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Ted Greene 1-8-75 Voice-Leading P.

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Voice-Leading
(The connection of chords with minimum movement)

One of the smoothest ways to connect chords is by moving the individual voices as little as
possible. The technique is as follows:

1. First you must know how to spell the “chords” involved; in the progressions you will work
with at first, only diatonic chords will be used, so the spelling can be derived by using every
other letter in the diatonic scale ( like an A chord is A, C#, E, a Bm chord is B, D, F#, etc. as
in the diatonic chords you have already learned).
2. You write out the spelling of the chords you are trying to connect. Say you are on an A chord
and you want to connect it to D – you would write:

3. You look for common tones (notes that are the same in both chords).

4. You connect the rest of the notes with a minimum of movement.

5. Notice in the example just given that while E is equally close to D & F#, C# is only close to
D, not F#. So would not be the closest voice-leading.

An important exercise now is to take all your 3 note triads and play the following exercises, using
good voice-leading: I IV I | I V I | I IV (I) V I

Also in minor: i iv i | i V i | i iv i (V) I | i V (i) iv i

Occasionally you might hit a fingering that is not too practical; in these cases you should switch
strings. Example:

could become

There are not many cases where this type of thing will be necessary, so generally everything just
works out with the fingerings you normally arrive at.
Ted Greene 1-8-75 Voice-Leading P.2/3

Voice-Leading with 4 Part Close Triads


(Triads with 2 roots & the upper 3 voices as a close triad)

The principles are basically the same with this type of triad but because of the doubled root the
following new guidelines are given:

1. Connect the top 3 voices as with 3 note triads.


2. The bass should sound only roots of the chords (for now) even if this seems to contradict
the principles of voice-leading given so far, Example: I IV V I

Try the progressions listed above with all forms of the 4 part close triads.

Classification of Chord Progressions Given By Root Movement


For ease of working with some principles to follow, chord progressions are classified in 3 ways:

1. Chords can progress up or down an interval of a 4th. Examples:


A D (root up a 4th) | Bm E (root up a 4th) | A E (root down a 4th)
2. Chords can progress up or down an interval of a 3rd. Examples:
A C#m (root up a 3rd) | Bm D (root up a 3rd) | A F#m (root down a 3rd)
3. Chords can progress up or down an interval of a 2nd. Examples
A Bm (root up a 2nd) | C#m D (root up a 2nd) | F#m E (root down a 2nd)

Notice that any progression in one direction equals its counterpart in the other direction if subtracted
from 9. Examples: A F#m = down a 3rd or up a 6th . A E = down a 4th or up a 5th.

The following guidelines are commonly accepted as working with 4 part close triads:
1. If a chord progresses up or down the interval of a 3rd or 4th, the 2 guidelines given above
alone should be used (top of this page “Voice-Leading with 4 Part Close Triads”).
2. If a chord progresses up or down the interval of a 2nd move the top 3 notes in contrary
motion (to the nearest chord tones) to the bass. This principle may confuse you but it will be
illustrated below.

Suppose you want to connect C#m to D. This progression is up a 2nd. Starting with this
form:
According to the last principle on the
previous page you would get:

What has happened is that the top 3 notes have moved down, because the bass moved up –
in other words, the top 3 notes went in contrary motion to the bass.

Another example:
Ted Greene 1-8-75 Voice-Leading P.3/3

Chord progressions of 2nds open up the possibility of DIATONIC PASSING TONES,


notice in the first example above that the top 3 voices move as follows:

while the top 2 voices are moving right along the diatonic scale, the C# is leaping to A, skipping the
B note. This B could be added after the C#m chord (while it still is ringing) and is called a
DIATONIC PASSING TONE. So it can be said that passing tones are used to fill in a melodic leap
in any voice (if desired).

For those who read here is an example of what all this looks like:

Sometimes in a progression, there is no bass that can be added, after you have voice-led the
top 3 notes: this can pose problems; for instance if you tried to play the following progression:
I(A) iii(C#m) IV(D) V(E) I(A), starting with this form you couldn't do it:
do it.

A possible solution is first to start an octave higher and then transfer the C#m to its same voicing on
another set of strings which will then enable you to add a bass note and continue on:

(added bass note) (transferred voicing)

This may seem like a lot of jumping around, but sometimes that's the only way to get the good
sounds out of the guitar.

