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Census of India 2011

HARYANA

SERIES-07 PART XII-A

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK


GURGAON

VILLAGE AND TOWN DIRECTORY

DIRECTORATE OF CENSUS OPERATIONS

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URBAN AREA WITH POPULATION SIZE: CLASS I, III, IV & V .. ... ! ! ! !
TOTAL AREA (In Sq. Km)... ... 1258.00
NATIONAL HIGHWAY... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... NH 8
TOTAL POPULATION ... ... ... 1,514,432
STATE HIGHWAY . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... SH 26 NUMBER OF TAHSILS.. ... ... 5
OTHER IMPORTANT ROADS... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... NUMBER OF TOWNS .. ... ... 9
RS C.D. BLOCKS NUMBER OF VILLAGES... ... 242
RAILWAY LINE WITH STATION, BROAD GAUGE ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
RIVER AND STREAM.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... A PATAUDI
CANAL ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... PART OF DISTRICT GURGAON FALLS IN C.D. BLOCK TAORU
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HOSPITAL ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... E D SOHNA
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OTHER IMPORTANT VILLAGE WITH NAME... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
CENSUS OF INDIA 2011
HARYANA
SERIES-7 PART XII-A

DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK


GURGAON

VILLAGE AND TOWN DIRECTORY

Directorate of Census Operations, Haryana


Gurgaon- The Millennium City
Gurgaon district has witnessed a phenomenal growth in all spheres of developments,
particularly in industry and urbanization. Today, it has become a hub of multinational
companies, industries giants, call centres, software companies, shopping malls and skyscrapers.
Gurgaon is strategically located with its boundaries touching Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Delhi.
Its excellent connectivity with other state via Delhi-Jaipur –Ahmedabad broad gauge rail link
and NH 8, brings thousands of people to Gurgaon for the purpose of work travel and
entertainment.

In fact with the collaboration of Suzuki Motors of Japan and Maruti Udyog Limited in
early eighties, a new area of rapid industrialization of Gurgaon started as a result of which the
district came on the international map. Maruti Suzuki is India’s Largest passenger car company.

The automobile industry of Gurgaon is producing passenger cars, motor cycles, scooters
and its components. The Gurgaon –Manesar-Bawal belt has emerged as the auto hub of the
country, Thereby offering ample opportunities to the entrepreneurs.There are many prominent
and prestigious units involved in the manufacturing of telecommunication equipments, electrical
goods, sports goods, rubber products and readymade garments, and in software development.
Other industries include light engineering goods, pharmaceuticals, agro based and foods
processing, leather, terry towels, air conditioners, shoes, pesticides , insecticides, etc. the main
industries in these fields are Cosco, Enkay Rubber, Perfetti, Haldiram, HFCL, Martin Haris,
TERI, Ranbaxy Laboratories etc.

With its rapid development, Gurgaon city has emerged as a jewel in the crown of
Gurgaon district and has done the district proud with its achievement.
Contents
_____________________________________________________________________ Pages
Foreword 1
Preface 3
Acknowledgement 4
History and scope of the District Census Hand Book 5
Brief History of the District 7
Analytical Note
(i) Physical features 11
Location and size 11
Physiography 11
Drainage 11
Climate 12
Natural Economic resources, namely, Forestry, Minerals and mining, Soil and
cropping pattern, Land and land-use pattern, Tenancy, Agriculture, Irrigation, Animal
husbandry, Fishery, Industry, Trade and commerce, Transport, Electricity and power,
Gram Panchayat, its composition, jurisdiction and role in the Development of Village
and its economy 13
(ii) Census Concepts 28
(iii) Non-Census Concepts 33
(iv) 2011 Census findings - Population, its distribution 33
(v) Brief analysis of PCA data based on insets tables 1 to 35 35
(vi) Brief analysis of the Village Directory and Town Directory data based on inset tables
36 to 45 56
(vii) Major social and cultural events 63
(viii)Brief description of places of religious, historical or archaeological importance 66
and places of tourist interest in the district
(ix) Major characteristics of the district, contribution of the district in the form of any 68
historical figure associated with the district
(x) Scope of Village Directory and Town Directory 69

PART A - VILLAGE AND TOWN DIRECTORY


Brief Note on Village and Town Directory 83
Section I - Village Directory
(a) List of villages merged in towns and outgrowths at 2011 Census 93
(b) C.D. Block wise presentation of Village Directory Data
Pataudi C.D. Block
(i) C.D. Block Map 95
(ii) Alphabetical list of villages alongwith location code 2001 and 2011 97
(iii) Presentation of Village Directory data 100
Gurgaon C.D. Block
(i) C.D. Block Map 133
(ii) Alphabetical list of villages alongwith location code 2001 and 2011 135
(iii) Presentation of Village Directory data 136
Farukhnagar C.D. Block
(i) C.D. Block Map 153
(ii) Alphabetical list of villages alongwith location code 2001 and 2011 155
(iii) Presentation of Village Directory data 156
Sohna C.D. Block
(i) C.D. Block Map 181
(ii) Alphabetical list of villages alongwith location code 2001 and 2011 183
(iii) Presentation of Village Directory data 186
Taoru C.D. Block
(i) C.D. Block Map 211
(ii) Alphabetical list of villages alongwith location code 2001 and 2011 213
(iii) Presentation of Village Directory data 214
(c) Appendices to Village Directory
Appendix I :Summary showing total number of villages having Educational,
Medical and other amenities in villages-C.D. Block level. 222
Appendix IA : Villages by number of Primary Schools 226
Appendix IB : Villages by Primary, Middle and Secondary Schools 226
Appendix IC : Villages with different sources of drinking water facilities available 227
Appendix II : Villages with 5,000 and above population which do not have
one or more amenities available 228
Appendix III : Land utilisation data in respect of Census towns 230
Appendix IV : C.D. Block wise list of inhabited villages where no amenity
other than drinking water facility is available 230
Appendix V : Summary showing number of villages not having
Scheduled Castes population 231
Appendix VI : Summary showing number of villages not having
Scheduled Tribes population 231
Appendix VIIA : List of villages according to the proportion of the Scheduled 232
Castes to the total population by ranges
Appendix VIIB : List of villages according to the proportion of the Scheduled 238
Tribes to the total population by ranges
Appendix VIII : Number of villages under each Gram Panchayat (C.D. Blockwise) 239
Section II - Town Directory
Town Directory Statement I - Status and Growth History 246
Town Directory Statement II - Physical aspects and location of towns, 2009 250
Town Directory Statement III- Civic and other amenities, 2009 252
Town Directory Statement IV - Medical facilities, 2009 254
Town Directory Statement V – Educational, Recreational and cultural facilities,
2009 256
Town Directory Statement VI - Industry and banking, 2009 260
Town Directory Statement VII - Civic and other amenities in slums, 2009 262
Appendix to Town Directory - Town showing their outgrowth with population 266
FOREWORD
1. The District Census Handbook (DCHB) is an important publication of the
Census Organization since 1951. It contains both Census and non Census data
of urban and rural areas for each District. The Census data provide information
on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of population at the lowest
administrative unit i.e. of each Village, Town and Ward of the District. The
Primary Census Abstract (PCA) part of this publication contains Census data
including data on household amenities collected during 1st phase of the Census
i.e. House Listing and Housing Census. The non Census data presented in the
DCHB is in the form of Village Directory and Town Directory contain
information on various infrastructure facilities available in the village and town
viz; education, medical, drinking water, communication and transport, post and
telegraph, electricity, banking, and other miscellaneous facilities. Later on, the
Telegraph Services were closed by the Government of India on 15 th July, 2013.
The data of DCHB are of considerable importance in the context of planning
and development at the grass-root level.
2. In the 1961 Census, DCHB provided a descriptive account of the District,
administrative statistics, Census tables and Village and Town Directory
including Primary Census Abstract. This pattern was changed in 1971 Census
and the DCHB was published in three parts: Part-A related to Village and Town
Directory, Part-B to Village and Town PCA and Part-C comprised analytical
report, administrative statistics, District Census tables and certain analytical
tables based on PCA and amenity data in respect of Villages. The 1981 Census
DCHB was published in two parts: Part-A contained Village and Town Directory
and Part-B the PCA of Village and Town including the SCs and STs PCA up to
Tahsil/Town levels. New features along with restructuring of the formats of
Village and Town Directory were added. In Village Directory, all amenities
except electricity were brought together and if any amenity was not available in
the referent Village, the distance in broad ranges from the nearest place having
such an amenity, was given.
3. The pattern of 1981 Census was followed by and large for the DCHB of 1991
Census except the format of PCA. It was restructured. Nine-fold industrial
classification of main workers was given against the four-fold industrial
classification presented in the 1981 Census. In addition, sex wise population in
0-6 age group was included in the PCA for the first time with a view to enable
the data users to compile more realistic literacy rate as all children below 7
years of age had been treated as illiterate at the time of 1991 Census. One of
the important innovations in the 1991 Census was the Community
Development Block (CD Block) level presentation of Village Directory and PCA
data instead of the traditional Tahsil/Taluk/PS level presentation.
4. As regards DCHB of 2001 Census, the scope of Village Directory was
improved by including some other amenities like banking, recreational and
cultural facilities, newspapers & magazines and `most important commodity’
manufactured in a Village in addition to prescribed facilities of earlier
Censuses. In Town Directory, the statement on Slums was modified and its
coverage was enlarged by including details on all slums instead of ‘notified
Slums.
5. The scope and coverage of Village Directory of 2011 DCHB has been widened
by including a number of new amenities in addition to those of 2001. These

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newly added amenities are: Pre-Primary School, Engineering College, Medical
College, Management Institute, Polytechnic, Non-formal Training Centre,
Special School for Disabled, Community Health Centre, Veterinary Hospital,
Mobile Health Clinic, Medical Practitioner with MBBS Degree, Medical
Practitioner with no degree, Traditional Practitioner and faith Healer, Medicine
Shop, Community Toilet, Rural Sanitary Mart or Sanitary Hardware Outlet in
the Village, Community Bio- gas, Sub Post Office, Village Pin Code, Public Call
Office, Mobile Phone Coverage, Internet Cafes/ Common Service Centre, Private
Courier Facility, Auto/Modified Autos, Taxis and Vans, Tractors, Cycle-pulled
Rickshaws, Carts driven by Animals, Village connected to National Highway,
State Highway, Major District Road, and Other District Road, Availability of
Water Bounded Macadam Roads in Village, ATM, Self-Help Group, Public
Distribution System(PDS) Shop, Mandis/Regular Market, Weekly Haat,
Agricultural Marketing Society, Nutritional Centers (ICDS), Anganwadi Centre,
ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist), Sports Field, Public Library, Public
Reading Room, Assembly Polling station, Birth & Death Registration Office. In
the Town Directory, seven Statements containing the details and the data of
each Town have been presented viz.; (i)-Status and Growth History of Towns,(ii)-
Physical Aspects and Location of Towns, (iii)-Civic and other Amenities, (iv)-
Medical Facilities, (v)-Educational, Recreational & Cultural Facilities, (vi)-
Industry & Banking, and (vii)- Civic & other amenities in Slums respectively.
CD Block wise data of Village Directory and Village PCA have been presented in
DCHB of 2011 Census as presented in earlier Census.
6. The data of DCHB 2011 Census have been presented in two parts, Part-A
contains Village and Town Directory and Part-B contains Village and Town wise
Primary Census Abstract. Both the Parts have been published in separate
volumes in 2011 Census.
7. The Village and Town level amenities data have been collected, compiled and
computerized under the supervision of Smt. Neerja Sekhar, IAS, Director of
Census Operation, Haryana. The task of Planning, Designing and Co-ordination
of this publication was carried out by Dr. Pratibha Kumari, Assistant Registrar
General (SS) under the guidance & supervision of Dr. R.C.Sethi, Ex-Addl. RGI
and Shri Deepak Rastogi present Addl.RGI. Shri A.P. Singh, Deputy Registrar
General, (Map) provided the technical guidance in the preparation of maps. Shri
A.K. Arora, Joint Director of Data Processing Division under the overall
supervision of Shri M.S.Thapa, Addl. Director (EDP) provided full cooperation in
preparation of record structure for digitization and validity checking of Village
and Town Directory data and the programme for the generation of Village
Directory and Town Directory including various analytical inset tables as well
as Primary Census Abstract (PCA). The work of preparation of DCHB, 2011
Census has been monitored in the Social Studies Division. I am thankful to all
of them and others who have contributed to bring out this publication in time.

New Delhi. (C.Chandramouli)


Dated :- 16-06-2014 Registrar General &
Census Commissioner, India

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Preface

The District Census Handbook (DCHB) is one of the important and


most valuable publications of Census Organisation which is brought out for
each district. It contains several demographic and socio-economic
characteristics village-wise and town-wise of the district along with the
status of availability of civic amenities, infrastructural facilities etc.

DCHB reflects an overview of the district and is widely used by


administrators, planners, academicians, researchers, various departments
and general public. For DCHB publication, population data was taken from
Census 2011, whereas non-census data was collected with the active
collaboration of State Govt.

The Census 2011 was conducted under the able guidance of Dr. C.
Chandramouli, IAS, Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. The
credit of the successful accomplishment of this huge task goes to him for his
tremendous and spontaneous work. On behalf of this Directorate I am
highly grateful to him and also extend my thanks to Sh. Deepak Rastogi,
Additional Registrar General for timely guidance. I extend my thanks to Dr.
Pratibha Kumari, Assistant Registrar General (Social Studies), under whose
guidance this publication was finalised. Further I extend my special thanks
to Sh. A. P. Singh, Deputy Registrar General (MAP) and Sh. A.K. Arora, Joint
Director, EDP, who took great pains in bringing out this publication.

I am very grateful on behalf of this Directorate to Smt. Neerja Sekhar,


IAS, the then Director under whose able guidance the specified task was
mostly completed and I would like to acknowledge all the staff members of
DCO Haryana, particularly the team headed by Sh. Vinod Kumar Babbar,
DDCO, Sh. B.V.L. Sai Sekhar, the then ADCO and the entire team of DCO
Haryana. Lastly I record my appreciation for the best efforts put in by the
staff of DCHB, Map and Census Sections.

I hope this publication will provide more useful information for all the
data users.

Chandigarh G.Bapuji
18-06-2014 JDCO, Haryana.

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Acknowledgement

Drafting of DCHB
Sh. Amarjit Singh Toor Assistant Director (Retd.)
Ms. Kavita Panchal St. Investigator Gr. I

Editing and Scrutiny of DCHB


Sh. Vinod Kumar Babbar Deputy Director (Retd.)
Sh. D. Subba Raju Assistant Director
Sh. Satish Kumar Assistant Director

Finalisation of DCHB
Sh. G. Bapuji Joint Director

DCHB Section
Ms. Kavita Panchal St. Investigator Gr. I
Sh. Amrit Lal St. Investigator Gr. II (Retd.)
Sh. Lekh Raj St. Investigator Gr. II
Sh. Nagesh Kumar Seth St. Investigator Gr. II (Retd.)
Sh. R.K. Yadav St. Investigator Gr. II (Retd.)
Ms. Anju Sem Senior Drawing Assistant
Ms. Rashmi Saini Sr. Compiler

Map Section
Sh. Tej Pal Singh Research Officer (Retd.)
Dr. Radha Raman Senior Geographer
Sh. Vidya Sagar Senior Draughtsman
Ms. Neelam Lakhanpal Senior Draughtsman
Sh. Ashwani Kumar Senior Draughtsman
Sh. Gautam Kumar Roy Senior Draughtsman

Printing Section
Sh. K.M. Deshmukh Proof Reader

Others associated with the Project


Dr. Ruchi St. Investigator Gr. I
Sh. Om Prakash St. Investigator Gr. I
Sh. Amit Kumar Bhargav St. Investigator Gr. I
Sh. Sanjeev Kumar St. Investigator Gr. I
Sh. Krishan Kumar St. Investigator Gr. II
Sh. Gurvinder Pal Singh St. Investigator Gr. II
Ms. Raksha Devi Sr. Compiler
Ms. Ram Dasso Sr. Compiler
Ms. Pinki Dhankhar L.D.C.

