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Breanna O’Neill

Secondary Curriculum 2A - English


Lesson Plans and Sequence for sub-unit
Module -
This sub-unit will fall within the Preliminary Advanced English Module A: Narratives that Shape our
World. The primary focus of the unit will be around Narrative Poe-tential: Gloomy and Mysterious
Narratives for the Ever-Changing Audience. The lesson sequence to be discussed will fall within weeks 2-5
of the 10-week unit.

Texts to be covered –
The variety of texts to be covered within this module will enable students to effectively engage with
narratives of both past and contemporary eras, and prompts said engagement through a range of modes,
including prose fiction, poetry, film/television, a video game, a picture book and a song.

Substantive text – featured focus on author Edgar Allan Poe


Edgar Allan Poe is a literary author of the late 19th century, best known for his prose fiction short stories
and poetry. Poe’s texts, in particular the three to be used within this unit, portray a strong stylistic tone and
unique development of character that overall enhance his strong use of imagery and denotes a unique
literary aesthetic for the context in which his work was produced. Within Module A, students will consider
the role of context and values in shaping Poe’s narratives through textual analysis, and in turn consider the
connections between these values of the past with those of the contemporary era via the textual adaptations
to be studied in conjunction. Students will draw inspiration from Poe’s use of narrative conventions in order
to express their own imaginative ideas in a range of modes.

Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) - prose fiction


Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’ enables students to analyse and engage with the
traditional murder-mystery detective story through an understanding of Poe’s characterisation, unique
textual style, strong use of imagery, and overall construction of literary aesthetic. Poe’s protagonist, Auguste
Dupin, is of particular interest here, due to his influence on the ‘traditional detective’ character that has
developed over time within literature, and as such students will be able to draw connections between both
narratives and character here when this historical text is juxtaposed with contemporary adaptations (Dark
Tales: Murders in the Rue Morgue AND The Six Thatchers with specific focus on Sherlock Holmes).

The Raven (1845) - poetry


Engagement with poetry within Module A will enable students to analyse the strong use of imagery,
voice and setting in building the narrative of a piece, and Poe’s ‘The Raven’, which follows a narrative
storyline though a unique stylised structure, prompts said engagement. Students will work through macro
and micro analysis of the text in order to analyse and reflect upon Poe’s use of language forms and features
within his narratives, as well exploring context in order to denote the representation of the individual within
the text. In looking at adaptations, students will look at the way in which composers can vary narrative
conventions in order to engage with audiences of different eras, and will use this knowledge to assist them in
the construction of their own texts and adaptations.

Eldorado (1849) - poetry


Poe’s poem ‘Eldorado’ explores a narrative-based literary take on a traditional Spanish fable.
Students will explore the cultural connotations connected with the fable through the author’s adaptive take,
whilst examining the role of narrative in crafting the piece for a different audience. Whilst maintaining the
gloomy mood that is thematically consistent within Poe’s writing, the poem is more traditional in form than
‘The Raven’, and prompts engagement with cultural values and traditions of the past. Students will reflect
on Poe’s imaginative recreation of narrative, and work collaboratively to reimagine other traditional fables
or stories for contemporary audiences.

Subsequent texts –
Big Fish Games Dark Tales: Murders in the Rue Morgue (2009) – video game
As a contemporary adaptation to Poe’s prose fiction story, the video game created by Big Fish
Games provides students with an opportunity to engage with a multimodal text that utilises traditional
narrative structures within a modern mode. Comparison of narrative conventions, forms and features
between the text and Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’ will assist students in their
understanding of conveying ideas across eras, and the role this plays in conveying meaning to new
audiences. Students will also learn to analyse texts of this new media, and utilise new technologies in order
to express their own ideas within this form.

BBC One The Six Thatchers- S4, Sherlock Holmes (2017) – television episode
Specific focus on the character development and appropriation of Sherlock Holmes through new
narratives will lead students to an analysis of similarities and differences in varying societies and historical
eras of the traditional detective character. As such, students will explore the elements of characterisation that
reconceptualise Poe’s Auguste Dupin from ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’ with the contemporary Sherlock
Holmes character within the BBC One television show. The change in mode, form and narrative will be
examined in relation to the effect on audience and purpose, and students will draw on the concept of
characterisation in order to acknowledge societal connections across eras, and in turn refine their own
narrative compositions.

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror: The Raven (1990) – film/television


Through analysis of a text via an alternate mode of delivery, students are able to engage with the
ideas, values and meaning created by the various composers. Students exploration of The Simpsons
appropriation of Edgar Allen Poe’s ‘The Raven’ will examine the visual stylistic features of the text, and the
way in which various composers have constructed the texts in order to deliver specific meanings and effects
for their different audiences. Students will specifically be looking at the change in audience demographics
and experience that influence narrative mode and understanding of texts through comparative means.
Utilising said text to explore storytelling of narratives and within narratives (i.e. via point of view and voice)
will call on students to consider and experiment with use of said conventions within their own compositions,
and evaluate their use of these effectively in engaging audiences for specific purposes.

