no vas a llegar a Sevilla esta noche y explícale dónde pasarás la noche.

P Dígale '¡Qué pena!' y pregúntele a qué hora saldrá de Madrid mañana por la mañana.

E Dile a qué hora saldrás de Madrid mañana por la mañana y que lo sientes mucho.

P Pregúntele qué le gustaría hacer mañana por la noche.

E Dile lo que te gustaría hacer mañana por la noche (menciona 2 cosas).

P Responda de forma apropiada y termine la conversación.

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN [Turn over

33
20

For Role Play Cards Three, Six, Nine. Role Play B.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): recepcionista de un camping

Estás buscando un trabajo en España para las vacaciones y llamas por teléfono a un camping
que ha publicado un anuncio.

P Conteste el teléfono y diga 'Camping Mar y Sol… ¿En qué puedo servirlo/la?'

E Saluda al/a la recepcionista. Preséntate y explica por qué llamas.

P Pregúntele por qué le gustaría trabajar en un camping.

E Explícale por qué te gustaría trabajar en un camping (menciona 1 cosa).

P Pregúntele cuándo estará libre y por cuánto tiempo.

E Dile cuándo estarás libre y por cuánto tiempo.

P Pregúntele si ha trabajado en un hotel o en un camping antes.

E Dile que has trabajado en un hotel en tu país y explícale por qué te gustó este trabajo.

P Pregunte al/a la estudiante que le envíe su CV y si quiere hacerle alguna pregunta.

E Haz una pregunta sobre el trabajo (por ejemplo: ¿uniforme?, ¿sueldo?, ¿horario?).

P Responda de forma apropiada y termine la conversación.

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN [Turn over

34
21
SPANISH (0530)
Oral Examination Working Mark Sheet
IGCSE
Please read the instructions printed in the Teachers’ Notes Booklet before completing this form

Centre Number Centre Name JUNE 2 0

Impression
Role Play A Role Play B Topic/Topic General Internal

(Max. 10)
Conversation Conversation and/or
R.P. (max 15) (max 15) (max 30) (max 30) Total External
Candidate Card Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Mark Moderation
Number no. Candidate Name Mark (Max) 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15 15 15 15 10 100

Name of teacher completing this form Signature Date

© UCLES 2010 0530/03/TN


35
22

IGCSE Spanish (0530): Cover Sheet for Moderation Sample


A copy of this cover sheet must be completed by the Centre and enclosed with the Moderation
documentation and recorded sample to be despatched to CIE.

Centre name: Centre number:

1 Tick to confirm that the required moderation documents are enclosed:

(i) Moderator copy of MS1 or printout of Internal Marks Report from Cameo.
(ii) Copy of completed Working Mark Sheet(s) (WMS).*
(* One WMS per Examiner in Centres using more than one Examiner)

If any other documents are enclosed for CIE's attention, please list them below:

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

2 Tick to confirm that documentation has been checked for arithmetical and transcription errors:

(i) Addition of marks on WMS has been checked and Total Mark is correct for each candidate.
(ii) Total Mark for each candidate has been correctly transferred to the MS1 or Cameo.

3 Tick to confirm that the recording quality of Moderation samples has been checked:

All sample recordings are clearly audible.


Samples are recorded on standard size CDs/cassettes and recorded at normal speed.
Digital recordings only: each candidate saved individually and files saved as .mp3.

4 Tick to confirm that the correct number of candidates has been submitted for moderation:

For Centres with 16 or fewer candidates, the following are enclosed:

Recordings of the complete Speaking test for all candidates.

For Centres with 17 or more candidates, the following are enclosed:

(i) Recordings of the complete Speaking test for 6 candidates across the range AND
(ii) Recordings of the complete Speaking test for the first 10 candidates by candidate number.

5 CENTRES USING MORE THAN 1 EXAMINER – tick to confirm Internal Moderation procedures:

Internal moderation carried out and details of Internal Moderation procedures enclosed.

Materials checked by: (name) Date:

(signature)

36
IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

May/June 2009 Role Play Cards IV

37
IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

38
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card One 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.
*8824888180*

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

39
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de la estación de tren

Quieres comprar unos billetes para ir a Bilbao. Vas a la estación de tren.

1 Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar unos billetes.