ORGI- Data Processing Division


Sh. Jaspal Singh Lamba Deputy Director (EDP)
Ms. Usha Assistant Director (EDP)
Sh. Anurag Gupta DPA Grade ‘A’
Sh. Mukesh Kumar Mahawar DPA Grade ‘A’
Ms. Shagufta Nasreen Bhat DPA Grade ‘A’
Ms. Shashi Seth Sr. Supervisor
Sh. Khem Verma Jadon Sr. Consultant
Sh. Yashwant Singh Jr. Consultant

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HISTORY AND SCOPE OF THE DISTRICT CENSUS HANDBOOK
The need of data at the grass root level for the administrative and
planning purposes at sub micro level as well as academic studies prompted
the innovation of District Census Handbook. District Census Handbook is a
unique publication from the Census organization which provides most
authentic details of census and non-census information from village and
town level to district level. The District Census Handbook was firstly
introduced during the 1951 Census. It contains both census and non
census data of urban as well as rural areas for each district. The census
data contain several demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the
lowest administrative unit i.e. of each village and town and ward of the
district. The non census data comprise of data on availability of various civic
amenities and infrastructural facilities etc. at the town and village level
which constitute Village Directory and Town Directory part of the DCHB.
The data of DCHB are of considerable importance in the context of planning
and development at grass-root level.
In 1961 census DCHB provided a descriptive account of the district,
administrative statistics, census tables and village and town directory
including Primary Census Abstract. This pattern was changed in 1971
Census and the DCHB was published in three parts: Part-A related to village
and town directory, Part-B to village and town PCA and Part-C comprised
analytical report, administrative statistics, district census tables and certain
analytical tables based on PCA and amenity data in respect of villages. The
1981 census DCHB was published in two parts: Part-A contained village and
town directory and Part-B the PCA of village and town including the SCs and
STs PCA up to tahsil/town levels. New features along with restructuring of
the formats of village and town directory were added into it. In Village
Directory, all amenities except electricity were brought together and if any
amenity was not available in the referent village, the distance in broad
ranges from the nearest place having such an amenity, was given.
The pattern of 1981 census was followed by and large for the DCHB of
1991 Census except the format of PCA. It was restructured. Nine-fold
industrial classification of main workers was given against the four-fold
industrial classification presented in the 1981 census. In addition, sex wise
population in 0-6 age group was included in the PCA for the first time with a
view to enable the data users to compile more realistic literacy rate as all
children below 7 years of age had been treated as illiterate at the time of
1991 census. One of the important innovations in the 1991 census was the
Community Development Block (CD Block) level presentation of village
directory and PCA data instead of the traditional tahsil/taluk/PS level
presentation.

As regards DCHB of 2001 Census, the scope of Village Directory was


improved by including some other amenities like banking, recreational and
cultural facilities, newspapers & magazines and `most important commodity’
manufactured in a village in addition to prescribed facilities of earlier
censuses. In Town Directory, the statement on Slums was modified and its

5
coverage was enlarged by including details on all slums instead of ‘notified
slums’.
The scope and coverage of Village Directory of 2011 DCHB has been widened
by including a number of new amenities in addition to those of 2001. In the
Town Directory, seven Statements containing the details and the data of
each town have been presented viz.; (i)-Status and Growth History of
towns,(ii)- Physical Aspects and Location of Towns, (iii)-Civic and other
Amenities, (iv)-Medical Facilities, (v)- Educational, Recreational & Cultural
Facilities, (vi)- Industry & Banking, and (vii)- Civic & other amenities in
Slums respectively. CD Block wise data of Village Directory and Village PCA
have been presented in DCHB of 2011 census as presented in earlier
census. The data of DCHB 2011 Census have been presented in two parts,
Part-A contains Village and Town Directory and Part-B contains Village and
Town wise Primary Census Abstract. Both the Parts have been published in
separate volumes in 2011 Census.

--------------------------------------------------------

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Brief History of the District
Nothing much is known about the ancient history of the areas comprising the Gurgaon
district but it seems always to have been held under the sway of the rulers of Delhi. It is said
that the name Gurgaon is a corruption of Guru Gram, i.e. village of a spiritual leader. The
traditional account is that Yudhishtira, the eldest of the Pandavas, gave this village to his
Guru Dronacharya, in whose memory a tank still exists on the west side of the road to the
railway station.
It can be assumed on the basis of the extent of the Mauryan Empire that, the region
was held under effective Maurya control. After the breakup of the Mauryan Empire, inroads
of the foreign invaders, like the Bactrians, Greeks, Parthians, Scythians and Kushanas spread
confusion in the region. But soon the Yaudheyas rose up and repelled the rule of the
Kushanas from the region between the Satluj and the Yamuna. They were first subdued by
the mighty Saka Satrap Rudradaman, then by Samudragupta, later by the Hunas who were
overthrown by Yasodharman Vishnuvardhana of Mandasor and lastly by Yashovarman, the
king of Kanauj.
The area of Gurgaon also formed a part of Harsha’s Empire in the first half of the
seventh century, and then of the Gurjara-Pratiharas. The Tomaras who were earlier the
feudatories of the Pratiharas, and later became independent, laid the foundation of Delhi, then
called Dhillika, in A.D. 736 and the Gurgaon region was under them till Visaladeva
Chahamana conquered Delhi about A.D. 1156.
During the early Muslim invasion, the people, of the region would appear to have
experienced vicissitudes of fortune at the hands of the incoming Muslim invaders. For nearly
two centuries the people of the region sturdily resisted the Muslim domination and the history
of ‘the region is a record of incursions of’ the people of’ Mewat area which includes districts
of Gurgaon, Mathura (UP) and parts of former States of Alwar and Bharatpur (Rajasthan)
into Delhi territory and of punitive expeditions undertaken against them.
At the time of Babar‘s invasion, Hasan Khan Khanzada was the chief of Mewat. As
he declined to submit, Babar led an expedition against him. Hasan Khan was killed in A.D.
1527 and his son, Nahar Khan, submitted to the Mughals - Mewat was made a part of the
Mughal empire and henceforward regular Governors were appointed for this area. .
In the time of Akbar (A.D. 1556—1605), the area covered by the Gurgaon district
was contained in Subah of Delhi and Agra.
During the flourishing times of the Mughal empire, Gurgaon was not in the limelight
of history, but with its decay, mention of the district is again found in historical writings. In
1685, Aurangzeb had to send a powerful army under the command of Raja Jai Singh to
Mewat area against Ikram Khan who had started giving trouble to the Mughal administration.
With the decline of the Mughal empire after the death of Aurangzeb, the district was
torn between several contending powers.
Under the Marathas, the greater part of the district was held by Generals De Boigne,
Perron and Boruquin. Begum Samru owned the pargana of Jharsa or Badshahpur, and George
Thomas had that of Firozpur assigned to him in 1793. George Thomas once plundered
Gurgaon but could not retain this possession. Apa Khande Rao, the Maratha Governor of the
Mewat country, west of Delhi, engaged George Thomas and placed a battalion of Sepoys
under him. He worked for Apa Khande Rao for four years from 1793 to 1797.

7
In 1801, the rising power of Daulat Rao Sindhia in North India was completely
broken by the British forces under General Lake in the second Maratha war. The Gurgaon
district, with other possessions of Sindhia, west of the Yamuna, passed on to the British East
India Company by the Treaty of Surji Arjungaon signed on December 30, 1803.

At the time of annexation in 1803, the Gurgaon district (exclusive of the paragana of
Pali which was transferred to Delhi in 1863) consisted of 11 parganas viz Jharsa, Sohna, Nuh,
Hathin, Palwal, Hodal, Punahana, Firozpur, Bahora, Rewari and Shahjahanpur. At that time,
it was a principle of British possession, and to interpose between that border and foreign
territory a buffer of semi-independent States; and consequence of the effect given to that
policy it was only gradually that the greater part of the district came under direct British rule.
Pataudi territory was granted in perpetuity in 1806 to Faiz Talab, a descendant of
Afghan family of Samana (Punjab). The Nawabs continued to rule Pataudi till after
Independence when the State was merged with the Gurgaon district.
By 1857, the life in the district seemed to have settled down to a peaceful and quiet
routine. The feudatory races had to be taken themselves to agriculture, the higher castes to
trade and British services.

Gurgaon was attacked on May 13, 1857 by a large party of the 3rd light Cavalry
troopers who had come through Delhi. The complete political vacuum thus caused led the
people to believe that the British rule had ceased to exist.
On October 2, 1857, Brigadier-General Showers was sent to punish the turbulent
Meos, Gujars, Rangharas, Ahirs and ‘the rebel princes’ and to settle the Gurgaon district. He
carried fire and sword far and wide. All the villages between Dharuhera and Taoru were
indiscriminately burnt and their inhabitants were shot down ruthlessly. An account of his
experiences in the district of Gurgaon by Brigadier-General Showers is worth noticing “From
the time, I entered the Gurgaon district, I was in enemies country”.
After 1857, the British, Government followed a relentless policy of harshness. No
steps were taken to develop Gurgaon region, educationally and economically. Though
situated in the immediate neighbourhood of Delhi, the district was deliberately kept
backward. Under the Minto Morely Reforms, as embodied in the Indian Councils Act, 1909,
the District Boards and other local bodies of the Gurgaon, Rohtak and Hisar districts were
constituted into an electoral unit to elect a member to the Punjab Legislative Council. The
policy of ignoring the district was slightly modified after World War I in which the people of
the district contributed liberally in men and money.
During World War I (1914-1918), after having done all that, they could hardly be
happy at what was offered to them by the Rowlatt Committee Report of 1918. It is, therefore,
no wonder that strikes and other disturbances became frequent.
Non-Cooperation Movement was, in full swing, in 1921. Hartals were repeatedly
observed in April in the towns of all the districts including Gurgaon. Congress Committee
had been established in almost all the towns of the district and so the movement was, well-
organised. The provisions of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, XIV of 1908, Part-II were
extended to the Gurgaon district also. All volunteer bodies were declared unlawful. Many
persons were arrested and lodged in the police station.
The country was partitioned and India achieved Independence on 15th August, 1947.
One of the most significant political changes that have taken place after the Independence has

8
been the formation of Haryana as a separate State on November 1, 1966. Gurgaon became
one of the districts of the new State.

9
10
ANALYTICAL NOTE
(iv) Physical features:
Location and Size:
Gurgaon district is adjacent to the Delhi State surrounded by Jhajjar, Rewari, Mewat,
Palwal and Faridabad districts. It has both oval and elongated shape. It lies between 27° 39'
00" North and 28° 32' 25" North latitudes and between 76° 39' 30" East and 77° 20' 45" East
longitudes. It has a geographical area of 1258.00 square kilometres containing 976.65 square
kilometres of rural area and 281.35 square kilometres of urban area.
The district is located in the south-eastern bulge of the State and is having common
border with Delhi State in the north. Jhajjar district lies to its north west, Rewari district to its
south west Mewat district in South, Palwal district in south east and Faridabad district makes
eastern boundary with the district.
Physiography:
Gurgaon district has a rolling plain and interspersed by extensions of Aravallis. Aravalli
ranges offshoot along the western part of the district and further upto the National Capital,
Delhi in the north-east. These rocks are one of the oldest mountain systems in the Country.
The hillocks are dissected by rain fed torrents.
Physiographically we can sub-divide the district into two sub-parts: Gurgaon Plain and
Sohna Undulating Plain with Aravalli Offshoots. Gurgaon Plain spreads over northern and
north-western parts of Gurgaon tahsil and whole of Pataudi tahsil. The region as a whole is
plain area. The region is quite homogeneous to Sahibi Plain of Rewari district. Sohna
Undulating Plain with Aravalli offshoots extends over parts of Sohna and Gurgaon tahsils.
The entire region is covered with rocky surfaces of Aravalli Offshoots. These landforms
make a series of flat topped ridges. Only some patches of land are under cultivation. Due to
offshoots of Aravalli ranges, the region is undulating. There is little cultivation owing to
rocky areas, poor soil cover and roughness of surface.
Drainage:
There is no perennial river in the district. Seasonal streams are only a few, smaller in size
and are inland. The drainage of the district is typical of the arid and semi-arid areas. Because
of topographic diversity, the streams do no flow in any uniform direction.
The Sahibi Nadi, which rises in the Sewar hills of Jaipur (Rajasthan), also makes its
presence in Gurgaon tahsil before losing itself in the topographic depression of Jhajjar tahsil
(Jhajjar district) after flowing in northern direction through Rajasthan State and Rewari
district. The nadi disappears in Gurgaon tahsil near Rewari-Pataudi road. Owing to its long
passage, through arid and sandy areas, the stream flows with strength only during rainy
season. However, the stream moves into the level areas of the Gurgaon district, its speed
slackens and the load deposited raises the bed of stream and checks its flow. Consequently,
the stream sometimes changes its course and wanders aimlessly.
The Indori Nadi originates from Aravalli hills in Rajasthan near village Indauri flowing
in northerly direction. After passing through many villages of the district it joins Sahibi Nadi
near Pataudi. It is supplemented with so many tributaries coming from Aravalli hills. Apart
from the above nadis, Badshahpur, Mehndwari, Kasan, Manesar and Landoha nallahs play
havoc during heavy rains. To control these nadis/nallahs, 3 bunds are constructed at Indori
nadi and its tributaries in Haryana State and 3 bunds in Rajasthan State and the waters
channelised through drains. In normal times, Landoha nala is helpful in draining waters of
Sohna valley into Khalilpur depression.

11
Climate:

The climate of the district is characterised by its dryness and extremes of temperature and
scanty rainfall. The district has a sub-tropical continental monsoonal climate where we find
seasonal rhythm, hot summer, cool winter, unreliable rainfall and great variation in
temperature. Air is generally dry.
During the greater part of the year Scorching dust laden winds that blow during hot
season render the weather very tiring. Dense fog sometimes occurs during winter months.
Four seasons are observed in a year. Mid-March to end of June is summer season,
followed by rainy season from July to mid-September, after which a transition period of two
months follows. Then the cold season comes from mid-November to mid-March. With the
onset of cold season temperatures begin to decrease rapidly. January is the coldest month
when mean daily maximum temperature is about 21.4° C and mean daily minimum at 5.4° C.
Cold waves affect the region in the wake of passing western disturbances and the minimum
temperatures drop down to about freezing point occasionally. The highest maximum
temperature recorded at Gurgaon was 49° C on May 10, 1966 and the lowest minimum
temperature was 0.4° C on December 5, 1966.
With the onset of summer season temperatures begin to rise rapidly. May and June are the
hottest months. The mean daily maximum temperature in the month of May is around 40.2°
C. On individual days, the day temperature may occasionally exceed 45° C. Hot westerly
winds locally known as “looh” begin to blow from the month of April. With the beginning of
monsoon season, day temperatures drop appreciably, whereas, nights continue to be as hot as
in summer. During rainy season, weather is unpleasant due to increased moisture in the air.
After the monsoon season day temperature remain high but night temperatures go down
rapidly.
Rainfall records (2005-2009) reveal that average annual rainfall in Gurgaon district is
505.4 mm. and about 72 percent of the normal annual rainfall in the district is received during
June to September, July and September being the rainiest months. Rainfall generally
increases from west to east. Rainfall in the month of June is significant mostly in the form of
thundershowers. The variation in the annual rainfall from year to year is very large. On an
average there are 28 rainy days in a year. The heaviest rainfall in 24 hours recorded in the
region at Gurgaon was 282.2 mm. on July 14, 1968.
Winds are generally very light in the district with some strengthening in force during late
summer and monsoon seasons. Cloudiness is moderate to heavy during monsoon season, rest
of the year skies are generally clear or lightly clouded. Easterly or south easterly winds blow
during summer monsoon season but for the rest of year winds are westerly or north-westerly.
Air is dry for most part of the year. Relative humidity is generally high in the mornings
during monsoon season and from December to February. During summer season relative
humidity is as low as 30 percent in the afternoons. Thunderstorms occur throughout the year
but the highest incidence is during summer and monsoon seasons. Some of the thunderstorms
are very violent, while others are dry; a few others are accompanied by heavy showers and
occasionally with hail. Thunderstorms occur in winter months also with passing western
disturbances.