Practice the following progressions using all forms of the 4-part close triads:

To get the 1st chord of progressions starting on minor chords, you use the equivalent voicing of
your major 4-part triads, examples:

The equivalent voicings of are

A separate list of progressions in minor will follow on a later page.


Voice-Leading and Parallelism on Guitar
Ted Greene – 1975-03-09

In the period of time where most of the principles of harmony were summed up (roughly 1600–1900),
voice-leading was definitely one of the most important considerations for composers, improvisers, etc. Certain
types of similar motion (especially, the similar motion of any 2 parts in octaves, 5ths, or unisons) were pretty much
avoided.
To understand this it would help to know a little something about the music that existed before 1600. Here
is an extremely simplified résumé: (By the way, the period of 1600-1900 is generally referred to as the Common
Practice Period).

1) Harmony, on the idea of more than one note being sounded at the same time, did not come along until the
9th century. Up until then, music was Monophonic, that is only one melody line at a time was heard. Even if 40
people were singing (early music was primarily vocal music), they would all be singing the same note. Much of the
music of this type that survives are in the category known as Gregorian chant(s) (also known as Plain Chant(s) or
Plain Song(s)).
Example: (a simplified imitation of one) A later development was the singing
in octaves of these chants.

2) In the 9th century, experiments were begun with what is known as Organum (oŕ-gan-um), which was the
beginning of Harmony. Organum consisted of adding a 2nd melody a perfect 4th below (or perfect 5th above) the
original melody.

Sometimes the new melody and/or the original would be doubled an octave away.
Also, experiments were done with drone basses.

More experiments were tried with intervals of 4ths and 5ths (like putting 4ths above the original and 5ths
below). Then two or three hundred years later, the element of Contrary Motion of the different parts was
experimented with in the 2nd main kind of harmonic writing which is sometimes called Free Organum. The same
intervals were mainly used (that is unisons, octaves, 4ths, 5ths) but now sometimes in contrary motion:
Example: (Also notice the different time values.)
Voice‐Leading and Parallelism on Guitar Ted Greene, 1975‐03‐09 page 2

There were quite a few other subtle developments before the 17th century, and when one compares the
music of say Bach, which all this was eventually going to lead up to, with these earlier types of sounds, an
immediate difference to be noticed is that all these bare, open-sounding 4th and 5th intervals and parallel lines have
been replaced with triads, 7th chords, and totally independent melodic lines (these features actually were pretty well
established by about the end of the 15th century, except for 7th chords).
Apparently, there was a gradual displeasure with the sound of so much parallelism and limited use of
intervals, so that musicians kept growing farther and farther away from these sounds until finally rules were
established that said: No two parts may move in parallel octaves, 5ths, or unisons; which brings us to the main
reason for this page: Whether or not to utilize parallel octaves, 5ths, and unisons on guitar when working with
harmony of the Common Practice Period.
It is really up to each individual as to how much, if any, he wishes to use these sounds – some may like
these sounds more than others. However, I humbly offer this suggestion: at least be aware of how to avoid these
sounds. The reason? You will have more choices in any situation where parallels would normally occur and also,
the avoidance of parallels can produce some very attractive sounds that would not occur to one who always has
used parallels without further investigation.

Observe:

Much experimenting and study will be necessary if you want to always avoid the old parallels, because the
guitar is a very parallel-oriented instrument in its physical layout. But if you are like most people, you won’t mind
an occasional parallel octave or 5th.
As an interesting sidelight, ever since the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with the advent of the music of
Claude Debussy, most music has gone back to lots of parallel everything. Debussy, in a style coined
Impressionism, brought out many beautiful effects through various parallel devices using pentatonic scales, exotic
chords, chord streams, and other fresh approaches; but all this is another story and will have to be saved for a later
time.
Master Harmonization Chart
for Power-Bass Major Triads – “Major” Key
Ted Greene, 1989-09-25
Progressions of 4 (or 5) chords with sopranos of K2, K3, K4, K5, and such. [does not apply]

[K = “of the key.” For example, K2 = 2nd note of the Key. For this lesson the K number indicates the soprano
pedal, although usually it refers to a bass pedal. Notation examples are all given in the key of C. ~Editor’s note.]