2 Dile adónde quieres ir y cuándo quieres viajar.

3 Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y escoge uno de los trenes y dile cuántos billetes
quieres.

4 Dile el tipo de billete que quieres. (¿ ?¿ ?).

5 Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y pregúntale el precio.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de una farmacia

Ayer comiste en un restaurante y hoy no te encuentras bien, por eso vas a la farmacia.

1 Explica que no te encuentras bien y describe lo que tienes (menciona 2 cosas).

2 Dile cuándo empezaste a sentirte mal.

3 Explica adónde fuiste ayer y lo que comiste.

4 Pregúntale lo que debes hacer (por ejemplo: ¿cama? ¿no comer? ¿médico?).

5 Explícale que estás de vacaciones y dile cuándo vuelves a tu casa.

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


40
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Two 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

41
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de la estación de tren

Quieres comprar unos billetes para ir a Bilbao. Vas a la estación de tren.

1 Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar unos billetes.

2 Dile adónde quieres ir y cuándo quieres viajar.

3 Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y escoge uno de los trenes y dile cuántos billetes
quieres.

4 Dile el tipo de billete que quieres. (¿ ?¿ ?).

5 Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y pregúntale el precio.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): amigo/a español(a)

Estás en Madrid y quieres ir a Sevilla pero llegas tarde a la estación y pierdes el tren. Llamas a tu
amigo/a para explicarle la situación.

1 Saluda a tu amigo/a y explícale dónde estás.

2 Explícale por qué perdiste el tren.

3 Dile que no vas a llegar a Sevilla esta noche y explícale dónde pasarás la noche.

4 Dile a qué hora saldrás de Madrid mañana por la mañana y que lo sientes mucho.

5 Dile lo que te gustaría hacer mañana por la noche (menciona 2 cosas).

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


42
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Three 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

43
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de la estación de tren

Quieres comprar unos billetes para ir a Bilbao. Vas a la estación de tren.

1 Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar unos billetes.

2 Dile adónde quieres ir y cuándo quieres viajar.

3 Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y escoge uno de los trenes y dile cuántos billetes
quieres.

4 Dile el tipo de billete que quieres. (¿ ?¿ ?).

5 Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y pregúntale el precio.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): recepcionista de un camping

Estás buscando un trabajo en España para las vacaciones y llamas por teléfono a un camping que
ha publicado un anuncio.

1 Saluda al/a la recepcionista. Preséntate y explica por qué llamas.

2 Explícale por qué te gustaría trabajar en un camping (menciona 1 cosa).

3 Dile cuándo estarás libre y por cuánto tiempo.

4 Dile que has trabajado en un hotel en tu país y explícale por qué te gustó este trabajo.

5 Haz 1 pregunta sobre el trabajo (por ejemplo: ¿uniforme?, ¿sueldo?, ¿horario?).

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


44
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Four 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

45
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a en la oficina de turismo

Quieres comprar entradas para un concierto. Vas a la oficina de turismo.

1 Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar entradas para un concierto.

2 Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y elige el día que prefieres.

3 Dile cuántas entradas quieres y pregúntale el precio.

4 Contesta a la pregunta sobre tu edad.

5 Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y haz una pregunta acerca del concierto (por ejemplo:
¿lugar? ¿aparcamiento? ¿horario?).

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de una farmacia

Ayer comiste en un restaurante y hoy no te encuentras bien, por eso vas a la farmacia.

1 Explica que no te encuentras bien y describe lo que tienes (menciona 2 cosas).

2 Dile cuándo empezaste a sentirte mal.

3 Explica adónde fuiste ayer y lo que comiste.

4 Pregúntale lo que debes hacer (por ejemplo: ¿cama? ¿no comer? ¿médico?).

5 Explícale que estás de vacaciones y dile cuándo vuelves a tu casa.

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


46
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Five 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

47
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a en la oficina de turismo

Quieres comprar entradas para un concierto. Vas a la oficina de turismo.

1 Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar entradas para un concierto.

2 Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y elige el día que prefieres.

3 Dile cuántas entradas quieres y pregúntale el precio.

4 Contesta a la pregunta sobre tu edad.

5 Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y haz una pregunta acerca del concierto (por ejemplo:
¿lugar? ¿aparcamiento? ¿horario?).

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): amigo/a español(a)

Estás en Madrid y quieres ir a Sevilla pero llegas tarde a la estación y pierdes el tren. Llamas a tu
amigo/a para explicarle la situación.