12
Natural Economic Resources:

Forestry:
The district covers Gurgaon, Sohna and Pataudi forest ranges headed by the Range Forest
Officers. These ranges are part of Gurgaon Forest Division under the charge of Deputy
Conservator of Forests stationed at Gurgaon. The district falls in South Forest Circle with
headquarters at Gurgaon.
Till about 1930, there were no forests in the district. It was only after Independence,
special efforts were made to increase areas under forestry. All the road strips were transferred
to the Forest Department in 1950. Similarly, Canals and railway strips and flood protective
bunds were also transferred later on for afforestation.
The area under forests is classified according to ownership, viz. Private and State. Forests
owned by corporate bodies and private individuals are included under private forests. The
State forests are categorized as reserved, protected and unclassed.
Forests are mostly privately owned or panchayat areas. These natural forests contain
species like Khairi (Acacia Senegal) Dhouk (Anaogeisus pendula edgew), Dhak (Butea
monosperma), Papri, (Holopetelea integrifolia planch) Rounj, (Acacia leucophloea) Inderjo,
(Wrightia tincloria) Chamror (Erhetia laevis), Grevia populifolia etc. Shisham and Neem are
found in the foothills and plains. Kikar grows in the plains. Its bark is good for tanning.
Shisham, Neem and Kikar are valuable as timber, firewoods and for making agricultural
implements. Plantation of Eucalyptus trees in the plains, along roads, canals and boundaries
of agricultural fields are the latest phenomenon in forestry development. Kit is used as
firewood and pulp wood for paper industry.
FOREST TYPES IN GURGAON DISTRICT, 2010-11
Sr. No. Type of Forest Area
(Sq. kms.)
1 2 3
1 Reserved Forests 2.2
2 Protected Forests 15.9
3 Unclassed Forests 0.2
4 Forests under section 38 of IFA, 1927 2.4
5 Forests under section 4&5 of LPA, 1900 68.3
Total Forest area 88.9
Source: Haryana Forest Deptt. (Overview) Panchkula, 2011
The district is not well wooded. Natural forests on Aravalli foothills have poor
composition and density. It is the result of soil erosion and excessive biotic interference.
Scrub vegetation of Aravalli foothills is in the last stages of degradation.
About 95 percent forest areas are situated along railway lines, canals, roads, drains and
flood protection bunds in the shape of linear strips. At present most of these strips bear forest
plantations of various ages. Kikar (Anilotica), Safeda (Eucalyptus hybrid), Shisham
(Dalbergia sissoo), Israeli Kikar (A.tortilis), Vilayati kikar (Prosopis juliflora) Siris (Albizia
procera), Neem (Azadirachta indica), Bakain (Melia azadirach) Ulloo Neem (Ailanthus
excelsa) and Cassia Siamea have been raised successfully. Kikar constitutes three-fourths of
the total plantation and found all over the district. Khair (Acacia catechu wild) has been

13
mostly grown on Aravalli hills. Neem is generally found growing along road routes but in
and around villages also where Peepal and Barh occur frequently. Jand occurs mostly in arid
region. The special tree of the hill range is dhauk that covered the hills in the past. One of the
most characteristic plants of the district is jhar beri or pala (Ziziphus nummularia) that is
common all over the district except low-lying inundated tracts. It is very valuable plant.
Bansa grows abundantly near the hills. Khip grows on salt lands.
Munj grass is found all over the district. Wilayati akra sprouting in submerged lands is
also grown as a hedge along field boundries. Nag-phani (Opuntia dillenii) forms a thick
hedge in many places. Besides, anjan, khabbal or dubs, dab, khas, pans, sanwak, palwan, are
also found. Anjan is very nutritious for cattle. The seeds of sanwak are eaten by the poor.
The district is inhabited by various groups of mammals. Primates are represented by
rhesus macaque or bander and the langur. The tiger and the leopard once abundant in the
district are now almost extinct. Panthers and wolves have also seen the same fate. The
carnivorous animals found in the district are the jungle cat (banbilla), foxes, jackals,
mongoose (neola) and hare are found in forested areas of the district. Rats and mice are very
common.
A large number of migratory water birds visit the district during winter. Various types of
ducks and geese such as Eastern greylag goose, Barheaded goose, Brahminy duck, Common
teal, Mallard, Gadwall, Wigeon, Blue winged teal, Shoveller, Common pochard, Ferruginous
duck, Tufted duck etc can be seen at tanks and lakes during winter. Some other ducks such as
Comb duck, Cotton teal, Spotbill duck, large whistling teal and Tree duck occur throughout
the year at suitable habitats. Eastern large egret, Median egret, little bittern affect inland
water marshes, jheels etc. Cattle egret can be seen moving along with grazing cattle.
Colourful birds add beauty to the varied wild life. Most common colourful birds are
Flamingo, Large Indian Parakeet, Rose-ringed Parakeet, Kingfishers Woodpecker; Bulbul
etc. The national bird of India, the Common Peafowl is quite common and is seen in
orchards, fields and gardens.
Scavengers like Black kite, White backed Vulture, Black Vulture, Tawny eagle, House
crow etc., keep the district cleared of dead animals by feeding on them. Predators like Black-
winged Kite, Shikra, Falcons and kestrel visit the district in winter. Owls keep a check on
various rodents as well insect pests. Swifts, Swallows, Drougos, Babblers, Warblers, Fly
Catchers meet the challenge of insect pests by consuming insects as staple diet. Larks,
Wagtails, Rosy Pastor, Common Startling and several species of Mynas play a vital role in
destroying numerous noxious insects, including locusts on large scale.
Goh and Bis-cobra type of lizards are found in the district. Girgit and mongoose are in
plenty. Different kinds of snakes like Bis-sanda and cobra; and scorpions are found. Bis-
sanda is known as Daboia.

Minerals and mining:


The geological structure of the district is formed of Alluvium (recent) and Delhi Super
Group (Middle Proterozoic) rock formations. Major part of Gurgaon district contained
alluvial tracts, out of which protrude widely scattered isolated strike ridges of old rocks, the
remanants of Aravalli hills of pre-cambrian age. Delhi Super Group consists of Alwar and
Ajabgarh rock formations. Due to poor quality of groundwater, its availability for drinking
and irrigation is low.
The discontinuous patches of Aravalli hillocks in Southern Haryana are exposed in
Faridabad, Palwal, Gurgaon, Mewat, Bhiwani, Rewari and Mahendragarh districts and

14
houses maximum number of economic mineral deposits. Sand, bajri and quartzites are mined
from various localities from the hills of Manger-Harchandpar Bhondsi-Sohna.
Minor occurrences of saltpetre are reported from all tahsils of the district. Other minerals
found in small quantities in the district are arsenopyrite, china clay (kaoline) and other clays,
graphite, farnet, iron, kyanite, silicons kankar, mica and quartz. Mica in large flakes is
obtainable from Bhondsi. Good deposits of potter’s clay occur at Sikanderpur, Alipur,
Ghamroj and Ghausgarh. Clay occurs near Kasan and Ferozepur Jhirka.The Alwar quartzite,
in weathering, has given rise to friable sand which is excavated as bajri but is suitable for
glass making. Such deposits occur at Manger village. Graphite occurs in a band of schist,
interbedded in the quartzite in the hill just west of Sohna town. The deposit is very small
one. It is also reported in a gorge on the eastern side of Sohna hill. Graphite is also reported
west of Hariahera. The reported occurrence of kankar in 112 villages in the district was
examined to assess their suitability for manufacturing of Cement. Kyanite crystals are
reported from Bhondsi and Mahammadpur Meo villages in schist bands. Transparent quartz
crystals occur near Bhondsi, Indri and Sohna. Poor quality slate bands, about 3.5 metres in
thickness, occur in Basai Meo.
Hot springs of mineral water are located at the base of hill at Sohna in the district. The
temperature of water is 46°C and it is said it resembles Vichy type of water. This water is
known for its curative powers for the skin diseases and liver ailments for the past one and a
half century.
Mining in Haryana State is lying closed since March, 2010 due to Environmental non-
clearance.
Soil and Cropping Pattern:
The district has light soils as sandy loam, medium soil particularly light loam (Seoti) and
loam (Bhangar and Nardak), coarse loam (Dahar and choeknote) and rocky surfaces. Soils as
classified by the National Bureau of Soil Survey and Land Use Planning (ICAR), Nagpur, the
district has Ochreptps type of soils in its major parts while Orthids-Fluvents and Ochrepts-
Ustrets-Ustalfs types of soils are found in central western and south western parts of the
district respectively. The soils in Gurgaon Sub-Division range between sandy to sandy-loam.
The crops grown in the district are divided into two main categories viz. kharif and rabi,
locally called as sawani and sadhi. The former is the summer season harvest and the latter
the winter season harvest. Any crop which does not strictly fall within these two harvests is
known as a zaid crop and its harvest is called the zaid kharif or zaid rabi, according to the
harvest with which it is assessed. Toria (an oilseed) is cultivated as zaid kharif and
vegetables, melon and green fodder as zaid rabi.
The major kharif crops of the district include paddy, jowar, bajra while the minor ones
include kharif oilseeds, kharif pulses like massar and kharif vegetables (kaddu, karela, bhindi,
kakri, tinda, ghia, chillies, tomato, brinjal, onion).
The major rabi crops are wheat, barley, rape seed & mustard oil seeds while the minor
ones include rabi pulses, fodder crops and rabi vegetables (raddish, carrot, turnip, brinjal,
cauliflower, potato, pea, tomato, band gobhi, palak, methi). vegetables are main cash crops of
the district. A major breakthrough in agriculture has been achieved after Independence by the
introduction of high yielding varieties of various crops and following latest mechanical
technology.

15
Land and land-use pattern:
In the year 2010-11, against a geographical area of 1258.0* sq.kms (includes 281.35
sq.kms. of urban area), the area of the district according to village papers supplied by the
revenue authorities is 978.58 sq. kms. (rural area only). This shows difference in two sets of
areas arrived at by different methods of measurement adopted by two separate agencies.
However, we will discuss here land use as per village records. Of the total area of 97,858
hectares, 73415 hectares is net sown area; 1581 hectares is culturable waste (including
gauchar and groves) and 1430 hectares of area is not available for cultivation to which we
may call barren and unculturable land. Net area sown in the district is 75.02 percent of total
area. Gurgaon tahsil has a rural area of 144.36 sq.kms. whereas Farrukhnagar, Sohna,
Manesar and Pataudi tahsils possess 275.62 sq.kms, 270.21 sq.kms, 140.78 sq.kms and
147.61 sq.kms of rural area respectively.
Tenancy:
Tenancy system was the outcome of insecure days after the decay of Mughal Empire
owing to conflict between two classes viz - the landlords and the tenants. Taking into
consideration, the deteriorating state of agriculture and the cultivator, the Punjab Tenancy Act
of 1887 was enacted providing the right of occupancy.
After Independence, the government decided to bring land reforms especially to carry out
its policy of ‘Land to tillers’ in order to improve the condition of cultivators and increase
agricultural production. Haryana State comprised areas which were earlier in Punjab or in
Pepsu (Patiala and East Punjab States Union) and had two different sets of legislation
applicable to the State which were as follows:
Punjab Laws
(1) The East Punjab Utilisation of Lands Act, 1949
(2) The Punjab Abolition of Ala Malikiyat and Talukdari Rights Act, 1952
(3) The Punjab Occupancy Tenants Act, 1952
(4) The Punjab Security of Land Tenures Act, 1953
(5) The Punjab Bhudan Yagna Act, 1955
Pepsu Laws
(1) The Pepsu Abolition of the Ala Malkiyat and Talukdari Rights Act, 1954
(2) The Pepsu Occupancy Tenancy Act, 1952
(3) The Pepsu Tenancy and Agricultural Lands Act, 1955
(4) The Pepsu Bhudan Yagna Act, 1955
After the merger of Pepsu with Punjab two more Acts, the Punjab Resumption of Jagirs
Act, 1957 and Punjab Village Common Lands (Regulation) Act, 1961 were enacted.
Under the East Punjab Utilisation of Lands Act, 1949, the government enforced the
utilisation of every inch of available culturable land. Under this Act a notice to take over the
land is served on every land owner who allows his land to remain uncultivated for 6 or more
consecutive harvests and the land taken over is leased out to others for a term ranging 7 to 20
years, priority being given to Harijans.
Abolition of Ala Malikiyat and Talukdari Rights Acts of 1952 and 1954, the rights of ala
malik in the land held by adna malik were abolished.

16
Occupancy Tenants Acts of 1952 and 1954 declared all occupancy tenants as the owners
of the land. The Punjab Security of Land Tenures act, 1953 and the Pepsu Tenancy and
Agricultural Lands Act, 1955 contained provisions relating to ceiling on agricultural land
holdings, utilization of surplus area and security for tenants against exploitation and
ejectment were in force in different parts of Haryana. Government was further empowered to
utilise the surplus area of both land-owners and tenants for the resettlement of ejected tenants,
landless labourers and small land-owners. All areas owned by a local owner above 30
standard acres and by a displaced person above 50 standard acres were considered as surplus
area. Haryana Ceiling on Land Holdings Act, 1972 was enacted as recommended by the
Central Land Reforms Committee, which provided for the assessment of permissible area in
relation to a family instead of an individual and reduced the permissible area limit to 7.25
hectares of land under assured irrigation capable of growing at least two crops in a year, 10.9
hectares of land under assured irrigation capable of growing at least one crop in a year or 21.8
hectares in respect of any other land including banjar and land under orchards.
Owners of land generally cultivate their land themselves known as khudkasht (self
cultivation). Sometimes the land is leased to small/marginal/landless farmers on theka
(contract) or batai (Share-cropping). The normal rate of batai is one-third depending upon the
provision of irrigation, fertilisers, seeds etc. However the rate of contract varies from time to
time depending upon the quality of land and facility of irrigation system etc. Between the
two, theka (contract farming) is more prevalent. As large number of farmers own modern
machinery, they prefer to offer services for various types of agricultural operations against
payment. This system is gaining popularity.
Average size of landholding during 1995-96 in Haryana was 2.1 hectares, which was
relatively higher than the all India average of 1.6 hectares. 27.7 percent of the landholdings
were below 0.5 hectares, more than 50 percent holdings were of the size between 0.5 and 3.0
hectares. Only 0.4 percent landholdings were of the size 20 hectares and above. 2.4 percent
and 1.9 percent of the landholdings were respectively of the size of 5.0 to 7.5 hectares and 7.5
to 10.0 hectares.
As per Agricultural Census 2010-11 in Haryana State marginal operational land holdings
were 48.4 percent i.e. below one hectare, small land holdings were 19.4 percent (1 to 2
hectares) semi-medium land holdings were 17.2 percent (2 to 4 hectares), medium land
holdings (4 to 10 hectares) were 12.1 percent and the large holdings (10 to 20 hectares &
above) numbering 45,978 were 2.9 percent as per data supplied by the Director Land
Records, Haryana. Average size of the land holding is 2.21.
In Gurgaon district landholdings during 1995-96, numbered 125,197, out of these 38,941
landholdings measured less than half-hectare size. Number of landholdings decreased
abruptly, with the increase in the size of the holdings. Only 243 landholdings were of the size
of above 20 hectares in the district. Average operational landholding in the district was 1.5
hectares quite lower than the State average of 2.1 hectares. 23.8 percent and 21.6 percent of
the landholdings belonged to the size category of 0.5 to 1.0 hectare and 1.0 to 2.0 hectares
respectively. Landholdings measuring between 2 and 5 hectares were 17.8 percent (22,525)
and 5 and 10 hectares were 4.9 percent (6,121). 10 to 20 hectares size category formed a
meagre percentage of 0.4 only
As per Agricultural Census 2010-11 average size of operational landholding in Gurgaon
district was 1.6 hectares which was slightly higher than that of 1995-96 (1.5 hectares).
Proportion of marginal landholding (less than1 hectares) was 56.2 percent, that of small sized
landholdings (1-2 hectares) was 21.1 percent, semi -medium landholdings (2-4 hectares) was

17
14.5 percent, medium sized landholdings (4-10 hectares) contribution was 7.0 percent and
that of large size landholdings (10 hectares & above) were merely 1.2 percent.

Agriculture:
Gurgaon district has fastly transformed its economy from “Agriculturally dominant” to
“Developing” economy. Proportion of main workers engaged in agricultural activities
(cultivators and agricultural labourers) has come down from 53.9 percent of 1991 to 12.3
percent in 2011Census. Tertiary activities with 81.4 percent of the main workers are fastly
dominating the economy of the district. But proportion of marginal workers engaged in
agricultural activities is still very high (40.1percent) in the district.
The Government is making all efforts to encourage agricultural production by distributing
improved seeds, fertilizers, pesticides, providing latest developments in modern techniques,
multiple cropping pattern techniques, increasing irrigation facilities, providing easy loans for
modern agricultural machinery, etc.
RABI AND KHARIF CROPS IN GURGAON DISTRICT, 2008-09
Sr. No. Crops Area Sown Production
(in hectares) (in tonnes)
Rabi
1 Wheat 48,800 207,000
2 Barley 2,400 7,000
3 Rape seed & Mustard 13,900 27,000
4 Groundnut 100 N.A.
5 Sweet Potatoes 61 N.A.
6 Other Vegetables 3,526 N.A.
Kharif
1 Paddy 3,400 8,000
2 Bajra 33,700 67,000
3 Jowar 1,200 1,000
4 Other Pulses 700 700
5 Sesamum 600 300
6 Other Fresh Fruits 84 N.A
Source: Statistical Abstract of Haryana, 2008-09

Major jowar, wheat and oilseeds producing areas were transferred from Gurgaon to newly
carved out Mewat district in 2004. During 2008-09 jowar, grown on 1,200 hectares in the
district gave production of only 1,000 tonnes, the reasons for so low production are area
transferred, the lowest yield and the crop used as fodder crop while green. Bajra is the
principal kharif foodgrain crop of the district, cultivated on 33,700 hectares and contributed
67,000 tonnes of the produce to the State pool. Both these crops are mostly grown under
barani conditions. Bajra is an important item of food during winter season.

