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JODY WILLIAMS C/O

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SEX WORKERS ANONYMOUS
2 5516 BOULDER HIGHWAY
SUITE 2F378
3 LAS VEGAS, NV 89122
(702) 488-1127
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WWW.SEXWORKERSANONYMOUS.COM
5 MSJODYWILLIAMS@GMAIL.COM

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8 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE DISTRICT OF NEVADA
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JODY WILLIAMS; as an individual, ) CASE NO.
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and dba SEX WORKERS )
13 ANONYMOUS; and TRAFFICKING ) DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS
AND PROSTITUTION SERVICES: ) IN SUPPORT OF COMPLAINT
14 both projects under the umbrella of the
)
nonprofit 501c3 corporation )
15
OMNI-SCII, )
16 )
Plaintiffs, )
17 -vs- )
)
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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, )
19 And JEFFERSON B. SESSIONS, )
In his official capacity as the )
20 ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE )
UNITED STATES, )
21
)
22 Defendants. )
____________________________________)
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I, JODY WILLIAMS, am a natural person residing currently in the state of Nevada. I
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declare as follows:
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I am the founder and director of the 12-Step program Sex Workers Anonymous (formerly

28 Prostitutes Anonymous).

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 1
I. OUR LEGAL STRUCTURE
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2 This 12-Step program has members and groups across the United States, in Canada, in

3 Australia, the UK, Costa Rica, and various other countries in the world with new groups popping
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up all the time. The program and hotline was launched on August 15, 1987 in Los Angeles,
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California. This means I’ve been doing this volunteer work for 32 years now.
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Our first meeting was held at the Tarzana. Treatment Center. We had 30 men and

8 women attending that first meeting. To my knowledge, everyone who was at that first meeting
9 has been out of sex work, and clean, since 1988. I personally have been clean, and have not
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worked in any part of the sex industry, nor engaged in any criminal act since January 3, 1985.
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In order to create this program, I neither received “permission” nor “approval” or
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13 “endorsement” from Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) to do so as it’s against their traditions to do

14 such a thing for anyone. We are not connected to A.A. in any way.
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However, in order to start a 12-Step program, one does have to get a copyright release in
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writing from the General Office of A.A. to adapt their steps and traditions to your program, and
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to reprint their steps and traditions in your literature.
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19 I learned how to create, and run, a 12-Step program from a “mentor board” I put together

20 comprised of (1) Bob Stone, the Executive Director of Narcotics Anonymous after he replaced
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Jimmy Kinnon, the founder of Narcotics Anonymous, (2) Roy K., the founder of Sexaholics
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Anonymous, (3) Ruby, the founder of Overeaters Anonymous, (4) the founders of Cocaine
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Anonymous who wish to remain anonymous, (5) Lucy B., wife of Bob B., founder of Naranon,

25 (6) James Crossen, PhD, who had created the first addictions studies program at Mission College
26 to teach people how to be drug and alcohol counselors who taught me about the neurology of
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addiction and trauma in the population we were working with, (7) Lois Lee, founder of Children
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 2
of the Night, who I studied her methods of outreach, operating a hotline, and working with a
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2 juvenile population coming out of prostitution, and (7) the founder of Co-Dependents

3 Anonymous who wishes to remain anonymous.
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I also received a lot of mentorship in the financial structure of a 12-step group from the
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A.A. General Office treasurer who wishes to remain anonymous, as well as how money supports
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A.A. through the Alano Clubs and vice-versa from the owner of the Eagle Nest Alano Club in

8 Reseda, California.
9 Greg Pearce, who was a “right hand” to Jimmy Kinnon, taught me extensively about the
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meanings of the steps and traditions, how to “work” them, how they applied to every part of my
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life, and a tremendous amount about Narcotics Anonymous history and legal battles they had to
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13 fight and win. For example, Greg showed me the lawsuit they had to file when the Yellow Pages

14 refused to let them advertise N.A. He also showed me how it used to be a crime just to attend a
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meeting if you were a felon or on parole, that you were in violation of these by going to a
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meeting because it was illegal to “associate with another felon”. N.A. had to actually change
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those laws in order to just hold meetings.
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19 Bo Sewell, who was the man responsible for the first edition of the N.A. Basic Text, as

20 well as Bob Barrett who founded Impact House in Pasadena., both taught me invaluable lessons
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in how to help addicts change and find recovery. Bob’s story also appears in the Basic Text as
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the, “Only Meeting in the World” about how he joined N.A. when there was literally one
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meeting in the whole world of N.A.. This is why his wife formed Naranon.

25 So I have received a great deal of training in how to create and run a 12-Step program, as
26 well as in how to help our new members find recovery because no program existed before ours
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dealing with this subject, we had no role models nor road map.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 3
Therefore, we had to create our own maps from scratch. These mentors helped me find
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2 flashlights to make finding the road easier as to what worked for us because they also had to

3 discover what worked for them when they created their programs. I was very blessed to have
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these tutors.
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There was, and still is, no school I’m aware of in how to create and run a 12-Step
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program or hotline connected to a 12-step program either. I was also very blessed to have the

8 WSO of N.A. allow me to join in with many of their world level committees such as for public
9 information, hospitals and institutions, outreach, regional level, board of trustees’ meetings, and
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other committees and boards that taught me how to run the world level of a 12-step program.
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I received a written letter with permission from the General Office of A.A. in 1987 that I
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13 have on file granting me permission to adapt their steps and traditions to our program. Since I

14 don’t have permission to make letter/consent public record, I’m not attaching it to this
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declaration.
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I was told by the General Office of A.A. at that time, and when I received consent again
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in 1995 when I changed our name to Sex Workers Anonymous, that no other 12-Step program
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19 exists working with this population than ours.

20 Our program connects callers to other members, or groups, or meetings, by operating a
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hotline for anyone to call whether they be male, female or transgender, over the age of 18 years
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old, of any sexuality, religion or lack of religion, (we are a spiritual not a religious program),
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from anywhere in the world, with a desire to leave any part of the sex industry, legal or illegal,

25 whether it be prostitution, stripping, pornography, phone sex, web camming, sugar baby
26 arrangements, or any form of commercialized sex, or sexual related commercial activity, forced
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or voluntary, who desire to exit this industry for any reason whether it be because they were
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 4
being forced, or they’re simply changing careers, getting older, became pregnant, developed
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2 health issues, got married, were put on probation or parole, or for any of the many reasons that

3 motivate someone to decide they want to exit any part of the sex industry on a permanent basis.
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The only requirement for membership in Sex Workers Anonymous is to have a desire to leave
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the sex industry in its entirety, permanently, and to have a desire for recovery.
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The name “Prostitutes Anonymous” was chosen at first so we could easily step in to

8 provide an alternative to incarceration for people convicted of prostitution in the USA under laws
9 grandfathered in by A.A. and N.A. – other 12-Step groups.
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We changed our name from Prostitutes Anonymous to Sex Workers Anonymous in 1995
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because of the invention of the internet. The internet overnight becoming the number one-way
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13 people were doing research to find resources such as ours. All the directories and rolodex’s we

14 were in before became obsolete overnight because of the internet thus forcing us to make the
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name change.
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Now we have the courts and jails not wanting to allow us to openly hold meetings again
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in connection with them because they feel this change means we’re making a statement that
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19 “prostitution is work” instead of “a human rights violation” which is what the church wants us to

20 say. That’s why the faith-based groups’ are shunning us in fear that even talking to us will make
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them appear to be in violation of the “prostitution clause” Randall Tobias makes everyone sign
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stating they’re “against prostitution” (which I think people confuse with being against the
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prostitutes).

25 Adult filters that were on all computers at public libraries, government offices, colleges,
26 university campuses, county programs, jails, prisons, probation offices, doctors’ offices, police
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departments, and anyone else who might be looking for a resource such as ours we found were
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 5
blocking our URL in search engines and website directories because of the word “prostitute” in
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2 our name and URL. After being told by the offices of these search engines and filters they didn’t

3 know how to change this blocking – we felt we had no choice but to change the name to be
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found if we wanted to continue to have people find us.
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Through trial and error, we found the only word that conveyed what our program was
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about, that would bypass these adult filters was “Sex Workers Anonymous”. So in 1995, we

8 took a world level group conscience (a vote from all of our members) who unanimously agreed
9 to the name change. A second group conscience was taken in 2015 which confirmed the
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fellowship wanted to be known as Sex Workers Anonymous.
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We changed our name to Sex Workers Anonymous solely so we could bypass adult
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13 filters on the internet, and because it seemed to be a good way to also cover the rise of new

14 industries which involved commercial sexual activity without physical intercourse created by the
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internet. Pornography and stripping for example are commercial forms of sex, but do not
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involve physical intercourse. Web camming and phone sex also are forms of commercial sex
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without intercourse. Therefore, the internet also made the term “prostitute” too limited of a term
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19 for us to be identified by because we need to leave the industry as a whole in order to recover.

20 It was not done as any type of position statement about the sex industry itself because as
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a 12-Step program, we are not allowed to have any official opinions on outside issues, nor can
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we endorse, nor condemn any outside entity, or take any position on any outside issue such as
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the sex industry itself For further understanding of the traditions, or guidelines on how we are to

25 operate as a 12-Step program, a copy of our Steps and Traditions are attached to my declaration
26 as Exhibit 1.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 6
Another one of these traditions states that a “12-Step group ought never be organized”.
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2 That is why we have not incorporated Sex Workers Anonymous itself, but instead created Omni-

3 Scii as our nonprofit corporation under the tradition of being able to “create service boards or
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committees directly responsible to those they serve”.
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Therefore, the 501c3 nonprofit corporation of Omni-Scii is what we operate under, but
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it’s also directly responsible to members of the board of Sex Workers Anonymous they serve.

8 Omni-Scii’s employer identification number is 471217527, and we are incorporated in the state
9 of Nevada. We originally incorporated in California in 1991 as Prostitutes Anonymous, but let
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that go because we changed the name to Sex Workers Anonymous.
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We incorporated after receiving a threat from the Secretary of State for Nevada to have
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13 me thrown in jail for ‘operating a business without a license” for running this 12-Step program

14 and hotline without having some type of official business structure. This threat came in 2013
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after his office received a complaint we were soliciting money online from a woman named
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Lynn Anderson.
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It turned out to be a site set up by Jacqueline Homan from Pennsylvania that was
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19 appearing to be our site we were unaware of linked to her Paypal account. When we pointed this

20 out to the Nevada Secretary of State, he suggested that by not being incorporated, it was making
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it easier for others to impersonate us, and thus defraud people as Jacqueline was doing.
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We had also been impersonated by a woman out of California named Anne Bissell who
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had taken money while representing herself to be us online also. We sent her formal “cease and

25 desist” letters threatening legal action, but she continued to leave a site up that appeared to be
26 ours, quoted our literature, and was taking money for donations and book orders.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 7
The only way we got her to stop was to report this to her internet provider, and to the
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2 local authorities. Members of her board for another program she ran called Silver Braid were

3 arrested for fraud finally. After the arrests, the site and the impersonations finally stopped. Then
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she disappeared completely off the scene from about 2007 to 2013. Since we were having a
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problem with people impersonating us, even taking money from people while acting like they
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were us also with these but a few of the instances.

8 The Nevada Secretary of State upon hearing about these impersonations suggested we
9 could reduce this kind of fraud from happening by incorporating. He offered this would give
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people a way of looking up who really was the people in charge of our program, and what our
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legitimate contact information was, thereby reducing these acts of fraud and impersonation. In
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13 other words, he said we could help eliminate this by incorporating.

14 It sounded logical, so in 2013, once we received the funds to do so from a generous
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supporter we incorporated Omni-Scii to provide a business structure, and not S.W.A., because
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we didn’t want to violate our traditions.
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Unlike the other 12-Step programs like A.A. and N.A., we don’t take in millions of
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19 dollars from donations and sales of literature because of the very nature of the population we

20 serve. Therefore, I’ve had to pay our expenses out of my own pocket by working second and
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third jobs when what little donations and sales we get don’t cover our overhead each month.
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We are dealing with a population going through a severe change of the source of their
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income. In the 32 years we’ve operated this program/hotline, we’ve never seen anyone walk out

25 of the industry with a dime left in their pocket. The internet and fax machines have allowed us to
26 save a great deal of money we used to spend on printing, postage and shipping. This even allows
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us to send out free literature online to new members who can’t afford to buy any.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 8
New apps like Skype allow us to have video conference meetings with members in other
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2 countries for free whereas back in the 1990’s we used to have to pay high fees to video

3 conference with someone outside of the United States.
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Thanks to the internet we’ve been able to rebuild our Canada groups, establish an
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Australia branch where prostitution is legal, and even reach a jail in Costa Rica which now runs
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one of our meetings weekly. This has allowed us to expand our inmate “mail order step study”

8 program by giving us more money to spend on our jail/prison outreach.
9 Because we can’t afford an international trademark registration, we’ve been operating our
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book sales under the “natural trademark” laws to date.
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We did copyright our Recovery Guide with the Library of Congress in 1992 under my
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13 personal name. That way when I die, the rights to the work will pass on down to my daughter

14 who has agreed to continue on running the world office of S.W.A. after I’m gone. A second
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copyright registration has just gone out to re-register the book under our new name of Sex
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Workers Anonymous just this month.
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In keeping with how we were taught to run the business structure of a 12-Step program
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19 by our mentors, we incorporated Omni-Scii as a 501c3 nonprofit. Sex Workers Anonymous and

20 Trafficking and Prostitution Services are projects that operate under Omni-Scii’s umbrella. Any
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function we need to perform that would be a violation of our 12 traditions, we have carried out
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by T.A.P.S. We have copyrighted all our literature, and have a natural trademark on our name
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because we have been engaging in commerce under that name since 1987.

25 The hotline operates under TAPS because it serves anyone who calls for help for any
26 reason, and because we refer anyone we can’t help to other programs or resources who might be
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able to help them. Everything legal to do with our program is in my name, or my daughter’s
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 9
name, in order to protect the anonymity of our other members besides myself. By doing things
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2 this way, we have modeled our business structure as much after the way A.A. and N.A. operates

3 theirs as possible.
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II. WHO ARE TARGET POPULATION IS
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To truly answer this, you have to put into context we were founded in the American
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culture of 1987. We were combatting strong stereotypes that existed then which divided the sex

8 industry into one of two factions – the first being that of the minority female drug addicted street
9 walking prostitute with a pimp on one arm and a needle in the other. The latter being that of the
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“Happy Hooker” who drove a Ferrari, went to Hollywood parties, swims in cash, and is living a
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very hip, prosperous lifestyle.
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13 This was about as accurate of people within the sex industry as a whole as the “whore”

14 and “madonna.” archetypes describe all women. The truth is there are people who do represent
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those two extremes, but they weren’t who we wanted to connect to.
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For one thing, if the main issue was that of drug addiction – then this person needs drug
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treatment. There’s plenty of professionals and programs to address drug addiction. While many
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19 addicts use prostitution to pay for their drugs – once you get them clean – they’re fine. So they

20 don’t need a program from us as programs already existed for them.
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The “Happy Hooker” also doesn’t need us. We have heard stories of people making
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millions in the industry, and then going off to retire happily ever after somewhere. Again, those
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people aren’t going to be calling in a hotline looking for help. So we don’t have anything to

25 offer that type of person.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 10
The biggest challenge we had was that society itself didn’t really recognize that the very
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2 type of person who would be a potential member of our program, was someone that society

3 didn’t want to accept was a reality.
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I know that because I witnessed “Linda Lovelace” (her porn name), attempt to enlighten
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the public about her reality when she was the star of “Deep Throat”. How her husband was her
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pimp. That she made the film while he was holding a gun on her off camera, while no one on the

8 set lifted a finger to stop him. Profits from the film made millions of dollars that went to support
9 organized crime. She was forced to make the film, and to act as a prostitute by her
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husband/pimp threatening to kill her, her family, and even brainwashing her using hypnotism to
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get her to do whatever he wanted to exploit her sexuality for money.
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13 I know society didn’t believe her because I saw her TV appearances to promote her

14 memoir, “Ordeal” she came out with in the early 1980’s. Audiences tore her to shreds. The
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adult industry tore her to shreds. Those who knew her story to be true didn’t want the truth out
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there because that would endanger their livelihood. Outsiders who had fantasies about what the
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adult industry was like, didn’t want something like reality messing that up. Everyone met her
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19 with disbelief when she simply tried to speak her experience.

20 I watched the typical “objections” she couldn’t seem to overcome. She was accused of
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“making it up so she could sell her book”. Others said she was only making these accusations to
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make money another way because she was “outdated” within the porn industry since she’d been
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replaced when her ex-husband/pimp turned around and married Marilyn Chambers. He then

25 promoted Marilyn like he had Linda, so he would tell people “Linda is just jealous she’s not
26 popular anymore like Marilyn”.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 11
The thing I found interesting was like the idea of sex trafficking, there were no laws on
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2 the books against what had happened to her on the film. After her book came out, she had

3 started working with Edwin Meese also. He put her on the Meese Commission on Porn.
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Wanting to punish these men who forced her to do the film, and then made millions off
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her which was funneled to organized crime, not to her, the best Meese could do was to charge
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everyone on the film but her with obscenity to try and make some kind of statement that what

8 was done to Linda was wrong.
9 Of course, it wasn’t obscenity, and everyone beat the case. The whole situation was an
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exercise in what I was seeing needed to be done – we needed to raise awareness about what the
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problems and realities were, then use that awareness to channel the right people and energy into
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13 creating laws to help protect us, and then to create a recovery program where we could go and

14 heal from the damage of what we’d just suffered by connecting to others who have been in our
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shoes.
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I also saw where Linda veered off course. She started coming forward with the truth
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about her experience in the sex industry – not to have pornography outlawed -but to try and have
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19 something done to put laws in place to create safer working conditions on the porn sets. For

20 example, if you compare the safety manual for actors on a “regular” film set where they’re
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making a very hard-core sex scene (which these days would be an XXX film back in the 1960’s),
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you see they have much better, current, and stricter, safety standards in the manuals for the
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“regular” film industry than that of the adult film industry.

25 A few years ago, there were nine female adult performers who said they had been raped
26 on site by a male performer who ironically was also the director of the Adult Protection
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Association at the time of the rapes. One of these women said she had been raped anally on set
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during filming, and that the crew APPLAUDED when she was raped so badly that she was torn
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2 and blood was pouring everywhere on the set. In checking with the safety manual for adult

3 films, I don’t see anything in them to provide for the protection of performers – male or female –
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against this kind of abuse on a set. That’s what I believe Linda was trying to have done when
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she came forward with her story.
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However, she was scooped up by the womens’ movement and the religious right groups

8 who paraded her around as their new poster gal to “stamp out the adult industry”. Their
9 campaigns raised a lot of money for them because a lot of men with checkbooks came out to har
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Linda speak at their local church for sure – but Liinda wasn’t able to work because of these
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speeches and public appearances. Nor did she get private health insurance.
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13 She had been kicked many times by her pimp/husband in her major organs, and because

14 of the stress of traveling, her PTSD, and her past drug abuse as well, she became very ill to the
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point where she required an organ transplant. In attacking the industry itself as these groups had
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got her to do, she’d cut off her ties to the adult industry completely. She was not welcome back.
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When she asked for help to get the $10,000 she needed for an organ transplant, from the
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19 people she’d helped to raise millions of dollars, for what I don’t know as the adult industry is

20 even stronger today than it was in the 70’s and 80’s – she was shut out and dumped cold.
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Not having any choice, Linda made another adult film in order to pay for her transplant.
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I believe the shame and humiliation of having to do this after what she’d done was so heavy on
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her, that this is why she returned to the drugs that eventually contributed to her death through an

25 accident when she was diving. I made a mental note from this the religious right and the
26 womens’ groups had no loyalty to women like us they used to try and promote their agendas –
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because while all they did was increase the use of porn from what it was then to what it is today,
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 13
they didn’t make a dent in stopping it for sure, but what they did do was lose the original
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2 message about improving the safety of the working conditions for women on the set. Let’s face

3 it – you’re a tiny woman on a set with a bunch of guys. What are you going to do on a porn set –
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cry rape? It’s way more of a pickle than if raped on a mainstream movie set. If I’m wrong, tell
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me the last time you saw an adult performer or stripper win a rape case.
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So before I embarked upon my campaign to make changes to our society with respect to

8 what I was seeing was needed to be done, I studied carefully where I felt Linda went wrong,
9 along with spending some time studying the civil rights movement, the womens’ movement,
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Prohibition, and even how Hitler had gained control in Germany by first gaining control over the
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pornographers because they represented press he wasn’t in control of.
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13 I also studied the people who were trying to make the world believe UFO’s and aliens

14 were real. We’ve come a long way from the “War of the Worlds” broadcast where people really
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thought we were being invaded by Martians, and we had a record number of suicides to today
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where we’re seeing N.A.S.A. footage of unidentified objects that have shown up on radar. Dr.
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John Mack even came out of Cambridge University, with top degrees and the most respected
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19 references, and publishing a book about his research into the phenomena of alien abductions,

20 giving great credibility to the idea these kinds of things were real. So the “ancient alien
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theorists” have come a long way into changing our beliefs in a short time. I studied them to see
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how they accomplished the change in our thinking to help me learn how I could do that with
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respect to how our society viewed the sex industry, as well as some of it’s built in problems.