1 Saluda a tu amigo/a y explícale dónde estás.

2 Explícale por qué perdiste el tren.

3 Dile que no vas a llegar a Sevilla esta noche y explícale dónde pasarás la noche.

4 Dile a qué hora saldrás de Madrid mañana por la mañana y que lo sientes mucho.

5 Dile lo que te gustaría hacer mañana por la noche (menciona 2 cosas).

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


48
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Six 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

49
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a en la oficina de turismo

Quieres comprar entradas para un concierto. Vas a la oficina de turismo.

1 Saluda al/a la empleado/a y dile que quieres comprar entradas para un concierto.

2 Escucha lo que te dice el/la empleado/a y elige el día que prefieres.

3 Dile cuántas entradas quieres y pregúntale el precio.

4 Contesta a la pregunta sobre tu edad.

5 Agradécele al/a la empleado/a y haz una pregunta acerca del concierto (por ejemplo:
¿lugar? ¿aparcamiento? ¿horario?).

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): recepcionista de un camping

Estás buscando un trabajo en España para las vacaciones y llamas por teléfono a un camping que
ha publicado un anuncio.

1 Saluda al/a la recepcionista. Preséntate y explica por qué llamas.

2 Explícale por qué te gustaría trabajar en un camping (menciona 1 cosa).

3 Dile cuándo estarás libre y por cuánto tiempo.

4 Dile que has trabajado en un hotel en tu país y explícale por qué te gustó este trabajo.

5 Haz 1 pregunta sobre el trabajo (por ejemplo: ¿uniforme?, ¿sueldo?, ¿horario?).

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


50
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Seven 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

51
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): vendedor(a)

Quieres comprar una camisa. Entras a una tienda de ropa.

1 Saluda al/a la vendedor(a) y dile que quieres comprar una camisa.

2 Dile tu talla.

3 Escucha lo que te dice el/la vendedor(a) y elige un color.

4 Te quieres probar la camisa. ¿Qué dices?

5 Dile que quieres la camisa y pregúntale el precio.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): empleado/a de una farmacia

Ayer comiste en un restaurante y hoy no te encuentras bien, por eso vas a la farmacia.

1 Explica que no te encuentras bien y describe lo que tienes (menciona 2 cosas).

2 Dile cuándo empezaste a sentirte mal.

3 Explica adónde fuiste ayer y lo que comiste.

4 Pregúntale lo que debes hacer (por ejemplo: ¿cama? ¿no comer? ¿médico?).

5 Explícale que estás de vacaciones y dile cuándo vuelves a tu casa.

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


52
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Eight 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

53
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): vendedor(a)

Quieres comprar una camisa. Entras a una tienda de ropa.

1 Saluda al/a la vendedor(a) y dile que quieres comprar una camisa.

2 Dile tu talla.

3 Escucha lo que te dice el/la vendedor(a) y elige un color.

4 Te quieres probar la camisa. ¿Qué dices?

5 Dile que quieres la camisa y pregúntale el precio.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): amigo/a español(a)

Estás en Madrid y quieres ir a Sevilla pero llegas tarde a la estación y pierdes el tren. Llamas a tu
amigo/a para explicarle la situación.

1 Saluda a tu amigo/a y explícale dónde estás.

2 Explícale por qué perdiste el tren.

3 Dile que no vas a llegar a Sevilla esta noche y explícale dónde pasarás la noche.

4 Dile a qué hora saldrás de Madrid mañana por la mañana y que lo sientes mucho.

5 Dile lo que te gustaría hacer mañana por la noche (menciona 2 cosas).

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


54
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS
International General Certificate of Secondary Education

SPANISH 0530/03
Paper 3 Speaking Role Play Card Nine 1 March — 30 April 2009
Approx. 15 minutes
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

You must carry out the tasks specified in the situations overleaf. The roles to be played by the Examiner and
yourself are indicated. You have 15 minutes to prepare the situations.
The important thing is to convey the message.
You should remember that you are taking part in a conversation: you must respond to what the Examiner
says and not simply carry out the tasks supplied as though the Examiner were not there.
Although it may not be specified, you are expected to include such details as ‘Good Morning’, ‘Thank you’,
etc., as appropriate.