Donovan Eldorado (1996) – song


As an appropriation of Poe’s poem through a change in medium, student’s look at the role of new
media, particularly through song, in connecting people within cultures, and acknowledging the aesthetic
diversity that comes with the multimodality of the adaptation. Students here will explore the power of the
mode in framing specific narratives for audience, and the way in which the personal context of the responder
will influence their perspective and the development for meaning for them. This text extends upon the
aesthetic qualities established by Poe within his poem, and students should work towards an understanding
of how the various multimodal elements of textual form play a role in shaping said narratives.

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Aaron Becker Journey (2013) – wordless picture book
Drawing on Poe’s thematic exploration of the Legend of El Dorado in South America through his
narrative poetry, students will engage with Becker’s contemporary adaptation of the journey towards
something that is considered better. The wordless picture book invites students to draw on their own
personal experiences in order to imaginatively piece together their own narratives for the illustrated journey
of the protagonist in the book. Students are therefore not only working creatively in the formation of
narratives through use of the visual stimulus, but are also able to recognise how the composer uses visual
features in order to convey the narrative, and how said features signify varying meanings between
individuals as a result of contextual differences.

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ENGLISH LESSON PLAN 1

Class: Year 11 Advanced English Time: 60 minutes

Outcomes
EA11-1 - Analyse the ways language features, text structures and stylistic choices shape ideas and
perspectives and influence audiences
EA11-3 - Engage with complex texts to understand and appreciate the power of language in shaping
meaning

Materials
- White board/Electronic Board
- Whiteboard markers
- Projector (if no electronic/smart board is available)
- 30x copies of Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allen Poe (enough for 1 per student – either
online or hard copy)
- 4x ‘Key Feature Clue’ sheets (one key feature clue per sheet for each group – see activity 2)
- Access to internet
- Sticky notes
- 4x poster board (A3)
- Student work books
- Writing materials

Procedures
Time Organisation Teaching/ learning activities
5 min Individual Bell ringer activity –
 Introductory activity for getting student’s focused and set for the lesson
ahead. Teacher will pull up visual stimulus of the day from Pobble365
(http://www.pobble365.com/). Students will have 30 seconds to look
over the image, followed by 2 minutes to write the beginning few
sentences (as much as they can within the time limit) of a story based off
of the stimulus. Students will do so in their creative logs in the back of
their books.
Learning Intentions – Teacher to outline 3 intentions for the day ahead.
 What can we decipher and hypothesise about a text based off of broad
details given to us by the composers?
 How does Edgar Allan Poe use language to stylise his narrative and
intrigue his audience?
 Does the development of mystery inspire us to continue engaging with a
text?
20 min Group Introduction to text – Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe (1841)
collaboration  Divide class into three equal groups. Each group will be given one key
+ Class feature of the text drawn from the following – the title of the narrative,
discussion
the sequence of illustrated images used on the first page of the first 3
parts of the short story, and the first paragraph of the short story (first 2
sentences) -See APPENDIX A.

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 Based off of their clues, and their knowledge of Edgar Allan Poe as an
author as learnt during the first week of the unit, students will work
together to hypothesise on the potential plot of the short story, the genre
it may fall within, and what ideas from their learnt knowledge and given
clue led them to this hypothesis. Students will be given 5 minutes to
complete this in their groups.
 Each group will then be given a 2-minute speed round to present their
clue and their discussed ideas with the class. As students are presenting,
the teacher will put the key points from each group on the board, and at
the end students will be asked to discuss together as a class the
similarities between each of the groups. Key question to ask – did our
knowledge of Poe as an author of the mid 19th century influence our
hypothesis of the plot line?
20 min Class Class reading of Murders in the Rue Morgue: Part One (First chapter of short
collaboration story)
+  Hand out sticky notes to students prior to reading – each student should
read/individual
be given at least 4.
answering
 Put up 4 poster boards on the board, and as a class work together to
devise questions that address each of the following areas –
o Mood (e.g. what mood do you feel Poe develops throughout the
first part of the short story?)
o Point of view (e.g. how does Poe’s narrative point of view
influence our understanding of the characters and plot in the
story so far?)
o Language (e.g. what rhetoric techniques has Poe employed to
establish his narrative thus far? Only choose ONE, and tell us
how it has assisted him)
o Audience (e.g. how effective is Poe in his use of these elements
in engaging the reader to continue through his narrative? Do you
think he could have been MORE effect, and why?
 Together as a class, read Part One of the short story (first four pages).
 After initial read, students will then individually answer the four
questions devised as a class individually on their sticky notes (1 note per
answer), working from question 1-question 4. After they have completed
each answer, they will stick them on the appropriate question board.
10 min Class Class discussion about answers
discussion  Once each student has completed an answer for the four questions and
stuck them on the board, the teacher will select 2-3 sticky note answers
from the first question (that give varying opinions if possible) and read
them out to the class.
 Students will be asked to deliberate on the potential answers, and
attempt to reach a unanimous decision upon the overall meaning derived
from each of the post board topics –
 Mood – students should work to recognise the suspenseful yet
gloomy mood developed by Poe through his narrative voice