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Oilseeds are main cash crop of the district. During 2008-09, oilseeds (Rapeseed and
mustard) were sown on 14,600 hectares and contributed 27,300 tonnes to the State pool.
Sesamum oilseeds is a kharif crop grown on 600 hectares and giving a production of 300
tonnes only.
Paddy, locally known as dhaan, requires frequent irrigation, damp climate and heavy
soils. With extension of irrigational facilities, area under this crop is on the rise. During 2008-
09 paddy was sown on 3,400 hectares in the district and obtained 8,000 tonnes of production.
Wheat is the principal rabi foodgrain crop grown on 48,800 hectares of area and production
obtained was 2.1 lakh tonnes. Wheat is grown under irrigated conditions.
Gram and barley both are grown under barani conditions during rabi season. Gram,
locally known as channa, forms a good item of diet both for human beings and cattle. It is
consumed right from germination to grain development stage and used for variety of
purposes. Timely rainfall increases its cultivation while late rainfall leads to decrease. During
2008-09 barley was sown in 2,400 hectares with, production obtained was 7,000 tonnes.
Gram was grown on less than 50 hectares. Apart from Chari (jowar) as fodder, the stalks of
bajra and the chaff of wheat, gram and minor cereals are used as animal feed. The forage
crops are grown both during rabi and kharif in irrigated as well as in unirrigated areas.
Popular among fodder crops are gowar, jowar, peas and barseem.
Area under vegetables during 2008-09 was 3,526 hectares and 61 hectares was under
sweet potatoes. Area under horticulture was 84 hectares which provided fresh fruits.
Important among the fruits included ber, grapes, mangoes, citrus fruits etc.
Apart from compost, cattle dung and green manures, chemical fertilizers are being used
increasingly. During 2009-10 chemical fertilizers (NPK) were used to the tune of 16,714
tonnes in the district. Out of this 11,203 tonnes was Nitrogenous (N), 4,885 tonnes
Phosphatic (P) and 626 tonnes Potassic (K).
Irrigation:
The average annual rainfall in the district during 2005-2009 was 505.4 mm which is
uniformly light and almost whole of it falls between June and September. The rainfall is
scanty and uncertain. The problem of inadequate and uncertain rainfall can be solved by
extending means of artificial irrigation i.e. canals, wells, tanks and tubewells etc. The district
has a considerable topographic diversity. As the drains tend to flow towards inland
depressions instead of some river, here irrigation is possible only by storing water by making
bunds. Underground water level is relatively high in the district but under rocky surfaces
water level is quite deep. Irrigation facilities are coming up in the district, giving a hope of
prosperity to the farmers whose mainstay is agriculture.
During 2009-10, only 84.5 percent of the net sown area was irrigated. Net area irrigated
in the district during this period was 71,000 hectares, out of which only 2,000 hectares was
irrigated through canals and remaining 69,000 hectares was through by tubewells and
pumping sets. With 146.5 points on intensity index, irrigation intensity in the district the
lowest intensity among the districts of the State. 24,576 tubewells and pumping sets
functioning in the district, out of these 23,953 were electric and 623 diesel pumping sets.

Animal husbandry:
Gurgaon district has a meagre stock of animals. One major reason for this has been that
newly created Mewat district has been carved out of it, taking more than half of the area out
of its jurisdiction. Secondly, 22.4 percent area of the district is urbanised, second highest after

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Faridabad district in the State. The district possesses only 2.0 lakhs animals and 9.4 lakh
poultry birds as per livestock Census 2007.
LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY IN GURGAON DISTRICT, 2007
Category Number of Animals Percentage of
State Stock
Haryana Gurgaon

1 2 3 4

Cattle 1,552,361 31,178 2.01

Buffaloes 5,953,228 131,964 2.22

Horses & Ponies 25,834 968 3.75

Donkeys 4,838 437 9.03

Mules 10,600 244 2.30

Sheep 601,379 6,116 1.02

Goats 538,320 14,207 2.64

Camels 38,608 163 0.42

Pigs 133,521 8,364 6.26

Poultry Birds 28,785,497 934,563 3.25

Source: Statistical Abstract of Haryana, 2009-10


The district is well known for world fame breeds of Haryana Cows and Murrah buffaloes.
As per Quinquennial Livestock Census, 2007 the district possessed 131,964 buffaloes and
31,178 cattle. 41.4 percent of the buffaloes and 36.6 percent of the cattle were milch animals.
With these percentages, Gurgaon district ranked number one and number two respectively
among the districts of the State.
During 2009-10, there were 297 Dairy and Milk Supply Cooperative Societies in the
district through which milk and milk products worth Rs. 6,974.7 lakhs were procured and
sold milk and milk products worth Rs 8,388.1 lakhs. Milk and its bye- products are exported
from the district to Delhi, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.
Though the district contains 2.8 percent of the area of the State yet it possesses 3.75
percent of the horses and ponies and 3.3 percent of the poultry birds of the State. Except
buffaloes and poultry bird, decrease in every category of other animals has been recorded in
the last decade (1997-2007). Camels are almost going to extinct. People now prefer to keep
quality cattle like cross breed cows and Murrah buffaloes for milk. Milk & milk products and
poultry products demand is increasing day by day with the development of economies.
Nearness to National Capital, Delhi has accentuated this demand further more.
During 2009-10 there were 23 Veterinary Surgeons and 26 Veterinary and Livestock
Development Assistants functioning in the district whose duties included to provide breeding
facilities promptly and effectively to penetrate the benefits to the interior rural areas, to
implement piggery development programmes through supply of exotic breed at subsidised
rates and training persons in raising poultry on scientific lines. Veterinary institutions
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functioning in the district were 21 Govt. Veterinary Hospitals and 46 Govt. Veterinary
Dispensaries where main activities being carried out were cattle breeding, artificial
insemination, control of outbreak of contagious diseases among livestock, improvement of
livestock and provision of Veterinary aid.
There were 3 Developed Gaushalas affiliated with Gaushala Sangh in the district, to
house stray, unproductive, old, infirm and useless cattle under religious sentiments. To give
new meaning to the old concept of Gaushalas, some institutions have been converted into
cattle breeding –cum-milk producing centres with some financial and technical assistance. To
ensure availability of hygienic and disease free meat for human consumption, the district
administration has allowed 2 recognised slaughter houses to function wherein 6,100 goats
were slaughtered for disease free meat for human consumption during 2009-10.
Fishery:
Fisheries development is looked after by the Department of Fisheries. Fisheries
Development Officer of the district functions under the administrative control of Director
Fisheries, Haryana. The district lies in semi arid zone of south Haryana at the foothill of
Aravalli ranges. The district has fisheries resources in the form of canals, lakes and drains
comprise 342.5 sq.kms. which are notified waters. Akera and Kotla lakes are also notified
waters. Sultanpur and Damdama lakes are managed by Wildlife and Tourism Departments
respectively. During 2009-10, 511 hectares of area was stocked for fisheries development in
the district.
During 2009-10, fish production 2,665 tonnes was achieved as in the district that was
valued at Rs.10.7crores. Almost every village has one or two ponds used mainly for washing
purposes and drinking water for cattle. People though vegetarian but have started taking
interest in developing the ponds for fish culture. Fisheries Department has only one hatchery
at Damdama producing 35 lakh fish seed. About 165 lakh fish seed is imported from West
Bengal. The fish produced in the district finds its selling outlets at recently developed AC
market at Faridabad and also at traditional market of Delhi. Fishing licenses were issued to
100 private parties/persons during 2009-10.
Industry:
Gurgaon district remained industrially backward prior to partition of the country in
1947. Only small and cottage industries such as moorha making, glue making, tanning and
shoe making, manufacturing of saltpetre and glass bangles existed in the district. In 1883,
there were flourishing salt works both near Sultanpur in Gurgaon tahsil and around the town
of Nuh. The demand for Sultanpuri salt has been steadily declining. After partition, the
district has made rapid progress in industrial development. Today, Gurgaon district has the
largest number of large and medium units among the districts of the State. As per list of large
and medium units supplied by the Director, Industries Haryana there was 425 units in 2010.

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION IN GURGAON DISTRICT, 2010-11


Sr. No. Item Production
1 Cotton textiles Rs. 18 lakhs
2 Agricultural Implements Rs. 855 lakhs
3 Machine tools Rs. 2,100 lakhs
4 Scientific instruments Rs. 45 lakhs

21
5 Hosiery Rs. 80,100 lakhs
6 Powerloom weaving Rs. 1,400 lakhs
7 Sports Rs. 35,000 lakhs
8 Motorcycles/scooters/Mopeds 3,906,959
9 Automobiles 3,910,000(numbers)
10 Bicycles 3,000 (numbers)
11 Sewing machines 300,000 (numbers)
12 Water Fittings Rs. 45,000 lakhs
13 Bicycle parts Rs. 300 lakhs
14 Glass Rs. 65 lakhs
15 Wooden Textiles Rs. 1,100 lakhs
16 Machine Embroidery Rs. 17,900 lakhs
Source: Statistical Abstract of Haryana, 2012.
As per Statistical Abstract of Haryana, for the year 2012 there were 1,825 registered
working factories in the district employing an estimated number of 250,202 workers therein.
Major fields of concentration of industries included textile products; other manufacturing
industries; transport equipment and parts; chemical & chemical products; electrical
machinery, apparatus and appliances; machinery and machine tools etc; non-metallic mineral
products; rubber, plastic and petroleum products; metal products and parts; and basic metal
and alloys. Minor areas of concentration included food products; cotton textile; repair
services; wool, silk and synthetic fibres; beverages, tobacco & products; gas & steam; water
works & supply; and wholesale & retail trade.
During the last decade (2000-2010), the district has made remarkable industrial progress
due to various policy decisions of Haryana Government from time to time. The State
Government has provided favourable infrastructure to entrepreneurs not only for Indians but
also from abroad. The district has now come on the industrial map of the world. The district
has become the foremost choice of industrial houses owing to its proximity to National
Capital and International Airport, New Delhi.
As per list supplied by the Director Industries, Haryana, there were 425 large and medium
industrial units upto 2010 in Gurgaon district. Having about 27.5 percent of the large and
medium industrial units, it was top ranking district of the State.
LARGE AND MEDIUM SCALE INDUSTRIAL UNITS IN GURGAON DISTRICT, 2010
(Units with investments more than Rs. 500 crores)
Year of Investment
Sr. Name of Unit Production
Establishment (In Rs.Crs.)
No
1 M/s A.A Reality Ventures Pvt. 2008-09 ITES. Call centre 10,800
Ltd. IMT, Manesar, software development
2 M/s Compliments Metal Mills 2008-09 Automobile 10,800
(P) Ltd. IMT, Manesar, components
(Gurgaon)
3 M/s Delta India Electronics (P) 2008-09 Video display & 10,060
Ltd. IMT, Manesar, (Gurgaon) projection system

22
4 M/s Vimal Moulders India (P) 2008-09 Plastic moulded items 9,000
Ltd. IMT Maesar, (Gurgaon)
5 M/s Sun Vaccum Formers (P) 2008-09 Plastic moulded 8,100
Ltd. IMT Manesar, (Gurgaon) components
6 M/s Sebros Auto (P) Ltd. IMT 2009-10 High pressure die 5,400
Manesar, (Gurgaon)
7 M/s Ninetaur (P) Ltd. IMT 2009-10 I.T./ ITES 5,400
Manesar, (Gurgaon)
8 M/s KV Impex (P) Ltd. IMT 2008-09 High fashioned 3,349
Manesar, (Gurgaon) knifting & embroiding
9 M/s Panshil Electro. (P) Ltd. 2008-09 Electrical appliances 2,025
IMT Manesar (Gurgaon)
10 M/s Maruti Udyog (P) Ltd. 1983-84 Passenger cars/ 1,141
Delhi Road, Gurgaon vans/Jeeps etc.
11 M/s Maruti Udyog Ltd IMT 2006-07 Passenger cars 1,050
Manesar, (Gurgaon)
12 M/s Suzuki Powertain India 2006-07 Diesel engine 527
Ltd IMT Maneasr, (Gurgaon)
13 M/s Natrip IMT Manesar, 2007-08 Automotive testing & 500
(Gurgaon) homologation
facilities.
Source: Director, Industries, Haryana, 2010
Due to favourable industrial climate, better institutional, residential, commercial and
entertainment facility, 35 multinational companies have set-up their industrial units and more
than 60 multinational companies have set up their corporate offices in the district Besides,
582 small scale/micro small-medium industrial units were also working in 2011 with an
investment of Rs. 122.1 crores in the district. These units were providing employment to
4,587 persons and annual production was of Rs.152.0 crores.
The State government has set up Software Technology Park in Electronic City, Gurgaon,
functioning since 2002. The district, alone in the State, exported software of over Rs. 1,500
crores during 2000-01. Prominent information technology units in the district are Huge
Software Systems Ltd; Tata Consultancy Senses Centre; G.E. Credit International; IBM;
HCL Technology; Motorola Ltd; Polaris Ltd; Alcatel Modi Systems Ltd; etc.
As per list supplied by the Director Industries, Haryana, there were 425 large and
medium industrial units upto 2010 in Gurgaon district. Numerically, having 27.4 percent
share of large and medium scale units, it is top ranking district of the State. Most of the high
investment industrial units are of recent origin i.e. between 2006 and 2010 period and set up
in IMT Manesar in the district. Earlier, only one big unit with an investment of Rs 1140.5
crores was in 1983-84 on Delhi road, Gurgaon, manufacturing maruti cars/vans/jeeps etc.
The district was having 2,360 industrial plots and 221 industrial sheds in 1990. Then
govt. carved out industrial areas/estates in phase I and Phase II in Gurgaon city, Technology
Park, Trial Model Township, Manesar and Industrial Zones. Industrial Model Township
(IMT) Manesar had been first choice of industrial houses. Industrial progress in information
technology got momentum after the year 2000.
Prior to 1960, there was no large and medium scale industrial unit in the district. Year
of set-up of 6 units, out of 425 large and medium scale units is not known. One-unit each was
set up in the decades 1960-1969 and 1970-79. Industry got base in the decade 1980-89 when

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27 units were set up. With the establishment of 223 units in the decade 1990-1999 it picked
up momentum. In the next decade 2000-2010, industry reached new hights, when millionaire
investment units got set up in the district.
Investment wise, there are 323 large and medium scale industrial units each having
investment between Rs. 10 crores and Rs 50 crores; one unit having investment of Rs 53.3
crores; 8 units each between Rs 100 crores and Rs 200 crores; 3 units each between Rs 500
crores and Rs 1,000 crores and 2 units each having investments more than Rs 1,000 crores.
Trade and Commerce:
During the 19th century, the surplus grain of the district was collected in the local grain
markets from where it was exported to different places in the country. The principal grain
markets were Gurgaon and Sohna. The produce was exported to Agra, Mathura and Delhi by
road; Delhi, Alwar, Bombay and Gujarat by rail. Besides, camels were also pressed into
service for carrying trade with nearby markets of Rajasthan. Major exports included cotton,
salt and quarried slate. Ferozepur Jhirka was an emporium for cotton, which found a good
market in Rewari. Salt from Farrukhnagar was exported to North Western Provinces. Imports
included rice, Sambhar lake salt and sugar.
In order to eliminate unhealthy market practices and to ensure fair prices to the
agriculturists, regulated markets were set up at Gurgaon (1962), Sohna (1955) and Pataudi
(1962), after partition of the country. Main arrivals in these markets included wheat, barley,
bajra, paddy, gram, pulses, cotton, cotton-seed, potatoes, gur, khandsari and shakkar during
1976-77. The goods transported by road were mainly handled by the private operators. The
number of trucks registered in 1990 was 313. As compared to the railway freight and
incidental charges were less, if the goods were transported by road.
During the year 2011, the following principal agricultural markets existed in the district:
1. Gurgaon 2. Farrukh Nagar 3.Pataudi 4.Sohna
Apart from these, there were four sub-yards. Average area served per regulated market in
the district was 346 Sq. kms. whereas, number of villages served per regulated market was
88. Usual course of trade in agricultural produce is conducted through wholesalers, retailers
and commission agents or arhtias.
It is estimated that 90 percent agricultural produce of the district is brought to these
regulated markets. Total arrivals of agricultural produce during 2010-11 in these principal
agricultural markets and sub-yards in the district were 5.0 lakh tonnes. Heaviest arrival was
of wheat which accounted for 123,500 tonnes, paddy arrival was 6,900tonnes, barley 63,000
tonnes, bajra 15,900 tonnes, maize 600 tonnes, gram 400 tonnes, cotton seeds 900 tonnes,
groundnut 100 tonnes, Gowar 1,100 tonnes, chillies 100 tonnes, potatoes 78,700 tonnes,
onions 28,000 tonnes, gur, shakkar, khandsari 2,900 tonnes, pulses 3,800 tonnes, Oilseeds
14,100 tonnes, vegetables and fruits 145,700 tonnes and other agricultural produce was
18,100 tonnes.
Under the foodgrain procurement scheme during 2010-11 purchases were made by the
following agencies in the district: Wheat (45,737 tonnes)–State Government (9,232 tonnes),
Food Corporation of India (24,534 tonnes) and Haryana Warehousing Corporation (11,971
tonnes). There were 3 cold stores with a capacity of 1,000 tonnes storage during 1998-99.
During 2001-02, one hundred nine export oriented units were functioning in the district
which earned Rs.4649.8 crores to the State Exchequer.
Total establishments/enterprises in the district as per Economic Census, 2005 were
66,112. Non-agricultural enterprises formed 93.68 percent of the total establishments. Only

24
27.5 percent of the total enterprises employed one or more hired workers. 59.65 Percent
establishments were functioning under own premises whereas 8,704 establishments were
without premises. 96.65 percent of the enterprises functioned throughout the year whereas
2,214 enterprises were seasonal. Ownership of 96.54 percent enterprises was in private hands.
76.2 percent of the enterprises did not make use of power or fuel for running the
establishment. Employment in these enterprises was 257,304 persons, of these 30,700 were
females and 4,658 children. Hired workers numbered 186,774 which included 24,006 females
and 2,484 children.
During 19th century, when the facilities of modern banking and co-operative credit were
not available, the money lending was controlled by the sahukars in towns and petty
shopkeepers in villages. They exploited the poor land-holders.
Institutional finance is a must for development of any area. It is available through both
commercial and co-operative banks. In Gurgaon district, there were 260 banking institutions
including 39 Co-operative banking institutions in March, 2011. Gurgaon tahsil possessed 175
banks while Manesar tahsil has 34 banks, Farrukh Nagar tahsil has 17 banks, Pataudi tahasil
has 14 banks and Sohna tahsils has 20 banks.
BANKING INSTITUTIONS IN GURGAON DISTRICT, MARCH 2011
District/Tahsil T/R/U No. of villages/ Scheduled Co-
towns where commercial operative
Banking Facility banking banking
is Available institutions institutions
Govt. + Pvt.
1 2 3 4 5
Pataudi T 7 8 6
R 5 2 4
U 2 6 2
Gurgaon T 9 162 13
R 6 4 4
U 3 158 9
Farrukh Nagar T 12 8 9
R 11 4 8
U 1 4 1
Manesar T 5 30 4
R 4 6 3
U 1 24 1
Sohna T 7 13 7
R 5 1 4
U 2 12 3
Gurgaon District Total T 40 221 39
R 31 17 23
U 9 204 16
Source : Data collected from the field in 2011 Census.
Apart from the above scheduled commercial and co-operative banks, there were 4,425*
co-operative societies in the district registered with the Registrar of Co-operative Societies,
Haryana under the Rural Development and Co-operation Programme.