This document consists of 2 printed pages.

IB09 06_0530_03RP/3RP
© UCLES 2009 [Turn over

55
2

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): vendedor(a)

Quieres comprar una camisa. Entras a una tienda de ropa.

1 Saluda al/a la vendedor(a) y dile que quieres comprar una camisa.

2 Dile tu talla.

3 Escucha lo que te dice el/la vendedor(a) y elige un color.

4 Te quieres probar la camisa. ¿Qué dices?

5 Dile que quieres la camisa y pregúntale el precio.

Estudiante: tú mismo/a
Profesor(a): recepcionista de un camping

Estás buscando un trabajo en España para las vacaciones y llamas por teléfono a un camping que
ha publicado un anuncio.

1 Saluda al/a la recepcionista. Preséntate y explica por qué llamas.

2 Explícale por qué te gustaría trabajar en un camping (menciona 1 cosa).

3 Dile cuándo estarás libre y por cuánto tiempo.

4 Dile que has trabajado en un hotel en tu país y explícale por qué te gustó este trabajo.

5 Haz 1 pregunta sobre el trabajo (por ejemplo: ¿uniforme?, ¿sueldo?, ¿horario?).

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2009 0530/03/RPC/M/J/09


56
IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

Commentary and Assessment of the Recorded Speaking Tests V


Commentary and assessment of recorded Speaking Tests

To be used in conjunction with the May/June 2009 IGCSE Teacher’s Notes Booklet and Role Play
Cards (see sections III and IV). The recorded performances can be found on the accompanying CDs.

CANDIDATE 1 (CARD 7)

Role Play A

Task 1 No problems 3 marks


Task 2 No problems 3 marks
Task 3 No problems 3 marks
Task 4 No problems 3 marks
Task 5 No problems 3 marks

Total = 15 marks

Role Play B

Task 1 No problems 3 marks


Task 2 Incorrect verb form (empezó instead of empecé) 2 marks
Task 3 No problems 3 marks
Task 4 Mispronunciation of ‘en’ does not prevent a mark of 3 being awarded. 3 marks
Task 5 No problems 3 marks

Total = 14 marks

Topic Conversation: Mis pasatiempos (y mis planes para el futuro)

The candidate gives a natural delivery of the topic. It does not sound over-rehearsed and contains a
good range of vocabulary and tenses. The examiner has ample scope to develop the conversation
and does so by asking a good balance of both straightforward and unexpected questions. The
examiner is able to adjust her questioning to enable the candidate to respond for example when the
candidate does not immediately understand ‘alcanzar’ she asks further questions to elicit a response
before changing the line of questioning. This topic conversation is a good example of how the skill of
the examiner can support and enable the candidate to perform well.
Total = 14 + 14 = 28 marks

General Conversation

A clear distinction is made signalling the start of the General conversation. The examiner begins by
asking a question about the candidate’s family allowing him to respond fully. The examiner clearly
understands the requirements of the examination and then proceeds to ask a range of questions
which ensure that the candidate can demonstrate his linguistic ability.
Total = 13 + 13 = 26 marks

Impression

The candidate is fluent and generally has good pronunciation despite the pronunciation of certain
vowel sounds. The occasional mistake and/or hesitation does not interfere with comprehension.
There is some first language influence on intonation.
Total = 7 marks

Total = 15 + 14 + 28 + 26 + 7 = 90 marks

This represents a very good grade A performance.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

CANDIDATE 2 (CARD 2)

Role Play A

Task 1 No problems 3 marks


Task 2 ‘Quiere’ instead of ‘quiero’ 2 marks
Task 3 Only the second element of the task completed 2 marks
Task 4 No problems 3 marks
Task 5 No problems 3 marks

Total = 13 marks

Role Play B

Task 1 No problems 3 marks


Task 2 Two verb errors: incorrect formation of the past perfect
tense of ‘llegar ‘and ‘perder’ 2 marks
Task 3 Several small errors 2 marks
Task 4 Verb error 2 marks
Task 5 Only one element of the task is successfully completed 1 mark