25 Putting all this together, I realized we needed new laws created, while some existing laws
26 to be repealed. Namely we needed to get prostitution decriminalized in the USA if we were
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going to not only help prostitutes get out of sex work, but further to combat sex trafficking. We
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also needed to get laws passed about organized sex trafficking that were different than the
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2 existing pimping laws – much like how we needed the RICO Act to stop organized crime instead

3 of just individual crime laws like we had before. I saw how we didn’t pass the RICO Act until
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society believed we had a mafia in the first place. I knew this meant I had to find a way to get a
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more “realistic” view of sex work out to the public so we could have some changes to our legal
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system passed that would help us instead of hurting us as it was.

8 I asked myself, “How did they learn to believe the mafia was real? The answer was
9 through books like “The Valachi Papers”, Congressional Hearings, and films like the
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“Godfather” was how we got to the point of passing the RICO Act. In other words, we started
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hearing from the mafia itself. Then once we believed they were real, then something was done
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13 to stop them.

14 This is when I knew we needed to (1) bombard the media with real people telling their
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real stories to raise awareness, (2) I couldn’t agree to do a book or a movie deal because that
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would immediately have people just write my story off as fake so I could “sell books”, (3) I
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couldn’t hold any fund raisers or ask for a dime of money or they’d think this was some new con
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19 we were running, (4) I couldn’t pay myself for any of the work I was doing, and mostly, (5) I

20 needed to bring on as many different types of stories as I could so the public could see that we
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weren’t all just “junkies”, nor did all of us have street pimps, as well as why most victims felt
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they couldn’t go to the police for help. Because they couldn’t go to the cops for help – that’s
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why we needed the hotline.

25 The damage we had wasn’t about drugs – that’s why we needed a recovery program.
26 Also, I needed to put members out there in the media so others could identify with them – and
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feel safe enough to call us for help.
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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 15
One infamous study had shown almost everyone who entered the porn, strip, and
1

2 prostitution “jobs” had been raised in very strict religious homes. For this reason, anything that

3 sounded too religious would also turn off most of our potential members. In putting all of this
4
together, we created not only our outreach campaign for new members, but also our campaign to
5
(1) get prostitution decriminalized,, (2) find a way to stop the system from sending us to jail,
6

7
taking our kids, giving us a criminal record, etc., and (3) find a way to get the people together

8 who could create a law against the forced sale of the Americans..
9 This set our media/interview/public speaking/outreach policy from our launch to the
10
current date. We never went on any show plugging a book or movie. We never created fund
11
raisers nor asked for a dime of money from anyone. We never spoke about the industry as a
12

13 whole – but only spoke about our own personal experiences. We knew if we did this – then

14 people would see we weren’t doing this “for the money” and believe we were telling the truth.
15
I also tried to always bring onto TV shows and interviews members who didn’t have drug
16
problems, and tried to have a mix of half of the members talking about being forced into
17
prostitution, while the other half were voluntarily. I was always careful to try and show both
18

19 genders, and a wide variety of races. This way white women as well as Hispanic men would

20 identify and feel comfortable about calling the hotline for help.
21
Our methods worked. We get men and women calling who are LGBT, straight,
22
transgender, white, African American, Asian, Christian, Buddhist, Hindu – and just a real broad
23

24
spectrum of persons. The majority of people who calls us for help say they are flat broke and

25 they have no health insurance or assets.
26 Not to say people don’t exit the sex industry with money made. Those people who do
27
leave with large sums of money don’t seek out our help, support and guidance. The population
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 16
that comes to us do so because they have nothing left, their bridges are burned for one reason or
1

2 another, and they are starting over on a whole new life. Like A.A., people who don’t have

3 alcoholism, or at least a drinking problem, don’t contact them for help.
4
Not to say we believe one has to be “addicted” or even “have a problem” to contact us for
5
help. Groups like “Divorce Anonymous” or “Artists Anonymous” exist to bring people together
6

7
of like interests. We consider ourselves more along the lines of “Divorce Anonymous” where

8 those going through a divorce, wanting to talk to others who have been divorced, will reach out
9 to us to get empathic help and guidance.
10
Some group had to be set up that offered support to those who wanted to quit the industry
11
without being turned into someone who was a “Benedict Arnold”. That’s the contradiction I
12

13 could never understand about sex work in my day, and now even. I had joined COYOTE when

14 they first launched founded by Margo St. James. This was about Calling Off Your Old Tired
15
Ethics – which is I wanted to have an abortion I could because I controlled by body. I could
16
have sex with who I wanted to. I could also charge money if I wanted to. I believed then, and
17
still do, that sex work is a job. It has a purpose and it provides work for people who either love
18

19 to do it or need to do it but either way it’s a living. Just because I might not agree with what a

20 butcher does to a cow for a living – doesn’t mean I get to outlaw butchers and call him a
21
murderer and then tell people it’s okay to hunt and kill a cow as long as you don’t sell the meat
22
to another person and become a “horrible birth”.
23

24
So if we’re going to take a stance that sex work is a job, then as a job, that means I can

25 retire from that job any time I want. That I can have friends who have other jobs. I should plan
26 for my retirement, and have disability insurance to fall back on. But what I found was the
27
industry wanted me to pretend that my exit day was never going to come, I’d never face the need
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 17
for disability, and I was supposed to live in this fantasy that I was going to be dancing on tables
1

2 and such for money when I was 70 years old.

3 Further, the industry would treat you like an absolute “traitor” if you even said you
4
wanted to quit. If you talked about leaving the field, your “friends” would avoid you. Then
5
when you did decide to get into another line of work – they were there pushing you to come back
6

7
to sex work under the social threat of their abandoning your if you became an “outsider”. If you

8 want to see an example of what I mean – check out how the industry portrays any woman who
9 quits the industry in the blogs as a “kook”. When Jesse James announced at the AVN one year
10
she was retiring, you could hear an audible “boo” from the audience. The industry put so much
11
pressure on Jesse to return, she turned to using drugs, then lost her kids and her marriage, and
12

13 within two years time was back in the industry.

14 When I decided I wanted to quit because of what I saw going on in the industry in LA in
15
the 1980’s, I was witnessing a record number of serial killers targeting us like never seen before
16
or since, along with Iran Contra, or the flooding of LA with a drug that was making men crazy,
17
cops who were raping me and selling women to oil barons never to be heard from again, and
18

19 frankly I wanted none of it. But the minute I told someone I was going to quit the industry, go

20 back to college, get my degree and become a therapist – I immediately felt this hush backlash to
21
convince me to stay in the industry. When that failed to convince me because I wound up on
22
probation for three years – I literally was avoided like the plague by people still in the industry
23

24
unless they were in a crisis. I remember a lunch with Norma Jean Almodovar, who was the LA

25 head of the COYOTE chapter, where she made it clear I would be some kind of traitor,
26 “betraying my sisters” if I quit the industry. Losing your social network is one reason why
27
alcoholics, gamblers and addicts have a hard time changing – because it means giving up your
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 18
whole social network. I felt there was a need to provide a group to support people staying in
1

2 the sex industry, which existed then as COYOTE, as well as another group to support your

3 decision to go into another line of work if you wanted to, which was what I was finding a lack of.
4
Choice is about the freedom to choose.
5
It’s not a choice if you’re given only one option. My wanting to leave had nothing to do
6

7
with the sex industry, and everything to do with cocaine, the government, law enforcement, men,

8 rapists, kidnappers, pimps, the AIDS epidemic that was just destroyed everyone I knew in the
9 industry, and a whole slew of things that had nothing to do with the sex industry itself.
10
I, like many who are coining out of the sex industry, are suffering from severe PTSD.
11
Again, not from the sex work – but from the way our society treats people in our profession.
12

13 Imagine if someone hung a sign over your neck that said “hey rapists – over here – get a free get

14 out of jail card if you rape this person – we won’t do a damn thing to you”. That’s essentially
15
what society does to you – not the industry.
16
Look at the case of Miriam Weeks aka Belle Knox – she talked about how she almost
17
killed herself. Not because of the porn industry, but because of the way her peers in college
18

19 reacted to her when they found out she’d done a few adult films and photos. She was “slut

20 shamed” so badly by people from outside of the adult industry, she thought of taking her life in
21
her early 20’s. Some young women have – again not because of doing porn – but because of the
22
way society treats you for doing porn.
23

24
Meaning most of the time when you’re ready to exit the field, you got a lot of PTSD to

25 deal with. So in many ways, those coming out of sex work are like people who have just
26 survived a horrible natural disaster who are coming to FEMA for help. Since 1987, those like
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 19
this come to us when there’s nowhere else to go. We turn no one away because of a lack of
1

2 funding, or a lack of beds, and help anyone who dials our hotline.

3 Since we offer no resources in the way of money, all we can do is offer our “experience,
4
strength and hope” as to how we walked through that transitional period ourselves to the new
5
members, as well as to try and connect them to any current programs, resources, etc., that exist
6

7
that might be able to assist them. For example, I maintain a list of treatment programs where the

8 staff isn’t going to rape you in the middle of the night once they find out you used to be a sex
9 worker. Which if you read about Chris Batham, and the two women how died while in his
10
recovery program, women he had actually turned out into prostitution while they were in his
11
recovery program – then you know why we need to be referred to programs that are built for us
12

13 specifically – and not just “any” drug treatment program if that’s what’s needed.

14 We are not just an “exit” program either. Our 12-Step program is there to serve a specific
15
population who have tried to quit or leave the industry many times before, but for whatever
16
reason, couldn’t make the transition permanently. It’s like how an alcoholic has trouble finding
17
sobriety. This means we get calls from newcomers a day out of the industry, as well as from
18

19 people who have been out 20 years but are still struggling with issues.

20 Our specific focus is for those who have found no matter how many resources they’ve
21
had, how much help they’ve been offered, how many programs they’ve been in, how many times
22
they left their pimp, etc., that for whatever reason, they just can’t seem to make it out of the sex
23

24
industry even though they have a desire to do so. That is why we consider ourselves a spiritual,

25 not religious, program.
26 We grant we serve a very small specific niche population of people who exist within the
27
sex industry. Because we were the first international hotline to launch for adults (the only other
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 20
international hotline to launch prior to us was Children of the Night intended for juveniles in
1

2 1979 who had fallen into prostitution), we didn’t want to turn away callers who wanted help of

3 some kind, but didn’t fit the requirement for membership in our 12-Step program, so our hotline
4
serves anyone who for any reason wants help to exit any part of the sex industry. In other
5
words, we didn’t want to turn anyone away. We couldn’t because when we started up we were
6

7
the only hotline for us that existed for those over 18 years old. Remember, we started in 1987.

8 Polaris didn’t start the National Trafficking Hotline until 2002. Even then, they don’t help sex
9 workers exit the industry. Also, they require a victim to call them directly for help. So if
10
they’re’ being trafficked in such a way as they can’t get to a phone to call them – they’re just
11
SOL aren’t they? For that matter, if they could call someone, they’d call 911 I’d think.
12

13 This means that while the hotline serves as the vehicle through which potential members

14 find our 12-Step programs, its overall function and operation falls beyond the guidelines of the
15
12-Step fellowship.
16
For this reason, we created the second group we call Trafficking and Prostitution
17
Services, or T.A.P.S., T.A.P.S. is the program we operate under when we need to do something
18

19 that falls outside of our 12-Step guidelines, such as help someone organize a “rescue” or an

20 “intervention” of someone in sex work. .Remember, we didn’t have the national Trafficking
21
Hotline to assist us with adult calls until 2002 – so there was a period of 15 years we covered
22
ALL types of calls into the hotline. So technically our hotline is not restricted to just 12 step
23

24
actions because we have to address the needs of EVERY caller – so it’s covered under T.A.P.S.

25 III. OUR HOTLINE AND PROGRAM IS UNIQUE IN THE WORLD
26 Our hotline is very unique to the national Trafficking Hotline operated by Polaris. In
27
fact, no other hotline like ours exists anywhere in the world.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 21
For one thing, it’s only answered by people who have been out of some part of the sex
1

2 industry for a minimum of two years, who are also clean and sober for at least two years (or are

3 not an addict or alcoholic in recovery), who have received training on how to answer crisis calls
4
such as (1) how to handle a potential suicide call, (2) how to handle a rape call, (3) how to handle
5
a domestic violence call, (4) how to handle a crisis call such as a 911 call where a crime is taking
6

7
place, (5) basic laws with respect to prostitution and the reporting of information such as

8 incidents of child abuse, (6) how to handle a crisis situation when the caller is trying to escape a
9 pimp and is in dangerous situation, and (7) what the basic beliefs are with respect to what Sex
10
Workers Anonymous does.
11
They are further trained how to look up resources online that the caller might need such
12

13 as emergency housing, drug treatment, medical care, etc. Most of all they serve as a peer the

14 caller can talk to. I myself have undergone this type of training as well, and more, so that I can
15
provide the best possible service to our callers.
16
In the 32 years I’ve answered this hotline, we have not had one reported death, nor one
17
single complaint or lawsuit lodged against us. Not many hotlines can boast of a record like this.
18

19 The people who answer the hotline are not paid for their work, nor do they receive

20 college credit.
21
They answer the hotline as part of doing their “12th step work” in Sex Workers
22
Anonymous.
23

24
In other words, they help with the hotline as part of doing their outreach to help others

25 who may be still suffering. The hotline isn’t a job to them, but instead an essential part of their
26 recovery process. So the hotline is a part of our 12-step program.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 22
IV. WHY WE’RE FILING THIS LAWSUIT
1

2 While we are not to take any type of position on any “outside issue”, THIS ISSUE is one

3 that directly affects us and therefore as an INSIDE ISSUE. That is why this lawsuit is being
4
filed.
5
We have been beaten back to the point of teetering on extinction. In order to survive as a
6

7
fellowship, we have to speak up about this particular issue that is the basis of the lawsuit.

8 I’m hoping my declaration will explain why I’m saying that its important we survive,
9 why we are important to this country we survive because of the vital unique services we offer,
10
and why its important that we do something to repeal this Act.
11
V. OUR HISTORY AND WHY WE EXIST
12

13 A. EARLY YEARS

14 Back in grade school, I had been enrolled in the Mentally Gifted Minors Program that
15
used to operate in Los Angeles County. I was part of this program because my IQ had been
16
tested at eight years of age as that of a genius. This was determined to be the root of my
17
behavior problem in school and why they transferred me into this MGM program. While in the
18

19 MGM program, my behavior problems ceased, and I flourished.

20 Whether my problems in school were because of having a high intelligence, or a cry for
21
help because of the abuse I was suffering at home, or because of these factors I wasn’t getting
22
along with anyone else in school (teacher or student alike), my dyslexia, my ADD, (I had
23

24
undiagnosed dyslexia and ADD until I found out I had these as an adult), or a combination of

25 everything, who knows.
26 I bring up my past because studies have shown many who get involved in prostitution, or
27
who become sex trafficking victims, and who also suffer from the disease of addiction have a lot
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 23
in common with my background. (It’s also why I believe in early intervention for those like me
1

2 between the ages of eight to 12 years of age.)

3 However, the funding was withdrawn from this MGM program I was briefly in, and my
4
short time of functioning in school was over. I was put back into regular public school and
5
proceeded to get back into all kinds of trouble again. I was soon being bullied again, and even
6

7
raped by a school mate at 15 years of age. (I’ve also found rape to be a very common factor in

8 people like me who get caught up in the sex industry.)
9 After the rape, and because of the bullying by both students and teachers, I decided to
10
take the equivalency test when I was 15 years old. This way I could jump from high school
11
before graduation and instead enroll in community college.
12

13 My goal was to become a psychologist to work with other rape and child abuse survivors.

14 Since I had also been physically abused by my mentally ill drug addicted mother and sexually
15
abused by my father as a young child., my grandmother had been murdered after years of
16
domestic violence, and my grandfather had died due to his alcoholism - I felt I’d make a good
17
psychologist.
18

19 I entered community college after a year off at about 17 years of age after relocating to

20 the San Fernando Valley. I then proceeded with my education and enrolled at Los Angeles
21
Valley College. I did not drink, smoke, do drugs, nor was I engaging in sex with anyone at this
22
time in my life. Instead I was caring for my mother and focusing on my studies.
23

24
However, my father stole $50,000 I had earned from helping him flip real estate I had in

25 my bank account I was going to use for my education.
26 When confronted about it, he said he took it because he wanted to use it for law school,
27
leaving me without funds for college.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 24
I didn’t qualify for financial aid because I lived with my mother and her income was too
1

2 high for me to qualify. Not wanting to drop out of school, I went looking for work.