Red (and other colors) = the triads

Soprano Note:
K2: (key’s 2nd)

V
I²9\9 VI11\11 V7\5/7 V\5/5
IV Lydian

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bVII
bIII²9\7 I11\9 bVII7\3/7 bVII\3/5
bVI Lydian (bVI Lydian)

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Master Harmonization Chard for Power-Bass Major Triads – Ted Greene, 1989-09-25 page 2

II
II7\R/b7 II\R/5 II7\K2/K5 III11\b7
bVI Lydian (I Lydian)

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K3:

I
I7\3/7 I\3/5 IV²9\7 II11\9
bVII Lydian

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K4:

IV
IV7\R/5 bIII Lydian V11\b7 IV7\9/b7
bVII²9\5 (bIII Lydian)

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Master Harmonization Chard for Power-Bass Major Triads – Ted Greene, 1989-09-25 page 3

¨VII
bIII²9\9 I11\11 bVII7\5/b7 bVII\5/5
bVI Lydian (bVI Lydian)

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¨II
#IV²9 bII7\3/b7 bII7\3/5 bIII11\9
VII Lydian

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K5:

I
IV²9\9 II11\11 bVII Lydian\5 I\5/5
bVII Lydian (I7\5/b7)

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Master Harmonization Chard for Power-Bass Major Triads – Ted Greene, 1989-09-25 page 4

V
V\R/5 I²9\5 VI11\b7 V7\R/b7
IV Lydian (IV Lydian)

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¨III
bIII7\3/b7 bIII\3/5 bVI²9\7 IV11\9
(bII Lydian) bII Lydian

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K¨3:

¨III
bIII\R/5 bVI²9\5/R IV11\b7 bIII\R/b7
bII Lydian (bII Lydian)

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Master Harmonization Chard for Power-Bass Major Triads – Ted Greene, 1989-09-25 page 5

¨VI
bII²9\9 bVII11\11 bVI7\5/b7 bVI\5/5
#IV Lydian (#IV Lydian)

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VII
bII11\9 (III²9\7) VII\3/5 VII7\3/b7
VI Lydian (VI Lydian)

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K6:

IV
IV7\3/b7 IV\3/5 bIII Lydian V11\9
(bIII Lydian) bVII²9\7

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Master Harmonization Chard for Power-Bass Major Triads – Ted Greene, 1989-09-25 page 6

II
I Lydian III11\11 II7\5/b7 II\5/5
(V²9\9) (I Lydian)

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K¨6:

VI
VI\R/5 II²9\5 VII 11\b7 VI7\R/b7
V Lydian (V Lydian)

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K7:

V
V7\3/b7 V\3/5 I²9\7 VI11\9
(IV Lydian)

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K¨7: [nothing listed]
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Master Harmonization Chard for Power-Bass Major Triads – Ted Greene, 1989-09-25 page 7

K8 (1):

I
I\R/5 IV²9\5 II11 I7\R/b7
(bVII Lydian) (bVII Lydian)

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IV
bVII²9\9 V11 IV7\5/b7 IV\5/5
(bIII Lydian) (bIII Lydian)

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¨VI
bVI7\3/b7 bVI\3/5 bII²9\7 bVII11
(#IV Lydian) (#IV Lydian)

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K¨2: [nothing listed]


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K#4: [nothing listed]
Major Triads (Slash Chords) “Dynabass Voicings”
The “Pure” ones first…and of those “the Big 4” first.
“Tri-Energized” Chords…Tri-Level Chords
Reference Page
Bass Organized Method
Ted Greene, 1978-07-18, 1989-08-29 & 30

1) Major 9 no 3 and “five over one”

2) Dominant 11 (9sus4), and Add 9 (9 in Bass), and “Flat seven over one”
Major Triads Slash Chord, 1978-07-18 & 1989-08-29 & 30 – Ted Greene page 2

3) Dominant 7, 3rd inversion, and 6/9#11 no 3 (“Lydian”)….“Two over one”

4) 2nd Inversion Major Triad, and “Four over one”

Optional: Root inside of the triad:

Other:
Major Triad Polychords – Type 1 (Consonant)
Ted Greene, 1977-07-17, 1978-07-23

Major Triads with: (R), (3), 5, b7, 9, 11, (13) in bass.


Major 9’s (and Lydian chords):

Also check out:


1) Minor triad polychords. Example: Bm\5/C
2) Doubled-note voicings: ———————————
3) Open triad polychords.