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 Point of view – students should work to recognise that Poe’s use
of narrative point of view through the unnamed character helps
him to characterise Auguste Dupin in a more in depth manner,
and develop an air of mystery about him
 Language – ask students what effect these rhetoric devices have
on Poe’s development of ideas and mystery within the narrative.
Students should work to recognise that Poe’s vast use of simile,
metaphor, imagery, sentence structure etc. allows him to develop
a sense of experience for the reader, as though they are
witnessing the development of this friendship first hand.
 Audience – students should work to recognise the role of context
in assessing potential audience engagement with a text (ask
students if they believe a responder of the mid-late 19th century
would be engaged by this narrative, and why).
5 min Individual Wrap up lesson. Students will write down in their lesson log at the back of their
book 2 key things they took away from the lesson, and 1 way they can apply it
in the broader world.
Homework Continue reading Murders in the Rue Morgue up until the end of part 4 (pp. 42-
54).

Evaluation/ Extension
- Interacting with textual clues to spark interest in and speculation around the text will work to prompt
students investment in the first text for the module. The lesson will be the catalyst for the gradual
release of responsibility, whereby we begin engaging with the text together as a class and, over the
course of the module, work towards having students analyse, understand and forms critical
evaluations of the text. The sticky note discussion activity enables students to reflect upon and form
their own ideas before discussing them with others, which should enable a better deliberation
between students.

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Lesson 2
Focus – How does the context of composers, responders and a text influence the way meaning is constructed
and understood?
Content –
EA11-1 - Explain the personal, social, historical and cultural contexts of composing and responding,
and evaluate how these contexts impact on meaning

Lesson Outline –
Students will have explored Edgar Allen Poe’s personal and social context within week 1 of the unit, and so
will be building off of this understanding. Students to work in pairs to uncover the context of the text
through a ‘detective inquiry’, whereby they will search up information on the time and setting of the
narrative, the central theme (detective mystery), and its prominence within the social context of Poe’s time.
As a class, then work through an exert from the text (Part 3, pp.48-49), and compile a list of key vocabulary
terms/phrases that reflect this context as well as support Poe’s development of mystery within the text.
Student’s will choose 3 of these words/phrases, and suggest a synonym/alternate phrase, and write a 2-3
sentence explanation on how the language chosen shapes the mood and meaning of the narrative to them.

Lesson 3
Focus – How does the composer utilise the conventions of theme, structure, and language choice to develop
and maintain the aesthetic nature of his narrative?
Content –
EA11-7 - Appreciate the different ways in which a text can be valued, for example for its themes,
aesthetic qualities or representation of culture
EA11-1 - Analyse the ways language features, text structures and stylistic choices shape ideas and
perspectives and influence audiences
Lesson Outline –
We will begin by exploring what we mean by ‘aesthetic’ within the context of literature through a ‘think-
pair-share’ activity. Students will be posed the question, ‘Does Poe establish the experience for his audience
through his narrative?’ and will be given 3 minutes to write down their various answers. Students will then
justify their opinions with a partner, and then class will come back together to discuss what was meant by
‘experience’, if Poe achieved this, and finally connect this all by noting that literary aesthetic is achieved
through the creation of the experience for the audience. Students will then work through a scaffolded
activity (See Appendix B) drawing out key examples of rhetoric and style (e.g. imagery, simile, structure,
dialogue, narrative voice), recognising their purpose in developing the story, and the effect they have on
audience understanding and perspective of Poe’s narrative.

Lesson 4
Focus – How can we use these conventions in the creation of our own appropriated texts?
Content –
EA11-5 - Investigate complex ideas and information through sustained argument and imaginative
compositions
EA11-2 - Experiment with emerging textual forms by combining different media and technologies
and describe the impacts of this combination on meaning and response
Lesson Outline –
Students will be building on the conventions analysed in the previous lesson in order to compose their own
appropriated storyboards though Canva. Students are asked to pick one convention from the following to
base their composition around – theme, character, point of view, voice. Students will need to consider how
Poe crafts their convention, and its purpose in relation to the text as a whole. They will then need to alter one
aspect of their convention (i.e. if exploring character, they may choose to look at developing the sailor).
Using Canva online, students will create a 4-6 panel storyboard that reflects their new narrative with the
altered convention. Students will need to justify their stylistic decisions by composing a SETEL paragraph
(O’Donohue 2016) explaining their purpose, use of rhetoric within the images and written words of their
storyboard, and what effect this will have on the development of meaning for the audience.