3 B. MY ENTRANCE INTO THE SEX INDUSTRY
4
The only work I could find that wouldn’t interfere with my classes was that of a cocktail
5
waitress at a Tarzana. nightclub. The club I later learned had been opened as a means to launder
6

7
drug and prostitution money from the family that Richard Pryor has talked openly about coming

8 from. I know this because the man I got involved with there, Tommy Lee Scoot, used to deliver
9 drugs daily to Richard. Plus Weldon, the owner, told me they were related and that was the
10
purpose of the club.
11
This was an African-American generational family that had been involved in drugs and
12

13 prostitution dating back to their days of just having been freed from slavery according to

14 Weldon.
15
Because I wasn’t 21 years of age yet, I created a phony ID so I could work there serving
16
alcohol at night and then go to school in the mornings – sleeping in the afternoons. Every man
17
connected to that club was also a pimp. The other waitresses were prostitutes under the pimps in
18

19 the club. Surrounded by these people, and them living a block from my house, I eventually got

20 sucked into the “family business”.
21
The head pimp, Weldon, took me under his wing. He told me I was to be groomed to
22
“run things” because “any dumb bitch can be a whore but we need someone to run things around
23

24
here”. While I wasn’t “turned out” like most prostitutes, I was still “turned out” just in a

25 different way. Under Weldon’s tutorage, I learned all different types of “pimping” and “game”
26 as they called it back then.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 25
I was educated in all manner of crime. Then introduced to all types of criminals from
1

2 people who made unmarked guns to counterfeiters who worked for the KKK while connected to

3 this family. I eventually was making so much money and working so many hours, I dropped out
4
of school. I was manipulated and brainwashed in ways I didn’t fully understand until years later
5
in recovery.
6

7
I felt bad about leaving college at first, but Weldon assured me “Girl you’ll get an

8 education with us about people you won’t get out of no book in school”. He was right. Through
9 this family I learned how the African American “mafia” who operated through a network across
10
the USA.
11
I saw a good portrayal of this system in the film “American Gangster” once, only in
12

13 reality they weren’t limited to drugs. In this family system, the men did the drug sales and

14 pimping while the women did the prostitution part of the criminal activities. Everyone used to
15
connect once a year in a “convention” in what was called the “Pimp and Ho Ball” in later years.
16
Eventually the cocaine use took its toll on the family. Nick, the man who worked at the
17
club as the bartender, and who pimped also, shot and killed himself after a three-day drug binge.
18

19 That’s when I decided I wanted to break away from the so called “protection” of this

20 family. I made a deal with Weldon to part ways and go “independent”. The remaining family
21
members relocated back to Texas where I’ve researched through obituaries these men have now
22
all passed away. I was the only person to leave this family alive to my understanding.
23

24
It was while I was with this family, I witnessed women who were trapped in a very

25 abusive relationship with pimps that were not willing to let them go. These women were not
26 able to call the police to stop the abuse because they had children with these men.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 26
How do you leave a man who is forcing you to prostitute when the state is forcing you to
1

2 let him know where you live, where your children are living and going to school, and to

3 physically see his children who reside with you on a regular basis? Knowing that you can’t
4
escape this man because of the laws regarding child visitation and custody rights, these women
5
were reluctant to prosecute the pimps no matter how violent, or financially exploitive the
6

7
relationships were. They also didn’t want to anger him by arresting him because they had to deal

8 him for the next 18 plus years because of these children. If they were to leave and not leave a
9 forwarding address – ironically, he could have them arrested for kidnapping his kids.
10
While witnessing these dynamics, I would see these women arrested for prostitution for
11
going out on calls they were forced to go on by both the pimp and circumstance. These were
12

13 women who had no education, no job skills, multiple children at a young age, lower than average

14 intelligence, usually a drug or alcohol problem, etc.
15
When you combine their lack of employability with a criminal record for prostitution,
16
what other options were there for them to support their children – especially with a man who
17
wasn’t working but yet demanding money or else they were subjected to violence.
18

19 I would see cops shaking their heads saying to these women to “just leave” while not

20 telling them “where” or “how”. It was the same as telling them to “fly to the moon” and then
21
acting surprised they didn’t get on a space ship to the moon. The whole system seemed crazy.
22
After I broke away from the family, I got scared. Los Angeles was experiencing a record
23

24
number of serial killers targeting prostitutes at that time. Up until I entered this lifestyle, and it is

25 a lifestyle for most of us, these killers had focused on street prostitutes.
26 The reasons were simple. Back in the 1970’s and 1980’s, to see a “call girl”, you had to
27
use a land line phone that was listed in the white pages. One of these phones required placement
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 27
in a house or business and thus had to be ordered under your legal name. You couldn’t order
1

2 them without a lease and a large deposit. They were expensive and took weeks to install. They

3 were also stationary so this gave us a great deal of security when going out to a call at an address
4
that had a listed telephone number.
5
So there was an assurance if someone called you from such a land line phone, then that
6

7
was a phone in their name. If they then showed you an ID matching that name when you

8 arrived, then you knew this was not a man who wanted any “trouble”. Knowing you had his
9 phone number, and could call his wife back – most of these clients totally behaved themselves.
10
This knowledge served as our protection. I’d never heard of any calls girls being harmed up
11
until the two cousins who were called the “Hillside Stranglers”. They changed everything.
12

13 These cousins started out as “gorilla pimps”. How those pimps operated was by

14 kidnapping women who were just walking down the street. A gorilla pimp would kidnap a
15
woman walking down the street, drug her, rape her, brainwash her, and then turn her out to work
16
as a prostitute for him in fear of her life if she didn’t do as told. Since this type of prostitute
17
would run off at her first chance, they were always looking for another victim. So it wasn’t safe
18

19 to walk down the streets of LA back then.

20 Especially when the police were less than sensitive or caring. Not that they could do
21
anything about the situation. These two cousins would kidnap a woman, rape and torture her,
22
then hold her hostage in a hotel room for a few weeks while bringing “johns” to the room and
23

24
force them to engage in acts of prostitution or be hurt further.

25 They would make the women afraid to leave the room by hiding in the bushes right
26 outside the door, and beating them when they’d try to leave. They’d keep sending johns to their
27
hotel rooms so word would spread on the streets these women were hookers new on the track.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 28
When the women would finally get the nerve to run and flee to the police, the word was
1

2 already on the street that they had “been hooking out of that hotel such and such”. So they had

3 been labeled through word of mouth on the streets as “prostitutes”.
4
Not caring how they became prostitutes, the police treated them as such, and told the
5
women to “get lost” when they would finally get up the nerve to run to them for help. They
6

7
refused to take the reports against these two cousins because they ran a body shop in Glendale

8 and were considered “respectable business men”.
9 I got a call from a woman asking for help by a woman who had been raped, beaten,
10
kidnapped and even stabbed 51 times by these men. After we got her stitched up, I took her to
11
the LAPD. We were thrown out of their offices and they refused to even take a report despite
12

13 her stitches being fresh.

14 When I demanded to know why they were treating her this way, I was told by the officer
15
quote, “You have to understand she’s a whore. In the eyes of the law, we have to get a warrant
16
to search these guys’ property or to arrest them. To get a warrant means we need a credible
17
witness. A whore is not a credible witness. Her testimony will not hold up on a stand. The
18

19 judge and jury won’t believe her. In the eyes of the law she’s the criminal here and therefore her

20 word means nothing to us. So I have nothing from her I can even get a search warrant on, let
21
alone arrest anyone because as long as prostitution is illegal she’s the one considered a criminal
22
– not them.”
23

24
I protested to this officer reminding him she had been forced into these acts of

25 prostitution by these men in the first place so why was he treating her like the criminal. He
26 pulled out the law book with the relevant laws with respect to prostitution.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 29
There was nothing in there about exigent circumstances such as force. He even explained
1

2 to me that it was still legal to rape one’s wife in the USA (this was a long time ago). Offering it

3 might not be fair, but explaining it was the law, he told me that there was no room within our
4
laws for the idea of “force” with respect to prostitution.
5
What I witnessed then was these men were essentially manufacturing their own defense
6

7
to these horrible crimes by making their victims out to be prostitutes. Such was the state of our

8 American legal system at that time.
9 After that, I started getting calls from two madams. They had obtained my name from a
10
mutual client. One of them was Alex Adams, who was later dubbed the Beverly Hills Madam by
11
the press. The other was Cheri Woods who was dubbed the Death Row Madam after her high-
12

13 profile arrest.

14 Alex worked with many Saudi Arabians who were coming into Los Angeles to make oil
15
deals that was big back in the 1980’s in the area by Beverly Hills, Bel Air and the airport. Cheri
16
used to cater to the film and music crowd in Hollywood because she was once married to a
17
famous musician, and was related also to Philip Michael Thomas who was in Miami Vice, the
18

19 TV series popular back then.

20 C. THE NEED FOR SCREENING ARISES
21
They were warning me that there had been some women going missing lately. The trick
22
seemed to be the calls were coming from pay phones, the new “brick” cell phones, and the
23

24
address they were giving out was wrong. They told me to watch the news. I turned on the news

25 that night and I saw them talking about how the “john” would give out an apartment address of
26 say apartment A and then wait out in front of the building for the escort.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 30
When she’d arrive, he’d say he made a mistake and it was really apartment C and take
1

2 her there. He could do this now he had a cell phone and could move around. Then she wouldn’t

3 be heard from again. I couldn’t help but wonder if the news knew of this, why wasn’t something
4
being done about it to help find these women or the men behind this.
5
In my ignorance, I contacted that officer again about the fact they’d give us warnings, but
6

7
not do anything about this.

8 He again talked to me like this was law school. He asked me if there was a guy going
9 around breaking into buildings, and if there was some kind of defect in the buildings where he
10
was going to get hurt doing this – that it was not their job to protect crimiinals. Again, he was
11
emphasizing that in the eyes of the law, we as prostitutes were considered “criminals”. Not that
12

13 we were citizens who were committing an illegal act. But that we as people were criminals like

14 a classification of people who didn’t deserve their protection.
15
He essentially was saying that society didn’t believe that they were to “serve and protect”
16
us because we were not living a life that society approved of. What he was also telling me in so
17
many words was that it was open season on us.
18

19 I felt chilled to my bones to realize we were unprotected in this extreme of a way as was

20 becoming clear to us because of the way we were making our money. I again didn’t think it was
21
fair because of the majority of us doing it because of not having choices, being forced, or doing it
22
simply to feed their kids. I didn’t think there was more dignity in being homeless and hungry or
23

24
letting your children sleep in the street and starve. Especially since I knew many of these pimps

25 were raping their women to deliberately get them pregnant, and then locking them in the house
26 for at least five months until it was too late to abort the baby to make sure they didn’t get escape.
27
It seemed to me they were being penalized for trying to simply survive.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 31
Realizing we had no way to protect ourselves the way other people do in our society, and
1

2 that we are also targeted for just that reason by this same criminal element that seeks to prey on

3 us because they know we aren’t protected, and can’t call for help,
4
I decided I had to exit this life entirely and “go straight”. To accomplish this, I started
5
looking for various “legal” businesses I could go into while trying to go back to school to finish
6

7
getting my degree so I could complete my original goal of becoming a therapist.

8 I opened an adult theater using an old warehouse that was over next to the Van Nuys
9 Police Station. I thought because of it’s proximity to the police station, we’d be fairly safe from
10
any violence there.
11
I soon found we were being targeted by both the LAPD and pimps who kept wanting to
12

13 either rob me, rape me, or try to extort payments out of me so we could operate without being

14 busted. Even though I’d set up a technically legal business, it wasn’t safe so I shut it down.
15
At this time, HIV/AIDS had started to infect a lot of people I knew. The “johns” were
16
refusing to want to wear condoms. Some got violent even when you’d ask them to wear them.
17
This got me thinking of non-sexual types of business I could get into that was physically safe as
18

19 well as legal. For a short time, I tried sending out strip-o-grams. It wasn’t profitable.

20 Big back then were 900 phone lines. These were recordings people would hear when
21
dialing the number from their phones. Payments were made on their phone bill.
22
However, many of the clients I spoke to didn’t want a recording, nor did they want the
23

24
bill showing up on the phone bill for their wives to find. The market was calling for a live phone

25 call with the ability to put the charge on a business credit card or check.
26 I had plenty of women who were willing to be the performers to make these calls. Living
27
in Los Angeles, there was a lot of out of work actors we could hire to perform on the calls. The
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 32
big hurdle was the fact banks and phones weren’t set up yet to take a credit card over the phone.
1

2 Credit card companies were insistent on charge slips that were signed and slid at that time. To

3 set up a merchant account to take phone orders was a very tall order then. The banks required
4
you to have a storefront, and they would send someone from the bank to actually visit your
5
storefront to make sure everything was real before they’d give you an account.
6

7
But it was a legal, safe business in demand that would allow me to go back to school. So

8 I set up a phony front business to fool the bank so they’d allow me to take credit card and check
9 payments by telephone without a signature.
10
This was accomplished through a company called Telecheck. What Telecheck did was
11
connect to TRW, a credit reporting agency, to verify this was a real person making the
12

13 transaction. They would guarantee the transaction this way for a percentage of the sale.

14 Telecheck also tapped into DMV to verify you were looking at this persons’ authentic drivers
15
license. I realized that this was my gateway not only to make legal money, but also to protect
16
the security of escorts nor their safety was in increasing danger. As cell phones were now
17
coming into use in the 1980’s, this option would allow me another way to verify who the caller
18

19 really was to provide for our safety.

20 We had a record number of serial killers and violence against women and prostitutes in
21
LA in the 1980’s because we were being flooded with cocaine back then. Every party, every
22
night club, every house you went to had bowls of cocaine. It was evident that cocaine use made
23

24
men sexually interested, while unable, at the same time. This frustration was creating a very

25 volatile situation where the men were taking it out on the women. We never saw this with
26 heroin, weed or alcohol before.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 33
So I blamed the increase in violence, rape and murder against us on the sudden influx of
1

2 cocaine that hit all at the same time as also porn became easier to get ahold of that would give

3 these guys even stranger ideas. The whole thing was a “perfect storm” to create more of a need
4
for a woman to have some kind of security system out there just to stay alive.
5
I set up the first ever live phone sex service in Los Angeles that was paid for using a
6

7
credit card or company check. From the gate, we were making not $30,000 a month as one news

8 story about me reported, but $30,000 a week. Most important, it was legal. Because I had now
9 found a legal way to make money, good money, and be safe, I stopped working as a prostitute at
10
this time.
11
D. I WANTED TO QUIT THE INDUSTRY
12

13 I shut down the warehouse I had used as an adult theater, but since I still had a lease on it,

14 I had another six months use left. I kept it because I was always getting calls from women
15
saying they needed to get away from their pimp for a few days. I figured I’d leave the beds, the
16
TV, the fridge, etc., in the warehouse and let them stay there. I didn’t want them at my house
17
because I didn’t want the pimps to come looking for them there. With the police so close to the
18

19 warehouse, and the fact it had a lot of security like cameras, bars on the doors, etc., I figured it

20 was a safe secure place for them to hide. In other words, it was the first sex trafficking safe
21
house for adults in the country I’d established.
22
I had become social friends with these madams, Alex and Cheri, by this time. They had
23

24
introduced me to some of the women who worked for them also. This is when I’d met Heidi

25 Fleiss. Alex told me Heidi was learning the business from her so she could take over when she
26 died. Anyone could see Heidi planned on taking over. But most of the women on the upper
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 34
levels of the high-call escort industry, the strippers and porn performers knew me. So of course
1

2 they’d heard of this new billing system I had also for the phone sex business.

3 When these women had their periods, or they got pregnant, or were recuperating from a
4
violent encounter so they had a broken arm or a black eye – they’d come work for my phone sex
5
company for a while. Soon word spread that I had this ability to bill this way, and to verify the
6

7
clients’ real identity.

8 As we talked socially, we realized this would be a great way to screen out the potential
9 for not only violence, but also to screen out police from arresting any of us. In other words, my
10
Telecheck system could be set up to be the first ever screening system for escorts.
11
Since I had to pay the phone sex performers by paychecks, I had to find an accountant to
12

13 help me write their checks. I found an accountant in an office next to mine who could tell what

14 we were up to and he thought it was a great idea.
15
He advised me how we could set up the performers’ paychecks so they could pay their
16
taxes, build their credit, and even buy health insurance. For those who were also prostituting, he
17
showed them how they could purchase disability insurance also for those “down” times and so
18

19 their medical bills could be paid. This gave us the ability to even build up a credit rating.

20 Cheri had a lot of “movie” clients such as producers and directors. When I told her how
21
we could take a company check or card, she told her clients. They called me and we started
22
having business meetings on how they could write into their movie budgets what they were
23

24
paying for not only prostitutes but drugs on their sets.

25 Money laundering laws were just coming to pass about this time, and they needed a way
26 to write these expenses into the budget that would pass inspection by the IRS. Years later a
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 35
huge scandal broke out about how Paramount was writing prostitutes and drugs into their film
1

2 budgets. That’s how it all got started.

3 Very quickly I found myself engaged in all kinds of business that wasn’t me prostituting
4
or madaming any longer. It might not have been totally legit, but on the outside at least I looked
5
on paper like I was now a legitimate business woman. I was soon able to save up some money
6

7
and started to think about going back to school.

8 But this was during a time period that’s now been called “Iran Contra”. For those of you
9 who don’t know what this means, it was a time period when our CIA was flooding this country
10
with cocaine in order to raise black cash in order to fund the rebels fighting the Contra’s under
11
Reagan.
12

13 In order to fuel the desire for cocaine, they went about it using two approaches. The first

14 was to create media to make cocaine appear “hip, slick and cool” as well as safe. This was a new
15
drug, and to make people want it, media had to be created to make it appear not only “hip” but
16
also “safe”.
17
To do that, people like Chuck Barris, a top Hollywood producer show made shows like
18

19 “The Dating Game”, the “Gong Show”, and the “Newlywed Game”, was recruited to work with

20 the CIA. (He has since confessed to this with a wink in, “Confessions of a Dangerous Mind”.)
21
The second was to recruit the madams to carry the drug in their purses into the homes of
22
these top Hollywood producers, directors, actors, etc., to not only introduce them to the drug,
23

24
how to use it, let them know it was fun and safe, but also to get it from areas like Compton and

25 South Central into areas of town like Bel Air, Beverly Hills, or onto Hollywood sets or movie
26 parties.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 36
Soon the “johns” were ordering both their coke, and their escorts, from their favorite
1

2 madams who would then dispatch both to them paid for on a card or check through their

3 production companies so no cash ever changed hands. All processed through my company for a
4
small processing fee.
5
It was then I was contacted by a man who told me he was a CIA man. Another who told
6

7
me he was a senator, and yet another who told me he was a Beverly Hills cop. The cop easily

8 proved to me his identity by making a sloppy false arrest of me for prostitution for which the
9 charges were dropped hours later. The CIA man and the senator were verified to me who they
10
were through Telecheck reports I ran on them. I also found some news clips on the senator in the
11
library to verify he was who he said he was.
12

13 I was soon asked for help to make all kinds of introductions. You have to realize before

14 there was Google, madams like I was back then were the “google of the underworld”. We knew
15
who sold drugs, who bought them, what lawyers were dirty, which bankers were willing to bend
16
the rules, even who made unmarked guns and counterfeit money.
17
I was paid large sums of money to introduce these men to people like chemists who could
18

19 teach them how to process cocaine from the leaf into the finished drug. They wanted to find a

20 group of dentists who would help them sign the papers to import large quantities of cocaine
21
supposedly for their practices. Pot dealers wanted to meet coke dealers so we’d introduce them.
22
Every was afraid of a wire – so we’d throw a sex party. Everyone would be naked, this would
23

24
prove no one was a cop, and we’d get our business done that way.

25 They especially wanted to know what escorts they could use that were smart enough to
26 not try and steal something from one of their drug dealers and cause trouble, or discrete enough
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 37
to send over to another politicians’ hotel room for a party. I saw nothing illegal or wrong about
1

2 selling information so I had no problem doing this.

3 But then the Beverly Hills cop said he wanted me to run an escort service for them that
4
would service celebrity clients at a known Beverly Hills hotel that was, and still is, very
5
exclusive. Further, he wanted me personally to service some of their more “sensitive” clients
6

7
who they needed to make sure were happy, but that talk about didn’t hit the tabloids or other

8 police or news people. I declined because I didn’t want to be involved in prostitution anymore.
9 I was threatened with another arrest and then raped by this officer to make sure I was
10
“under control” and compliant.
11
E. I WITNESS SEX TRAFFICKING – NOT PIMPING
12

13 Once he thought he had me agreeable to do his bidding, he introduced me to another man

14 who also identified himself as CIA. Between them they asked me to help them find beautiful
15
women who “had no family” who could “disappear and no one would ask questions about where
16
they went”.
17
I asked them what on earth they were talking about, and they explained to me they had
18

19 clients who wanted to “own” white women. That our government had certain business deals

20 they wanted to cement with these men, and these men out in the jungles and deserts wanted the
21
women more than the money.
22
But they needed my help to identity a woman who wouldn’t be missed. They told me
23

24
that all I had to do was send her on a call to an address they’d give me, and someone would be

25 waiting for her there with chloroform to knock her out and then put her on a diplomat’s plane.
26 They offered me $50,000 cash to make this happen for them.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 38
Of course I thought these men were out of their minds or joking with me. I was not doing
1

2 drugs, nor drinking anything at this time in my life. So I was perfectly sane and sober. They

3 explained to me they were already doing this. That the audition tapes for the “Dating Game”
4
were sent overseas to drug lords and oil barons who expressed an interest in American women.
5
That when one was picked, she’d “win” a date. She’d then get on a plane to her “date” she’d
6

7
win, and no one ever asked who didn’t come back from these trips. He even joked if I hadn’t

8 wondered why some of those trips were to some very strange cities and countries. I had.
9 I still couldn’t believe they were serious, so I talked to Cheri knowing she had Hollywood
10
connections. She told me she’d made an audition tape and even been on the “Dating Game”
11
show. I asked if she’d won and she said no. She did mention some of the trips were to very
12

13 strange places. I asked if she’d ever seen an escort do the show and not come back, and she said

14 she actually had lost touch with a few women who she’d referred to the show and won. When
15
she told me she had known two women who hadn’t come back from their “dates”, I got scared.
16
Telling these men to stop yanking my chain, they decided to convince me they were
17
serious. I once had a woman who worked for me who would bounce from pimp to pimp who
18

19 claimed she’d been on the streets hooking since she was 12 years old.