Total = 10 marks

Topic Conversation: Las diferencias entre España e Inglaterra

The candidate identifies three differences which she talks about before being questioned by the
examiner. The candidate appears to be somewhat reticent and it is possibly for this reason that the
examiner does not fully probe all the points made in the exposition. It is obvious that the candidate
has a good level of comprehension however she does not have a sufficient grasp of the
grammatical structures and vocabulary necessary to convey what she would like to express and
therefore makes some basic subject/verb errors. She does have difficulty hearing the examiner on
at least two occasions.
Total = 13 + 10 = 23 marks

General Conversation

Examiners should announce clearly the change-over from the Topic conversation to the General
conversation primarily for the benefit of the candidate but also for the moderator. The examiner in
this case does give an indication that the General Conversation is about to begin but not clearly
(‘Ahora te pregunto - sigo preguntando’). The examiner covers three of the Defined Content Topics
and adheres to the stipulated time. The candidate responds satisfactorily to both straightforward
and unexpected questions. Examiners should be aware of the requirement for the candidate to
convey past and future time in both the Topic conversation and the General conversation before
being awarded 7 or more for linguistic content on Scale (b). They should ask appropriate questions
in order to give the candidate every opportunity to fulfil this requirement. Although the examiner
does ask the candidate questions in the past the candidate does not show that she can convey
past meaning and the examiner asks no further questions that would require her to do so. A mark
of 6 on Scale(b) is therefore awarded.
Total = 12 + 6 = 18 marks

Impression

The candidate is fairly fluent and there is an attempt at pronunciation and intonation.
Total = 6 marks

Total = 13 + 10 + 23 + 18 + 6 = 70 marks

This performance is the equivalent of a B grade.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

CANDIDATE 3 (CARD 8)

Role Play A

Task 1 ‘Quiere’ instead of ‘quiero’ 2 marks


Task 2 Brief but appropriate – the task is communicated 3 marks
Task 3 Brief but appropriate – the task is communicated 3 marks
Task 4 The examiner attempts to cue the candidate into asking the required question.
The candidate is unable to fulfil the task and moves on. 0 marks
Task 5 The first element of the task is mumbled and incomplete 1 mark

Total = 9 marks

Role Play B

Task 1 The second element of the task is incomplete 1 mark


Task 2 There is no real explanation provided however she does communicate
that she does not know why she has missed the train 1 mark
Task 3 Communication is achieved despite a slight verb error in the first part of the task2 marks
Task 4 Only the first element is completed. The candidate does not
attempt the second element 1 mark
Task 5 The task is communicated. ‘Me’ is omitted from ‘gustaría’. 2 marks

Total = 7 marks

Topic Conversation: Mi familia

The candidate begins to talk about herself and her family. The examiner does not allow the
candidate to make an uninterrupted presentation of up to two minutes and starts to question the
candidate too soon. The candidate responds well to a series of questions even though she
struggles with the correct use of basic verbs such as tener and ser. The examiner curtails the
conversation after less than three minutes. The questions that the examiner asks are mainly
factual and on the whole only require short answers. Unfortunately the candidate is unable to show
that she can convey past and future meaning. The examiner does not give her the opportunity to
do so. The Teachers‘ notes suggest that candidates should avoid topics such as ‘Yo mismo’ or ‘Mi
vida’. They can become too general and can pre-empt the General conversation. In this case the
topic is not fully exploited.
Total = 9 + 6 = 15 marks

General Conversation

In this section the candidate responds satisfactorily to questions on a variety of topics such as
leisure activities, future plans and house and home. Again the examiner does not give the
candidate the opportunity to convey both past and future meaning. The questions asked do not
encourage the candidate to talk freely. The candidate despite struggling with grammatical
accuracy(first and second person present tense verbs such as ir and trabajar, confusion between
use of querer and gustar) makes herself understood and only occasionally requires some re-
phrasing.
Total = 8 + 6 = 14 marks

Impression

The candidate is fairly fluent and there is an attempt at pronunciation and intonation.
Total = 6 marks

Total = 9 + 7 + 15 + 14 + 6 = 51 marks

This performance is the equivalent of grade D standard.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

CANDIDATE 4 (CARD 4)

Role Play A

Task 1 No problems 3 marks


Task 2 No problems 3 marks
Task 3 Task accomplished. Verb error and minor error in second element of task 2 marks
Task 4 No problems 3 marks
Task 5 The order in which the elements of the task are completed is not important
as long as the elements are attempted. In the second element the candidate
uses the infinitive empezar instead of empieza 2 marks