25
CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETIES IN GURGAON DISTRICT, 2010-11
Sr. No. Type of Society Number
1 Agricultural Credit Co-op. Societies 33
2 Non-Agricultural Credit Co-op. Societies 25
3 Marketing 4
4 Milk supply Co-op. Societies 297
5 Weaver Co-op. Societies 19
6 Consumer Co-op. Societies/Stores nil
7 Housing Co-op. Societies 3,813
8 Farming Co-op. Societies nil
9 Women Co-op. Societies nil
10 Other Co-op. Societies 234
District Total 4,425
*Source: Statistical Abstract Haryana, 2010-11.
Transport:
Transport and Communications is the nervous system of the economy of a particular area.
In 1883-84 there were only 110 kilometres of metalled roads which traversed the district that
too were mainly in the present Faridabad district i.e (Delhi-Arga National Highway).
Gurgaon-Delhi via Qutb, a section of 24 kilometres of Delhi-Alwar Road and 6 kms. Stretch
of Railway Station to Gurgaon town. Means of transport were very poor, Gurgaon tahsil areas
were sandy. During rainy season it was impossible to journey through this region. Trade with
native States was mainly carried on camels. It was only after Independence that considerable
expansion in road construction has taken place. A crash programme to link every village with
a metalled road was started by the Govt. in 1970. At present all the towns and villages are
connected by metalled roads.
The only National Highway-8 Delhi-Jaipur passing through only Gurgaon town of the
district in northeast-southwest direction has a length of 59 kilometres within the district.
Length of State Highways in the district totals is 75 kilometres. State Highway-13 Gurgaon–
Sohna-Alwar is the track of the district passing through its major towns in north- south
direction. Other State Highways include S.H.-15A Jhajjar-Farrukhnagar-Gurgaon; Gurgaon-
Rewari-Narnaul-Singhana; and Palwal-Sohna-Rewari that cross through the district. Other
major district roads that traverse through the district are Hodal-Utawar-Nuh-Taoru-Pataudi-
Patauda and Mehrauli-Gurgaon Road to Faridabad.
The only Broad Gauge Railway Line of the district goes side by side of the S.H.-26 in the
district covering Gurgaon, Basai, Dhankot, Garhi-Harsaru, Patli, Jataula, Pataudi, Inchhapuri
and Khalilpur railway stations. A small section of Metre Gauge Railway Line, Farrukhnagar-
Garhi Harsaru-Gurgaon also exists.
Important focal points of the district are Dundahera, Gurgaon, Sukhrali, Jharsa, Bhondsi,
Sohna, Farrukhnagar, Pataudi, Haileymandi and Garhi-Harsaru.
Transport statistics as supplied by the State Transport Commissioner, Haryana, Motor
Vehicles registered in the district during 2010-11 were 36,989 Cars, 2,514 Jeeps, 1,111
Tractors and 34,905 Motorcycles/Scooters/Auto cycles, 5,877 trucks, 2,577 taxies, 797 buses,
1,837 auto-rickshaws and 9,552 miscellaneous vehicles whereas motor vehicles on road

26
during the same period were reported in the district as 325,282 Auto
cycles/Scooters/Motorcycles, 25,445 Jeeps, 206,122 Private Motor Cars 16,499 Tractors
17,084 auto-rickshaws, 3,761 taxies, 16,196 other public service vehicles, 73,862 goods
vehicles and 235 miscellaneous vehicles.

Electricity and Power:


Power availability in the State has improved drastically over the last four decades which
was 601 million KWH during 1966-67 and 27,224 million KWH during 2008-09. During
1966-67 per capita consumption was 48 units KWH which increased to 507 units per capita
KWH during 2000-01 and 905 units per capita KWH during 2009-10. There were 47.9 lakh
total electric connections in the State, out of which 36.8 lakh were domestic connections in
2010-11.
Gurgaon district is served by operation circle of Dakshin Haryana Bijli Vitran Nigam,
Gurgaon with headquarters at Hisar. A small pocket of Pataudi area falls under operation
division, Dharuhera and Rewari under Narnaul circle. Operation circle, Gurgaon consists of
four Operation Divisions i.e. City Division, Sub-Urban Division, Occ. Division and
Operation Division, Sohna.
During March, 2011 there were 297,240 domestic, 42,114 commercial, 11,327 industrial,
2,330 other purposes and 28,904 agricultural connections in the district. Census 2011 results
show cent percent of the households in the district make use of electricity for lighting
purposes.
Gram Panchayats, composition, jurisdiction and role in Development of Village and
its economy:
Village has been the basic unit of administration and instrument of development of Indian
Society since ancient times, the institute of ‘Panchayat’ being an integral part of self-
governance at grass-root level. The term ‘Panchayati Raj’ refers to the process of governance
at the lowest level i.e. Panchayat. There is a three tier system of governance in the State;
‘Gram Panchayat’ at the village level, ‘Panchayat Samiti’ at the community development
blocks level and ‘Zila Parishad’ at the district level.
Haryana State has been in front line by effecting the 73rd amendment in the constitution
Act of Parliament, 1992 with a view to make Panchayati Raj Institution, (PRI) especially the
Gram Panchayats, a centre of decision making machinery at the local level and viable to plan,
execute and monitor various projects of development at their own level in accordance with
law. During 2008-09 State Govt .launched four new schemes, namely, Mahatma Gandhi
Gramin Basti Yojana, Special Development Works Scheme, Mukhya Mantri Anusuchit Jati
Nirman Basti Yojana, Grant-in aid to Panchayats in lieu of abolition of house tax. An amount
of Rs 866.1 crores was allocated to Development & Panchayats Department, out of which
683.1 crore was made over and other bodies in the state as grants under various schemes like
matching Grants Scheme, Revenue Earning Scheme, State Finance Commission Grants
Scheme, Honorarium to village chowkidars and representatives of Panchayati Raj
Institutions, Health and sanitation, Education, Rural Roads and Communication Schemes,
constructions of Anusuchit jati/Backward class/General class Chaupals (subsidiary scheme),
Total sanitation campaign, pavement of streets, etc. Besides, States budgetary allocation, the
PRI’s were allocated Grants-in-aid by Govt. of India as per recommendations of the Central
Finance Commission and annual lease money of village shamlat lands had been other major
sources of income of the Gram Panchayats.
Haryana Panchayati Raj Act 1994, provides that the Government shall by election
establish a Gram Panchayat by name in every Sabha Area constituted for any village or a

27
part of village or group of contiguous villages with a population of not less than five hundred
and the Gram Panchayat shall consist of a Sarpanch elected by Gram Sabha from amongst its
Voters, by secret ballot and Six to Twenty Panches from wards in a Gram Panchayat area.
Haryana Panchayati Raj Election Rules, 1994 further provide that the minimum number of
seats/wards in a Gram Panchayat having population upto 500 shall be Six and for every
additional five hundred population or fraction thereof one extra seat shall be provided subject
to a maximum of Twenty seats.
The last general elections of Panchayats in the State were held in March, 2010 under the
provisions of Haryana Panchayati Raj Act of 1994. Every Gram Panchayat, Panchayat
Samiti and Zila Parishad has adequate seats reserved for scheduled castes and also for the
women. Gurgaon district has 210 Gram Panchayats, 4 Panchayat Samitis and the Zila
Parishad.
It is obligatory on part of a Gram Panchayat to make adequate arrangements in the field
of agriculture, animal husbandry, dairy milk, poultry, fisheries, social and farm forestry,
minor forest produce, fuel, fodder, village and cottage industry, drinking water, rural
electrification and non-conventional energy sources, poverty alleviation programme,
education, adult and non formal education, public libraries, cultural activities, markets and
fares, rural sanitation, public health and family welfare, women and child development, social
welfare which also includes welfare of the handicapped and mentally retarded, welfare of the
weaker sections, public distribution system, maintenance of community assets, construction
and maintenance of dharamshalas and similar institutions, cattle sheds, ponds, cart-stand/bus
stop, regulation of manure pits in public places, etc. Panchayat Samitis are meant to oversee
the activities being undertaken by Gram Panchayats and assist them in achieving their goals.
At the district level, it is the Zila Parishad which coordinates and advises the government on
the issues relating to developmental activities in the villages, allocation of work to Gram
Panchayats and Panchayat Samitis and also approves the budget required for Gram
Panchayats and Panchayat Samitis in carrying out developmental programmes.
(ii) Census concepts:
Building: A ‘Building’ is generally a single structure on the ground. Usually a structure will
have four walls and a roof. Sometimes it is made up of more than one component unit which
are used or likely to be used as dwellings (residences) or establishments such as shops,
business houses, offices, factories, workshops, work sheds, Schools, places of entertainment,
places of worship, godowns, stores etc. It is also possible that building which have
component units may be used for a combination of purposes such as shop-cum-residence,
workshop-cum-residence, office-cum-residence etc. But in some areas the very nature of
construction of houses is such that there may not be any wall. Such is the case of conical
structures where entrance is also provided but they may not have any walls. Therefore, such
of the conical structures are also treated as separate buildings.
Pucca houses: Houses, the walls and roof of which are made of permanent materials. The
material of walls can be anyone from the following, namely, Stones (duly packed with lime
or cement mortar), G.I/metal/asbestos sheets, Burnt bricks, Cement bricks, Concrete. Roof
may be made of from any one of the following materials, namely, Machine-made tiles,
Cement tiles, Burnt bricks, Cement bricks, Stone, Slate, G.I/Metal/Asbestos sheets, Concrete.
Such houses are treated as Pucca house.
Kutcha houses: Houses in which both walls and roof are made of materials, which have to
be replaced frequently. Walls may be made from any one of the following temporary
materials, namely, grass, Unburnt bricks, bamboos, mud, grass, reeds, thatch, plastic
/polythene, loosed packed stone, etc. Such houses are treated as Kutcha house.

28
Dwelling Room: A room is treated as a dwelling room if it has walls with a doorway and a
roof and should be wide and long enough for a person to sleep in, i.e. it should have a length
of not less than 2 meters and a breadth of at least 1.5 meters and a height of 2 meters. A
dwelling room would include living room, bedroom, dining room, drawing room, study
room, servant’s room and other habitable rooms. Kitchen, bathroom, latrine, store room,
passageway and verandah which are not normally usable for living are not considered as
dwelling rooms. A room, used for multipurpose such as sleeping, sitting, dining, storing,
cooking, etc., is regarded as a dwelling room. In a situation where a census house is used as a
shop or office, etc., and the household also stays in it then the room is not considered as a
dwelling room. But if a garage or servant quarter is used by a servant and if she/ he also lives
in it as a separate household then this has been considered as a dwelling room available to the
servant’s household. Tent or conical shaped hut if used for living by any household is also
considered as dwelling room. A dwelling room, which is shared by more than one household,
has not been counted for any of them. If two households have a dwelling room each but in
addition also share a common dwelling room, then the common room has not been counted
for either of the households.
Census House :A ‘census house’ is a building or part of a building used or recognized as a
separate unit because of having a separate main entrance from the road or common courtyard
or staircase, etc. It may be occupied or vacant. It may be used for residential or non-
residential purpose or both. If a building has a number of Flats or Blocks/Wings, which are
independent of one another having separate entrances of their own from the road or a
common staircase or a common courtyard leading to a main gate, these are considered as a
separate Census house.
Village: The basic unit for rural areas is the revenue village, which has definite surveyed
boundaries. The revenue village may comprise of one or more hamlets but the entire village
is treated as one unit for presentation of data. In unsurveyed areas, like villages within forest
areas, each habitation area with locally recognized boundaries is treated as one village.
Rural-Urban area: The data in the census are presented separately for rural and urban areas.
The unit of classification in this regard is ‘town’ for urban areas and ‘village’ for rural areas.
The urban area comprises two types of towns viz; Statutory towns and Census towns. In the
Census of India 2011, the definition of urban area adopted is as follows:
(a) Statutory Towns : All places with a municipality, corporation, cantonment board or
notified town area committee, etc are known as statutory towns.
(b) Census owns: All other places satisfying the following three criteria simultaneously are
treated as Census Towns.
i) A minimum population of 5,000;
ii) At least 75 percent of male working population engaged in non-agricultural pursuits; and
iii) A density of population of at least 400 per sq. km. (1,000 per sq. mile)
For identification of places which would qualify to be classified as ‘urban’ all
villages, which, as per the 2001 Census had a population of 4,000 and above, a population
density of 400 persons per sq. km. and having at least 75 percent of male working population
engaged in non-agricultural activity were considered. To work out the proportion of male
working population referred to above against b) (ii), the data relating to main workers were
taken into account. In addition the above stated towns, urban areas also constitutes of OGs
which are the parts of UAs.
Urban Agglomeration: An Urban Agglomeration is a continuous urban spread constituting a
town and its adjoining urban outgrowths (OGs) or two or more physically contiguous towns
together with or without urban outgrowths of such towns. In some cases, railway colonies,
university campuses, port areas, military camps etc; may come up near a statutory town
outside its statutory limits but within the revenue limits of a village or villages contiguous to

29
the town. Each such individual area by itself may not satisfy the minimum population limit to
qualify it to be treated as an independent urban unit but may qualify to be clubbed with the
exiting town as their continuous urban spread (i.e., an Out Growth).Each such town together
with its outgrowth(s) is treated as an integrated urban area and is designated as an ‘urban
agglomeration’. For the purpose of delineation of Urban Agglomerations during Census of
India 2011, following criteria has been adopted:
(a)The core town or at least one of the constituent towns of an urban agglomeration should
necessarily be a statutory town; and
(b)The total population of an Urban Agglomeration (i.e. all the constituents put together)
should not be less than 20,000 as per the 2001 Census. In varying local conditions, there were
similar other combinations which have been treated as urban agglomerations satisfying the
basic condition of contiguity.
Out Growth (OG): The outgrowth is a viable unit such as a village or a hamlet or an
enumeration block and clearly identifiable in terms of its boundaries and location. While
determining the outgrowth of a town, it has been ensured that it possesses the urban features
in terms of infrastructure and amenities such as pucca roads, electricity, taps, drainage system
for disposal of waste water etc., educational institutions, post offices, medical facilities, banks
etc and physically contiguous with the core town of the UA.
City: Towns with population of 100,000 and above are called cities.
Household: A ‘household’ is usually a group of persons who normally live together and take
their meals from a common kitchen unless the exigencies of work prevent any of them from
doing so. Persons in a household may be related or unrelated or a mix of both. However, if a
group of unrelated persons live in a census house but do not take their meals from the
common kitchen, then they are not constituent of a common household. Each such person
was to be treated as a separate household. The important link in finding out whether it was a
household or not was a common kitchen/common cooking. There may be one member
households, two member households or multi-member households.
Institutional Household: A group of unrelated persons who live in an institution and take
their meals from a common kitchen is called an Institutional Household. Examples of
Institutional Households are boarding houses, messes, hostels, hotels, rescue homes,
observation homes, beggar’s homes, jails, ashrams, old age homes, children homes,
orphanages, etc. To make the definition more clearly perceptible to the enumerators at the
Census 2011, it was specifically mentioned that this category or households would cover only
those households where a group of unrelated persons live in an institution and share a
common kitchen.
Houseless household :Households who do not live in buildings or census houses but live in
the open or roadside, pavements, inhume pipes, under flyovers and staircases, or in the open
in places of worship, mandaps, railway platforms, etc., are treated as Houseless Households.
Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes:-
The list of SCs and STs applicable in Haryana State is given here under:-
HARYANA
gfj;k.kk
SCHEDULED CASTES
vuqlwfpr tkfr;ka
1. Ad Dharmi 1- vkn~/kehZ
2. Balmiki, Chura, Bhangi 2. ckfYedh] pwM+k] Hkaxh
3. Bangali 3. caxkyh
4. Barar, Burar, Berar 4. cjkj] cqjkj] fcjkj
5. Batwal, Barwala 5. cVoky] cjokyk
6. Bauria, Bawaria 6. cksfj;k] ckofj;k