20 They told me they had her and that she was going on that plane, and they were going to
21
prove it to me by picking me up in 15 minutes to take me to the airport.
22
They did and the girl was unconscious in the back seat of the van. I was taken to the
23

24
airport with her. There was a diplomatic plane there. She was loaded onto the plane like a sack

25 of potatoes.
26 At first, I thought it was a bad practical joke. When I realized this was serious, I tried
27
convincing the man who claimed to be CIA to stop this. He assured me that a diplomatic plane
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 39
could not be stopped, nor searched, and that she was “going to be serving her country”. I asked
1

2 him why he was showing me this. He told me that I needed to know he was serious, and I also

3 needed to know I could do nothing to stop it. Even throwing in that if I tried to even talk about
4
this to anyone – that I’d be the one locked up in a psychiatric ward for it as crazy because no one
5
would believe me.
6

7
To prove his point further, he challenged me to try and stop the plane. I ran to the airport

8 security who informed me they couldn’t do anything about a diplomatic plane. I tried calling the
9 police who kept accusing me of being high and hanging up on me. The last call they told me
10
they’d arrest me for lying to the police if I called again. I witnessed the plane leaving with her
11
unconscious body on it and I never saw her again.
12

13 He proved his point. Their offer to pay me to direct them to women who wouldn’t be

14 missed for a finder’s fee was serious. But I still didn’t understand why they would do this to
15
another human being. To allow me to grasp the true gravity of the situation, this man took me
16
down to the pier to witness a boat being unloaded with boxes of cocaine. I was even asked to
17
drive one of the trucks to the processing point where the paste was processed for sale in an empty
18

19 warehouse in Watts. From there, I witnessed other trucks being loaded who dropped off the vials

20 to the crack houses like it was the milk man making a daily delivery because they had me drive
21
one of the trucks. They joked I had to drive because if one of the men drove – we’d be stopped
22
by LAPD thinking I was being “kidnapped” if an African American male drove a white woman
23

24
in the middle of the night in that part of town.

25 They were employing homeless people and gang members to operate these windows at
26 these crack houses day and night. The stronger young male gang members with guns would
27
stand outside in the streets and sell cocaine like it was a drive-thru on certain streets.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 40
The poorer quality cocaine was put into the vials to go to the crack houses. The better-
1

2 quality power was packaged up to go to the San Fernando Valley and the Beverly Hills areas

3 with couriers.
4
A lot of the powder in large amounts was given to the madams to distribute to their
5
clients through their escorts. Then there were the dealers who worked the clubs. Each club had
6

7
a dealer who handled the drug sales for that specific bar or club. One of the biggest stops the

8 courier made was in North Hollywood to a man I’ve seen portrayed in films a lot. He’s easy to
9 recognize because he always wore a speedo and a silken robe. I didn’t know if he was Arab, or
10
Persian or what. I just knew he had black hair and wasn’t American.
11
At the end of my “tour” of southern California, I was taken to an office they had on the
12

13 Paramount studio lot. I asked why I’d been shown all of this. He told me he wanted me to

14 understand that I was alone in this business referring to the fact I didn’t have a pimp. That if I
15
was to continue to operate in this world, then I needed to know that the industry didn’t belong to
16
me and I needed to understand I was part of a larger picture. I was told I “needed to learn my
17
place” within the sex industry and underworld.
18

19 I felt like I was back with Weldon when he was saying he wanted to train me to help

20 “run” things, because this man then explained he needed my help also with the “management”
21
level of this operation. That it was hard to find someone who was over 18 years of age, who
22
wasn’t getting loaded, who wasn’t a thief, who didn’t have a criminal record, and that could just
23

24
as easily go down to Compton as to walk into a bank in Beverly Hills and sign for a lease on a

25 building. As a matter of fact, they needed someone to help them rent some buildings.
26 When I asked for what, he explained they needed to rent houses they could use as holding
27
spots for the drugs and cash, and they needed someone who could walk in and get the lease
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 41
papers signed without raising any questions. They also wanted me to start setting up shell
1

2 companies for them – just as I’d done for myself.

3 He told me that I’d already proven I knew how to do this kind of thing with the set-up I’d
4
just done for myself with the merchant account and Telechek and that’s why they wanted my
5
help. Help for which he told me I’d be paid $10,000 a week plus bonuses.
6

7
Now I ask you, how do I say “no” to this? These men are with cops, the CIA and

8 politicians. They know who I am and where I live. They know where my offices are, who my
9 friends are, and where my family lives. Every one of my clients can be reached because every
10
one of them sees the same pool of prostitutes. These men have just shown me they can knock
11
me out and stuff me onto a plane that no one can stop if they wanted to.
12

13 So I ask you, how do I say no to what they’re asking me to do? Call the police? If I

14 knew of a cop who wasn’t involved in this, how would I call them without being locked up in
15
Olive View (our local psychiatric hospital back then) the minute I tried to explain to them what I
16
was calling for help with?
17
F. I’M ARRESTED WHILE DOING NOTHING WRONG
18

19 The only thing I could think of to do was to run. I didn’t go home. I didn’t go to my

20 mom’s house. I didn’t go to my boyfriend’s house. I went and rented a hotel rom with an indoor
21
restaurant, so I didn’t have to even go outside of it to eat in Sherman Oaks. I was literally sitting
22
in a hotel room having food delivered and doing nothing, when I got a phone call from the desk.
23

24
They told me I had to come move my car because it was parked wrong. As I opened up

25 the hotel room door, I was greeted with a S.W.A.T team that arrested me, the desk clerk and the
26 cab driver that drove me there. The desk clerk and cab driver had been arrested for “deriving
27
earnings from that of a prostitute”, i.e., me.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 42
When I asked what I had been arrested for, I was told they didn’t know yet. I was held
1

2 for 71 and a half hours without being booked and then let go. During those hours I was held, I

3 asked my mother to go get my dog out of the hotel room.
4
She did and told me she found cocaine and a pipe sitting on the dresser in the room.
5
They were not mine. She’d evidentially made it back there before the police could get a warrant
6

7
to come back, find the drugs, and charge me for them. I was lucky my mom believed me those

8 drugs weren’t mine.
9 I called a cab and my attorney told me not to go home, nor to get in my car. My mother
10
snuck into my apartment and found a pound of cocaine stuffed under my bed. She searched my
11
car and found bags of what looked like heroin that were also not mine. LAPD had the
12

13 RAMPART trials after this for doing just this sort of thing as they did to me like planting drugs

14 like that to frame people.
15
Not feeling safe to go home or to anyone I knew, I went to stay with a drug dealer I knew
16
who lived in a gated locked compound who bred Dobermans who patrolled the yard.
17
To build a case against me that would stick, LAPD found a woman who had worked for
18

19 me at the warehouse in the past. She was on probation for a drug charge. They told her they’d

20 lift her probation if she lied to frame me. Agreeing to do this, she called me to say her pimp had
21
just beaten her badly. I don’t know if she did this to make the story appear true or not, but when
22
I went to pick her up, she had two black eyes, and an arm in a cast. I took her to the warehouse
23

24
and told her she could stay there and rest until she was better. I then left her there.

25 I went back to stay with the drug dealer. After a few weeks, she called me to say she’d
26 been arrested for hooking out of the warehouse. I told her I’d bail her out and get her an
27
attorney.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 43
The next day my attorney told me he had received papers that I was being charged with
1

2 pimping this woman out of the warehouse. I wanted to fight it because they clearly didn’t have a

3 shed of evidence. My phones had all been turned off when I started to run and hide from this
4
CIA guy that was scaring the heck out of me that I was going to wind up dead in a ditch
5
somewhere or stuck on one of those planes.
6

7
The woman later told me the cops had forced her to lie about me by threatening to violate

8 her probation if she didn’t and throw her in jail. So I knew from what this other cop had told me,
9 her word wouldn’t be enough to convict me of something.
10
I went to my arraignment. Before I did, I had told my mother not to go in support. She
11
came any way and they arrested her. The charge was pimping me. The DA showed a photo
12

13 they’d taken of me handing her a $20 bill and her handing me back a bucket of KFC chicken.

14 According to him, this proved she had “received money from the earnings of a prostitute” and
15
therefore she was guilty of pimping.
16
I knew the whole thing was being manufactured because I was afraid to play ball with
17
this CIA guy and because I had just wanted to quit everything, go back to school and leave all
18

19 this insanity behind me. I felt like it was the government who had been trying to force me back

20 into prostitution and crime, and I didn’t appreciate it. I told my attorney I wanted to fight it.
21
He told me to come into the office because he had to show me some things. When I
22
came in, he showed me all kinds of things I hadn’t known or even suspected. Like when I had
23

24
been taken on this tour of the cocaine distribution from the pier into Watts and then into the

25 valley, he showed me photos that had been taken of me because of an undercover operation. He
26 showed me proof that a regular of mine who I thought owned a shoe store, that he was really
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 44
using the store as a front to import massage amounts of drugs from Mexico into the USA, and
1

2 because I’d taken money from him, I was involved now in money laundering charges possibly.

3 That day he showed me all kinds of things that had been going on around me for years I
4
hadn’t known about, and told me I was in the middle of something I was clearly in over my head
5
over, but also that I wouldn’t be able to defend myself in this case. He told me I’d be lucky to
6

7
get out of this alive.

8 Remember, this was 1984 when I was arrested. We hadn’t even known of this thing, let
9 along have it even called “Iran Contra” yet. My attorney explained the only way to defend me
10
would be to introduce evidence that the minute he did, the state’s attorney would step in and
11
object based on the needs of “national security” and then I’d be unable to defend myself or my
12

13 mother. In other words, I was royally up a legal creek without a paddle.

14 My attorney told me the prosecutor had said that yes they had manufactured the case
15
against my mother and I. They had done so because they wanted me to testify as to the things
16
I’d witnessed. That if I agreed to testify as to the things I’d witnessed they’d drop the charges.
17
Great choice I was given – 10 years possibly in prison for my mother and I, or get
18

19 murdered because of testifying against very powerful people, or try and fight an impossible case

20 to fight that would probably just piss off the judge and get me more time in prison. If I survived
21
the trial. I knew I’d be murdered whether I was in jail or out so that I wouldn’t testify if I agreed
22
to. I had clients I knew weren’t to happy worried I might say something about them also. Look
23

24
at this whole thing with Stormy Daniels and you have an idea why I had people really worried

25 about what I was going to say to try and save myself from jail.
26 G. WHY I COULDN’T TURN TO THE PROSECUTOR FOR HELP
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 45
I talk about this because I know that not everyone who is involved in a trafficking
1

2 situation CAN just go to the authorities. But that doesn’t mean they don’t need help. Help we

3 can provide them without having to involve the authorities.
4
The sad fact is that not only is that because in some cases it’s because our own
5
government, or law enforcement, is involved in that trafficking, making the prosecution and/or
6

7
defense impossible of the victim/witness, which makes that a suicide mission for the

8 victim/witness – but also because in some cases there’s just no way to build a case against the
9 people who were forcing you. I also didn’t have tiny hidden cameras back then like we do now
10
to get any type of evidence about what was happening to us either.
11
When Gary Webb, a reputable reporter, came forward with the story of Iran Contra, he
12

13 was widely discredited and ridiculed at first. I looked at the heat that man took, and the way no

14 one believed him at first, and I realize there’s no way anyone would have believed me, a simple
15
prostitute, talking about these same exact things back in 1984.
16
Even if I had been believed, even if no one tried to murder me to silence my testimony –
17
what evidence did I have to make anyone believe such a fantastic story?
18

19 Madams used to divide their territory by their area codes. That was because local calls

20 didn’t show up on phone records. In other words, if you called locally only, there were no phone
21
records. So dealers, and madams, used to try and stick to their area codes to not leave traces of
22
their phone calls anywhere.
23

24
To make matters even more complicated, my attorney was then threatened to try and

25 prevent me from having any defense or objection. If he hadn’t been a family friend, I’d have
26 been lost. He told me that he had been warned by the prosecutor if he took a penny from me,
27
they’d arrest him for pimping. As it was, they’d threatened him with an IRS audit to make sure I
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 46
hadn’t “laundered criminal money through him”. He told me LAPD had threatened him into
1

2 resigning my representation, and when that didn’t work they offered him a $250,000 bribe to

3 walk away from my defense. I was very fortunate he didn’t abandon me when I was in a lot of
4
legal trouble and threatened with about 10 years in prison.
5
Even more fortunate he was like a father figure to me. After he explained to me that I
6

7
had no idea how much deep trouble I had really gotten myself into, and he promised me he’d get

8 my mother and I out of this mess, he told me he wasn’t going to take me out of the frying pan
9 into the fire. I asked him what he meant by that.
10
He reminded me of the Beverly Hills prostitution arrest. That this wasn’t the first time I
11
was in legal trouble. He also reminded me I was now 24 years old and not a juvenile anymore.
12

13 That I had now been deemed a “career criminal” by the prosecutor. If I didn’t clean up my act

14 now, I would wind up in prison eventually. He made me promise that if he got me out of this
15
mess – that I would “go straight” and not come back into his office in trouble ever again.
16
I thought of all of the women I had been helping and to agree with him was a struggle. I
17
told him that. To go “straight’ meant many prostitutes wouldn’t trust me anymore, nor come to
18

19 me for help. That if they couldn’t come to me for help, where would they go instead. I was

20 reluctant to leave because I felt like I was helping these people to stay alive in desperate
21
situations where they had nowhere else to turn for help.
22
He then asked me if I really meant that. I did. That’s when he asked me if I knew of any
23

24
advocates who had been successful while living the life of a criminal. That I would be

25 ineffective as an advocate if all police had to do to stop me was arrest me. If I truly wanted to
26 help these women, then I needed to “go legit” and advocate for them from the safe legal outside.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 47
His position made a lot of sense so I shook his hand and promised him I would leave the criminal
1

2 life as he asked if he would get me out of this jam.

3 H. I MANAGE TO REALLY CLEAN UP MY ACT THIS TIME - SORTA
4
He kept his word and I kept mine. I was put on three years of probation and ordered to
5
pay a fine. My probation required me to go to school, get a job, and stay out of trouble. I
6

7
enrolled in Control Data Institute to learn computers, got a waitress job at a coffee shop, and

8 started going to Narcotics Anonymous meetings to get clean. After my arrest, while staying with
9 the drug dealer, I had started using cocaine myself.
10
At my first N.A. meeting, I saw Marilyn Chambers also take a welcome chip. I took this
11
as an omen I was in the right place.
12

13 But now I was on probation, these people who wanted me to help them with their

14 criminal operation, as well as the cop who really wanted me in prison because his ego bothered
15
him I’d got off basically after he arrested me, decided they were going to get me to violate my
16
probation. My phone was tapped. I was followed everywhere I went. I swear I even had
17
someone taking gunshots at me and trying to run me off the road because some people were
18

19 scared of what I’d say to the police and/or the press. I was also pretty shook up when I thought

20 about all the drugs LAPD had tried to plant on me.
21
My attorney advised me they’d have a hard time planting drugs on me if I went to stay
22
with my elderly grandmother who was always home. She would also be my witness that I hadn’t
23

24
killed myself or engaged in any criminal acts. After a woman was killed who was driving my

25 car who looked like me, and another woman almost killed who was at my apartment they
26 thought was me, I agreed to move in with my grandmother. To stay safe while driving because
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 48
it seemed there was always this car that would follow me, and/or shoot at me sometimes, my
1

2 mom would drive me to and from school and work for that first year.

3 But someone would call my employers and I’d be fired after just a few days. I kept
4
getting fired. Needing a job not to have my probation violated, I didn’t know what to do. My
5
attorney suggested whoever it was doing this would be too scared to bother me if I was at a law
6

7
office.

8 For this reason, he suggested I get a legal secretary or paralegal trainee job. Back in
9 1985, there were no schools for this. The only way to learn this type of job was to be trained by
10
a mentor who had a law library.
11
I joined the local Bar Association and after networking with a few lawyers, I found one
12

13 willing to train me. Because of his wonderful mentorship, I’ve been a paralegal ever since 1985.

14 It also worked because I would see what appeared to be an undercover police car following me
15
to work at the beginning. They’d see I was pulling into a law firm parking lot and then they’d
16
turn around and leave. Once a guy pretended to be the phone company to come in and verify I
17
really was working there. When he verified I truly was working there, I wasn’t bothered again
18

19 this way.

20 I. THE CATCH-22 WE’RE PUT IN BY THE LEGAL SYSTEM AND MEDIA
21
Every madam in the country had been arrested in 1984. I was not unique. All of us had
22
been stripped of our money and possessions. We had our names and faces plastered all over the
23

24
media for weeks, so it was impossible to find work. I was lucky in that the DA had changed my

25 name in my case to protect me from any assassination attempt. So my real name hadn’t been
26 blasted on the news as it was with the others. I also cut my hair, gained weight, got colored
27
contacts, and dramatically altered my appearance so no one really connected I was “that madam”
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 49
they’d heard about on the news. The others weren’t so lucky. They couldn’t get any type of job
1

2 because of the press.

3 Not having a penny left and their business destroyed by the arrest, everyone was eager to
4
take the money Hollywood offered all of us for the rights to make a movie about our lives. I
5
noticed that Alex and Sydney had movies go into production about their lives, while Cheri and I
6

7
weren’t seeing any progress.

8 It didn’t make sense to me until in later years I realized Hollywood didn’t want to risk
9 making a movie for people to hear the things Cheri and I would talk about, i.e., Iran Contra is
10
why our movies weren’t being made. The contracts we signed were being used to keep us quiet.
11
The money was just golden handcuffs to keep us happy about being quiet.
12

13 Without my screening service around anymore, I started hearing about a lot of women

14 being murdered. Even more calls were coming in about someone dying from HIV/AIDS. After
15
work, I was going to a lot of hospital rooms and funerals that first year I was on probation.
16
I kept wondering what I could do about it and remembered about COYOTE. Back then,
17
Norma Jean Almodovar was starting a Los Angeles chapter of the group that was started to fight
18

19 for sex workers’ rights. I invited her to lunch because I had seen her on TV talking about her life

20 where she’d once been a cop, and then became a call girl, and she’d been arrested too in 1984.
21
She was still waiting on her sentencing. I couldn’t help but feel her promoting prostitution on
22
TV wasn’t going to help them give her a light sentence in court and told her that.
23

24
After lunch, I was followed home by what appeared to be an undercover car. When I got

25 home, the light was on a device I had to tell me if my phone was tapped. I contacted Norma to
26 let her know she was being watched, and suggested maybe she needed to lay off her TV
27
appearances until after her sentencing. She was adamant she wasn’t going to be silenced. Not
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 50
long after that, she was sentenced to three years of incarceration for giving the phone number of
1

2 a regular to another woman who had said she wanted to see what prostitution was really like who

3 worked with her as a meter maid (cop).
4
I continued to talk to Margo St. James who had founded COYOTE, and also started
5
going to these CATHARSIS meetings that had been started by Norma Ashby, another high-level
6

7
madam whose clients were mostly in the Burbank and Glendale areas of Los Angeles. She had

8 been friends with Chief Gates, so she didn’t get too much time when she was arrested in 1984.
9 On top of holding monthly CATHARSIS meetings as support groups for ex-escorts, Norma also
10
helped Lois Lee with the outreach for Children of the Night.
11
Over 80 % of the world’s porn was produced in the valley back in the 1980’s because
12

13 Hollywood and the cameras and crews are there to make the films before digital cameras were

14 invented. So when any porn performers wanted to get clean, they were coming into the same
15
N.A. meetings I was going to. Because my N.A. meetings, COYOTE, CATHARSIS Children
16
of the Night, and just my old friends like Alex (I didn’t know she was an informant until the
17
story came out in the news in the late 1980’s), were still talking to me – I was hearing about how
18

19 bad things had gotten in the industry since my screening service had been shut down. Murders

20 of prostitutes just soared from what I was hearing in the news.
21
J. OTHER FELLOWSHIPS ARE NOT THE SOLUTION FOR US I FIND AND WHY
22
What I saw over and over again in Narcotics Anonymous was very frustrating. These
23

24
women would come in and want to get clean. Their pimps would come in and drag them out of

25 the meetings because it was a “waste of time” and “money out of pocket”. The pimps would
26 keep drinking and using in front of them, using their money to get high with. They’d come to
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 51
meetings black and blue from beatings because no domestic violence shelter would accept them
1

2 because they were “prostitutes”.