Total = 13 marks

Role Play B

Task 1 Omission of ‘me’ in the first element of the task 2 marks


Task 2 Verb error (sentirte instead of sentirme) 2 marks
Task 3 No problems 3 marks
Task 4 The candidate is unable to formulate an appropriate question 0 marks
Task 5 Communication achieved. Verb error (volver) and minor adjectival error 2 marks

Total = 9 marks

Topic Conversation: Kuala Lumpur

The candidate is allowed to present her topic uninterrupted for two minutes. She speaks clearly
and at a measured pace. The examiner does not rush her and although clearly aware of the need
to extract both factual information and opinions fails to ask a question that would elicit a past tense.
The examiner could have perhaps challenged the candidate a little more into using a variety of
time frames thereby given her the opportunity to achieve a higher mark. He could have asked her
about her most recent visit to Kuala Lumpur for example. With appropriate questioning it is
possible to encourage candidates to use a range of tenses. The candidate is fairly fluent although
a little hesitant at times.
Total = 8 + 6 = 14 marks

General Conversation

The examiner starts in an unusual way by inviting the candidate to describe herself. Where a
candidate appears to lack confidence or is a little nervous it is preferable to start by asking a few
straightforward questions. The examiner covers two topic areas; family and health. The candidate
responds well however requires some rephrasing. She is able to convey past meaning without
difficulty although she appears initially unsure when asked a question requiring the use of an
immediate future. This performance falls into the Satisfactory band for both
Comprehension/responsiveness and Linguistic content.
Total = 8 + 7 = 15 marks

Impression

The candidate is fairly fluent and there is an attempt at pronunciation and intonation.
Total = 6 marks

Total = 13 + 9 + 14 + 15 + 6 = 57 marks

This is the equivalent of a D grade performance. It is only 3 marks from the C/D boundary, and
would have been a C grade if the candidate had been more accurate in the role play B.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

CANDIDATE 5 (CARD 8)

Role Play A

Task 1 No problems 3 marks


Task 2 Verb error 2 marks
Task 3 Communication is achieved. Minor error – adjective ending tolerated. 3 marks
Task 4 No problems 3 marks
Task 5 Verb error (está instead of es) 2 marks

Total = 13 marks

Role Play B

Task 1 The language is inaccurate but the task is communicated. 2 marks


Task 2 The examiner prompts the candidate. An explanation is not given 0 marks
Task 3 The candidate is unable to respond 0 marks
Task 4 The candidate is a little confused. She fulfils the first element of the task.
Her response is brief but acceptable 1 mark
Task 5 The examiner rephrases the prompt. The candidate is unable to respond. 0 marks

Total = 3 marks

Topic Conversation: Mi tiempo libre

The candidate starts off quite confidently only to come to an abrupt halt. The examiner is patient
and gently encourages her to respond offering a mixture of straightforward and unexpected
questions with frequent re-phrasing. The candidate responds well to some of the more difficult
questions however is unable to sustain a conversation due to her limited range of vocabulary and
structures. It is important for examiners not to show impatience however exasperated they may
feel. The candidate’s performance falls into the Weak band for both
Comprehension/responsiveness and Linguistic content.
Total = 6 + 5 = 11 marks

General Conversation

The examiner does not announce the change-over from Topic to General Conversation. The final
section begins with ‘¿Qué hiciste la semana pasada?’ The candidate’s responses are generally
short or monosyllabic. The examiner is fully aware of the requirements for the candidate to convey
past and future meaning and gives her several opportunities to do so. She covers several topic
areas to find a point of interest to develop the conversation. The candidate often struggles to
respond and is unable to express herself adequately. Her performance again falls into the Weak
band for on Scale (a) Comprehension/responsiveness and on Scale (b) Linguistic content.
Total = 5 + 4 = 9 marks

Impression

The candidate lacks fluency. There is an attempt at pronunciation and intonation however there are
many errors.
Total = 4 marks

Total = 13 + 3 + 11 + 9 + 4 = 40 marks

This performance is the equivalent of an E grade standard.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