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ENGLISH LESSON PLAN 5

Class: Year 11 Advanced English Time: 60 minutes

Outcomes
EA11-6 - Compare how composes draw on aspects of other texts, for example through theme, genre,
intertextuality, style, event and character
EA11-6 - Reflect on the ways in which particular texts are influence by other texts and contexts

Materials
- White board/Electronic Board
- Whiteboard markers
- Projector (if no electronic/smart board is available)
- 30x copies of Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allen Poe (enough for 1 per student – either
online or hard copy)
- Student laptops/tablets/devices – if not able to have 1 per student, 1 per 3 students will suffice
- Access to internet
- Link to Dark Tales: Murders in the Rue Morgue gameplay -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHHynP-7Apg OR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bn-
ynTkJaNc
- 30x ‘Reimagining the Rue Morgue – Checklist and Response’ worksheet (enough for 1 per student)
- Sticky notes
- Student work books
- Writing materials

Procedures
Time Organisation Teaching/ learning activities
5 min Individual Bell ringer activity –
 Have the following scenario written/displayed on the board – ‘You’re
called on by a children’s entertainment company to entertain and
engage students with stories by Edgar Allan Poe in the 21st century.
You ask if you can adapt these narratives for the contemporary
audience, and they oblige. How would you adapt and reimagine
Murders in the Rue Morgue for these children, and why would you
do it in this way?’
 Students will have 30 seconds to look over the scenario, followed by
2 minutes to write as much of a response to the question as they can
within the time limit. Students will do so in their creative logs in the
back of their books.
Learning Intentions – Teacher to outline 3 intentions for the day ahead.
 What we reimagine and appropriate texts for new and different
audiences, how may we go about it?
 Do adaptations of text solely have to be introduce in new textual
modes?
 Do video games allow responders to explore narratives in the
contemporary world?

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10 min Mini- Mini-lesson on appropriating, reimagining and reconceptualising texts
lesson/Class  Mini-lesson will focus on the idea that adaptations and appropriations
discussion do not have to solely be done with a change in form. Narrative
appropriations can draw key themes, ideas, characters, elements of
plot or point of view out from certain texts, and use those in crafting
new texts for varying purposes and audiences.
 Highlight to students that form is also now extending beyond
traditional means with the emergence of new technologies. Have
students consider and suggest different modes and media through
which narratives may be delivered to them, and write their various
answers on the board.
 Do not give students all ideas, as the next activity will ask them to
think about these in further detail in relation to Poe’s short story.
20 min Group Student brainstorm + visual mind-map of narrative adaptations and
collaboration reimagined texts based off of Poe’s Murders in the Rue Morgue for
contemporary audiences
 Extending on the bell ringer activity for this lesson, students will be
grouped into small groups of 2-3, and collaboratively brainstorm
ONE new text that extends on or draws from Poe’s narrative.
 Students should be encouraged to think of different modes of
delivery, plot lines, changes to narrative conventions, etc. Teacher
will outline these at the beginning of the activity, and remind students
that their own brainstorm for varying textual modes and media
remains on the board, and can be drawn upon for this activity.
 Students will also need to consider how their new text may be
influenced by their current context, and how the ideas/attitudes of
Poe’s narrative and context may influence their choices.
 Their brainstorm and ideas for their text will be presented through a
visual mind-map created virtually through the consolidation of
various images/phrases that reflect their compositions. These will be
sent to the teacher and shared through the google drive after the
lesson.
 Students are given 10 minutes to complete their brainstorms and
mind-maps, and are then given a 1 minute speed round wrap up for
present their idea to the class.
20 min Individual Introduction to text –Dark Tales: Murders in the Rue Morgue by Big Fish
analysis + Games (2009)
group viewing  Inform students that the next 4 lessons will involve engagement with
and analysis of video games as a new mode for the delivery of
narrative
 Hand out ‘checklist’ worksheet for narrative conventions and
elements, and explain to students that they will be watching a 6-
minute game play clip from the Big Fish game. Students will be
using the checklist worksheet in order to take note of similarities they
recognise within the game that extend on Poe’s narrative.

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 Once the viewing has taken place and students have completed their
checklists accordingly, teacher will draw a horizontal scale on the
board that ranks from 1-10. Students will have to write their names
on a sticky note and place it on the scale at a number that reflects,
based on their initial engagement, how successful they believe the
adaptation is for a different audience.
 Students will then be given 5 minutes to write a justification to their
rank. Students will need to consider at least 2 of the
conventions/elements referred to within the checklist in responding to
this.
5 min Individual Wrap up lesson. Students will write down in their lesson log at the back of
their book 2 key things they took away from the lesson, and 1 way they can
apply it in the broader world.
Homework Complete response if incomplete in class.