30
7. Bazigar 7. ckthxj
8. Bhanjra 8. Hkatjk
9. Chamar, Jatia Chamar, Rehgar, 9. pekj] tkfV;k pekj] jxj]
Raigar, Ramdasi, Ravidasi, Balahi jk;xj] jkenklh] jfonklh] ckykgh
Batoi, Bhatoi, Bhambi, Chamar- cVksbZ] HkVksbZ] HkkEch] pekj&
Rohidas, Jatav, Jatava, Mochi, jksghnkl] tkVo] tVkok] eksph]
Ramdasia jkenkfl;k
10. Chanal 10. puky
11. Dagi 11. nkxh
12. Darain 12. Mjsu
13. Deha, Dhaya, Dhea 13. Msgk] MbZ;k] MS;k
14. Dhanak 14. /kkud
15. Dhogri, Dhangri, Siggi 15. Mksxjh] Mkaxjh] flXxh
16. Dumna, Mahasha, Doom 16. Mweuk] egk”kk] Mwe
17. Gagra 17. xxM+k
18. Gandhila, Gandil Gondola 18. xa/khyk] xfny xanksyk
19. Kabirpanthi, Julaha 19. dchjiaFkh] tqykgk
20. Khatik 20. [kVhd
21. Kori, Koli 21. dkSjh] dkSyh
22. Marija, Marecha 22. ejhtk] ejhpk
23. Mazhabi, Mazhabi Sikh 23. etch] etch flD[k
24. Megh, Meghwal 24. es?k] es?koky
25. Nat, Badi 25. uV] cknh
26. Od 26. vkS<+
27. Pasi 27. iklh
28. Perna 28. iSjuk
29. Pherera 29. QjSjk
30. Sanhai 30. lugkbZ
31. Sanhal 31. lugky
32. Sansi, Bhedkut, Manesh 32. lkalh] HksM+dwV] eus”k
33. Sansoi 33. lalksbZ
34. Sapela, Sapera 34. lisyk] lisjk
35. Sarera 35. ljsM+k
36. Sikligar, Bariya 36. flDyhxj] ckfj;k
37. Sirkiband 37. fljdhcan

HARYANA
gfj;k.kk
SCHEDULED TRIBES
vuqlwfpr tutkfr;ka
NIL
“kwU;
Language and Mother tongue: As per the census concept, each language is a group of
mother tongues. The census questionnaire collects information on the mother tongue of each
person. Mother tongue is the language spoken in childhood by the person’s mother to the
person. If the mother died in infancy, the language mainly spoken in the person’s home in
childhood will be the mother tongue. In the case of infants and deaf mutes, the language
usually spoken by the mother is considered as mother tongue. It is not necessary that the

31
language spoken as mother tongue should have a script. The mother tongues returned by the
respondents in census are classified and grouped under appropriate languages according to
their linguistic characteristics.
Literate: A person aged 7 years and above who can both read and write with understanding
in any language is taken as literate. A person who can only read but cannot write is not
literate. It is not necessary that to be considered as literate, a person should have received any
formal education or passed any minimum educational standard. Literacy could have been
achieved through adult literacy classes or through any non-formal educational system. People
who are blind and can read in Braille are treated as literates.
Literacy rate: Literacy rate of the population is defined as the percentage of literates in the
age-group seven years and above. For different age-groups the percentage of literates in that
age-group gives the literacy rate.
Educational level: The highest level of education a person has completed.
Work: Work is defined as participation in any economically productive activity with or
without compensation, wages or profit. Such participation may be physical and/or mental in
nature. Work involves not only actual work but also includes effective supervision and
direction of work. It even includes part time help or unpaid work on farm, family enterprise
or in any other economic activity. All persons engaged in ‘work’ as defined above are
workers. The main point to note is that the activity should be economically productive.
Reference period for determining a person as worker and non-worker is one year preceding
the date of enumeration.
Main worker: A person who has worked for major part of the reference period (i.e. six
months or more during the last one year preceding the date of enumeration) in any
economically productive activity is termed as ‘Main worker’.
Marginal worker: A person who worked for 3 months or less but less than six months of the
reference period (i.e. in the last one year preceding the date of enumeration) in any economic
activity is termed as ‘Marginal worker’.
Non-worker: A person who has not worked at all in any economically productive activity
during the reference period (i.e. last one year preceding the date of enumeration) is termed as
‘Non worker’.
Cultivator: For purposes of the Census, a person is classified as cultivator if he or she is
engaged in cultivation of land owned or from government or from private persons or
institutions for payment in money, kind or share. Cultivation also includes effective
supervision or direction in cultivation. Cultivation involves ploughing, sowing, harvesting
and production of cereals and millet crops such as wheat, paddy, jowar, bajra, ragi, etc., and
other crops such as sugarcane, tobacco, ground-nuts, tapioca, etc., and pulses, raw jute and
kindred fiber crop, cotton, cinchona and other medicinal plants, fruit growing, vegetable
growing or keeping orchards or groves, etc. Cultivation does not include the plantation crops
like– tea, coffee, rubber, coconut and betel nuts (areca). The workers engaged in Plantation
crops are recorded under “other workers”.
Agricultural labourer: A person who works on another person’s land for wages in cash or
kind or share is regarded as an agricultural labourer. She/he has no risk in the cultivation, but
merely works on another person’s land for wages. An agricultural labourer has no right of
lease or contract on land on which she/he works.
Household industry worker: Household industry is defined as an industry conducted by one
or more members of the household at home or within the village in rural areas and only
within the precincts of the house where the household lives in urban areas. The larger
proportion of workers in household industry should consist of members of the household. The
industry should not be run on the scale of a registered factory which would qualify or has to
be registered under the Indian Factories Act and should be engaged in manufacturing,

32
processing, servicing and repairs of goods. The activity relate to production, processing,
servicing, repairing or making and selling of goods. It does not include professions such as a
pleader, Doctor, Musician, Dancer, Waterman, Astrologer, Dhobi, Barber, etc. or merely
trade or business, even if such professions, trade or services are run at home by members of
the household.
Other worker: A person, who has been engaged in some economic activity during the last
year of reference period but not as a cultivator or agricultural labourer or worker in
Household Industry. The type of workers that come under this category include all
government servants, municipal employees, teachers, factory workers, plantation workers,
those engaged in trade, commerce, business, transport, banking, mining, construction,
political or social work, priests, entertainment artists, etc. In fact, all those workers other than
cultivators or agricultural labourers or household industry workers are ‘Other Workers’.
Work participation rate: Percentage of Workers (Main + Marginal) to total population.
Population density: Population density is the number of persons inhabited per square
kilometer of the area.
Age: Age is measured in terms of the completed number of years.
Sex Ratio: Number of females per 1,000 males in a population.

(iii) Non-Census Concepts:


Civic status of urban units: Civic Status of a town/city is determined on the basis of Civic
Administrative Authority of the town e.g., Municipal Corporation/Corporation, Municipal
Committee/Municipal council, Municipality etc.
Size class of U.A./town: Size-class of U.A./Town is based on the population size of the
U.A./City/Town.
U.A.s/Towns with 100,000 and above population is classified as Class I U.A.s/ Towns.
Towns with 50,000 to 99,999 population are classified as Class II towns, 20,000 to 49,999
population are Class III towns, population with 10,000- 19,999 are Class IV towns,
population with 5,000 and 9,999 are Class V towns and towns with less than 5,000 population
are Class VI towns.
Slum area: The Slum Areas (Improvement and Clearance) Act, 1956, which was enacted by
the Central Government defined slums as (a) Areas where buildings are in any respect unfit
for human habitation; or (b) are by reasons of dilapidation, overcrowding, faulty arrangement
and design of such buildings, narrowness or faulty arrangement of streets, lack of ventilation,
light or sanitation facilities, or any combination of these factors, are detrimental to safety,
health or morals.
Mega city :The concept of ‘Mega city’ is a recent phenomenon in the Urban Sociology and is
defined in term of metropolitan city in the form of large size, problem of management of
civic amenities and capacity to absorb the relatively high growth of population. Indian
Census in 1991 treated the population size of 5 million and above as the cut off point to
identify a place as the mega city. Whereas, for the purpose of inclusion in Centrally
Sponsored Scheme for Infrastructure Development in Mega cities the Ministry of Urban
Affairs and employment, Department of Urban Development adopted the criteria of 4 million
and above population as per 1991 Census for Mega Cities. In 2001 Census, cities with 10
millions and above population have been treated as Mega cities and the same criteria of
population have been adopted in 2011 census.

(iv) 2011 Census findings – Population, its distribution:


Gurgaon is the 4th largest populated district of the State containing 1,514,432 persons
and accounts for 6.0 percent of the total population of the State in 2011 Census. The area of
the district is above the average size of the district in Haryana and accounts for 2.8 percent of

33
the total area of the State. The growth of population in the district was 28.7 percent during
1951-61 as against 33.8 percent for the State as a whole. It was 34.1 percent during 1961-71,
35.5 percent in 1971-81, 28.6 percent during 1981-91, 44.2 percent during 1991-2001 and
73.1 percent during 2001-2011. The growth rate is astonishingly higher in the district during
2001-2011 at 73.1 percent in comparison to growth rate of population for the State as a
whole, which is 19.9 percent. The relative higher growth rate of population may be attributed
to in migration, due to close proximity to the National Capital. IT hub, industrial
development and mineral wealth of the district are responsible for attracting in migration.
The density of population in the district has drastically gone up to 1204 persons per
square kilometre in 2011 as against 717 persons in 2001. The literacy rate is 84.7 percent for
the district as a whole, which is higher than that of the State average of 75.6 percent. Above
68.8 percent of the total population of the district lives in urban area which accounts for 11.8
percent of the total urban population of the State.
For the State as a whole, the sex ratio was 867 in 1901, 871 in 1951, 865 in 1991, 861
in 2001 and 879 in 2011. On the other hand, Gurgaon district has recorded nominal increase
in sex ratio from 850 in 2001 to 854 in 2011. During 2001-2011, there was a increase of 15
points in the child sex ratio (0-6 age group) from 819 in 2001 to 834 in 2011 for the State as a
whole. The increase is relatively higher in Gurgaon district in the child sex ratio (0-6 years)
from 807 in 2001 to 830 in 2011, Gurgaon district consists of 5 tahsil, namely Pataudi,
Gurgaon, Farrukhnagar, Manesar and Sohna. The child sex ratio (0-6 year) of tahsil Pataudi
is 837, tahsil Gurgaon is 843, tahsil Farrukhnagar is 783, Manesar tahsil is 810 and Sohna
tahsisl is 809.
Gurgaon tahsil leads in Haryana out of 74 tahsils in literacy with the literacy rate of
87.0 percent.
Among total workers in the district work participation rate has come down to 36.0
percent in 2011 as against 37.3 percent in 2001. Work participation rate of Female workers
has decreased by 6.2 percent in the district.
At the time of 2011 census, out of a total population of 1,514,432 about 32.2 percent
of its population has been recorded as main workers in the district against 27.7 percent for the
State as a whole. 15.3 percent of its workers are engaged in agricultural activities which
include cultivators and agricultural labourers. The proportion of workers engaged in
household industry is 3.3 percent in the district. The percentage of workers in other worker
category is 81.4 percent.
According to present jurisdiction, Gurgaon district, ranks at 19 th position in the State
but according to size of population in 2011 has taken its position to 4 th place, with 6.0 percent
of the State total population in 2011. District Gurgaon has capacity to absorb labour force
owing to its infrastructural development. The percentage of non-workers marginally has
increased by 2 percent during 2001-2011 Census. The district registered 62.7 percent non-
workers during 2001 Census as against as against 64.0 percent of 2011 Census.
Gurgaon district emerges very strong in having good, Permanent houses,
Electrification, TV, Telephone, Drainage, Tap water, non- traditional fuel like LPG & CNG
etc, High female Literacy rate, Banking services, Basic Infrastructure, Bath room & Latrine
in the houses, radios etc.
Housing data of census 2011 reveals that there are 5,23,691 census house in this
district, which is highest in the state, among which 4,25,612 houses are occupied and 98,079
are vacant as such the proportion of vacant houses in Gurgaon is 18.7 percent, it is higher
than the State (8.71 percent) which is highest among all the districts. Further among the
occupied census houses 75.1 percent are under use for residential or partially residential
purposes and the remaining 24.9 percent are being used for non-residential purposes.

34
Separate Kitchen is available to 73.8 percent of the households. The use of LPG as
fuel for cooking is maximum in Gurgaon (74.3 percent) which is significantly higher than the
state (44.0 percent). The use of Electricity as source lighting is fairly high (95.4 percent) in
all the districts in state. Availability of bathroom & Latrine within the households is critical
indicators for measuring women health status in society. Gurgaon with 90.7 percent of
households having separate bathroom is better placed than the state (82.5 percent). Likewise
households with no Latrine in Gurgaon (15.4 percent) are less than the state (31.4 percent).
The Waste water outlets facility (closed & open) is available to 90.5 percent households in
Gurgaon district. 78.2 percent households are availing banking services and it is placed at 3rd
position after Panchkula and Rewari. Computer & Laptop facilities are available to 31.9
percent households which is highest in the state.
As regards to the availability of Radio/Transistor facilities Gurgaon district is
enjoying 1st position with 26.1 percent of the households and TV facilities is available to 77.4
percent households. Gurgaon ranks at 1st place with regard to availability of Motor/Cars/Van
etc. with 29 percent.
(v) Brief analysis of PCA data based on insets tables 1 to 35
Table 1: Decadal change in population of Tahsils by residence, 2001-2011

S Tahsil Population Percentage decadal Percentage


No variation 2001-2011 urban
population
2001 2011
Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban 2001 2011
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 Pataudi 100957 67791 33166 120012 78688 41324 18.87 16.07 24.6 32.85 34.43
2 Gurgaon 458963 219517 239446 977337 67331 910006 112.94 -69.33 280.05 52.17 93.11
3 Farrukhnagar 109365 99844 9521 134848 121335 13513 23.3 21.52 41.93 8.71 10.02
4 Manesar 81049 81049 0 116606 93158 23448 43.87 14.94 NA 0 20.11
5 Sohna 124361 96791 27570 165629 111667 53962 33.18 15.37 95.73 22.17 32.58
District Total: 874695 564992 309703 1514432 472179 1042253 73.14 -16.43 236.53 35.41 68.82
Table 1 shows the decadal change in population of tahsils by residence between
2001and 2011. The district has registered 73.14 percent decadal growth (874695 persons in
2001 Census to 1514432 persons in 2011). Decadal growth is depicted negative in rural areas
(-16.43 percent) and it is drastically higher in urban areas (236.53 percent). It is significant
that highest decadal variation is in Gurgaon tahsil (112.94 percent) and Pataudi tahsil (18.87
percent) remained at bottom. Decadal variation among urban areas, the highest ratio has been
observed in Gurgaon tahsil (280.05 percent) followed by Sohna tahsil (95.73 percent).
Percentage of urban population to total population has moved at slow pace from 35.41 cent in
2001 to 68.82 percent in 2011.
Table 2: Number and percentage of inhabited villages in specified population size ranges with the related population, 2011 (Rural)
Sr.No. C.D. Block Total number Total rural population Number and Population less
of inhabited percentage of than 200
villages villages

Persons Males Females Males Females


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 0105-Pataudi 73 1,35,800 71,103 64,697 1 ( 1 %) 17 14
2 0106-Gurgaon 34 93,197 51,822 41,375 3 ( 9 %) 187 182
3 0107-Farukhnagar 51 1,13,493 59,789 53,704 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
4 0108-Sohna 69 1,24,685 66,113 58,572 2 ( 3 %) 92 75
5 0109-Taoru 2 5,004 2,635 2,369 0 ( 0 %) 0 0
Total 229 4,72,179 2,51,462 2,20,717 6 ( 3 %) 296 271

35
Number Population 200 - 499 Number Population 500 - 999 Number Population 1000 - 1999
and and and
percentage percentage percentage
of villages of villages of villages

Males Females Males Females Males Females


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

4 ( 5 %) 684 618 21 ( 29 %) 8,924 8,084 29 ( 40 %) 22,032 20,112

2 ( 6 %) 495 333 4 ( 12 %) 1,722 1,557 5 ( 15 %) 3,981 3,463

1 ( 2 %) 177 168 6 ( 12 %) 2,591 2,304 18 ( 35 %) 14,219 12,885

8 ( 12 %) 1,527 1,294 14 ( 20 %) 5,172 4,528 19 ( 28 %) 14,599 12,874

0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 1 ( 50 %) 877 771

15 ( 7 %) 2,883 2,413 45 ( 20 %) 18,409 16,473 72 ( 31 %) 55,708 50,105

Number and Population 2000 - 4999 Number Population 5000 - 9999 Number Population 10000 and
percentage of and and above
villages percentage percentage
of villages of villages

Males Females Males Females Males Females

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

15 ( 21 %) 23,875 21,959 2 ( 3 %) 5,487 5,033 1 ( 1 %) 10,084 8,877

15 ( 44 %) 24,458 21,278 5 ( 15 %) 20,979 14,562 0 ( 0 %) 0 0

26 ( 51 %) 42,802 38,347 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0

23 ( 33 %) 35,200 31,203 3 ( 4 %) 9,523 8,598 0 ( 0 %) 0 0

1 ( 50 %) 1,758 1,598 0 ( 0 %) 0 0 0 ( 0 %) 0 0

80 ( 35 %) 1,28,093 1,14,385 10 ( 4 %) 35,989 28,193 1 ( 0 %) 10,084 8,877

Table 2 gives C.D. block-wise number and percentage of inhabited villages in


specified population size ranges. Out of 229 inhabited villages, there are 6 villages, which fall
in the below 200 population size range. 15 villages placed in higher ranges upto 200-499
population range, Population range 10,000 and above contain only 1 village and 5000-9999
range has 10 villages. 2000-4999 population range comprises 80 villages followed by 1000-
1999 population range having 72 villages whereas 500-999 population ranges contain 45
villages signifying that the size of majority villages is small to medium. Major concentration
of population (242,478 persons) is also found in 2000-4999 population range.