11’s ( /9/s):
Use for both functions. For instance: F#11 – F#7/7, Eb11 – Eb7/7, and (F#/9) F#/7, Eb/9 – Eb/7

6/9#11’s (Lydian chords) (7):


Use for both functions.

Major 5th in Bass:

Also possible in this general color sound on this page are m7’s and m7’s with the b7 in the bass.
Major Triad Polychords, 1977-07-17 & 1978-07-23 – Ted Greene page 2

Key of C
Melody Harmonization (Some of the most tonal)

C: Db²9, Bb²9, F²9 | Ab/9, F/9, C/9 | F#6/9#11 (Ab7), Eb6/9#11 (F7), Bb6/9#11 (C7) | Ab/Eb, C/G, F/C
Bb11, G11, D11

D: Eb²9, C²9, G²9 (D/G) | Bb/9, G/9, D/9 | Ab6/9#11 (Bb7), F6/9#11 (G7), C6/9#11 (D7) | Bb/F, D/A, G/D
C11, A11, E11

Eb: Db²9, Ab²9 | Ab/9, Eb/9 | F#6/9#11 (Ab7), Db6/9#11 (Eb7) | Ab/Eb, Eb/Bb
Bb11, F11

E: F²9 (D²9, A²9) | C/9, (A/9, E/9) | Bb6/9#11 (C7), (D6/9#11 - E7, G6/9#11 - A7) | C/G, (A/E, E/B)
D11, (B11, F#11)

F: Eb²9, Bb²9 | Bb/9, Db/9, F/9 | Eb6/9#11 (F7), B6/9#11 (Db7), Ab6/9#11 (Bb7) | F/C, Bb/F, Db/Ab
C11, Eb11, G11

F#: G²9, (E²9, B²9) | D/9 | C6/9#11 (D7), Cb7 (to Eb/Bb) | D/A
E11

G: C²9, Ab²9, F²9 | Eb/9, G/9, C/9 | F6/9#11 (G7), Bb6/9#11 (C7), Db6/9#11 (Eb7) | C/G, Eb/Bb, G/D
F11, A11, D11

Ab: Db²9, (Gb²9, A²9) | Db/9, Ab/9, (E/9) | (Db6/9#11-E7, B6/9#11-Db7, Gb6/9#11-Ab7) | Ab/Eb, (E/B, Db/Ab)
Eb11, Bb11, (Gb11)

A: Bb²9, G²9, (D²9) | F/9, (A/9, D/9) | Eb6/9#11 (F7), C6/9#11 (D7), G6/9#11 (A7) | F/C, D/A, (A/E)
G11, (B11, E11)

Bb: Ab²9, Eb²9 | Bb/9, Eb/9, Gb/9 | Ab6/9#11 (Bb7), (Db6/9#11 - Eb7, E6/9#11 - F#7) | Eb/Bb, Bb/F
C11, F11, Ab11

B: C²9, (E²9, A²9) | G/9 | F6/9#11 (G7), D6/9#11 (E7), (A6/9#11 - B7) | G/D (E/B)
A11

(Db): | A/9, Gb/9, Db/9 | | (A/E)


B11, Ab11, Eb11

Also open triad polychords / 5- and 6-note chords


Getting Acquainted with Triads
Text for “Assignments” for each page

Page 1, 1985-12-22
Assignment:
1) Write in the chord names over the blank diagrams. Write in the Roman numeral symbols
underneath each diagram.
2) Transpose all three exercises to the key of Ab. Exercise 3 should be done in the low register.
3) Transpose all three exercises to the key of C – use the following “descending” order:
a) Exercise 1 first, b) Exercise 3 next, c) Exercise 2 (low) last.
This will produced a descending flow in the “large view” sense.

Optional: Tune the 5th string to G and use it as an open “pedal” with this key of C material (on
the last chord you may find it necessary to play a C bass to feel satisfied).

Page 1a, 1986-10-10


Assignment:
1) Write in the chord names and the Roman numerals too as before.
2) Play in the given keys, then transpose the whole page up in 1/2 steps. The result will be:
Bb Db F; B D Gb; C Eb G; Db E Ab; D F A and finally stop on Eb Gb Bb.
So you’re doing the whole page six times, each time one key higher than before.