CANDIDATE 6 (CARD 4)
Role Play A
Task 1 No problems 3 marks
Task 2 No problems 3 marks
Task 3 Subject/verb error ¿Cuánto es? instead of ¿Cuánto son? 2 marks
Task 4 No problems 3 marks
Task 5 No problems 3 marks
Total = 14 marks
Role Play B
Task 1 No problems 3 marks
Task 2 Incorrect verb form empezó instead of empecé 2 marks
Task 3 First element of task omitted.
Incorrect verb form comió instead of comí in second element 1 mark
Task 4 There is reference to what she can eat but not sufficient for two marks 1 mark
Task 5 No problems 3 marks
Total = 10 marks

Topic Conversation: La importancia de reciclar y el reciclaje en España


The topic chosen by this candidate is ambitious for this level of achievement and candidates should
not attempt this type of topic unless they possess the necessary linguistic skills. The examiner allows
ample time for the candidate to present her topic which is well prepared but not over-rehearsed. The
candidate understands the questions first time and can respond to both straightforward and
unexpected questions. She can express opinions and give explanations. On Scale (a),
Comprehension/responsiveness the candidate falls into the Outstanding band. She does not require
any rephrasing and is able to respond to all questions. On Scale (b), Linguistic content, the candidate
displays a wide range of mostly accurate structures, vocabulary and idiom. There is some inaccuracy
in verb endings and choice of vocabulary in the conversation despite her sound knowledge of topic
specific vocabulary in the presentation itself. This performance falls into the Very good category.
Total = 14 + 12 = 26 marks

General Conversation
The examiner signals that she is moving onto General conversation. Two topic areas are covered
(free time and future plans).Unfortunately the examiner does not adhere to the stipulated timing of
approximately five minutes and as a consequence this section is too short. The candidate is not
quite so responsive to the questions asked although generally understands first time. On Scale (a),
Comprehension/responsiveness the candidate falls into the Very good band. The examiner is
aware of the requirements for the candidate to convey past and future meaning yet she does not
give the candidate sufficient opportunities to do so. To score a mark of 7+ on Scale (b) Linguistic
content there should be examples of correct past and future time. For this reason on Scale (b),
Linguistic content this performance falls into the Weak band.
Total = 12 + 6 = 18 marks
Impression
The candidate is fluent. The pronunciation is generally good and with correct intonation despite the
occasional mistake and/or hesitation.
Total = 8 marks
Total = 14 + 10 + 26 + 18 + 8 = 76
This is a very good performance and represents a top B grade which is only 4 marks from the A/B
boundary. This would have been an A grade except for the loss of marks in the General
Conversation section.

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

Appendix A: Defined Content Topic List

Topic areas Examination Topics


Area A Everyday activities

Home life and school Home life A1


School routine A2

Food, health and fitness Eating and drinking A3


Health and fitness A4
Area B Personal and social life

Self, family and personal relationships Self, family, pets, personal relationships B1
House and home B2
Leisure, entertainments, invitations B3
Eating out B4

Holidays and special occasions Festivals and special occasions B5


Holidays; getting around B6
Accommodation B7
Area C The world around us

Home town and local area Home town and geographical surroundings C1
Shopping C2
Public services C3

Natural and made environment Natural environment C4


Weather C5
Finding the way C6

People, places and customs Meeting people C7


Places and customs C8
Travel and transport C9
Area D The world of work

Continuing education Further education and training D1

Careers and employment Future career plans D2


Employment D3

Language and communication in the Communication D4


work place Language at work D5
Area E The international world

Tourism at home and abroad Holiday travel and transport (see also C9) E1
Geographical surroundings (see also C1) E2
Weather (see also C5) E3

Life in other countries and communities Places and customs (see also C8) E4
Food and drink (see also A3) E5
Meeting people (see also C7) E6

World events and issues Issues according to available resources E7


and individual interest

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

Appendix B: Working Mark Sheet

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IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish Speaking Test Training Handbook

SPANISH (0530)
Oral Working Mark Sheet
SPEAKING TEST TRAINING HANDBOOK
Please read the instructions printed in the Teachers’ Notes Booklet before completing this form
Centre Number Centre Name TRAINING
Role Play A Role Play B Topic/Topic General Internal

Impression
(Max. 10)
Conversation Conversation and/or
(max 15) (max 15) (max 30) (max 30) Total External
Mark Moderation
R.P.
Candidate Card Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Number no. Candidate Name Mark (Max) 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15 15 15 15 10 100

Name of teacher completing this form Signature Date

65