Evaluation/ Extension
- Providing students with basic frameworks (e.g. sampling the bell ringer activity before having
students engage with visual compositions) and modelled assistance (e.g. the provided checklist
scaffold) will work to help students in identifying methods of comparison and reflection, continuing
along the path of gradually releasing responsibility to them. Students are beginning the process of
drawing on narrative conventions of other authors for the eventual composition of their own pieces
through said activities.

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Lesson 6
Focus – How can contemporary composer’s create narrative meaning for their audiences through new
communicative modes and media?
Syllabus Content –
EA11-2 - Examine the way composers apply textual conventions to shape meaning in different
modes, media and technologies
EA11-6 - Analyse how composers combine elements from different texts, sources and genres to
create new texts for particular audiences
Outline –
Students will engage in content play with the game, Dark Tales: Murders in the Rue Morgue, for 10-15
minutes in small groups (2-3) at a time. Students will have a checklist of key conventions to take note of
during game play (i.e. point of view, symbolism, setting, key characters, etc.) that they will then be using for
a follow up activity. For each item on their checklist, students will then need to complete a visual-written-
link scaffold (See Appendix B) that will allow them to recognise and analyse the role of each of these in
forming the narrative, and then highlighting the links between the game and Poe’s narrative.

Lesson 7
Focus – Why do we reimagine narratives of the past for audiences of the future, and in what ways can we
best communicate our purpose to them?
Syllabus Content –
EA11-2 - Explore the ways different media and technologies influence the relationships between
texts and responders, for example flexible reading pathways in digital texts
EA11-2 - Experiment with emerging textual forms by combining different media and technologies
and describe the impacts of this combination on meaning and response
Outline –
First half of lesson will look specifically at audience engagement with text, and the purpose of reimaging
historical narratives for contemporary audiences. Student’s will take part in a sticky note discussion,
whereby 4 poster boards are put on the board, each with a different question about Poe’s narrative and
student opinion (e.g. What was one key moment in the narrative that stood out to you?; How do you think
Poe could have made his narrative more enticing?). Students will write individual answers on sticky notes
and stick them under corresponding question, and discussion will extend by drawing on 2-3 of these points
for each question, having students discuss the changes in context and textual form that influenced their
opinions. Lesson then moves towards the engagement with the creation of their own adaptations. Students
will use the storyboard created in lesson 4 to formulate their own video game for contemporary audiences.
Students must devise a plot line based off of their storyboard, justify how it builds on Poe’s narrative
through use of any narrative convention, and note how contemporary audiences can come to engage with
and understand their narrative.

Lesson 8 –
Focus – How can we create narratives for contemporary audiences in new and exciting ways whilst
carefully considering our use of narrative conventions?
Syllabus Content –
EA11-2 - Experiment with emerging textual forms by combining different media and technologies
and describe the impacts of this combination on meaning and response
EA11-4 – Integrate real and imagined experiences by selecting and adapting particular aspects of
texts to create new texts
Outline -
Students will use Flowlab online in order to build the first level of their games. They will need to consider
the purpose of their narratives carefully, and consider where they position the player, the setting, the use of
lighting and mood, etc. Give students last 10 minutes of the lesson to switch games with a partner, and put
their narratives to the test. Students will need to justify through a SETEL response for homework
(O’Donohue 2016) how the use of images, words, music and animation in their games enables them to
communicate their narratives to their audience.

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ENGLISH LESSON PLAN 9

Class: Year 11 Advanced English Time: 60 minutes

Outcomes
EA11-1 - Develop independent interpretations of texts supported by informed observation and close
textual analysis 

EA11-6 - Compare how composes draw on aspects of other texts, for example through theme, genre,
intertextuality, style, event and character

Materials
- White board/Electronic Board
- Whiteboard markers
- Projector (if no electronic/smart board is available)
- 30x copies of Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allen Poe (enough for 1 per student – either
online or hard copy)
- Access to internet
- Link to Sherlock Special: Official Extended Trailer (2015) -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hjPxUfV32Q
- 30x ‘Character Traits’ sheets (enough for 1 per student)
- Student work books
Writing materials

Procedures
Time Organisation Teaching/ learning activities
5 min Individual Bell ringer activity –
 Have the following question written/displayed on the board – ‘If you
were to reconceptualise Murders in the Rue Morgue from the point of
view of any other character (or perhaps in a different frame-using
third person narration?), who would you choose? Why do you think
this would make the narrative more engaging? ’
 Students will have 30 seconds to look over the question and
formulate their ideas, followed by 2 minutes to write as much of a
response as they can within the time limit. Students will do so in their
creative logs in the back of their books.
Learning Intentions – Teacher to outline 3 intentions for the day ahead.
 Who is Auguste Dupin? – character analysis
 Do entire narratives have to be reimagined for varying audiences, or
can composers draw from narrative conventions in building
reconceptualisations? – focus on character development and
evolution across texts
 Who is Sherlock Holmes? – introduction to character leading into
text
20 min Individual Character profile of Auguste Dupin from Murders in the Rue Morgue
analysis  Class will revisit Edgar Allan Poe’s Murder in the Rue Morgue, this
time specifically looking at characterisation as a key convention
within Poe’s narrative style.