Page 2, 1985-12-22
Assignment:
1) Write in the missing chord names (and the Roman numerals indicating the chord functions too).
2) Transpose all three exercises to the key of G. Do exercise 3 first, exercise 1 next, and exercise
2 last.
3) Transpose all three exercises to the key of B. Try exercise 1 first, exercise 3 next, and exercise
2 last, thereby creating a descending order of the phrases.

Page 3, 1985-12-23
Assignment:
1) Write chord names and Roman numerals in as before.
2) Transpose all three exercises to the key of Db: first exercise 2, next exercise 3, then exercise 1.
3) Transpose all three exercises to the key of F: first exercise 3, next exercise 2, then exercise 1.

Page 4, 1986-10-10
Assignment:
1) Write in the keys and chord names
2) Transpose the whole page down in 1/2 steps until you get to Ab E and C. There will be four
run-throughs of each line if you do this.
3) Consider using the earlier order of I - ii - iii - IV - ii - iii - I as well
A Session with the Stars
Reflections of Ted Greene

Ted Greene Video Lesson, 1980


Handout Sheets
Page 1: Chord Substitution, Harmonic Improvement — Examples 1, 2 and 3
Page 2: Chord Substitution, Harmonic Improvement (cont.) — Examples 4 and 5
Page 3: Jazz Progression #1 (key of C) and Jazz Progression #2 (key of Db)
Page 4: Jazz Progression #3 (key of Db) and Progression #4 (key of G)
Page 5: Jazz Progression #4 (cont.) and Jazz Progression #5 (key of C)
Page 6: Jazz Progression #6 (key of C)
Page 7: Jazz Progression #7 (key of A) and Jazz Progression #8 (key of E)
Page 8: Jazz Progression #8 (cont.)
Page 9: Rhythmic Notation
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions– Part 2
Ted Greene – 1987, March 13 and 14

Harp-like Right Hand Study with Symmetrical Dominant Progressions:


V-2 Middle Strings

For those of you not studying in the order I normally like to present (top strings first):
We’re going to start this area of study slowly and build into more challenging exercises
(especially mentally). Speaking of mental, if you force yourself to think while you memorize
these examples, you’ll certainly be getting more out of this material, especially in the long run.

Arpeggiate each chord from the bottom up. Two forms per chord change.

Also do this whole exercise up one half-step.

And do up one half-step too.

And optional to low


set if you feel the need.

_________________________________________________________________________
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions (part 2) Ted Greene, 1987‐03‐14 page 2

Harp-like Right Hand Study with Symmetrical Root Progressions


in V-2 Dominant 7ths, Middle 4 Strings

Arpeggiate each chord with the following string order:

Optional: Do each chord twice. Also try:

1) Chord names up in whole steps ascending, descending direction.

2) Chord names in descending minor 3rds. Ascending “units” or “quadrants.”

3) Chord names in ascending minor 3rds with “quadrants” ascending via ascending b6 move (descending
major 3rd) between “connecting chords” (This is getting pretty hairy but….)
|--Think desc. maj 3rd or asc. m6--|
| |
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions (part 2) Ted Greene, 1987‐03‐14 page 3

Middle String V-2 Symmetrical Dominant Progressions: Minor 3rd Stuff


See the right hand patterns sheet for suggestions and try starting the first chord in a pair on the “week
beat” too.

There are two patterns missing but they were the lesser of the lot for my ears and I figured that there was
plenty to work on with already, what with the right-hand patterns and all, so….
For a richer variety of future applications, please investigate two other variations in the texture:
1) Tied or sustained notes
2) The opposite: “Tip-toe” or staccato, light dancing notes here and there or on all notes in a pattern.
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions (part 2) Ted Greene, 1987‐03‐14 page 4

Middle String V-2 Symmetrical Dominant Progressions:


Minor 3rd and Flat Five Intervals

b5 Connections:
Optional: Try some of those units with some major 3rds thrown in instead of minor 3rds.
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions– Part 1
Ted Greene – 1987, March 8 and 14

Harp-like Right Hand with Symmetrical Dominant Progressions: V-2 Top Strings

We’re going to start this area of study slowly, gradually building into very challenging exercises
(mentally more than physically). Please do your best to think while playing…you’ll get more out
of this material if you do. Take it slowly, working mentally on the root cycles if necessary away
from the guitar, in your head and/or writing them out.
(Example: descend minor 3rds from E Æ E Db Bb G E Db Bb G E Db Bb, etc. — one of
three minor 3rd “Conveyor Belts”).