3 In Narcotics Anonymous, to stay clean you work with doing outreach. Every time I tried
4
to get a prostitute into detox, they’d refuse to admit her. They’d admit a bank robber, a child
5
molester, a murderer – but not a prostitute. The sober houses would accept the same scum,
6

7
including rapists and sexual predators, but they wouldn’t accept prostitutes. From 1985 to 1984,

8 I tried working with all kinds of addicts to help them get clean.
9 What I saw over and over again was any time they suspected a woman, or man, was a
10
prostitute, they would be denied services of any kind. Even those paid for out of federal money.
11
I would get calls that even the Skid Row homeless shelter would let them sleep in a bed –
12

13 prostitutes had to sleep on chairs in the church.

14 K. THE DOUBLE-STANDARDS WITHIN THE RECOVERY COMMUNITY
15
I began to see a two-tier system. While I was hearing how the “lie was dead that an
16
addict was always going to be an addict”, I was also seeing people say “a whore is always going
17
to be a whore” and you “can’t make a housewife out of a whore”. This angered me even more
18

19 when I thought of all of the men and women who were being forced into sex work.

20 Which there were different kinds of force. Back in 1980’s, if you wanted a sex change,
21
there was only one way to raise that kind of money for the operation. Health insurance wouldn’t
22
pay for the operation. Most transgenders were kicked out of their homes by about 15 years old
23

24
right onto the streets. So they had no high school diploma, GED or job skills. Most didn’t even

25 have an ID because their identification was for that of a male and they appeared female. The
26 operations weren’t very good back then either. Most looked like a man in a dress. So most were
27
completely unemployable.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 52
So if you were a transgender back then, your only way to support yourself, and even hope
1

2 to pay for your operation to at least pass for female, and not appear like a freak, was to work in

3 the sex industry to pay for the operation. Most street prostitutes were actually transgenders
4
because they were the only ones strong enough to defend themselves against the kinds of attacks
5
one would encounter when prostituting on the streets. Many women who worked the streets
6

7
would pair with a transgender for protection because they still had the strength of a man.

8 Since I didn’t see any other way for them to get their surgery, I didn’t really feel this was
9 a “choice” to be in prostitution either. Especially since most transgenders would quit prostitution
10
once they got the operation and their lives transitioned over. The ones I knew anyway.
11
I had already tried to use my warehouse as a “safe house” and it had gotten me busted
12

13 and on the news, I had no desire to do that again. I saw Lois Lee was doing a wonderful job

14 working with juveniles through Children of the Night.
15
But what I didn’t see being addressed was the needs of the sex industry which were many
16
long after my arrest and retirement from the industry myself.
17
L. I START SEEING THE NEED FOR MORE AND DIFFERENT SERVICES
18

19 My phone was still ringing as it was with prostitutes calling me for help. Please help me

20 get into detox. My pimp just beat me up and I need to get to the hospital. I’ve been arrested, and
21
I need someone to go to my apartment and feed my dog. I’m in the ER and someone needs to
22
pick up my baby from daycare. I just entered drug treatment and my counselor just raped me in
23

24
the back storeroom when he found out I was a prostitute. My probation officer is telling me if I

25 don’t give him a blow job he’s going to violate me and send me back to prison. My boss found
26 out I was arrested for prostitution and now if I don’t blow him then he’s going to fire me. My
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 53
parole officers says I have to have a job but everywhere I go they see my prostitution records and
1

2 won’t hire me. I’m getting out of jail in a week and I have nowhere to go.

3 The list went on about the calls for help I was getting because these men and women
4
knew that I understood their situation, and I not only wasn’t going to judge, I wasn’t going to get
5
anyone thrown into jail over what they were confessing to me.
6

7
During this time I kept looking for some kind of program that would take care of these

8 needs. I knew someone had to be doing this. I spent weeks going down to the UCLA libraries
9 going through their research books, their association directories, the AIDS resource guides, any
10
type of directory I could get my hands on trying to find some agency that would deal with these
11
specific needs. I talked to the rape crisis hotline people, the domestic violence hotline, etc.
12

13 While they offered me their training classes free, they didn’t know of anyone who

14 addressed these specific type of very real problems.
15
There seemed to be this universal myth that the prostitutes only problem was drugs and
16
that once she (never he) got clean, all was well. My case certainly proved this was not the case
17
in many cases.
18

19 M. HOOKERS DON’T HAVE HEALTH INSURANCE GENERALLY

20 As coming from a criminal lifestyle, I didn’t have health insurance. I was working on a
21
new job for peanuts now and still didn’t have benefits. So I didn’t qualify for any type of
22
professional treatment. This left me with having to get what help I could get to change my life
23

24
around for free.

25 Free help meant counseling through the county mental health center with students
26 interning for college credit going to UCLA their rich daddy paid for. Like most addicts and
27
prostitutes, I was uncomfortable sitting in church. Plus, like most addicts and prostitutes, I also
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 54
have ADD, so I had trouble sitting in church for hours also. Nor did I have the wardrobe for it
1

2 either. The men would stare and the women would glare at me at church so it was clear I wasn’t

3 welcome at most of them.
4
N. PROBLEMS WITH OTHER 12-STEP GROUPS
5
The 12-Step programs were free, but not very comfortable. If I went to an A.A. meeting,
6

7
most of the men in the rooms were older johns who were always trying to get me up to their

8 apartment after the meeting to “talk about the program”. The women there were trying to get
9 husbands, or keep their husbands, and wanted nothing to do with a woman like me they
10
considered a threat.
11
When I’d go to the N.A. meetings, I’d have to walk past a line-up of pimps just to get to
12

13 the coffee pot. Before the meeting would even start, I’d be approached by at least five or more

14 pimps. I’d have to avert my eyes so they didn’t think I was “choosing” them in the rooms when
15
all I was doing was trying to get clean. The pimps flocked to N.A. meetings trying to find girls
16
who had cleaned up enough for them to pimp who wouldn’t snort up all the money. It was truly
17
like batting off flies at meetings and very uncomfortable.
18

19 Sexaholics Anonymous had started up right about then, so I tried those meetings. They

20 were filled with rapists, child molesters, and really hard-core johns. The kind who would spend
21
their rent money on prostitutes or their grocery money on porn. Every type of pervert, sexual
22
predator, sexual deviant, and just plain dangerous men were in the SA rooms. I used to have to
23

24
ask for an escort to my car because I didn’t feel safe walking alone in the parking lot with the

25 way these men would stare at me in the meetings. When I’d bring other prostitutes, I was
26 sponsoring to an SA meeting, they’d ask us to leave because we were “disrupting” the other
27
members simply by our presence.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 55
The men coming out of prostitution didn’t have it any easier. If a transgender was in the
1

2 rooms trying to get clean and sober, the other straight sober men would avoid them like the

3 plague because of their “homophobia” or fear others would think they were gay or lovers. With
4
all the talk about “men with men and women with women” they’d be left sitting alone.
5
When they’d go to an SA meeting, they would argue over their definition of sobriety.
6

7
Sexaholics Anonymous defines sexual sobriety as no sex outside of a legal marriage. The gay

8 and lesbian members, the transgenders, etc., would say this was unfair because they couldn’t
9 legally get married. The riff about this got so bad the LGBT population in SA broke off to form
10
Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous. But that didn’t make the prostitutes in the rooms feel any
11
more comfortable there to work on their recovery.
12

13 It was during this time I was trying to work on my own recovery in these rooms, as well

14 as trying to take over “newcomers” under my wing with me in these other existing programs, and
15
it just wasn’t working for me or them.
16
I researched setting up special “specialty” sub-groups within these fellowships just for us
17
to meet. I contacted the main offices of each fellowship, talked over the problem we were
18

19 having as sex workers in the rooms, the need for a separate group, and we had a lot of meetings

20 to talk the problem over.
21
In N.A. and SA, we even tried to run some experimental sub-group meetings. Each time
22
we always ran into conflict over them being a “traditions violation”. Whatever the problems
23

24
were, I wasn’t getting anything out of it and neither did I see it helping the others either.

25 One huge problem we kept running into was when a woman wanted to get clean and
26 away from a pimp. Every place I’d take her to for help would refuse to do so. I would take her
27
to the domestic violence shelter, and she’d be turned away. They said some excuse but the truth
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 56
was they were afraid the pimp was going to show up and harm everyone. Since none of their
1

2 shelters had security, they told me they “had to protect the safety of their staff” when I asked

3 why they were refusing to help these women.
4
I’d try to get them into detox or treatment and we’d be turned away. I’d be given a bunch
5
of excuses, but when we’d talk off the record, they’d also express fear of the pimp plus fear of
6

7
the HIV/AIDS virus. I’d hear once again they “had to protect their staff”. Plus, they were

8 worried about the women “turning tricks while in the program”.
9 The sober living homes would require they have had a job for six months before they’d
10
take them in. The homeless shelter would refuse to take them because they were worried they’d
11
“cause a disruption” among the men.
12

13 Back in Los Angeles, there’d only been one house that had opened up that was designed

14 specifically for prostitutes. That was the Mary Magdalene Project. They would take women in
15
sometimes, but only in certain limited situations. First, no felony convictions. Second, no history
16
of mental illness or drug addiction. Third, she had to be clean and sober at least six months.
17
Fourth, no children or pets. Finally, if they did agree to take her in if she met these conditions, if
18

19 there was a pimp looking for her they had no security to protect her.

20 This was a house of women in Reseda. So if she needed any type of physical protection,
21
this wasn’t the place for her either. They only had six openings also so they were always full.
22
Our of the 1000’s of women in southern California alone that needed help, this one program was
23

24
a drop in the bucket.

25 The MMP has since been absorbed into the Sojourn Program and is now a domestic
26 violence program in Van Nuys and Arizona.. The problem with this is when you mix prostitutes
27
with non-prostitutes in the same shelter, fights always break out where the non-prostitutes try to
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 57
make the prostitutes leave the house. I can tell you story after story of violent physical fights
1

2 that have broken out over just this problem where I’ve had to go and pick up a battered prostitute

3 to take them elsewhere. So it rarely works out to mix these two groups of women.
4
O. MY PHONE KEEPS RINGING FROM THOSE NEEDING HELP
5
I’ve been giving you this history to help you to understand that my phone was ringing
6

7
constantly why I was trying to move on with my life, get clean, and become a paralegal. I had

8 calls for help coming in day and night from these men and women asking me for help, or from
9 some program asking me for help with a prostitute they were dealing with. It’s one of the
10
reasons I didn’t have time for college. Clearly there was a need for the help I was providing –
11
and I couldn’t find anyone else offering it but me.
12

13 By the time I’d get done with work, and then deal with these issues for other people who

14 were in life threatening situations, it was time to go to sleep or back to work again. Not like I
15
was being paid for any of this work either.
16
The later part of 1986, early 1987 was when a perform storm was created that led to me
17
creating the hotline and 12-Step program of Prostitutes Anonymous. The first most critical issue
18

19 we were dealing with was the HIV/AIDS epidemic. There was a bill being discussed to actually

20 round up anyone who might be contagious and put them onto an island so they could be isolated
21
from the rest of the population.
22
This truly scared me because it really reminded me of the gas chambers. Since I was
23

24
newly off drugs and out of prostitution, I was one of the people who was in that “risky” category

25 and I had no desire to be drug off to some remote island somewhere.
26 The second thing was the county of Los Angeles was straining under what the virus was
27
costing them. On top of the cost financially, many county workers were refusing to have
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 58
anything to do with anyone they considered a “risk factor”. If you were a prostitute, gay or an
1

2 IV drug user, then the ER staff was refusing to touch you. Paramedics were refusing to help

3 people like this. Cops were backing away from calls dealing with people like this. I remember it
4
was so bad this was when West Hollywood had to create their own city services such as
5
paramedics, police, hospital staff, etc., because they couldn’t get anyone to work there because
6

7
of the high gay population. They started talking on the news about how many jail guards were

8 refusing to come to work because of their fear of contracting HIV/AIDS from the prostitutes and
9 the gay inmates.
10
Right about this time, and because IV drug use was one of the main means of
11
transmitting the HIV virus, some of the first drug courts were being set up. On top of the drug
12

13 courts, I was seeing all kinds of clean needle outreach teams being put on the streets. I was

14 watching millions of dollars being pumped into opening up detox centers for addicts. Police
15
were getting training in how to aid drug addicts. Addicts coming out of jail were getting housing
16
vouchers to stop them from possibly spreading the HIV virus. Everywhere I was looking, I was
17
seeing addicts getting all kinds of services being handed to them suddenly because of the
18

19 HIV/AIDS crisis. Even the LGBT community was getting a huge influx of money to provide

20 them with services to try and stem the spread of the virus.
21
But for us - I saw nothing being done. What was clear to me was society was asking
22
prostitutes to get out of that line of work, while providing them not only with no support or
23

24
guidance or options they could use to make this transition. Then to add insult to injury, they

25 were making it impossible for them to let go of the only means of survival they had. They
26 weren’t even getting the same level of support that a heroin junkie, a wino drunk, a rapist, a wife
27
beater, or a child abuser were getting from the system. Even a rapist was being allowed to get
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 59
court ordered into therapy and SA meetings instead of jail – while they were talking about
1

2 rounding up prostitutes and leaving them on an island. Something needed to be done.

3 The final straw for me came when Joe Conforte, the owner of the Mustang Ranch legal
4
brothel in Nevada decided he wanted to expand into California as his solution to the HIV/AIDS
5
crisis. He had bought a study he rigged to make it appear none of the brothel prostitutes were
6

7
infected with HIV. To him, that was how he was going to get California to agree to let him

8 expand his operation by using propaganda that legal brothels was going to stop the spread of
9 HIV.
10
P. THE FCC SAVED CALIFORNIA FROM LEGALIZED BROTHELS
11
Back in this time period, the FCC had a requirement that the media had to adhere to. If
12

13 anyone was going to appear on TV, radio, or do an interview for a newspaper or magazine, their

14 opinion had to be accompanied by an equal opposing opinion. Joe’s problem was he couldn’t
15
get anyone to go on the record with him as an opponent because of how scared people were of
16
him. He was believed to be connected to the mafia for one. For another, he had murdered a
17
famous Argentina. boxer in cold blood right in front of a cop, and never served a day in jail.
18

19 Besides, who wanted to go on air as opposing legalized prostitution or Joe?

20 The media was quite heavily promoting prostitution back then as a “victimless crime”.
21
Playboy, Penthouse, Gent, Chic, were all huge household names in porn. The adult film “Deep
22
Throat” had been a HUGE success. Strip clubs, massage parlors, bath houses, were spreading
23

24
rapidly back then along with the idea of the sexual revolution.

25 All of these factors were coming together at once. Right about this time, I wasn’t sure
26 what to do.
27
I reached out to then California Attorney General Edwin Meese.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 60
I asked him what we could do to set something up where the prostitutes were treated
1

2 more like the addicts were – more like someone in need of services than that of a criminal.

3 He assured me the day of decriminalizing prostitution would never come in his opinion.
4
The best I could hope for was to set up an option for the courts to offer some alternative to
5
incarceration when sentencing, as well as a diversion program to at least stop the incarceration of
6

7
them when convicted.

8 Q. FORMING A 12-Step GROUP SOLVES MANY PROBLEMS EASILY
9 When I went over the options with him of how we could accomplish this, it was clear that
10
the formation of a 12-step group was the most cost effective efficient quickest way to be able to
11
set up these types of alternatives.
12

13 Plus he explained to me about all of the laws we’d be able to benefit from that would be

14 grandfathered into us because of A.A. and N.A.’s previous legal precedence that had been set.
15
For one, how N.A. had already had a law passed so felons on probation or parole could
16
go to a meeting without getting violated. Something we’d have to think about for our prostitutes
17
who were on probation or out on parole.
18

19 Coincidently, A.A. was having a huge conference in Reseda right about then to discuss

20 what they were going to do to get the addicts and the prostitutes out of their program.
21
I managed to get invited, and this allowed me to have very long talks with some of the
22
top people from the A.A. General Office about how they felt about the prostitutes in their
23

24
program that were coming in more numbers because of the HIV/AIDS crisis.

25 Bottom line – we weren’t welcome.
26

27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 61
R. WE DECIDE TO LAUNCH OUR OWN 12-STEP PROGRAM
1

2 After talking it over with all of these people, it was decided the best option was for us to

3 form our own, separate, 12-Step program. We sent out the invites and launched the program,
4
and it’s connected hotline, on August 15, 1987.
5
VI. OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS
6

7
California Attorney General Edwin Meese, Sheriff Sherman Block, Chief Darryl Gates,

8 and Mayor Tom Bradley – welcomed us with open arms. Mayor Bradley set up a task force for
9 us where we helped to create the first ever alternative sentencing and diversion program for
10
prostitutes, as well as organize an outreach to the sex industry with respect to HIV/AIDS.
11
Many other programs were launched because of the success of this task force. Within
12

13 one-year HIV infection among sex workers had gone down from 86 % to less than 6 percent –

14 less than that of non-sex workers.
15
Since our launch, I’ve gone over old phone bills to calculate we’d answered over 550,000
16
incoming calls since 1987. The vast majority of those calls have been from a man or woman
17
wanting help to exit the sex industry. Maybe 10 % of those calls have been from social workers,
18

19 therapists, police officers, or concerned family members wanting to know how they can help

20 someone to get out of the industry or away from a pimp or trafficker. About 5 % of our overall
21
calls have been from, or above, someone who was being forced in some fashion into sex work
22
and needing help to get out because of a person(s) preventing them from leaving. Half of the
23

24
calls are coming from someone who says they are not an addict or alcoholic and they don’t

25 believe they have a drug or alcohol problem.
26 In all of these cases, they do not believe they can get help from the local authorities. In
27
half of these calls, they believe the authorities are involved in the problem in some way whether
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 62
ir be that they’re the traffickers, or they’re taking a bribe to look the other way. We ask because
1

2 we need to know if we can talk to the local authorizes about their situation.

3 We’ve averaged the numbers, and we get five times more calls directly from the
4
prostitute than the National Trafficking Hotline.
5
In all of the calls we get, they say they don’t believe they would get help from the
6

7
National Trafficking Hotline “because they’re not being trafficked” and because they don’t have

8 another survivor answering the phone. Every caller calls because a survivor in recovery is
9 answering the phone, and because we do not report to the police.
10
Every single caller to our hotline tells us they were “not trafficked”. A tiny percentage,
11
maybe about 2 % will self-identify as having a “pimp”.
12

13 In 2017, we took a poll of the women inside of the Las Vegas City Jail. Out of 120

14 women who earned their living as prostitutes, not one of them self-identified as a “trafficking
15
victim”. None identified their pimp/trafficker as such – but instead as only their “husband” or
16
“man” or “boo”
17
We do not list the phone number as an office because we don’t want the number to be
18

19 able to be able to show up on the caller ID so that anyone getting into their phone will know why

20 they called our number. When we get a call from an angry boyfriend or husband asking “what is
21
this number?” we just reply it “must have been a wrong number”. If anyone looks up our phone
22
number in a reverse directory, hopefully it will appear to simply be a residential phone number.
23

24
We also set up “dummy” sites with our phone number as further “cover”. We’ve set up

25 sites for psychic readings with our hotline number so that snoopy boyfriends will think their
26 girlfriend called our number for a psychic reading. We’ve ran ads for selling cars, or legal
27
services. We’ve even run help wanted ads for strip clubs and escort services so that a pimp
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 63
might think she was calling us looking for work. We do this because if a pimp thought this
1

2 woman was calling our hotline for help to leave him he would be liable to do her harm.

