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NAME _____________________________________________ DATE __________________ PERIOD _________

Extended-Response Test SCORE _________

Demonstrate your knowledge by giving a clear, concise solution to each problem.
Be sure to include all relevant drawings and justify your answers. You may show
your solution in more than one way or investigate beyond the requirements of the
problem. If necessary, record your answer on another piece of paper.
1. You are planning to make a collage and are gathering materials. For the
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backing you will use a piece of heavy recycled cardboard that is 4 − feet
4
2
long and 2 − feet wide. One side of the cardboard will be covered with
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fabric. The other side will be left bare against the wall when you hang the
collage.

a. Estimate how much fabric you will need. Explain how you found your
estimate.

b. Find the actual amount of fabric you will need. Show all your work
and explain each step, so someone who doesn’t know how to work the
problem will understand.

2. In your collage, you want to scatter a few colorful plastic rectangles that
15 1
are each −− inch long and − inch wide.
16 4
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a. Estimate the area of a plastic rectangle. Explain how you found your
answer.

b. Find the actual area. Show your work.

3. You decide to place a design in the middle of the cardboard. This will take
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up an area of 4 − square feet. Rectangular cut outs that have an area of
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3
− square feet will cover this area. How many rectangles will fit in the
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middle area? Explain how you found your answer.

Course 1 • Chapter 4 Multiply and Divide Fractions 83
NAME _____________________________________________ DATE __________________ PERIOD _________

Extended-Response Rubric SCORE _________

Score Description
A score of four is a response in which the student demonstrates a thorough
understanding of the mathematics concepts and/or procedures embodied in the
task. The student has responded correctly to the task, used mathematically sound
4 procedures, and provided clear and complete explanations and interpretations.
The response may contain minor flaws that do not detract from the demonstration
of a thorough understanding.
A score of three is a response in which the student demonstrates an understanding
of the mathematics concepts and/or procedures embodied in the task. The student’s
response to the task is essentially correct with the mathematical procedures used
and the explanations and interpretations provided demonstrating an essential but
3 less than thorough understanding.
The response may contain minor flaws that reflect inattentive execution of
mathematical procedures or indications of some misunderstanding of the
underlying mathematics concepts and/or procedures.
A score of two indicates that the student has demonstrated only a partial
understanding of the mathematics concepts and/or procedures embodied in the
task. Although the student may have used the correct approach to obtaining a
2 solution or may have provided a correct solution, the student’s work lacks an
essential understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts.
The response contains errors related to misunderstanding important aspects of the
task, misuse of mathematical procedures, or faulty interpretations of results.
A score of one indicates that the student has demonstrated a very limited
understanding of the mathematics concepts and/or procedures embodied in the

Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission is granted to reproduce for classroom use.
task. The student’s response is incomplete and exhibits many flaws. Although the
1 student’s response has addressed some of the conditions of the task, the student
reached an inadequate conclusion and/or provided reasoning that was faulty or
incomplete.
The response exhibits many flaws or may be incomplete.
A score of zero indicates that the student has provided no response at all, or a
completely incorrect or uninterpretable response, or demonstrated insufficient
understanding of the mathematics concepts and/or procedures embodied in the
0
task. For example, a student may provide some work that is mathematically correct,
but the work does not demonstrate even a rudimentary understanding of the
primary focus of the task.

84 Course 1 • Chapter 4 Multiply and Divide Fractions
Chapter 4 Answer Key
Extended-Response Test, Page 83
Sample Answers
In addition to the scoring rubric, the following sample answers
may be used as guidance in evaluating open-ended assessment items.

3 2 3 2
1. a. Estimate 4 − × 2− . 4− × 2− rounds to 5 × 2. So, an estimate is 10. You will need
4 5 4 5
about 10 square feet of fabric.

3 2 19 12
b. Find 4 − × 2− . Write each mixed number as an improper fraction, −− × −− .
4 5 4 5
57
Then divide 4 and 12 by their GCF, 4. Multiply 19 and 3 then 1 and 5 to get −− .
2 5
Simplify to get 11 −.
5
15 1 15 1 1 1
2. a. Estimate −− ×− . −− rounds to 1. 1 × − =− . So, an estimate is − . Each plastic
16 4 16 4 4 4
1 2
rectangle is about − in .
4
15 1 15 15 2
b. −− ×− = −− . Each plastic rectangle is −− in .
16 4 64 64
3 1
3. Find how many groups of − are in 4 − . Use division.
2 8
3 4
1 3 9 3 9 8 9 8 12
4− ÷− =− ÷− =− ×− =− ×− = −− or 12. The answer is 12 rectangles.
2 8 2 8 2 3 2 3 1
1 1

Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission is granted to reproduce for classroom use.

A42 Course 1 • Chapter 4 Multiply and Divide Fractions