*Last point: Read this page as little as possible….memorize as you go!

Arpeggiate each chord from the bottom up. Two forms per chord change.

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Symmetrical Dominant Progressions (part 1) Ted Greene, 1987‐03‐14 page 2

Harp-like Right Hand Study with Symmetrical Root Progressions


in V-2 Dominant 7ths, Top 4 Strings

Arpeggiate each chord with the following string order:

Optional: Do each chord twice before moving to the next one.

1) Chord names up in whole steps.

2) Chord names in descending minor 3rds with parallel motion

3) Chord names in descending 3rds again but with voice-leading and new starting root for freshness to the
ear.
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions (part 1) Ted Greene, 1987‐03‐14 page 3

4) Chord names in ascending minor 3rds.

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Top String V-2 Symmetrical Dominant Progressions: Minor 3rd Material


See the right hand patterns sheet for suggestions, and remember that the first chord can be considered to
be on a weak beat as well as a strong.
Symmetrical Dominant Progressions (part 1) Ted Greene, 1987‐03‐14 page 4

Take all this slowly….it will come….work on your favorites if time is limited.
There are two patterns missing…don’t worry about it….you’ll have plenty to work with if you apply quite
a few of the right hand patterns to all this. And if you also work with transposition…it will be an ongoing
study.
Two last points: For a richer variety of future applications, try two other variations in the texture:
1) Tied or sustained notes.
2) The opposite: non-legato, “tiptoe” staccato sound on some or all of the notes.

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Top String V-2 Symmetrical Dominant Progressions: Minor 3rd and Flat Five Material

b5 Connections:
Optional: Try some major 3rd units instead of minor 3rds in spots.
Non-Diatonic Approach Chords, Constant Soprano
Ted Greene, 1986, January 24-25
Text for Assignments

Page 1
Assignment: Try all the examples, comparing the subtle differences. Please also don’t
forget the optional tones. Check all the stuff out from a variety of angles.
Suggestions: 1) * Chord tones, 2) Melodic relationships, 3) Inner voice motion, 4)
Contrary motion aspect(s),
5) Various fingerings, 6) Most importantly, the overall effect on the ear via each
example’s unique color (although certain examples overlap in this regard).

* All the chord progressions on this page are forms of v7 – I or V7 – I.

Memorize your favorites at least, and transpose to the key of Gb and maybe the key of
A (high) too.

Page 2
Assignment: As before, make friends with the subtle differences in color. Remember
these are all “five-one” progressions when you write in the chord names.
Also as before, the overall effect or color, the particular flavor of each of the approach
chords is where it’s at as far as your central focus. Many repetitions of the examples,
one after the other, with clear concentration, are the keys to developing a discerning and
sophisticated ear. It’s all waiting for you. Don’t expect miracles, but do expect results
of a substantial nature if you work patiently and diligently.
Transpose to the key of (high) Gb (when you are ready!) and then also practice in
descending chromatic keys
(F, E, Eb, D, Db, C, B and Bb).

Page 3
Assignment: Take the ones you love the most through the following keys: Start in high
Ab and descend chromatically till you reach the key of A.

Page 4
Assignment: Add the chord names to all these “five-one” progressions, but as usual, it’s
not the names that are so important, rather the colors, the spicy flavors of these V7 (or
v7) I’s.
Take at least your favorites through the following keys: Gb, F, E, Eb, D, Db, C, B and
Bb.

Page 5
Assignment: Take, at least your favorites, through the following keys: Ab, G, Gb, F, E,
etc., down to the key of A.
Ted Greene
Minor Chords and Astronomy 1979-10-13

Minor chords have nothing to do with astronomy. But I had to get your attention. And the breakdown of minor
chords can at least visually be likened to a sun (the minor triad), its planets (the m7, m6, m 7, and m7b5), their
satellites (the various extensions), and a few asteroids (the m/9 and m/9/11). So here’s the setup:

|--------------------------------------------The Minor Star System----------------------------------------|