3 This is not something the National Trafficking Hotline can, or does, do to cover up what
4
their phone number is about. Even with all these “dummy” sites, our online main website traffic
5
was averaging 190,000 views per month.
6

7
When we first started the program, we got the word out by running public service

8 announcements. Frances Nuyen, the actress from Joy Luck Club and South Pacific, volunteered
9 to do these for us in 1987. She recorded 15, 30 and one-minute commercials on broadcast tape
10
that we were able to run for free on radio and TV channels across the USA. Back then, the FCC
11
required every broadcaster to donate a certain portion of their time to grass roots groups like
12

13 ours. These PSA’s cost us nothing. To produce them, they would let film students make them

14 for us so we didn’t have to pay for production either. The stations would even duplicate them for
15
us. All we had to do was mail them to each station.
16
Then late night when they had unsold commercial time, they would run our commercials
17
for the hotline. Since late night was the best time for us, this caused our hotline to ring all night
18

19 every night because of PSA’s running in every major city. Our phone bills at $0.25 a minute

20 were costing me $1,000 a month just to keep the phone on because of the hotline calls.
21
Local cable stations used to teach film students how to produce TV shows by letting them
22
produce a 30-minute weekly show for us. There was a station in Santa Monica and Canoga Park
23

24
that gave us 30 minutes a week to broadcast on their cable stations. For the Santa Monica

25 station, we would record a PA meeting and broadcast it. For the other meeting, I’d interview a
26 member as to her story of recovery. These shows also brought us in a lot of new members.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 64
Every year to keep their broadcast license, the stations had to show they’d “done
1

2 something worth while for their community”. This meant they’d invite us on a lot to interview

3 us about our work. The news would bring us on about once a month. Channel 9 did a two-hour
4
documentary on our work. ABC radio used to have me go on the Michael Jackson show once a
5
year and that’s how I met Gloria Allred was on her radio show on ABC radio.
6

7
Since the FCC required opposing opinions, we always got to meet people who had

8 opposing views to us and had some very useful discussions this way. These shows we did
9 accomplished more than outreach – they raised awareness about what the realities of prostitution
10
were in the American mind. Awareness that without which I highly doubt the Trafficking Act of
11
2000 would have ever passed. If we hadn’t spent 13 years raising the public awareness that sex
12

13 trafficking was real and did require different laws than we already had – it wouldn’t have passed.

14 These shows did more than outreach to the viewers at home. On one Sally Jesse Raphael
15
show, Joe Conforte came on with three of his prostitutes with me as the opposition. At the end
16
of the hour, one of the women came up to me and asked me to help her leave Joe right on the
17
spot. We were in Chicago so I sent her to the Genesis House program that was operating there at
18

19 the time. That’s where I first met Brenda Myers-Powell. When Edwina Gately shut down

20 Genesis, Brenda picked up the PA meetings and is still operating them today years later.
21
Even newspapers would donate us free ad space. Because of these FCC requirements, we
22
were allowed to advertise nationally. Because of this, from 1987 when we launched, until the
23

24
Telecommunications Act of 1995 passed, we had chapters of PA in every major city of the USA.

25 These cities included LA, San Diego, San Francisco, Hollywood, Orange County, Tarzana.,
26 Lancaster, Las Vegas, Sacramento, Oakland, Portland, Detroit, Seattle, Phoenix, Dallas, Austin,
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 65
New York, Charlotte, Miami, Orlando, Fort Lauderdale, Philadelphia, Atlantic City, Orange,
1

2 Chicago, and on up into Vancouver, Ontario and Victoria Canada.

3 Because we had a group in every city, we had to have a meeting place. Not many places
4
were willing to rent a place for hookers to congregate because it’s actually illegal to rent any
5
type of housing to a prostitute, even for two hours.
6

7
So we had a huge dilemma. This was resolved by the Salvation Army and Catholic

8 Charities. They gave us a free meeting space in each one of their shelters in the cities we had
9 meetings at for free. This was in return for providing services to the women in their shelters so it
10
wasn’t a violation of traditions in that it was a ‘fair trade” rather than a “donation”.
11
We had a few meetings inside of the jails. I started a meeting in Sybil Brand Womens’
12

13 Jail in 1987. This evolved into the mens’ jail for the transgenders and pimps.

14 That evolved into the first alternative sentencing and diversion program in LA for adults
15
in their history. This was so effective that I was asked to duplicate this in Allentown,
16
Pennsylvania in 1988.
17
By 1989, I had launched the Program for Female Offenders in Allentown with Ruth
18

19 Wernick. Because that program was so effective, they were able to delay the building of a new

20 jail that had been severely overcrowded. The money they saved allowed them to form an office
21
to provide services to children and the elderly.
22
I also started a meeting in the Atlantic City and Philly jails while I was running the
23

24
Allentown program. All of the women we worked with, save for two who were bipolar, got out

25 of prostitution and clean through those programs.
26 Norma Hotaling would never have founded SAGE without us. In 1989, when she
27
decided to get clean, she reached out to us for help. For two years, I sponsored her on the
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 66
telephone. She felt the local women needed more than what a 12-step program offered and she
1

2 founded SAGE about 1991 in San Francisco.

3 Paige Latin used to run our Miami, Florida PA meetings. She saw me on a Geraldo show
4
and quit that day. After running the Miami meetings a while, she decided to return to Canada.
5
When she got to Canada, she started a local chapter there. Feeling the women there needed a
6

7
crisis drop-in center, she created SPACE. The first ever drop-in crisis center for prostitutes and

8 addicts in Vancouver. Soon after launch, she shortened it to PACE.
9 After the death of her father, Paige turned this program over to the others there, and it
10
became the PACE-Society that’s still providing services today to prostitutes.
11
I knew of others like in Phoenix where Kathleen Mitchell had started a meeting in the jail
12

13 there. She wrote us after seeing us on TV. We worked our “inmate mail order step study”

14 program with her, and when she was released – it was the last time she went back. Since she’d
15
been arrested over 50 times before – this was a miracle. That Durango jail meeting she started
16
after her release evolved into the Dignity Project in Arizona. which ran for over 20 years.
17
Brenda took over the Genesis meeting and that evolved into Project 17 in the Cook
18

19 County jail in Chicago, Illinois. Her program has been featured in three documentaries – one by

20 Oprah, and the last is airing on Showtime now called “Dreamcatchers”. NONE of these
21
programs, or advocates, would have benefited this country had they not first come through our
22
hotline, and program, and been at least inspired by us.
23

24
The sheer explosion of our program on the scene allowed us to write and publish our

25 Recovery Guide by 1991. It’s the world’s first and only book on recovery from prostitution
26 written by ex-prostitutes in publication. We have this book currently for sale online on our site,
27
with Lulu.com and with Amazon.com also.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 67
When Annie Lobert came to Vegas to leave prostitution, she called our hotline. In her
1

2 case, she felt the women of Vegas needed a house and also a more religious base so she created

3 “Hookers for Jesus” and the “Destiny House”. Annie’s program has been featured on Bravo,
4
Joyce Meyer and the 700 Club.
5
Shelley Lubben contacted us the year she came into recovery after hearing about us
6

7
through AIM. AIM was a medical testing center that focused on the adult film industry and sex

8 workers only founded by Dr. Sharon Mitchell who used to be a porn performer.
9 I met Sharon when working on a task force created by mayor Tom Bradley in LA created
10
to put together not only that first alternative sentencing and diversion program we did, but also a
11
specialized AIDS outreach project focusing on the sex industry. Tom helped Sharon get through
12

13 a special medical program in just two years that allowed her to open AIM so that sex workers

14 had a testing site they could feel comfortable going to – and thus would go to more often.
15
Shelley also felt a more religious approach was needed and launched the Pink Cross.
16
Harmony Dust contracted AIDS in the industry, and also contacted us after a referral
17
from AIM. She then partnered with a local church in North Hollywood and launched her own
18

19 program.

20 I helped Sharnel Silvey to get clean and out of prostitution who used to madam at the
21
Mustang Ranch. Years later, she formed the first alternative sentencing program in northern
22
Nevada which ran for about two years. She also helped to get Joe out of the ranch and the
23

24
country by turning over his real books to the IRS.

25 I doubt these other programs would have launched if not for coming into contact with our
26 program first through our hotline, and then getting inspired to do something “more” than what
27
we were doing. After A.A. was founded, the whole recovery field was developed. We are part
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 68
of this process of evolution. The whole sex trafficking field would not have been created had it
1

2 not been for the founding of our hotline/program.

3 Our most important accomplishment I believe is the passing of the Trafficking Act of
4
2000 and the founding of Polaris. Prior to the year 2000, there were no laws on the books
5
making it illegal to traffic, coerce, force, or sell an adult American person. If you inquired back
6

7
in the 70’s, 80’s and even 90’s, about the idea of “white slavery”, you’d hear “oh that’s dead and

8 gone”. People of America didn’t believe that “white slavery” existed anymore.
9 When the pill was invented in the 1960’s, the sexual revolution was created along with
10
the womens’ movement. Playboy launched an empire of which his magazine was just a tiny
11
part. There was the mansion parties, the nightclubs, the bunny costumes, even the exclusive Key
12

13 Clubs and his TV show that only the hip stars got to appear on. Playboy created a culture in

14 America that believed prostitution was a “victimless crime”.
15
This culture allowed Joe to create the first legal brothel in Nevada in 1973. This culture
16
led adult films out of adult theaters into the mainstream media. Hookers were glamourized what
17
with books and movies like the “Happy Hooker” that hit the NY Best Seller List in the 70’s.
18

19 Dolly Parton portrayed a madam in the hit “Best Little Whorehouse in Texas”. Gypsy Rose Lee

20 went from being a stripper to a talk show host and broadway author.
21
Films like “Thoroughly Modern Millie” with Julie Andrews in 1968 even poked musical
22
satire at the idea of Asians being involved in sexual slavery of white women in New York. The
23

24
term even of “sex trafficking” didn’t even exist prior to the year 2000.

25 For 13 years, our program bombarded the media with interviews, talk shows,
26 documentaries, PSA’s, articles, and all sorts of firsthand accounts that raised the American
27
consciousness about the fact not all who were in sex work were “Happy Hookers”. We were the
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 69
people though our stories who raised awareness that we needed better laws than we currently had
1

2 on pimps – we needed laws to cover how organized crime trafficked us. Crimes that were going

3 not only unpunished, but completely unnoticed even before.
4
Our hotline wasn’t just getting calls from victims of trafficking or prostitutes needing
5
help. We also were getting calls from Attorney Generals who thought the system needed to
6

7
change to. In fact, I remember hearing the list of the 22 Attorney General’s that George W. Bush

8 fired for “no reason” and remember thinking those were the same AG’s who had been calling me
9 on conference calls talking about how we “needed to do something” to provide services for
10
American victims of forced prostitution.
11
These conference calls, and networking that we accomplished though the connecting of
12

13 like-minded people, was how we coordinated the people who made the Trafficking Act of 2000

14 possible.
15
Our hotline, and media, was the point of control that brought everyone together. I have
16
contacted historians who have told me the “human slavery” movement had actually ended years
17
before I took up the mantle – and this time including prostitutes. Something which the author,
18

19 Michael Horowitz, has been quoted by reporter Tom Ragan in 2013 as saying is a movement

20 that’s “become a federal entitlement program now”.
21
If the Trafficking Act of 2000 hadn’t passed, granting federal recognition to sex
22
trafficking victims’ the official status as “victims” and not “criminals” across the board without
23

24
exception like we had before, I guarantee you Polaris would not have been created two years

25 later.
26 They wouldn’t have had the funding to do so otherwise. All made possible because of
27
our work, our hotline, our program, our outreach efforts.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 70
VII. OUR CHALLENGES, THREATS AND BARRIERS
1

2 I could go on about these years and how many people we saved, as well as how many

3 programs have sprouted out of our work, but I need to talk about how the Telecommunications
4
Act of 1995 almost destroyed us. Once that Act passed, it was like someone pulled a plug on us.
5
The main basic reasons we were able to get onto TV, radio, and in print were now suddenly not
6

7
required of the media any longer. Without being required to do these things – the media refused

8 to do them. Why would they when the people who advertise sexual services for money pay them
9 so much better to run oppositional ads and viewpoints to ours?
10
After this Act passed, I received calls from the TV and radio stations to let them know
11
where to mail my tapes. They were no longer going to air so they wanted to get rid of them.
12

13 They said I could buy commercial time if I wanted to, but they weren’t giving me any discounts

14 on the price. Since no one would broadcast the tapes, and I couldn’t afford to pay for the postage
15
to have them returned to me, I told these stations to throw them out.
16
Without our PSA’s running daily, we no longer got calls from the local agencies like the
17
police, social workers, probation officers, judges, attorneys, etc., who were aware of our
18

19 program. This meant we had no way of doing outreach to those who gave us referrals either.

20 Without the PSA’s, without the referrals, we ceased to have new members coming into
21
the meetings. Since most members get on their feet, married, pregnant, etc., at about the two-
22
year mark where they leave us, by 1997, our meetings were almost all decimated. We were left
23

24
with maybe a handful of meetings in our main cities of LA, NY, Dallas, Portland, San Francisco,

25 San Diego, Vegas, Oakland and Vancouver, Canada by 1996 once we had no PSA’s.
26 I have since tried to get some PSA’s on network TV. In 2016, I contacted some stations
27
like CBS and NBC. I was told I had to get a commercial from the Ad Council in NY to have a
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 71
PSA air with them free. When I contacted them, they said it would cost us $150,000 to have a
1

2 PSA produced. So much for that idea.

3 By 1996, once we realized the adult filters were blocking us on the computers and the
4
internet, we were hardly getting any incoming calls at all. We were mostly left with the clients
5
who were coming through the Salvation Army and Catholic Charities at that time.
6

7
I had married and relocated to Nebraska after the 1994 Sherman Oaks earthquake –

8 which was right before this bomb went off in 1995. If I had known, I wouldn’t have left Los
9 Angeles. Because I hadn’t known, I was up in Nebraska buying safe houses for our members
10
because they could be had for $5000 each and employers were easy to find. I now had 10 houses
11
I owned for safe houses, and no calls coming in from women in need. I still was getting a few
12

13 calls coming through the Children of the Night hotline when someone over 18 years old would

14 call them for help. Other than that, we had nothing.
15
When we realized we were being blocked on the internet, and that this was where
16
everyone was now going to find resources like us, this is when we had to change our name to
17
Sex Workers Anonymous to survive. The decision was made and it worked. Once we started
18

19 getting listed in the major search engines like AOL (back then), yahoo, Alta, Google, etc., our

20 call volume started going back up again.
21
Between about 1995-1997, we had a lot of police departments providing us with referrals.
22
Vice officers used to call us up for books and flyers they’d pass out to the prostitutes on the
23

24
stroll. They’d find us online. We were still getting referrals from courts where the prostitute

25 was asking to attend our meetings as an alternative to incarceration and it was being granted to
26 her. This was when we started our first online and phone meetings for their purposes. We’d sign
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 72
their court cards and they were even able to get their records expunged. In Detroit, you couldn’t
1

2 get off your first year of probation without having attended our meetings for a year.

3 This weird shift happened about 1997, that I didn’t understand for some time. When we
4
started our program, I understand there were only two for profit prisons in the USA.
5
As of 2016, I understand that 86 percent of the countries facilities are now for profit.
6

7
Back in the 1980’s, to arrest and incarcerate a prostitute used to come out of the county or state

8 budget as an expense.
9 Today, the county and state RECEIVES money based on the number of days a person,
10
even a prostitute, is incarcerated. What we have here is a financial incentive to now incarcerate
11
people we didn’t have in the 1980’s.
12

13 Only they’re not arrested anymore on a prostitution charge if it can be helped. The

14 reason is simple – laws require if someone is arrested for prostitution they have to be tested for
15
HIV. One-year Las Vegas showed an 80 % infection rate among prostitutes. This was “bad for
16
tourism”. In fact, it’s downright scary. To mask the true rate of local infection among a town’s
17
prostitutes, the normal procedure now is to hold someone on “trespassing” or “loitering” charges
18

19 where this HIV test is not mandatory. Juveniles haven’t been tested at all since 2015. This

20 means we have no statewide statistics on the HIV rates among prostitutes available to us.
21
Besides, if the jail knew the inmate was infected, special precautions would have to be
22
taken that cost them money. Jails are money making proposition these days, so this eats into
23

24
their profits. Much cheaper to just throw everyone all together in one room.

25 Why bother? There are quotas now to how many people need to be incarcerated daily in
26 this country now. At the same time, there’s no budget given to the police to conduct any type of
27
complex investigations. This makes prostitutes a prime target to be picked up by police on any
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 73
charge they can think of – even it that’s to hold them as a “witness” to sex trafficking as is
1

2 popular these days.

3 I’d like to quote the Dallas, Texas Head of Vice who I talked to in 2015 about this. He
4
told me, “We are not given a budget to properly investigate high level criminals. We’re not
5
given a budget at all. But we are given a quota of people we need to lock up. Now you tell me
6

7
what our options are on how to lock up someone cheap and easy to keep our jobs and our budget

8 other than a prostitute. Busting hookers and johns is the cheapest, fastest, safest way to meet our
9 quota on our budget to do our job and until that changes, I’m locking up any prostitute I can get
10
my hands on.”
11
Compare this to a phone call I received from Allentown in 1988 when they BEGGED
12

13 me to come help them find a way to “get the prostitutes out of their jails because the cost is

14 killing them to keep up with.”
15
I understand Clinton passed IIRIRA in 1996 requiring 36,000 people to be in detention
16
on any given day. Yep – that’s right. We now have a QUOTA of people that have to be in
17
detention daily – while no extra investigation funds have been cut loose. Especially none to
18

19 investigate complex sex trafficking operations.

20 Now those people have to come from somewhere. In light of these new changes to the
21
system, I no longer have the support and encouragement of the criminal justice system to provide
22
us with referrals to our hotline and program in order to accomplish their goals. I also no longer
23

24
have the benefit of free national advertising to accomplish our goals. I’m swimming entirely

25 upstream here now in other words.
26 Think about it – when locking up prostitutes COST money – they wanted to give them to
27
us to put into an alternative sentencing program. But now we have a quota to fill, and the federal
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 74
government is paying money based on the number of people locked up each year – there’s now
1

2 an incentive to lock up as many people as possible, as long as possible, and as cheap as possible.

3 Welcome to the new system of “protective custody” many women are being subjected to in the
4
name of “rescuing” them from “sex trafficking”. Women are now literally been kidnapped off
5
the street by the police, held without a call to an attorney, no speedy trial, and not even allowed a
6

7
phone call – because they’re not being “prosecuted” – they’re being “questioned”. That might

8 explain why suddenly these courts want to act like they can’t remember our name when we’re
9 the reason prostitution courts got started in the first place.
10
Also, we haven’t received multi-million dollars grants from Google like Polaris has that
11
runs the national Trafficking Hotline. A hotline who serves a small portion of the population we
12

13 do I need to add here. Nor have we received a huge grant from the federal government to

14 operate our hotline as Polaris has either.
15
Since Bradley Myles co-founded Polaris with his wife, Kathryn Chon, who was also the
16
Director of Victim Services, that issued $300,000 grants yearly to Polaris for their hotline, it’s
17
not like they’re going to give us that kind of money for our operation, nor can they since we are a
18

19 12-step program. Since Katherine was in charge of issuing the grant money through the Office

20 of Victim Services when she was the director, and she gave that grant money to Polaris for their
21
hotline, and not ours, all of those agencies took that to mean they shouldn’t be using our hotline
22
also for the prostitutes within their programs out of respect to Katherine.
23

24
No one wants to bite the hand that feeds them, especially with grant money being so hard

25 to get. To ensure they stayed in her good graces, everyone in the country shifted over to using
26 the national Trafficking Hotline for their prostitution referrals – even if it didn’t make any sense.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 75
I say that because of the complaints I’ve been hearing out of the clients who have found
1

2 us online and complained to me saying “I don’t know why they gave me that number when I

3 wasn’t being trafficked but I sure as hell needed help to quit prostitution”. The situation created
4
a “Natural monopoly” that wasn’t anyone’s deliberate causing nor fault.
5
Here’s what it looks like – because of the Telecommunications Act of 1995, I was forced
6

7
to move from Nebraska to Las Vegas. With national free advertising – I could live anywhere.

