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The views expressed in this presentation are the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect the

views or policies of the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), its Board of Directors, or the
governments they represent. ADBI does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this paper and accepts no responsibility for any consequences of their use. Terminology used may not necessarily be consistent with ADB
official terms.

Development Partner Roundtable on Sustainable Sanitation in Asia
20 September 2018
Tokyo

Development Partner Presentation

The World Bank and
Citywide Inclusive Sanitation in Asia
By
Joseph Ravikumar
Sr. Institutional Development Specialist, World Bank
Ongoing/ planned initiatives / achievements (using the categories for SDG 6 report)
Development Partner Roundtable on Sustainable Sanitation in Asia
Asia Context
• Home to over 50% of the world’s
urban population

• 6 of the world’s 10 largest cities

• 70% access to improved sanitation

• ~ 25 - 60% connected to sewers
Sample of World Bank funded projects in Asia
S. On going / planned initiatives Investment
No. (US $ million)
1. National Ganga River Basin Project (India) 1000
2. Tamil Nadu Sustainable Urban Development Program (India) 400
3. Bangladesh Municipal Water Supply and Sanitation Project 200 Achievements
4. Dhaka Sanitation Improvement Project 300 • Sanitation interventions as appropriate to the context
5. Maldives Urban Development and Resilience Project 15 (FSM for small towns with low population densities &
6. Second Ho Chi Min Environmental Sanitation Project 450 low levels of water supply)
7. Manila wastewater management project 275 • Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS)
8. Water Supply and Sanitation Improvement Project (Cambodia) 56 (mix of sanitation intervention – network & non-
network options)
Leadership/Enabling Factors/Institutional arrangements at the national/ subnational level for sanitation
Development Partner Roundtable on Sustainable Sanitation in Asia
S. No. Enabling factors
India
1. National Urban Sanitation Policy (2008)
• Accords importance to human excreta management
• Considers the full cycle of sanitation (the ‘sanitation service chain’)
• Safe collection, treatment and disposal of human excreta and wastewater
through network / non-network approaches
2. Service level benchmarks
• 20% of wastewater to be recycled and reused
3. National Policy on urban fecal sludge and septage management (2017)
• Reaffirms importance of FSM and septage management
Bangladesh
4. Institutional and regulatory framework for fecal sludge management

Institutional arrangements

• DBOT contracts with 5 – 10 operations and maintenance
• Contracts monitored by cities / financial intermediaries / parastatal water and wastewater
organizations
Leadership/Enabling Factors/Institutional arrangements at the national/ subnational level for sanitation
Development Partner Roundtable on Sustainable Sanitation in Asia

Leadership
Projects aligned with national programs and / or country strategies
and led by the National Govt
India
• National Mission for Clean Ganga
• Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation
Bangladesh
• Water Supply and Sanitation Strategy
Maldives
• Urban resilience and improved water security

Project planning and design – National and state governments
Project financing – household, national / state governments / MDB
Project monitoring – states / cities / parastatal wastewater entities
Project implementation – private sector (long term contracts)
Financing/Business models for sustainable sanitation

Financing
Capex
Bank / Govt (national & state)

Opex
Energy recovery system – meet 60 – 70% of the plant’s energy needs

Revenue from sale of treated wastewater to industries (wherever possible)

User charges / subsidies (central / state governments)
Innovation towards scaling sanitation to 80% by 2030, to achieve in SDG Target 6.2
Development Partner Roundtable on Sustainable Sanitation in Asia

• Integrated citywide approach
• Departure from only centralized solution to a
mixed approach
• Interception, diversion and treatment from
drains Source: IIHS, 2018
• Co-treatment (septage) at sewage treatment
plants
• Involvement of NGO’s to motivate households
to connect to network
• NGO paid Rs. 300 for every household
connected to the network
• Mobile app to facilitate application, track
progress and validate house connection
Development Partner Roundtable on Sustainable Sanitation in Asia

Thank You for your attention !