m9 m7/11 m6/9 m6 7

1,b3,5,b7,9 1,b3,5,b7,11 1,b3,5,6,9 1,b3,5,6,7

The The
Minor 7th Minor 6th
1, b3, 5, b7 1, b3, 5, 6

m11 m11/13 m6/9 7 m6/9/11

1,b3,5,b7,9,11 1,b3,5,b7,9,11,13 1,b3,5,6,7,9 1,b3,5,6,9,11

The
m/9/11 Minor Triad m/9
1, b3, 5
1,b3,5,9,11 1,b3,5,9

m9b5 m7/11 m 9 m 7/11

1,b3,b5,b7,9 1,b3,b5,b7,11 1,b3,5,7,9 1,b3,5,7,11


The The
Minor 7b5 Minor Major 7th
1, b3, b5, b7 1, b3, 5, 7

m11b5 m7b5b13 m 9/11 m 7#11


(+)
1,b3,b5,b7,9,11 1,b3,b5,b7,b13 1,b3,5,7,9,11 1,b3,5,7,#11

Notes:
1) The 13th is occasionally added to the m7 and m7b5 groups (the m11 chord already has it: m11/13).
2) The #11 is occasionally added to the m6 and minor/major7 groups and less often to the m7 group and m/9.
3) The minor augmented and m7b9 chords and groups are occasionally encountered, but less so than the chords
in the system above.
4) The 11th can be added to the other chords in the m6 group besides the m6/9.
Low-End Major Voicings - Overview
Ted Greene, 1987-02-22, 23, and 24
—Text for handwritten sections—
Page 1:
Overview of Some Friendly Low-End Major Voicings Geared to the Given Key
Ted Greene, 1987-02-22
1) Db6. Systematic inversions of 6ths. Optional: omit the 5th string for “comfort
voicings.”
And descend with each line too once you get to the last given form.

2) Db. Open triads.


3) Db6, Db6, Dbmaj7, Db6, Dbmaj7. Mixing some major 7ths with the 6th chords.
4) Db, Db/9, Db/9, Db/9. Grid #1: “kind of low for a 9th”
5) Db6, Db6, Db Pentatonic…. Adding some “Pentatonics”
6) Db/9, Db6, Db6, Db6/9, Db6/9, Db/9, Db6, Db6/9.
Long combination row (no maj.7 tones here though…no reason…maybe the moon.)

You may know some or most (all?) of this material already, but a little review and direct
side-by-side comparison won’t hurt, right?
When you’re ready, transpose this page (from memory) to the keys of D and Eb (these keys
only…there’s a reason relating to following material).

_____________________________________________

Page 2:
Overview of Some Low-End Major Voicings
Ted Greene, 1987-02-23
1) E6. Systematic inversions of 6ths. Optional: omit the 5th string for “comfort voicings.”
And of course, play each given line ascending and descending.
2) E. Open triads.
3) E6, Emaj7, E6, Emaj7, Emaj7. Mixing in the maj.7’s with the 6ths.
4) E/9. Add 9’s.
5) E/9. More add 9’s
6) E6, E6, E6, E6/9, E/9, E6/9. Adding some “pentatonics”
7) E/9, E/9, E6, E6, E6/9, E/9. General combination row: chosen for pleasure to the ear
and within reason, to the hands.

Transpose from memory (when ready) to the keys of F and Gb.


_____________________________________________
Page 3:
Overview of Some Low-End Major Voicings
Ted Greene, 1987-02-24
1) G6. Systematic inversions of 6ths. Optional: omit the 5th string for “comfort
voicings.”
Reminder: all rows to be played ascending and descending.
2) G. Open triads.
3) Gmaj7, G6, Gmaj7, G6, Gmaj7. Maj.7’s with 6ths.
4) G/9. Add 9’s. Grid#1: “omit this note if too tough at 1st
5) G(6), G/9, G6, G6/9, G6/9. Mixing in some pentatonics
6) G6/9, Gmaj7, G/9, G6, G6/9, G6/9, G/9, G6/9. Long row of some favorite successions.

Please transpose from memory (when ready) to the keys of Ab and A.

_____________________________________________

Page 4:
Overview of Some Low-End Major Voicings
Ted Greene, 1987-02-24
1) Bb6. Systematic inversions of 6ths. Optional: omit the 5th string for “comfort
voicings.”
Do all rows ascending and descending.
2) Bb. Open triads.
3) Bbmaj7, Bb6, Bbmaj7, Bb6, Bbmaj7. Maj.7’s with 6ths.
4) Bb(/9), Bb/9, Bb/9, Bb/9, Bb/9. Add 9’s.
5) Bb, Bb6/9, Bbmaj7, Bb6/9, Bb6, Bb6/9. Mixing in some pentatonics
6) Bb, Bb6/9, Bbmaj7, Bb/9, Bb6, Bb6/9. Mixed bag – similar to last example.