36
Table 3: New towns, de-notified, declassified and merged town in 2011 census

(a) New
(i) Statutory town
Nil

(ii) Census town


1.Garhi Harsaru(8063)
2.Badshahpur(8064)
3.Manesar(8065)
4Bhondsi(8066)

(b) Denotified
(i)Statutory towns of 2001 census denotified and also did not satisfy the criteria to
be treated as census towns.
Nil

(ii)Statutory towns of 2001 census denotified but identified as census towns based
on demographic and economic criteria.
Nil

(iii)Census towns of 2001 census are notified as statutory town in 2011 census.
Nil

(c) Declassified
Nil

(d) Wholly merged with other town(s).


1.Sukhrali Merged in Gurgaon corp. (7069)
2.Dundahera Merged in Gurgaon corp. (7069)
3.Gurgaon(Rural) Merged in Gurgaon corp. (7069)

*Declassified means the census towns of 2001 census which failed to satisfy the demographic and
economic criteria.

Table 3 details new statutory/Census Towns, denotified, declassified and merged


towns in 2011 Census. There is no new statutory town but Garhi Harsaru (8063), Badshahpur
(8064), Manesar (8065) and Bhondsi (8066) are classified as new Census town in the district
in 2011. No town in the district is denotified, declassified, but Sukhrali and Gurgaon (Rural)
are wholly merged in Gurgaon M.cop. during 2011 Census.

37
TABLE 4 : SEX RATIO OF STATE AND DISTRICT, 1901-2011
Census State District
year Total Rural Urban Total Rural Urban
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1901 867 861 908 908 904 961


1911 835 834 842 881 880 904
1921 844 848 811 861 861 874
1931 844 851 792 862 865 822
1941 869 879 806 883 883 888
1951 871 877 845 898 900 885
1961 868 874 842 880 884 856
1971 867 870 853 887 888 881
1981 870 876 849 878 879 873
1991 865 864 868 871 861 892
2001 861 866 847 850 848 855
2011 879 882 873 854 878 844
Note :- Sex ratio has been defined here as the number of females per 1000 males

Table 4 depicts decadal sex ratio in the district and the State from 1901 to 2011. State
sex ratio was 867 in 1901 with great fluctuations during the past decades and now depicts to
879 in 2011. Rural sex ratio was 861 in 1901 have gone up little to reach 882 in 2011, but
urban sex ratio has come down from 908 in 1901 to 873 in 2011. The district sex ratio, both
rural and urban which was quite high in 1901 (Rural 904 and urban 961) has come down
passing through great ups and downs during inter-decades up to 2011 (Rural 878 and urban
844). Sex ratio in 2011 is higher in rural (878) areas than in urban (844) areas. These have
remained up and down to each other intermittently at different decades.

Table 5: Sex ratio by Sub-district, 2011


Sr.No. Name of Sub- Sex ratio
district
Total Rural Urban
1 2 3 4 5
1 00416-Pataudi 911 916 900
2 00417-Gurgaon 849 869 848
3 00418-Farrukhnagar 902 901 910
4 00419-Manesar 779 821 630
5 00420-Sohna 862 880 826
District: 086-Gurgaon 854 878 844

Table 5 depicts sex ratio by tahsils. The district has sex ratio of 854 which is much
lower than that of the State (879).Urban sex ratio (844) in the district is quite low as
compared to the rural sex ratio (878). Among the tahsils, the highest sex ratio is noted in
Pataudi tahsil (911) followed by Farrukhnagar tahsil (902) and the lowest has been observed
in Manesar tahsil (779) followed by Gurgaon tahsil (849) and Sohna tahsil (862).

38
Table 6: Sex ratio by CD Blocks, 2011
Sr.No. Name of CD block Sex ratio

1 2 3
1 0105-Pataudi 910
2 0106-Gurgaon 798
3 0107-Farukhnagar 898
4 0108-Sohna 886
5 0109-Taoru 899
Total 878

Table 6 presents sex ratio by C.D. blocks in the district. Sex ratio for the rural areas is
878 which is higher to the district sex ratio (854). Pataudi C.D. block (910) has the highest
sex ratio followed by Taoru C.D. blocks (899) and Farrukhnagar (898) C.D. blocks.
Extremely lowest ratio has been reported in Gurgaon C.D. block (798) followed by Sohna
C.D. block (886). Low sex ratio in Gurgaon C.D. block could be due to various reasons i.e.
speedy industrialization etc.

Table 7: Sex ratio of rural population by ranges, 2011


Range of sex ratio Number of Percentage of Population 2011 Percentage
for villages inhabited villages villages in each range distribution of
population
1 2 3 4 5

Less than 700 7 3.06 19532 4.14


700 - 749 2 0.87 3276 0.69
750 - 799 2 0.87 1500 0.32
800 - 849 17 7.42 30148 6.38
850 - 899 88 38.43 187315 39.67
900 - 949 90 39.30 199804 42.32
950 - 999 20 8.73 28895 6.12
1000 - 1099 2 0.87 532 0.11
1100+ 1 0.44 1177 0.25
District: Gurgaon (086) 229 100 472179 100

Sex ratio District (Rural):878

Table 7 exhibits the sex ratio of rural population by ranges. Only 110 villages in the
district have sex ratio in the range of 900-999 and 3 villages are female biased, having an
excess of females over males. By contrast, 11 villages are as such having low sex ratio
(below 800). 105 villages containing 46.05 percent rural population fall in the sex ratio range
of 800-899.Remaining 90 villages lies in the range of 900-949.

39
Table 8: Sex ratio of towns, 2011
Sr.No. Name of town Urban status of town Sex ratio

1 2 3 4
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) (MC) 892
2 800428-Pataudi (MC) (MC) 909
3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) (M Corp. + OG) 847
4 062837-Garhi Harsaru (46) (CT) (CT) 872
5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) (CT) 900
6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) (MC) 910
7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) (CT) 630
8 800431-Sohna (MC) (MC) 892
9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) (CT) 699
Sex ratio (Urban) district: 844

Table 8 depicts sex ratio in urban agglomerations/towns. The district is having urban
sex ratio of 844 which is quite lower than the rural sex ratio (878). The highest sex ratio (910)
has been recorded in Farrukhnagar MC followed by Pataudi MC (909). Sex ratio has gone
down too low (630) in Manesar Census Town followed by Bhondsi Census Town (699). The
reason for low sex ratio in these Census Towns might be the migration of industrial male
labour to these towns owing to cheap housing availability, which go for labour in nearby
industrial locations.
Table 9: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 for Sub-district, 2011
Sr.No. Name of Sub- Total/ Total population in 0-6 age group Sex ratio for 0-6 age
district Rural/ group
Urban
Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 00416-Pataudi Total 16107 8769 7338 837
Rural 10378 5691 4687 824
Urban 5729 3078 2651 861
2 00417-Gurgaon Total 126104 68408 57696 843
Rural 9633 5337 4296 805
Urban 116471 63071 53400 847
3 00418-Farrukhnagar Total 18235 10229 8006 783
Rural 16276 9145 7131 780
Urban 1959 1084 875 807
4 00419-Manesar Total 16552 9146 7406 810
Rural 13170 7297 5873 805
Urban 3382 1849 1533 829
5 00420-Sohna Total 25604 14153 11451 809
Rural 18016 9999 8017 802
Urban 7588 4154 3434 827
District: 086-Gurgaon Total 202602 110705 91897 830
Rural 67473 37469 30004 801
Urban 135129 73236 61893 845

Table 9 reveals tahsil wise sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 by residence.
Sex ratio in 0-6 age group has gone down to 801 in rural areas as compared to 845 in urban

40
areas in the district. Child sex ratio in the district (830) is significantly lower than the general
sex ratio of the district (854). Urban areas of all tahsils have child sex ratio higher than their
corresponding rural areas. Sex ratio (urban areas) in the age-group 0-6 is the lowest in
Farrukhnagar tahsil (807) followed by Sohna tahsil (827) while the sex ratio (rural areas) is
also the lowest in these two tahsils i.e. Farrukhnagar (780) and Sohna (802). The highest rural
sex ratio (0-6 age group) is reported in Pataudi tahsil (824) followed by Gurgaon (805) and
Manesar tahsils (805).

Table 10: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 for CD Blocks, 2011
Sr.No. Name of CD Sex ratio for 0-6 age
Block Total population in 0-6 age group group
Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 0105-Pataudi 18121 9966 8155 818
2 0106-Gurgaon 13462 7463 5999 804
3 0107-Farukhnagar 15408 8667 6741 778
4 0108-Sohna 19827 11015 8812 800
5 0109-Taoru 655 358 297 830
Total 67473 37469 30004 801

Table 10 reports C.D. block-wise sex ratio of rural population in the age group 0-6.
There is a wide disparity in sex ratio (0-6 age group) among C.D. blocks. It is the lowest in
Farrukhnagar C.D. block (778) followed by Sohna C.D. block (800) while Taoru C.D. block
has the highest sex ratio (830) followed by Pataudi (818). Gurgaon CD block has child sex
ratio (804).

Table 11: Sex ratio of rural population in the age group 0-6 by ranges, 2011
Range of sex Number of Percentage Population 2011 Percentage
ratio for inhabited villages distribution of distribution of
villages villages population
1 2 3 4 5
Less than 700 50 21.83 7634 11.31
700 - 749 33 14.41 10675 15.82
750 - 799 46 20.09 17307 25.65
800 - 849 36 15.72 13716 20.33
850 - 899 25 10.92 7914 11.73
900 - 949 12 5.24 3250 4.82
950 - 999 12 5.24 4957 7.35
1000 - 1099 10 4.37 1467 2.17
1100+ 5 2.18 553 0.82
District:
229 100 67473 100
Gurgaon (086)
Sex ratio District (Rural):801

Table 11 depicts sex ratio of rural population in the age group 0-6 by ranges. 83
villages have sex ratio (0-6 age group) less than 749. Sex ratio varies between 750-949 for
about half (119) villages in the district and 62.53 percent population are also concentrated in
these ranges. 22 villages have sex ratio varies between 950-1099 while only 5 villages lies in
the range of 1100 and above.

41
Table 12: Sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6 of towns, 2011
Sr.No Name of town Urban status Total population in 0-6 age Sex ratio for 0-6
. of town group age group
Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) (MC) 2649 1427 1222 856
2 800428-Pataudi (MC) (MC) 3080 1651 1429 866
3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) (M Corp. + OG) 113163 61201 51962 849
4 062837-Garhi Harsaru (46) (CT) (CT) 1068 599 469 783
5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) (CT) 2240 1271 969 762
6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) (MC) 1959 1084 875 807
7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) (CT) 3382 1849 1533 829
8 800431-Sohna (MC) (MC) 5509 2996 2513 839
9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) (CT) 2079 1158 921 795
District (Urban): 086-Gurgaon 135129 73236 61893 845

Table 12 presents town-wise sex ratio of population in the age group 0-6. Sex ratio in
urban areas of the district is 845.Towns, namely, Pataudi MC (866), Hailey Mandi MC (856)
and Gurgaon M.Cop.(849) have child sex ratio higher than the district average. The lowest
sex ratio has been recorded in three Census Towns, namely, Badshahpur CT (762), Garhi
Harsaru CT (783) and Bhondsi CT (795).The only Municipal Corporation Gurgaon of the
district has low Child Sex ratio 849. Low sex ratio (0-6 age group) in these urban areas could
be the effect of steep urbanization and industrialization etc.
Table 13: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in Sub-districts,
2011
Sr. Name of Sub- Total/ Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of
No District Rural/ population scheduled scheduled scheduled scheduled
. Urban castes tribes castes tribes
population population population to population to
total population total
population
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 00416-Pataudi Total 120012 27310 0 22.76 0
Rural 78688 17485 0 22.22 0
Urban 41324 9825 0 23.78 0
2 00417-Gurgaon Total 977337 95710 0 9.79 0
Rural 67331 14905 0 22.14 0
Urban 910006 80805 0 8.88 0
3 00418-Farrukhnagar Total 134848 26773 0 19.85 0
Rural 121335 22626 0 18.65 0
Urban 13513 4147 0 30.69 0
4 00419-Manesar Total 116606 16878 0 14.47 0
Rural 93158 15104 0 16.21 0
Urban 23448 1774 0 7.57 0
5 00420-Sohna Total 165629 31266 0 18.88 0
Rural 111667 19993 0 17.9 0
Urban 53962 11273 0 20.89 0
086-Gurgaon Total 1514432 197937 0 13.07 0
Rural 472179 90113 0 19.08 0
Urban 1042253 107824 0 10.35 0

42
Table 13 details tahsil wise number and percentage of Scheduled Castes and
Scheduled Tribes population. There is no population notified as Scheduled Tribes in the
State. 197,937 persons constituting 13.07 percent of the total population of the district belong
to Scheduled Castes. Their share in rural and urban areas is 19.08 percent and 10.35 percent
respectively. Proportions of Scheduled Castes are higher in urban areas of Farrukhnagar,
Pataudi and Sohna tahsils whereas this ratio is higher in rural areas than in urban areas in
Gurgaon tahsil and Manesar tahsil. Pataudi tahsil has the highest proportion of Scheduled
Castes in rural (22.22 percent) while Farrukhnagar tahsil has the highest proportion of
Scheduled Castes in urban (30.69 percent) areas.
Table 14: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes (rural) population in CD
Blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Total Total Total Percentage of Percentage of
No. Block population scheduled scheduled scheduled castes scheduled tribes
castes tribes population to population to total
population population total population population

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 0105-Pataudi 135800 27660 0 20.37 0
2 0106-Gurgaon 93197 16954 0 18.19 0
3 0107-Farukhnagar 113493 21560 0 19 0
4 0108-Sohna 124685 23094 0 18.52 0
5 0109-Taoru 5004 845 0 16.89 0
Total 472179 90113 0 19.08 0

Table 14 shows C.D. block-wise number and percentage of Scheduled Castes and
Scheduled Tribes population. There is no population notified as Scheduled Tribes in the
State. Out of total rural population in the district, 19.08 percent belong to Scheduled Castes.
Among the C. D. blocks, the percentage of Scheduled Castes to total population is the
highest (20.37 percent) in Pataudi C.D. block followed by Farrukhnagar C.D. block (19.0
percent) and the lowest is noted in Taoru C.D. block ( 16.89 percent) followed by Gurgaon
CD (18.19 percent) .