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 Students will compose a character profile for Dupin, outlining a brief
description of his appearance based off of textual evidence, 4 key
traits, quotes/examples from the text that convey said traits, and how
Dupin adds to the overall narrative/the feel of the narrative. Students
will complete this character profile in their workbooks, however the
teacher will model the layout on the board prior to the activity.
 Students will be able to draw from a list of character traits provided
for them by the teacher (See Appendix C), or may devise their own
accordingly based off of their personal observation of the text.
Activity is completed alone as each student must consider how they
perceive Dupin personally through Poe’s use of characterisation.
10 min Class Student consideration of other characters throughout history that may be
brainstorm similar to Auguste Dupin
+ discussion  Given that students have now considered the characterisation of
Dupin through their own observation, and his worth within Poe’s
narrative, ask students to think about characters in any texts they
have engaged with (television shows, movies, books, games, etc.)
that may portray the same characteristics, or that are similar to Dupin
and his role within the narrative.
 Students are being prompted to consider characters that reflect
Dupin’s inquisitive yet mysterious nature, alongside narratives that
may follow a methodical and suspenseful plot line.
 As a class, brainstorm these characters. Potential examples may
include:
o Sherlock Holmes – the film, television or novel text
o Dr. Gregory House – television character (House)
o Patrick Jane – television character (The Mentalist)
o Mma Ramotswe – fictional novel-based character (The
No.1 Ladies Detective Agency)
10 min Individual Direct focus towards Sherlock Holmes as character for inquisitive
questioning + comparative study
class  Students will write down in their book their initial thoughts on
explanation Sherlock Holmes (in terms of what they may know already) as a form
of pre-analysis of the character. This will be revisited in a later lesson
after students have engaged with the textual analysis and comparison.
 Teacher will explain to students that Sherlock Holmes is considered
to be an adaptation and extension of Auguste Dupin, who is remarked
as being the first true detective within narrative fiction.
10 min Individual Introduction to text Sherlock Holmes (television series) produced by BBC
response to text One.
 Students will watch the Sherlock Special: Official Extended Trailer
(2015) twice. First viewing will take place with full student attention
focused on it in order to allow them to get an understanding of the
basic plot line and recognise Holmes as the key character.
 During the second viewing, students will need to take note of any
similarities they may see between Holmes as presented within the

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trailer and Dupin based off of the character profile built earlier in the
lesson. These similarities may be drawn from textual phrases, camera
shots, character appearance/mood, etc.
5 min Individual Wrap up lesson. Students will write down in their lesson log at the back of
their book 2 key things they took away from the lesson, and 1 way they can
apply it in the broader world.
Homework -

Evaluation/ Extension
- Giving the students the opportunity to work closely with the text and pick out their own traits,
examples and features for analysis demonstrates progression in gradually releasing responsibility of
learning from teacher to students. Said activity also prompts the consideration of individual
interpretations, which is important in allowing students to consider their own values and ideas that
may influence their choices. Completing an initial innocent viewing of the Sherlock Holmes text is
important in developing a connection for students with the subject matter, whilst also ensuring
students can first think about the comparative connections to be drawn between the characterisation
of this text and that within Poe’s juxtaposed text, before completing analysis of it.

14
Lesson 10
Focus – Can we recognise similarities and adaptations in character created by composers through visual and
written rhetoric devices?
Syllabus Content –
EA11-4 – Understand that significant language concepts may operate across different textual forms
Outline -
The key language concept to be explored in the lesson is characterisation. Students will watch the first 10
minutes of ‘The Six Thatchers’ (BBC One, 2017), and take note of how they believe the director frames
Sherlock Holmes through three key quotes/shots/moments. Students will pair together to discuss their
significant quotes/shots, and what these collectively told them about Holmes’ character. As a class, we will
collect a select few of these from various pairs, and students will be asked to justify how these may or may
not be characteristics that also carry over from Auguste Dupin. Students will then read Eschner’s
Smithsonian article, ‘Without Edgar Allen Poe, We Wouldn’t Have Sherlock Holmes’ (2017) independently
in order to solidify their understanding of how Holmes is an extension of Dupin, and reflect in their writing
logs on how their symbolic representations were similar or different to the points raised in the article.