Please transpose from memory when ready, to the keys of B and C.


Diatonic 4/3/4/4 “4th Chords”
Ted Greene, 1988, October 2-3
Text for Notes

Page 1
Diatonic 4/3/4/4 “4th Chords” with Alternating Delay in Top 2 Voices, p.1
Notes:
1) Study each example carefully, mainly memorizing “by shape” from the soprano
down. Notice how the melody bounces back and forth among the top 2 strings – no big
deal, but not without a little charm instead of always just playing the chords as solid
blocks.
If you want to give these chords names, once again, do it from the 1st string soprano
view, that is, call the soprano tone the root. You could do it from the bass note instead
but using the soprano gives about equal results as far as the “logic” of the names goes,
and it will keep your attention upstairs where the “melody” is jumping back and forth.

2) Please transpose all 4 examples to the keys of E and Eb. See below for adjustments.

Page 2
Diatonic 4/3/4/4 “4th Chords” with Alternating Delay in Top 2 Voices, p.2
Notes:
You probably notice that the melodic play is the opposite of the preceding page. As
before, watch the soprano and think of the name, at least in broad general terms from
this note (you know, “one” chord, or “seven” chord, or….)

And you may wish to transpose….it’s up to you here.

Optional: If you have the time, consider rhythmic displacement by starting on “four
and” instead of on “one.”

Page 3
Integrating 4/3/4/4 Diatonic 4th Chords into Other Settings

1) Learn the sounds as given. Try to understand the “whys” of each chord choice.
2) Please do your ears a favor and transpose all progressions into the key of A, then into
Ab. These 3 keys (counting Bb too) sound the most favorable for this material it seems.
3) Make it SING. These are primarily WARM, beautiful colors here.
Combining 6th and 5th String Root Chords
in Short Progressions
Ted Greene, 1985-09-15 & 16
(Text from lesson pages)

Page 1:

I – IV

V7 - I

Assignment:
1) Write the “number” of each chord tone under the dots in each diagram.
2) Play and memorize each of the 12 little progressions.
3) Practice contrapuntal isolation (see below) to help your ears and understanding.

_______________________________________________

Page 2:

1) & 2): ii – V’s

3) ii7 – V7 – I (vi)

4) Repeat these phrases (play each one twice) here.

Assignment:
1) Study all the voice motions very carefully and listen to the overall colors too.
2) Memorize the phrases according to which soprano note starts the first chord.
This makes it a lot easier to recall the sounds. Example: 1st phrase starts with
the b7th on top, 2nd one with the 9th, and so on.
3) If time permits, try contrapuntal isolation.
3-Note Chord Hearts and Chord Fragments
“Small-voiced” Minor 7th Types in Semi-Chord Streams
Ted Greene — 1987, September 20

Text for handwritten parts

Please take all this slowly and really lock the chord shapes (and sounds) in.
Transpose to quite a few other keys….you’ll hit some snags….use good sense….our
instrument is a gorgeous thing but it does have its range limits, especially when drilling on
one set of strings.
Count the job well done if you can handle any and all of the above in all keys with
allowances for the physical limits.

I could have just written the five forms down in one key and said, “Learn in all keys”, but
cumulative drills such as the above have proven to have certain advantages, so stay with
them. We’ll get to other string sets with their quirks soon enough…not to mention other
chord types…one thing at a time….each learned well….a solid foundation. With this,
you’ll find yourself naturally running the forms from one end of the neck to the
other….i.e., you’ll really know them.
3-Note Chord Hearts and Chord Fragments
“Small-voiced” Minor 7th Types – 3rd Set
Ted Greene — 1987, September 20

Text for handwritten parts

This page is tougher than it looks, not physically but mentally….especially when you start
transposing. I mention this so 1) you know that I know….
2) you won’t talk trash to yourself (“What’s wrong with me?”….Nothing….the material’s
just hard, that’s all).

Suggestion: If you’re having trouble “seeing” any of this material, slow down everything
WAAAYYY down and work on small bites, then these bites in many keys, then add on
another chord form and repeat the process….and so on. This will do it.