8 Without it, I had to choose the city I thought needed me the most to reside in so I could focus on
9 that region.
10
That was Las Vegas. I made that decision because the women in the legal brothels have
11
no transportation out of there when they want to leave. No other state has that problem but
12

13 Nevada. There literally are no buses, cabs, commercial flights, nothing out of there for them to

14 get a ride out away from their pimp. Especially when the managers won’t release the women
15
their own money – but instead only give it to the pimp. When they call us for help from there -
16
they need a ride across half the state.
17
So I was forced to sell all my property, shut down my business, take my husband and
18

19 child and relocate to Las Vegas. I choose Vegas because my daughter was in school and I

20 needed my mother to babysit if I went to pick someone up and she lived in Vegas. (My husband
21
hating Vegas went back to Nebraska and this cost me my marriage.)
22
Once people knew I was in Vegas, we would get calls from Social Services, Metro, the
23

24
courts, Shade Tree, Salvation Army, everyone. Even Children of the Night used to get 2/3 of her

25 girls from Las Vegas back then she told me.
26

27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 76
Polaris was created in 2002. By the year 2007, Judge Voy creates a special court for
1

2 prostitutes because of a grant he got because of the press conference I held to announce a report

3 I’d helped to get done at the request of the State Dept. about sex trafficking needs in Nevada.
4
By 2009, Katherine Chon, through the Office of Victim Services, is the person issuing
5
money to Polaris AND to places such as Shade Tree, and other nonprofits in Las Vegas. Polaris
6

7
then comes to town and donates money to Metro, and four billboards with THEIR hotline

8 number on it only to be posted around Las Vegas.
9 Now I ask you – with Chon cutting grant checks does that send a message that referring
10
calls to us is going to be warmly welcomed by these same offices and nonprofits? Needless to
11
say, ALL CALLS from Metro, Social Services, the courts, Shade Tree, Salvation Army, every
12

13 single agency in Las Vegas except one I won’t name, has stopped any and all calls to us about

14 anything once federal grant checks started coming from Katherine Chon. We weren’t even
15
getting referrals from the jail, the mental health department or the rape crisis center after that
16
billboard donation from Polaris. Not when there was important federal grant money on the line.
17
I didn’t have the personal funds to incorporate the hotline as a nonprofit to even think of
18

19 applying for a grant until 2013 when someone took pity on me and donated the money so I

20 could. I say that because our members again don’t usually get on their feet financially until their
21
second year in recovery. Since my stroke in 2003, I only make $720 a month in SSI.
22
By then, they’re usually on their way and forget about us – which is as it should be.
23

24
Alcoholism and drug addiction are lifelong diseases. They require lifelong support. Our

25 situation however isn’t a “disease” therefore we don’t require lifelong support. The average time
26 our members need our services is about two years. So just about the time they’re able to be
27
financially stable, they’re on their way out of our program.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 77
With our monthly expenses averaging $1000 a month to keep the hotline on, and no
1

2 money coming in the door, and I personally have been existing on SSI disability since my stroke

3 in the year 2000 – I was not able to even raise the money to incorporate until that donation came
4
to us in 2013.
5
Let’s talk for a moment about the church that started working against us also. The TVRA
6

7
of 2003 was passed revising the Trafficking Act of 2000. What this did in plain English was

8 give over the money intended for sex trafficking victims to the control of “faith-based groups”.
9 This was done by Randall Tobias and George W. Bush. Once this money was given to the
10
church to control, they welded it.
11
In 2003, my phone starts ringing off the hook. Call after call is coming in from all of our
12

13 meetings all over the USA that were held in Salvation Army or Catholic Charities shelters. The

14 secretaries are telling me, “We just got asked to leave and we’re now banned from even coming
15
onto the property.”
16
This made no sense to me as our program was very effective. When I had the Allentown
17
program, the DOJ had done a study on us that found we were very effective. We only got shut
18

19 down when they realized they’d get a million-dollar grant if they opted to build that bigger jail

20 after all. Overcrowded they got too once they shut down our program there in Pennsylvania. It
21
wasn’t just one person either – this happened to every single chapter in the country.
22
Not content with just the meeting, every single one of our members who had jobs with
23

24
these people as outreach workers, case managers, hotline operators, you name it and if they were

25 a member of our 12-step program, they were fired as well as banned from their property. I was
26 stumped as to why until the year 2004. That was because some friends sent me copies of some
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 78
grant applications that went out asking for grant money from these new trafficking victim funds
1

2 to fund the replacements of what they’d just trashed. Now I understood the game plan.

3 We moved the meetings, and I tried to get these agencies to provide us with the clients
4
we’d been working with. They flat out refused to even speak to us.
5
When I tried to find out why, I finally had someone tell me that they were “forbidden to
6

7
work with, or even talk to, anyone who wasn’t in the Freedom Registry”. When I asked what

8 that was, I was told it was a list of people who had signed the “prostitution pledge”. That
9 essentially was a pledge that took the position prostitution was “not a job but a human rights
10
violation like rape”. Further, that no medical services would be provided that had any
11
connection to birth control or abortion.
12

13 It seems because we always encouraged new members to get HIV and STD testing so we

14 could determine what their health issues were, and also a general physical because we found
15
many of our members suffer from thyroid problems, and because we couldn’t sign this “pledge”
16
because “having an opinion on an outside issue” would violate our Traditions, we were not in
17
this Freedom Registry, and thus they would lose their funding from the Catholic Bishops if they
18

19 so much as even spoke to us was what I was told.

20 A few years later, I saw the ACLU win their lawsuit against the Catholic Bishops for
21
wielding their wallet this way with nonprofits, but it’s not like we had any way of getting the
22
news out to anyone without any of our free PSA options left open to us. It wasn’t being shouted
23

24
out in the news either. I doubt the Bishops sent out an announcement about their loss to

25 everyone either.
26 Meaning we were now completely blacklisted within these places operated, connected to,
27
supported by, affiliated with, or having anything to do with the church. Which in the USA is just
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 79
about every program that does any type of services for what the prostitutes go to when they need
1

2 help. Places like AIM that provided specialized STD testing, education, etc., for the sex industry

3 in Los Angeles was completely dead just a short time after that. Chaos was now back to reigning
4
again.
5
I say that because we had a pretty good system going there for a while. I have an
6

7
interview up with a woman from Phoenix, Arizona. I got to talk to me on the record. She had

8 been with the Dignity Project there since Kathleen started it, and had seen what happened once
9 the church came barging into town with their Project Rose pilot project. She talked about how
10
she got her recovery in the early days, and many women did – but now it was just a zoo with no
11
one getting well.
12

13 I’ve heard from many people now how crazy the recovery has become in Phoenix since

14 Project Rose came to town and Catholic Charities got rid of our program, and fired anyone who
15
was our members from even their outreach teams. Anyone can look on the news now and see
16
that places like Phoenix have just become pure chaos.
17
The very reason why children were originally taken from their parents was someone’s
18

19 bright idea it was a way to “protect children from their sex traffickers”. It wasn’t our members

20 who came up with that idea. We know separating children from their parents is the BEST WAY
21
TO MAKE THEM VULNERABLE TO TRAFFICKING.
22
What’s left? Since all this went down, we’ve focused our outreach on the internet. We
23

24
started out by running ads on Craigslist. When the internet first started up, and we first learned

25 about Craigslist, it was a magic tool for us. We used to get calls from the cops, or a mother,
26 telling us about a runaway teen. I’d ask for a photo. I would take that photo and usually after
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 80
about two hours online, I’d find the kid. I’d then call our local members, and they’d set up a
1

2 phony “date” and grab the kid back.

3 In 1995, we had helped a mom in Canada find her daughter. Sally Jesse put all of us on
4
her show to promote the hotline and talk about the rescue. The pimp had murdered two other
5
girls even, and now he was in prison. A producer came down to the dressing room, and said he
6

7
wanted to make a film about it. By 1995, the film “Fighting for my Daughter” was aired with

8 Lindsey Wagner. Because of this, more and more calls were coming in and we were finding
9 more and more teens this way. But we did it by not alerting the pimps to our methods.
10
I’ll never forget this call. The voice sounded familiar. The man started telling me about
11
how “Craigslist was promoting sex trafficking”. Then he asked me to sign a petition to have it
12

13 banned. I protested that it was helping us find about a kid a week, and there was no way I’d

14 protest it. I tried to explain to him how well it was working to FIND kids, and he wasn’t
15
listening to anything I said. His mind was made up. That man then went out and started a whole
16
campaign to have Craigslist shut down much the same way the campaign went up against
17
Backpage.
18

19 I had asked the man what group he was with. He told me and I did some research on the

20 guy. He had a Facebook page. On his FB page, I found he was friends with none other than
21
Oliver North of Iran Contra fame. This is when it began to make sense to me where this
22
opposition was coming from. Sure enough, the news started grand standing how the “cops were
23

24
issuing warrants to Craigslist”. This stopped the practice of posting the REAL pictures anymore

25 of the kids. It became impossible to locate kids online anymore. Not easily anyway.
26 This forced us back to the method of trying to find a kid on the ground. Impossible. A
27
young teen being pimped out makes a fortune. Millions. They’re going to keep them drugged
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 81
up, indoors, out of sight, and only a few trusted people are going to have any idea where they
1

2 are.

3 The only way to find them would be to have a photo of the kid and give that photo to the
4
local regular “johns” in the area. Then you’d have to convince them to call that information in to
5
the authorities.
6

7
Which is possible IF you decriminalize prostitution. But what happens next? The

8 movement to criminalize buyers. Now hell is going to freeze over before these guys are going to
9 risk their marriages, careers, freedom, money, just to report some kid back to their parents.
10
Won’t happen. Johns by nature are very selfish.
11
Once I heard this campaign heat up, I couldn’t help but wonder if it wasn’t the traffickers
12

13 themselves behind these campaigns because no one could dream up a better way to make their

14 life easier than what I was seeing. I remembered back when big tobacco used to market their
15
products to teens under the guise of launching a “stop kids from smoking” campaigns they used
16
to do in the 1960’s. The way they lied to Congress about what was in their products. After
17
watching documentaries like “Hot Toxic Seat”, I totally believed the organized traffickers were
18

19 behind these campaigns. Why else are they creating “fake” survivors like Samoly Mam while I

20 couldn’t get on TV if I was shot anymore? She’s getting press and awards and millions – and I
21
can’t get an inch of press.
22
But then again, she had Facebook’s publicist. As did a few of the other “fake” sex
23

24
trafficking victims spreading misinformation about American sex trafficking in the modern

25 times. Which is why I say I seem to keep finding myself working at odds against Facebook’s
26 publicist for some reason. Of course when I heard about Cambridge Analytica – well then I
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 82
knew why Facebook’s trying to shut us up. They got a lot of money riding on women they want
1

2 to remain in control over.

3 Not since 2007’s press conference anyway. Melissa Farley came to me saying she
4
needed our help to get a report done for the State Dept. I helped her. Then she said she needed
5
us to back up the research by being at a press conference about it. We agreed.
6

7
Only right before I was to speak, she pulls me to the side. She asks me if I would say

8 three things to the press. I asked her what those three things were. She told me and I told her if I
9 said those things -I would lose all credibility with our members. The reason why she’d asked me
10
to do this was because of our credibility so why ask me to ruin it?
11
Little did I know she was going to tell the press I believed those things anyway when I
12

13 wasn’t looking. I was quite shocked to see those things published the next day. Things that must

14 have angered Sheldon Adelson.
15
I say that because Abigail Goldman, or a woman who said she was Abigail Goldman,
16
asked me for an interview to “clear the record”. I agreed. We talked and at the end of the
17
meeting, she says, “I’ve been asked by Sheldon Adelson to tell you that you’ve been blacklisted
18

19 in all of the media he controls. That includes your name and that of Sex Workers Anonymous.

20 He does not care how many people die because of this. Your name, S.W.A.’s name, will not
21
appear in any media he controls ever.”
22
I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I asked her to repeat it and she did. I then said,
23

24
“No matter how many people DIE – he does not care?” She said back, “Affirmative”.

25 I admit I had no idea who this guy was, so I went home and looked up his name on the
26 internet. I have to admit since that date, I’ve had a lot of reporters tell me they were told they
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 83
couldn’t write about us, they were fired when they said my name, and I’ve only seen our name in
1

2 local small press since that date.

3 But it was okay, because I continued to run our ads for the hotline on sites like Craigslist,
4
Backpage, the Erotic Review, Eros, Ashley Madison, Tinder, and any other site I could find that
5
was being frequented by prostitutes and johns.
6

7
For a couple of years, we did outreach at the AVN shows. But Shelley Lubben and

8 Annie Lobert were so aggressive with their religious outreach, we got banned along with them
9 from even being on the premises of the show.
10
We still had our relationship with SWOP though. Robin Few had created Sex Workers
11
Outreach Project in about 2003. There was also a blog connected to SWOP called “Tits & Sass”
12

13 that many of the escorts used to check in on. I built a relationship with Robin, the founders of

14 the blog, and started attending a yearly meeting in Vegas that groups like the Desire Alliance, the
15
Red Umbrella Alliance and SWOP used to come together to discuss and network mutual
16
concerns. I had personal friendships with other people like Dave Elms who was the founder of
17
The Erotic Review, who most of the industry used to advertise on also.
18

19 Through developing personal friendships of trust with these people, whenever someone

20 would be in trouble and need help to escape a pimp and/or trafficker, or express a desire to exit
21
the industry, or they got arrested and needed some help to avoid jail – they would tell this person
22
to call us. So I was getting about half of our referrals from the internet and the other half from
23

24
these personal relationships with website owners.

25 Robin Few died in 2012. No one was doing anything with SWOP for a while. About
26 2009, shortly after Jeane Palfrey’s death, I started noticing how one site after the other after the
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 84
other was being systematically shut down with the owners being arrested. What struck me as
1

2 strange wasn’t that these were the sites that traffickers were operating through.

3 If anything, these were the sites where the owners were trying to keep traffickers off the
4
sites. The sites that I knew traffickers were operating through were being left alone entirely. It
5
honestly looked like the only sites I saw being targeted were the ones where I knew the owners,
6

7
and where we got referrals from the owners of the sites.

8 By 2015, a group of women had taken over SWOP. They were Bella Robinson,
9 Christian. A. Parreira, Norma Jean Almodóvar, Maxine Doogan, Megan, Alana., and a
10
dominatrix out of Denver who went by the stage name of Domina Elle. (Women I was friends
11
with pre-2013 – who suddenly came at me like age old enemies post-2013 and I have no idea
12

13 why.)

14 Some young girl took over as president named Savannah I’d never heard of before. Of
15
course too young to remember or know about any of this history. While Savannah simply
16
refused to talk to me, I found myself the focus of a very aggressive “stalk and smear” campaign
17
by Bella, Christina., Maxine, Megan and Alana., and Domina Elle.
18

19 Prior to this, SWOP had been pretty much a “harm reduction” type of program. They

20 didn’t really promote sex work, but they did teach self-defense, how to take care of your health,
21
and served as a social network to try and keep pimps at bay. They were mostly escorts and
22
madams who used to do street outreach to try and help the more troubled within the industry also
23

24
get help and services in ways no other agency could. That’s how we used to get the referrals we

25 did – from their outreach campaigns.
26 These women who were taking over after Robin died made it very clear they wanted
27
nothing to do with us. Suddenly, anyone in SWOP who even said my name, was chased out of
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 85
the group. My name was removed from all the online groups. I was removed as a “friend” from
1

2 anyone online. Anyone in S.W.A. was also attacked, removed, banned, smeared, or accused of

3 being me “impersonating” them. Any member or group who expressed anything positive about
4
us was promptly threatened, banned, attacked and smeared to the point where the remaining
5
members got the message – we don’t like S.W.A.
6

7
They started duplicating OUR outreach efforts. For example, I would read about

8 someone being arrested. I’d send out a gift package, a book and a letter of invite and support.
9 They’re now setting up SWOP Behind Bars – and doing the same exact thing. We
10
arrange for S.W.A. members to greet them the day they’re released so they don’t have to call a
11
pimp. We help them get a job, food, housing.
12

13 Suddenly, they’re doing that through SWOP behind Bars. Only difference is they don’t

14 have to agree to quit prostitution to get that help. Nor get clean. In fact, I’m having women
15
telling me they’re being greeted upon release with drugs, parties, dates, flown to go work at the
16
Bunny Ranch. I can’t compete with that. Essentially SWOP Behind Bars was a direct attack to
17
put our inmate outreach right out of operation in my personal opinion.
18

19 They even “wined and dined” John Meekins in Florida. John used to help us do outreach

20 in a Florida jail. Then I’m getting emails from him that he’s being taken on vacations by SWOP,
21
they’re sending him books to give inmates as gifts, and they’re providing him with all kinds of
22
“perks” (I can only imagine). He even challenges me to see if I can “match their offer”. I was so
23

24
upset by this I approached John’s employers about the situation. It seemed to me to be a bit of a

25 conflict of interest to be asked to compete with people promoting prostitution to get access to do
26 outreach to the inmates at that jail when prostitution is illegal and he’s a guard. John got fired
27
over the whole situation and everyone lost out.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 86
Between the sites we used to get referrals from the owners of who have been now shut
1

2 down, and the death of Robin Few, with the new SWOP board members in charge’s attack upon

3 us within the sex industry, including our blacklist in the media and the AVN – this has shrunk
4
our outreach pool down to the internet itself pretty much.
5
By 2015, the last avenues we were down to for outreach purposes was our social media
6

7
(YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and my personal blog), along with running an ad daily on

8 Craigslist and Backpage where the prostitutes would advertise. That was it.
9 When Craigslist shut down the “services” category, and everyone jumped over to the
10
“dating” section, we just moved our ads over to that section also.
11
But when Backpage shut down most of their site, that was actually a huge boom for us.
12

13 The day the site was partially shut down – our phone started ringing literally every 5 minutes for

14 24 hours a day 7 days a week. The call volume exploded. I wasn’t able to get enough people to
15
cover all the shifts, and was having to take time off work to answer the calls. They were so
16
frantic and desperate – I couldn’t let them go unanswered. Not a one of these callers identified
17
as a trafficking victim that would have called the national Trafficking Hotline.
18

19 While on one hand I was happy for the increased call volume – I was angry also because

20 of the increase in the financial burden. I was having to miss work which was costing me money.
21
I was having increased expenses for printing, postage, etc. to send out literature for people who
22
always are telling me they’re flat broke. I didn’t think it was fair to have this sudden call volume
23

24
thrust on us without us being prepared for it because we were not involved in the decision to

25 attack this site.
26 Plus not one of these callers wanted to join our program. They had no interest in quitting
27
sex work. They all just wanted advice on how to find new ways to work safely. We were put in
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 87
a position we didn’t want to be in because we didn’t want to “school them on the old school way
1

2 of prostitution before there was an internet”.

3 Without the internet, it’s tough out there. The strip clubs are predominantly owned by
4
the Russian mafia anymore. The Asian massage parlors are owned by the Triad. There’s very
5
few porn production companies anymore and frankly there’s just not the money in porn there
6

7
used to be. Very few people can support themselves in porn since the invention of the digital

8 camera and the internet.
9 Bars and clubs are generally dominated by African American pimps, while the streets are
10
very dominated by pimps of every color that are very dangerous usually. Unless a woman wants
11
to fly to Pahrump to audition for Dennis Hof, or relocate to Australia, or some other country
12

13 where prostitution is legal, what am I supposed to tell these women who woke up one morning to

14 find they were suddenly out of work once that site was taken down? We tried suggesting this
15
might be a good time to hang up the high heels, but that isn’t the advice these women wanted to
16
hear right then. Not with rent coming due in a few days and the wolf at the door.
17
With most of America a paycheck away from being homeless, these women were put in a
18

19 desperate situation where they made a lot of stupid mistakes. For one thing, scum buckets set up

20 new sites offering these women free ads. There was a rush to these news sites. The ads were
21
paid for. Now these site owners had their photos and knew their bank information. Many of
22
these women started getting blackmailed. I soon started getting calls asking what to do about the
23

24
blackmail threats. Again, we can’t call the police when a prostitute is being blackmailed so I

25 helped them navigate these situations legally.
26 This is when I started seeing what I call a “take over” within the upper levels of the sex
27
industry. It was very clear to me the new people running SWOP were chasing us out of the way
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 88
because they were “taking over” control of the upper levels of the sex industry that was being
1

2 affected by these site shutdowns.