Lesson 11
Focus –
Syllabus Content –
EA11-4 - Compare and evaluate specific uses of language in a range of textual forms
Outline –
Student’s will watch the next 15-minutes of ‘The Six Thatchers’ (BBC One, 2017). During this time,
student’s will need to look specifically at Sherlock Holmes, and take observation-style notes on his dialogue
and visual representation (language and visual rhetoric). Using these notes and their memory, student’s will
then need to complete a comparison chart that asks them to recognise literary techniques (either visual or
language) present within the shot, how they have been used, the effect these have on their understanding of
Holmes’ characterisation, and an example drawn from Poe’s text that highlights a similarity/adaptation. The
final box of the scaffold will ask students to explain which example/quote/shot is more engaging to them as
a member of the contemporary audience. This will be modelled together through an ‘I do, You help’ think
aloud activity (Howard 2016, p. 96) as a class before students complete it alone. Students to watch
remaining 20-minutes of episode for homework.

Lesson 12
Focus –
Syllabus Content –
EA11-4 - Explain how composers adapt language forms, features and structures of texts from other
genres, periods and cultures in new texts
Outline –
Begin lesson with a look at the contemporary context in which the BBC One text was created. Have students
discuss what they know of the BBC, English culture, the entertainment industry, and where Sherlock
Holmes fits into this within a contemporary context. Students will then take part in a language pairing
activity. In groups of 4, students will be given 5 quotes/examples that interrelate through means of theme,
character or language form/feature, drawn from both Poe’s ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’ and BBC One’s
‘The Six Thatchers’. Students will need to work together to pair these examples with the correlating one
from the opposing text, and then choose 1 pairing each to explain through a piece of writing how the BBC
One extend upon Poe’s character and mood for contemporary audiences.

15
ENGLISH LESSON PLAN 13

Class: Year 11 Advanced English Time: 60 minutes

Outcomes
EA11-6 - Reflect on the ways in which particular texts are influenced by other texts and contexts

Materials
- White board/Electronic Board
- Whiteboard markers
- Projector (if no electronic/smart board is available)
- Student work books
- Writing materials

Procedures
Time Organisation Teaching/ learning activities
5 min Individual Bell ringer activity –
 Have the following question written/displayed on the board – ‘Does
detective work only involve the solving of murder mysteries? Justify
your answer with an example.’
 Students will have 30 seconds to look over the question and formulate
their ideas, followed by 2 minutes to write as much of a response as
they can within the time limit. Students will do so in their creative logs
in the back of their books.
Learning Intentions – Teacher to outline 2 intentions for the day ahead.
 Are narratives reimagined and adapted for varying audiences and
contexts?
 How and why do composers do this? – taking on the role of composer
and responder
5 min Mini-lesson Mini-lesson led on the difference between open and close ended questions for
inquiry
 Mini-lesson will focus on the difference between questions that are
open and prompt thought-provoking answers from responders, and
those that are closed and therefore often only draw short remarks from
responders.
 Teacher will draw this back to the context of the lesson ahead with
examples of inquiry questions that responders may ask of composers
(i.e. Can you tell me about your purpose for reimagining Sherlock
Holmes for the contemporary audience through a visual medium? As
opposed to, Do you think using a visual medium is better for portraying
Holmes than in written form?)
20 min Individual Development of inquiry questions and ‘cheat sheet’ for composers -
composition  Students will need to individually compose 4 open ended questions as if
they are interviewing the three composers of the texts studied in class.
 Questions can be about:
o The context of the texts
o The perspectives explored

16
o The use of characterisation and point of view
o The overall mood of the narratives
o Their various forms
 Students should be challenged to compose questions in such a way that
all three composers can provide a suitable answer.
 Use their work from the past 16 lessons (i.e. lessons 1-12 outlines, plus
the first 4 from the week allocated before this sub-unit), students will
also need to devise a 1-page ‘cheat sheet’ for subsequent use in the next
activity.
 Their cheat sheets should include information about each of the three
texts studied between lessons 1-12 (Murders in the Rue Morgue by
Edgar Allan Poe, Dark Tales: Murders in the Rue Morgue by Big Fish
Games, and The Six Thatchers by BBC One), and may fall under the
same headings as those given to prompt questions –
o The context of the text
o The perspectives explored
o The use of characterisation and point of view – characters,
voice, setting
o The overall mood of the narrative
o Its form (textual mode and media)
25 min Small group Composer Hot Seat –
activity  In groups of 4, students will then complete their ‘role-play’ peer
interviews, whereby they will rotate between the interviewer, Edgar
Allan Poe, the game composer from Big Fish Games, and the director
from BBC One.
 The ‘interviewer’ will ask two of their questions to the ‘composers’,
and the composers must each provide a response, keeping in mind the
context of their piece.
 Students will rotate roles every 5 minutes in order to ensure that each
student responds in each role. No two students are allowed to ask the
same questions, or questions of a similar manner, when acting as the
interviewer.
 Teacher will rotate around groups and monitor student responses, whilst
also (when appropriate) asking additional questions to evaluate student
understanding more succinctly.
 This activity will enable students to assess their understanding of the
texts, as well as prompting them reflect on the conventions of narrative
within each, and how textual influence plays a role in the formation of
narrative.
5 min Individual Wrap up lesson. Students will write down in their lesson log at the back of their
book 2 key things they took away from the lesson, and a reflective statement on
whether they felt confident with their understanding of the narratives discussed.
Homework -

Evaluation/ Extension
- Students are being scaffolded throughout the lesson in the process of reflection. The mini lesson on
inquiry questions helps to formulate thinking when students are then prompted to develop their own
17
in the context of composer responses. Allowing students time to consolidate knowledge on the
subject matter prior to the Hot Seat activity works to prevent ‘dead air’ time, whereby students are
actively having to think and respond within a short period of time, which may halt the flow of the
lesson. Ensuring that each student plays a part in each of the four roles is important in enabling them
to demonstrate their understanding to both the teach and themselves on the role of context and
development of narrative within the texts studies so far within the unit, and will provide a basis for
their own compositions to be explored throughout the proceeding lessons.

18
Lesson 14
Focus –
Syllabus Content –
EA11-5 – Synthesis complex ideas and information in a sustained, structured argument using
relevant textual evidence
Outline –
Using their learnt knowledge and understanding, students will be asked to draw on their analysis of the three
texts explored over the last 3 weeks in order to compose a response to the following question; How do
composers of varying contexts develop purpose and meaning for their respective audiences through their
narratives? In their response, students will need to refer to at least two of the three texts they have engaged
with in class leading up to lesson 14. Prior to individual response, the class will compose a worked example
of a paragraph together on the board, reaffirming their knowledge and understanding of composing critical
evaluations in academic form.

Lesson 15
Focus –
Syllabus Content –
EA11-6 - Select and combine specific textual elements to create new texts and assess their
effectiveness for different audiences, purposes and contexts
EA11-4 - Draw on knowledge and experience of literary devices, for example genre and hybridity, in
creating new texts
Outline –
Students will be constructing their own narratives by drawing on ONE aspect of any of the three texts
explored in class, including characters, theme, style (in terms of construction, not form), setting, or any other
element brainstormed by the class during the initial discussion that takes place. Students will imaginatively
compose narrative pieces set within a contemporary context, and must use two rhetoric devices
appropriately within their piece in order to enhance their purpose. Teacher to do short conferences with each
student to allow them to discuss their ideas for their piece and consider purpose and audience as a key point.

Lesson 16
Focus –
Syllabus Content -
EA11-3 - Use accurate spelling, punctuation, syntax and metalanguage in complex creative and
critical texts
EA11-9 - Use constructive, critical feedback from others to improve learning, including their own
composing and responding
Outline –
Conduct mini-lesson on basic editing tips for students (new paragraphs, spelling errors, capital letters, etc.)
looking specifically at spelling and punctuation errors, and incorrect word choices. Give students the next 15
minutes to finalise their narratives, rounding out points or revising sections that may need more attention in
order to build their purpose. Students will then take 10 minutes to do a self-editing process using the tools
learnt in the mini-lesson for their own writing. Proceeding 15 minutes will then be spent in a process of
collaboration and discussion. Student work will be collected and redistributed randomly around the class as
a form of writer’s feedback, whereby students will be given CONSTRUCTIVE feedback on the work they
are given. This feedback will be modelled using the 2 stars and a question mark model (See Appendix D),
whereby they will be giving their co-writers 2 positive attributes about their narrative and writing style, and
an area that they think could perhaps improve the quality of their work. Next 10 minutes will see students
receive their works back, and take on the feedback given to them in order to rework/revise their narratives.

19
Appendix
Appendix A
Key Feature Clues for Murders in the Rue Morgue (to each be put on a separate sheet for distribution
between groups)

1-

2-

3-

Poe, E. (1841). Murders in the Rue Morgue. Retrieved from


https://americanenglish.state.gov/files/ae/resource_files/the_murders_in_the_rue_morgue.pdf

20
Appendix B
Jigsaw Rhetoric scaffold – utilising visual and written rhetoric to understand purpose and effect within the
narrative

Rhetoric Device Rhetoric Device

Purpose: Purpose:
________________________________________ _______________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________
Effect:
________________________________________ Effect:
_______________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________

Rhetoric Device Rhetoric Device

Purpose:
________________________________________ Purpose:
_______________________________________
________________________________________ ______________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________
Effect: Effect:
________________________________________ _______________________________________
________________________________________ _______________________________________

21
Appendix C
Character Traits Cheat Sheet

Character Traits Cheat Sheet

22
Appendix D
2 stars and a question feedback model

One element in your writing


that stood out was…

Your use of ______ helped me


to understand your purpose
by…

One area that I believe you


could work on is ______ .

? Perhaps you could think about


_______...

23
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