3 They started referring prostitutes to new sites, new screening services, setting up likes to
4
aid in the transition, and putting themselves in the position for the workers to trust going to them
5
for advice. I also never saw so many women working at the legal brothels before. The web cam
6

7
studios were exploding with new models also.

8 This was when the AVN basically solidified itself as the central “trade show” of the sex
9 industry. If you wanted to work in this industry full-time and survive, you needed to be at that
10
show and on the good side of the organizers. They went from having 50 performers at their
11
events to have over 500 performers in 2016.
12

13 The internet had really loosened the hold the mafia had over sex workers. It was virtually

14 impossible to control anyone because of the internet and the safety it offered. Especially since
15
you could screen well who you let get close to you.
16
But what these attacks on these major sites like the Erotic Review and Craigslist did was
17
start flushing out sex workers into these events like the AVN and putting people back under the
18

19 control of a few people who controlled the gateway to the top clients.

20 By increasing the street raids, and lowering the number of websites available, you really
21
pushed the workers back into these chutes that were easier for the mafia to get control over the
22
industry again. That’s what I was witnessing.
23

24
Which in reality makes it 1000 times harder for someone to exit the industry. It’s next to

25 impossible to leave the industry if someone who is still in it knows where you’ve moved to,
26 you’re now working, where you’re going to school, where your family lives, your kids go to
27
school, etc.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 89
Unless all ties are broken, old friends make contact again and bing, bang, boom – you
1

2 find yourself right back in the old groove again. It’s like trying to quit smoking in a room full of

3 people smoking – it’s a 1000 times harder to do.
4
Add into this equation if you’re trying to escape a pimp. If that pimp can find any way to
5
get at you to threaten you, your family, your kids, etc. – then the victim is forced back under
6

7
control of a handful of men again. By centralizing the industry, it makes it harder to leave, as

8 well as escape situations like this.
9 With SWOP being on the offense with us, it was also very difficult to work with callers.
10
The minute they’d reach out to one of their SWOP connections, they’d start getting pressure not
11
to talk to us again, even outright threatened.
12

13 Because of this SWOP factor, we were rarely hearing from the callers a second time.

14 Especially if they went online to do research on us and found those “hate sites” SWOP had set up
15
attacking us with those crazy false accusations.
16
VIII. THE IMPACT SESTA/FOSTA HAS HAD ON US DIRECTLY
17
When SESTA/FOSTA passed, it was about the same time period as Backpage’s site was
18

19 shut down entirely, and their owners arrested. That whole week our hotline exploded again. We

20 were back up to the phone ringing off the hook. I was having to take time off work again,
21
training members how to answer the hotline to take shifts, and our expenses went up again while
22
my income went down in relation.
23

24
I called Meghan at the national Trafficking Hotline and she said their phones had

25 exploded. Lois at Children of the Night said her hotline was jamming too. Then just as
26 suddenly, the calls stopped like someone had pulled a plug on us. I called Lois and Meghan who
27
said they were still getting a lot of calls.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 90
I went online to see if I could identify what was the reason for the call volume dropping.
1

2 I found a site that was talking about how Google had blocked anyone from finding my personal

3 blog. Since social media was how many people were finding our site – that explained why the
4
call volume dropped.
5
A few days later, the call volume dropped even more. I went onto Twitter and I started
6

7
getting messages that my URL was being blocked because it was “unsafe”. I tried my Facebook

8 on both my personal page, and the page for Sex Workers Anonymous – and both were telling me
9 that the url for www.sexworkersanonymous.com was being blocked because it was “unsafe”.
10
The last straw came when I tried to post a book review on Amazon and I was told I was
11
blocked also “because I was biased” whatever that meant.
12

13 I tried posting ads on Craigslist and found the ads were deleted immediately. I tried

14 posting them on other sites like the Recycler, and the same thing happened – our URL was
15
immediately deleted or blocked as being “unsafe”.
16
I have contacted a few sites and asked if we can place an ad. Sites I know prostitutes use
17
that I won’t name. I was refused. When I asked why I was told that if they put our ad up on
18

19 their site – it would be acknowledging they know they have prostitutes on their site and it would

20 get them “shut down like Back page”. So the answer was no.
21
Meghan nicely offered we could place the hotline number and they’d refer callers to us.
22
However, I’ve polled 100’s of sex workers who tell me they wouldn’t even call the national
23

24
Trafficking Hotline UNLESS they felt they were needing help with being trafficked. Since they

25 said they aren’t – they wouldn’t call and therefore we wouldn’t get a referral that way.
26 This is like saying that a vegetarian restaurant will put up a sign for a butcher shop in
27
their establishment. It’s a nice gesture – but it’s not going to get them a lot of business.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 91
I spoke to the Electronic Freedom Foundation when I heard they were planning a lawsuit
1

2 over this. I thought if we joined in with the lawsuit this might generate some publicity that

3 would help us get some outreach done. The gentlemen I spoke to were nice and said they would
4
“get back to me” if they decided they wanted to help us with this problem and support us in how
5
this Act was negatively impacting us.
6

7
When I was finding out about our url’s and emails and DM”s being blocked, I was online

8 doing research. In the process of doing this, I found out they had already gone forward with the
9 Woodhull Freedom Foundation in filing their lawsuit in opposition to SESTA/FOSTA.
10
In the Rolling Stone article, I also read that they had decided to join with Jesse Maley as
11
their “survivor of sex trafficking” and SWOP. Which frankly I don’t understand. It is a felony
12

13 to “promote prostitution” before SESTA/FOSTA was passed. Everything about SWOP since

14 Robin died, and Jesse took over, has been about “promoting prostitution”. Not only promoting
15
it, but further not even wanting to entertain the idea of exiting the business – ever.
16
When I have tried having discussions with them about the fact that there comes a day
17
when everyone in that industry is going to quit – whether it be because they were arrested, they
18

19 got too old, they got sick, pregnant, injured, fighting a child custody battle – or for whatever the

20 reason – there comes that day when you’re going to want to quit and you might want some extra
21
support to do so. The “new” SWOP under Jesse refuses to even discuss the idea of exiting with
22
me and they flat out deny that sex trafficking even exists.
23

24
If you look at every single article, interview, position paper, etc., that SWOP has put out

25 since 2013, you’ll see they deny sex trafficking exists. They feel any survivor who claims to
26 have been trafficked is a fraud. Any news story about trafficking is manufactured. I could
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 92
understand this when I was being led to believe the person behind these sites and interviews was
1

2 an active sex worker with a street name of Domina. Elle.

3 Now that I read in the Rolling Stone article, and in this lawsuit with the EFF and
4
Woodhull that it’s really Jesse Maley, I’m confused. Especially since in 2013, she told me she
5
was shutting down “Out of the Life” and exiting the sex trafficking field completely so she could
6

7
focus on running her hair salon.

8 Meaning I have no idea what dog Jesse has in this race to object to SESTA/FOSTA. We
9 have essentially been put out of business by SESTA/FOSTA.
10
If we can’t find a way to bypass these blocks online that our site, our social media, my
11
blog, etc., have been encountering by people trying to comply with this new law – we have no
12

13 way of continuing to exist.

14 IX. WE’RE BEING PUT OUT OF BUSINESS BY THE GOVERNMENT
15
Ever since the passing of the Telecommunications Act of 1995, I have been feeling the
16
government has been trying to inch by inch put us out of business.
17
First you took away all our free media – all our PSA’s, all our interviews, all our free
18

19 cable shows, etc. That means the American public no longer hears OUR VOICES. It’s not free

20 speech if no one is hearing us.
21
Now I have one big problem here with this and that’s the idea that prostitution is illegal
22
everywhere in the United States so that the federal government of the United States thinks it has
23

24
the right to decide issues about this for us as a whole.

25 First of all, up until a few years ago, prostitution was decriminalized in Rhode Island.
26 Prostitution is also legal in certain counties of Nevada such as Storey and Nye county. Meaning
27
I don’t believe the United States government has the right to decide issues for the country as a
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 93
whole based on the premise prostitution is illegal when in Nevada at the moment – it’s not
1

2 illegal.

3 In fact, if I were to move to a small enough county somewhere, I could get prostitution
4
legalized there myself. It’s not that hard to duplicate what Joe did when he created the first legal
5
brothel. All you need to do is get to a small enough town and then get enough votes. This
6

7
means I believe the United States has overstepped their boundaries here by thinking they can

8 decide an issue for us that is different state by state.
9 What they’ve also done by passing this law is to now make Polaris’ national Trafficking
10
Hotline, which is subsided by federal money, and works in partnership with the government, a
11
monopoly. You have created a monopoly by putting us out of business. If we can’t advertise, or
12

13 communicate, and people can’t find us who are researching other options, then you’ve just

14 created a monopoly. This reminds me of the case where Howard Hughes challenged Delta
15
Airlines as a monopoly because it was the only other airline that offered international flights
16
besides his airline.
17
Experience has proven that a prostitute who is raped will not call the Rape Hotline for
18

19 fear of being arrested. Experience has proven a prostitute will not call the domestic violence

20 hotline for fear she will be the one arrested as a prostitute, as well as her man for pimping or
21
trafficking now with these new laws – plus her children being taken from her.
22
They will however call our hotline for help. If they need drug treatment, they’ll call our
23

24
hotline where we can offer them free scholarships we have and refer them to programs we know

25 specialize in their needs. If they need therapy, we know therapists specially trained in their
26 needs. Many of who are also ex-sex workers even.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 94
History has shown that when this population is having just about any kind of problem,
1

2 they will call us because they know not only have we “been there”, but also that we are not

3 connected with any law enforcement, so no one is going to be arrested if they call us, and that
4
they will find empathy with us, not sympathy, judgment or shaming.
5
Further, they also will get the encouragement and support to seek the services they need
6

7
such as if they are raped or abused. I have lost track of the times we have sat with a woman

8 while she went through a rape exam, or called the police to make a domestic violence report, sat
9 with them through court so they could get a restraining order, held their hand while they got their
10
HIV results, or stood next to them in court when they were being sentenced so they could deal
11
with their legal issues instead of just stacking warrants up.
12

13 We don’t ask the government to pay us a dime to keep us in business. We don’t ask for

14 their endorsement or support. We don’t need anything from the government but to be allowed to
15
exist. I feel this law being passed was the last nail in our casket.
16
If this law is not repealed or modified, then after 32 years I feel that we will be run out of
17
business. Not because of a pimp or a trafficker or because we failed – but because of the
18

19 government passing these laws that have made it harder and harder for us to do what we do.

20 We have continued to operate despite the lack of media exposure. We have continued
21
despite the blacklisting of us. We have continued despite the church’s opposition to us using
22
their wallet. We have continued despite the competition from Polaris who can outspend us. We
23

24
have continued despite men with secrets like Snoop Dogg, Charlie Sheen and even Donald

25 Trump who would like to have our members’ voices silenced. So much so they’ll even pay us to
26 keep that silence. That or threaten us.
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 95
We have continued despite the competition from the for-profit prisons who view us as an
1

2 alternative to incarceration as a threat to their profits. We have continued despite corrupt men

3 who are threatened by us organizing together. We have continued despite being outright
4
threatened, attacked, stalked, smeared, and deliberate attempts to shut us down from people like
5
Melissa Farley, Swanee Hunt, the religious right, the Catholic Church, Sheldon Adelson, SWOP,
6

7
Jesse Maley, and many others who view us as some kind of threat. We have continued despite

8 being banned off the Salvation Army and Catholic Charities properties and very few landlords
9 willing to rent us meeting space. We have continued despite our outreach teams being
10
threatened by cops and pimps with bodily harm. We have continued despite all of the sites
11
we’ve advertised on being shut down and their owners arrested. Despite all these persecutions
12

13 and attacks – we have continued.

14 We’ve even thrived. In 2009, professor Sharon Oselin published her book “Leaving
15
Prostitution”. This book was the results of a 10-yearlong study she’d done on our Los Angeles
16
group. In the book she interviews members over these 10 years and wrote glowingly that the
17
women she studied felt we had saved their lives.
18

19 X. OUR PROGRAM WORKS – NO ONE ELSE CAN DO WHAT WE DO

20 No other program can do what we do. First of all, we operate an international hotline
21
without a paid staff or one dime from the government. We take calls no one else is taking – calls
22
to help people exit the sex industry for any reason – trafficked or not.
23

24
No other program can be set up instantly to provide an alternative to incarceration for

25 someone convicted of prostitution. No one can set up a program of recovery for a prostitute that
26 can support a prostitution court without the need for a government sponsored budget, nor a
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 96
licensed therapist or social worker to run it. We don’t need a house or a car. All we need to
1

2 operate is a place for people to sit and talk.

3 We can operate forever because we don’t run out of funding because we don’t operate off
4
of outside donations. We don’t need special equipment, a degree, a budget, a building, nothing.
5
All we need to do what we do is each other and the space to do what we do.
6

7
We are effective at what we do. Our internal research has shown us we have an 80

8 percent success rate with those who come to our program asking for help. We have been
9 researched by the DOJ, and reputable investigative reporters such as John Quinones, Bob
10
Herbert, Tom Ragan, and George Knapp just to name a few.
11
Each of them have written wonderfully positive stories about us. John devoted a whole
12

13 chapter to us in “Heroes Among Us” released in 2009. Bob did a series on us in 2013. Tom

14 believed in us so much he got fired over insisting the Review Journal publish a story on our
15
work.
16
We have countless testimonials from our members in interviews we have posted online. I
17
can’t even count the calls and letters we get from members saying we saved their lives, and they
18

19 have now double digit “time” out of the industry thanking us for that.

20 XI. S.W.A.N
21
We also operate S.W.A.N. That is the program like Alanon, but for us. We provide
22
support and guidance to the people who love someone who is in sex work and/or being pimped
23

24
and/or being trafficked. There is no other program or hotline I’m aware of that does this.

25 Besides offering emotional support, we assist mothers, husbands, even children, of
26 someone caught up in sex work on how to protect themselves, and what they can do to try and
27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 97
help their loved one to exit the industry safely. We have published the only books I’m aware of
1

2 on this subject as well.

3 XII. WE CAN’T GO ON UNLESS SESTA/FOSTA IS REPEALED
4
But this passing of SESTA/FOSTA, we can not survive. We will be shut down entirely
5
unless we can succeed in convincing you to repeal it.
6

7
You say you don’t want people to engage in prostitution. You say that by making it

8 illegal in about 99 percent of the USA. Fine. Then let us do something to help those in this
9 situation to find their way out. Putting them in jail doesn’t work. You learned with Prohibition
10
that doesn’t stop people. You learned with pot making things illegal doesn’t stop people from
11
doing something. All this law is going to do is stop prostitutes from finding help they can’t get
12

13 anywhere else. You can’t buy what we do either.

14 History and psychology has proven the more you try and “outlaw” or “forbid” something
15
to a human – the more they’re going to desire it. We’re not stupid. We know this now and
16
certainly learned this with Prohibition. History has also shown us those who were outlawing it
17
were profiting off that also. The people who are the true victims in this are the ones whose
18

19 voices are being silenced by people who have financial interests in this dog fight. I’m not trying

20 to get elected. I’m not trying to get publicity for a new movie I want to get hired in. I’m not
21
trying to get approved for a federal grant. All I want is the ability to do outreach for our hotline,
22
operate S.W.A., start being able to train the next generation to take over after my death, and to
23

24
make S.W.A. like A.A., and N.A. – part of our self-help groups we desperately need in this

25 country because we don’t have enough money or resources to keep up with the demand for the
26 services people need when wanting to exit any part of the sex industry for any reason, and to
27
work within the system to provide humane alternatives to incarceration.
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 98
.The sex industry is like any industry like the fashion industry, music industry, tobacco
1

2 industry, alcohol industry, etc. ANY industry has an element of forced labor within it. ANY

3 industry has people within that industry that are working there only because that’s the only way
4
they can pay the rent and they hate their job. ANY industry has a few people who are at the top
5
who are considered the “experts” who control that industry – it’s only a matter of degree as to
6

7
how strong that control is. ANY industry should have a retirement plan available for when it’s

8 time to quit. ANY industry where there are more workers who don’t have a lot of money and
9 power are always going to be at the mercy of the employers like we witnessed with the trucking
10
industry before the TEAMSTERS. That’s why the voices of those workers needs to be protected
11
– and allowed to express itself without having to pay for that time or get the green light from
12

13 someone in power. You may not agree or like what that industry does or produces – but that

14 doesn’t mean you can’t respect it if it’s legal and if it’s jobs people are using to feed their kids or
15
if it’s what people want to do with their lives.
16
But don’t be mistaken – prostitution is as intertwined with sex work, the adult industry,
17
pornography, and sex trafficking as is leather to a cow. To get the leather you have to skin the
18

19 cow. Sometimes it’s in the humane way that cow is treated – if we think it’s important to treat

20 cows humanely – why can’t we understand people have to be treated humanely also.
21
This means there’s also “occupational hazards” which in the case of sex workers, whether
22
prostitutes or not, means they can’t get the same kind of protection from law enforcement, or
23

24
even society, like other people. That’s why we have to be able to come together to protect

25 ourselves. We do have the right of free assembly as well as free speech don’t we?
26 When Narcotics Anonymous was allowed to hold meetings legally, and to advertise in
27
the yellow pages – addicts started to get clean. We need more of that not less. I’m speaking on
28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 99
behalf of the group I repeat – that of the person who can’t stay clean without also staying out of
1

2 sex work and that can’t be accomplished for me long term unless I work a 12-step program. It’s

3 why I’m one of the few people I know that’s been out of that industry for 32 years. FOSTA
4
takes what saved my life from me – and that scares me. As much as if you told the alcoholics
5
you were going to shut down A.A. You wouldn’t do that to them – so why are you doing it to
6

7
us? I’ve proven by the volume of calls we receive that this group of people exist. We deserve to

8 anyone in this country.
9 But if you want to start thinking you are going to eliminate sex trafficking by taking
10
down websites – how about shutting off phones? Outlawing cash?
11
How far into the bedroom even does this go? I know a lot of housewives who won’t have
12

13 sex with their husbands unless they’re paid. That’s prostitution in my book. Are you going to

14 start rounding up housewives?
15
When we had the use of a free press, and a free internet – we changed the American
16
consciousness. We got the Trafficking Act of 2000 passed. We changed this country. We also
17
saved a lot of lives. Now maybe Trump doesn’t want to hear from these women – but we do.
18

19 Let our hotline and website go!

20 I declare this to be my personal experience, and my personal opinions, as well as the truth
21
under penalty of perjury pursuant to the laws of the state of Nevada this 1st day of September,
22
2018.
23

24
_____________________________________
JODY WILLIAMS, DECLARANT
25

26

27

28

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 100
1

2

3

4
EXHIBIT 1
5 THE TWELVE TRADITIONS OF Sex Workers Anonymous

6 1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon S.W.A..
7
unity.

8 2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as He
may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not
9 govern.
10
3. The only requirement for S.W.A. membership is a desire to find recovery from the
11 sex industry.
12
4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or
13 S.W.A. as a whole.

14 5. Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry its message to the sex worker
who still suffers.
15

16 6. An S.W.A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the S.W.A. name to any
related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us
17 from our primary purpose.
18
7. Every S.W.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside
19 contributions.

20 8. Sex Workers Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service
centers may employ special workers.
21

22 9. S.W.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or
committees directly responsible to those they serve.
23

24
10. Sex Work Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the SW.A. name
ought never be drawn into public controversy.
25
11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need
26 always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
27
12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to
28 place principles before personalities.

DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 101
1
TWELVE STEPS OF SEX WORKERSS ANONYMOUS
2
1. We admitted we were powerless over our addiction. and that our lives had become
3 unmanageable.
2. We came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
4
3. We made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we
5 understood Him.
4. We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
6 5. We admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our
7
wrongs.
6. We were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
8 7. We humbly asked God to remove our shortcomings.
8. We made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them
9 all.
10
9. We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would
injure them or others.
11 10. We continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
11. We sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as
12
we understood God, praying only for knowledge of God’s will for us and the power to
13 carry that out.
12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this
14 message to prostitutes, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.
15

16 Copyright A.A. World Services, Inc. Rev.5/9/02

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

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25

26

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DECLARATION OF JODY WILLIAMS (WILLIAMS VS. USA) COPYRIGHT 2018 – PAGE 102