Table 15: Proportion of scheduled castes population to total population in villages, 2011
Percentage range of Number of Percentage Scheduled castes Percentage
scheduled castes population villages population
to total population

1 2 3 4 5
NIL 11 4.80 0 0.00
Less than 5 11 4.80 436 0.48
5 - 10 32 13.97 3958 4.39
11 - 20 94 41.05 40089 44.49
21 - 30 42 18.34 23567 26.15
31 - 40 24 10.48 14303 15.87
41 - 50 8 3.49 3959 4.39
51 - 75 5 2.18 3377 3.75
76 and above 2 0.87 424 0.47
District: Gurgaon(086) 229 100.00 90113 100.00

43
Table 15 details the proportion of Scheduled Castes population to total population in
villages. 11 villages in the district do not have Scheduled Castes population. 11 villages fall
in the less than 5 percent range whereas 32 and 94 villages are covered by 5 to 10 percent and
11 to 20 percent ranges respectively. 42 and 24 villages are covered by 21-30 percent and 31-
40 percent ranges respectively. Only 8 villages fall in 41-50 range while 5 villages are
covered by 51- 75 percentage range. 76 and above percent of Scheduled Castes population is
concentrated in only 2 villages.

Table 16: Proportion of scheduled tribes population to total population in villages, 2011
Percentage Number of Percentage Scheduled tribes Percentage
range of villages population
scheduled tribes
population to
total population
1 2 3 4 5
NIL 229 100.00 0 0.00
Less than 5 0 0.00 0 0.00
5 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00
11 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00
21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00
31 - 40 0 0.00 0 0.00
41 - 50 0 0.00 0 0.00
51 - 75 0 0.00 0 0.00
76 and above 0 0.00 0 0.00
District:
Gurgaon(086) 229 100.00 0 0.00

Table 16 pertains to Scheduled Tribes. There is no population notified as Scheduled Tribes in


the State.

Table 17: Number and percentage of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes population in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Total Total Total Percentage Percentage
No. Population scheduled scheduled of of scheduled
castes tribes scheduled tribes
population population castes population
population to total
to total population
population
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) 20906 5140 0 24.59 0
2 800428-Pataudi (MC) 20418 4685 0 22.95 0
3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) 886519 76079 0 8.58 0
4 062837-Garhi Harsaru (46) (CT) 7894 1854 0 23.49 0
5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) 15593 2872 0 18.42 0
6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) 13513 4147 0 30.69 0
7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) 23448 1774 0 7.57 0
8 800431-Sohna (MC) 36552 9574 0 26.19 0
9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) 17410 1699 0 9.76 0
District (Urban) : 086-Gurgaon 1042253 107824 0 10.35 0

44
Table 17 presents town-wise number and percentage of Scheduled Castes and
Scheduled Tribes to total population. There is no population notified as Scheduled Tribes in
the State. 10.35 percent of the urban population belongs to Scheduled Castes in the district.
Some of the towns, like Farrukhnagar (30.69 percent), Sohna (26.19 percent), Hailey mandi
(24.59 percent), Garhi Harsaru (23.49 percent), Pataudi (22.95 percent) and Badshahpur
(18.42 percent), have quite good ratios of Scheduled Castes population. Manesar CT (7.57)
possesses the lowest ratios of Scheduled Castes population in the district followed by
Gurgaon M.corp.+OG (8.58).

Table 18: Sex ratio among scheduled castes and scheduled tribes (rural) in CD
Blocks, 2011
Sr.No. Name of Scheduled castes Scheduled tribes sex ratio
C.D.block sex ratio
1 2 3 4
1 0105-Pataudi 930 0
2 0106-Gurgaon 883 0
3 0107-Farukhnagar 913 0
4 0108-Sohna 891 0
5 0109-Taoru 947 0
Total 907 0

Table 18 reports C.D. block-wise sex ratio among Scheduled Castes and Scheduled
Tribes. There is no population notified as Scheduled Tribes in the State. Sex ratio among
Scheduled Castes population is 907 while the sex ratio of rural population (878) in the
district. Taoru C. D. block (947) has the highest sex ratio of Scheduled Castes population
followed by Pataudi C.D. block (930) while the lowest Scheduled Castes sex ratio is observed
in Gurgaon C.D. block (883) followed by Sohna C.D. block (891).

Table 19: Sex ratio among scheduled castes and scheduled tribes in towns, 2011
Sr.No. Name of town Scheduled castes sex ratio Scheduled tribes sex ratio

1 2 3 4
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) 904 0
2 800428-Pataudi (MC) 933 0
3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) 883 0
4 062837-Garhi Harsaru (46) (CT) 917 0
5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) 930 0
6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) 939 0
7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) 810 0
8 800431-Sohna (MC) 905 0
9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) 792 0
District (Urban): 086-Gurgaon 889 0

Table 19 reveals town-wise sex ratio among Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.
There is no population notified as Scheduled Tribes in the State. Scheduled Castes population
in the district exhibits far better sex ratio (889) than overall urban sex ratio (844) in the
district. Among the towns, it is the highest (939) in Farrukhnagar MC and the lowest (792) in
Bhondsi CT, exhibiting a gap of 147 points.

45
Table 20: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in sub-districts, 2011
S Name of Total/ Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
r Sub-district Rural/ male-
. Urban female
Number of literates Number of illiterates
N literacy
o rate
.
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
00416-
1 Pataudi Total 83306 48348 34958 36706 14457 22249 80.18 89.47 70.1 19.37

Rural 54906 32094 22812 23782 8966 14816 80.38 90.74 69.25 21.49

Urban 28400 16254 12146 12924 5491 7433 79.79 87.07 71.75 15.32
00417-
2 Gurgaon Total 740742 418234 322508 236595 110259 126336 87.02 90.9 82.45 8.45

Rural 47547 27785 19762 19784 8241 11543 82.41 90.54 73.17 17.37

Urban 693195 390449 302746 216811 102018 114793 87.36 90.93 83.14 7.79
00418-
3 Farrukhnagar Total 94233 54596 39637 40615 16293 24322 80.81 90 70.84 19.16

Rural 84955 49287 35668 36380 14527 21853 80.86 90.16 70.78 19.38

Urban 9278 5309 3969 4235 1766 2469 80.3 88.62 71.35 17.27
00419-
4 Manesar Total 83614 52104 31510 32992 13436 19556 83.57 92.39 72.17 20.22

Rural 65509 40145 25364 27649 11014 16635 81.9 91.53 70.21 21.32

Urban 18105 11959 6146 5343 2422 2921 90.23 95.43 81.58 13.85
00420-
5 Sohna Total 109221 65384 43837 56408 23579 32829 78 87.4 67.22 20.18

Rural 71170 42977 28193 40497 16426 24071 75.99 86.99 63.72 23.27

Urban 38051 22407 15644 15911 7153 8758 82.05 88.2 74.61 13.59
District:
Gurgaon Total 1111116 638666 472450 403316 178024 225292 84.7 90.46 77.98 12.48
(086)
Rural 324087 192288 131799 148092 59174 88918 80.08 89.86 69.11 20.75

Urban 787029 446378 340651 255224 118850 136374 86.76 90.73 82.06 8.67

Table 20 details tahsil wise number and percentage of literates & illiterates by
residence in the district. 84.7 percent population of the district is literate, the corresponding
figures for males and females are 90.46 percent and 77.98 percent respectively and the
resultant gap is quite wide i.e. 12.48 percent. There are wide variations between rural-urban,
male-female and tahsil to tahsil. Proportions in rural (80.08 percent) and urban (86.76
percent) areas are quite divergent. Male literacy in rural (89.86 percent) and urban (90.73
percent) is not too varied as female literacy in rural is (69.11 percent) and urban (82.06
percent). Literacy levels in Sohna, Pataudi and Farrukhnagar tahsils are low as compared to
Gurgaon, and Manesar tahsils.

46
Table 21: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in CD Blocks (rural), 2011
Sr Name of CD Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap
. Block in
Number of literates Number of illiterates
N male-
o. femal
e
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females
literac
y rate
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 2
1 0105-Pataudi 95252 55666 39586 40548 15437 25111 80.94 91.05 70.01 21.04
2 0106-Gurgaon 65928 40326 25602 27269 11496 15773 82.68 90.91 72.37 18.54
3 0107-Farukhnagar 78986 45895 33091 34507 13894 20613 80.53 89.78 70.46 19.32
4 0108-Sohna 80457 48339 32118 44228 17774 26454 76.73 87.73 64.55 23.18
5 0109-Taoru 3464 2062 1402 1540 573 967 79.65 90.56 67.66 22.9
Total 324087 192288 131799 148092 59174 88918 80.08 89.86 69.11 20.75

Table 21 presents C.D. block-wise number and percentage of literates & illiterates by
sex. Rural area in the district has a literacy rate of 80.08 percent and the corresponding
figures for males and females are 89.86 percent and 69.11 percent respectively. Male-female
literacy gap is quite wide (20.75 percent). Sohna and Taoru C.D. blocks have low literacy
rates comparatively to Gurgaon, Pataudi and Farrukhnagar C.D. blocks. Female literacy is
lowest 64.55 in Sohna C. D. Block followed by 67.66 in Taoru CD block. Male literacy is
also the lowest 87.73 percent and 89.78 percent respectively in Sohna and Farrukhnagar C. D.
blocks. Gurgaon and Pataudi C. D. blocks possess the highest literacy both for males and
females among the C. D. blocks of the district.
Table 22: Distribution of villages by literacy rate range, 2011
Range of literacy rate for Number of Percentage Population Percentage
villages inhabited distribution of distribution of
villages villages population

1 2 3 4 5
0 0 0.00 0 0.00
1 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00
11 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00
21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00
31 - 40 0 0.00 0 0.00
41 - 50 2 0.87 3636 0.77
51 - 60 5 2.18 8076 1.71
61 - 70 7 3.06 10595 2.24
71 - 80 93 40.61 169251 35.84
81 - 90 117 51.09 278614 59.01
91 - 99 5 2.18 2007 0.43
100 0 0.00 0 0.00
District: Gurgaon(086) 229 100.00 472179 100.00
Literacy rate for District: 80.08

Table 22 shows distribution of villages by literacy ranges in the district. 117 villages
have fairly high literacy (above 51.09 percent) covering 59.01 percent population. 93 villages
covering 35.84 percent population also have good literacy rate. By contrast, low literacy (less
than 70 percent) is the characteristic of 14 villages covering 4.72 percent rural population of
the district. Only 5 villages have literacy rate more than 91 and above.

47
Table 23: Number of literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. male-
Number of literates Number of illiterates
female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
800427-Hailey
1 Mandi (MC) 15361 8723 6638 5545 2329 3216 84.14 90.63 76.9 13.73
800428-Pataudi
2 (MC) 13039 7531 5508 7379 3162 4217 75.2 83.29 66.39 16.9
800429-Gurgaon (M
3 Corp. + OG) 676571 380903 295668 209948 99139 110809 87.49 90.94 83.4 7.54
062837-Garhi
4 Harsaru (46) (CT) 5813 3381 2432 2081 835 1246 85.16 93.48 75.79 17.69
062838-Badshahpur
5 (87) (CT) 10811 6165 4646 4782 2044 2738 80.96 88.86 72.42 16.44
800430-
6 Farrukhnagar (MC) 9278 5309 3969 4235 1766 2469 80.3 88.62 71.35 17.27
062924-Manesar
7 (154) (CT) 18105 11959 6146 5343 2422 2921 90.23 95.43 81.58 13.85
8 800431-Sohna (MC) 24606 14040 10566 11946 5275 6671 79.26 86.03 71.76 14.27
062989-Bhondsi
9 (168) (CT) 13445 8367 5078 3965 1878 2087 87.7 92.08 81.33 10.75
District (Urban):
787029 446378 340651 255224 118850 136374 86.76 90.73 82.06 8.67
Gurgaon(086)

Table 23 presents town-wise number and percentage of literates & illiterates by sex.
86.76 percent urban population of the district is literate. Male-female differentials in urban
literacy (8.67 percent) are narrower as compared to rural literacy (20.75 percent). 90.73
percent males and 82.06 percent females in urban areas are literate. The highest male literacy
is reported in Manesar Census Town (95.43 percent) while female literacy is noted as the
highest in Gurgaon MCl (83.40 percent) followed by Manesar Census town (81.58 percent).
The lowest ratios both for males (83.29 percent) and for females (66.29 percent) have been
observed in Pataudi MC. Heavy industrialization, nearness to the National Capital Region
and district headquarters’ town has made great impact on the literacy level of urban areas.

Table 24: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in CD Blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No. Block male-
Number of literates Number of illiterates female
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females literacy
rate
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 0105-Pataudi 17933 10627 7306 9727 3701 6026 76.4 87.31 64.65 22.66

2 0106-Gurgaon 11332 6787 4545 5622 2215 3407 78.69 88.44 67.57 20.87

3 0107-Farukhnagar 14138 8271 5867 7422 3002 4420 76.98 86.66 66.5 20.16

4 0108-Sohna 14759 8810 5949 8335 3402 4933 75.67 86.12 64.15 21.97

5 0109-Taoru 581 330 251 264 104 160 80.25 89.43 70.7 18.73
Total 58743 34825 23918 31370 12424 18946 76.82 87.09 65.57 21.52

Table 24 presents C.D. block-wise number and percentage of Scheduled Castes


literates & illiterates by sex. 76.82 percent of the rural Scheduled Castes population in the
district is literate. Among the C.D. blocks, Taoru C.D. block is marked with the highest
(80.25 percent) literacy rate and the lowest (75.67 percent) is recorded in Sohna C.D. block.
All C.D. blocks have very high literacy rates both for males (above 85 percent) and females
(above 64 percent). Gap in male –female literacy rate is 21.52 in the district.

48
Table 25: Distribution of villages by literacy rate range for scheduled castes population (rural), 2011

Range of literacy Number of inhabited Percentage Scheduled castes Percentage


rate for villages villages having distribution of population distribution of
Scheduled castes villages population

1 2 3 4 5
0 0 0.00 0 0.00
1 - 10 0 0.00 0 0.00
11 - 20 0 0.00 0 0.00
21 - 30 0 0.00 0 0.00
31 - 40 1 0.46 42 0.05
41 - 50 4 1.83 233 0.26
51 - 60 3 1.38 330 0.37
61 - 70 32 14.68 8325 9.24
71 - 80 129 59.17 62976 69.89
81 - 90 47 21.56 18141 20.13
91 - 99 2 0.92 66 0.07
100 0 0.00 0 0.00
Total 218 100.00 90113 100.00
District Scheduled
castes Literacy rate: 76.82

Table 25 depicts distribution of villages by literacy rate for Scheduled Castes


population. Scheduled castes population are having literacy rates 76.82 in rural area. 176
villages (80.73 percent) fall in literacy ranges 71 - 90 which cover 90.02 percent of the rural
Scheduled Castes population of the district. 2 villages fall under very high literacy rate
ranges (above 91-99). On the other hand, 32 villages having literacy rate in the range of 61-
70. By contrast, low literacy (below 60 percent) is the characteristic of 8 villages in the
district.

Table 26: Number of scheduled castes literates and illiterates, literacy rate by sex in towns, 2011
Sr. Name of Town Number of literates and illiterates Literacy rate Gap in
No male-
. female
Number of literates Number of illiterates literacy
rate
Persons Males Females Persons Males Females Persons Males Females
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) 3249 1907 1342 1891 793 1098 73.76 82.59 64.03 18.56
2 800428-Pataudi (MC) 3075 1820 1255 1610 604 1006 76.38 87.12 64.79 22.33
800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. +
3 OG) 49754 29158 20596 26325 11252 15073 76.46 84.27 67.59 16.68
062837-Garhi Harsaru (46)
4 (CT) 1291 752 539 563 215 348 81.04 91.71 69.73 21.98
5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) 1716 999 717 1156 489 667 70.65 80.11 60.66 19.45
6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) 2556 1509 1047 1591 630 961 74.19 85.79 62.1 23.69
7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) 1156 719 437 618 261 357 76.91 85.6 65.91 19.69
8 800431-Sohna (MC) 5806 3413 2393 3768 1614 2154 72.12 81.07 62.3 18.77
9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) 1234 752 482 465 196 269 82.32 88.78 73.93 14.85
District: Gurgaon (086) 69837 41029 28808 37987 16054 21933 75.89 84.21 66.53 17.68

49
Table 26 presents town-wise number and percentage of Scheduled Castes literates &
illiterates by sex. 75.89 percent Scheduled Castes urban population in the district is literate
comprising 84.21 percent male literates and 66.53 percent female literates. The highest ratio
of Scheduled Castes literates is recorded in Bhondsi Census Town and Garhi Harsaru CT
(82.32 percent and 81.04 percent respectively). The figures are the lowest in Badshahpur CT
(70.65 percent).Gurgaon M.Corp.( 76.46), Haily Mandi MC( 73.76), Pataudi MC( 76.38),
Manesar ( 76.91), Farrukhnagar MC(74.19) and Sohna MC( 72.12) are having literacy rate
near about district.

Table 27,28and 29 pertain to Scheduled Tribes. There is no population notified as Scheduled


Tribes in the State.
Table 30: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in Sub-districts, 2011
Sr. Name of Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main Non workers
No. Sub- Males/ population and marginal
district Females morkers)

Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
00416-
1 Pataudi Persons 120012 28456 23.71 9071 7.56 37527 31.27 82485 68.73
Males 62805 25108 39.98 4721 7.52 29829 47.49 32976 52.51
Females 57207 3348 5.85 4350 7.60 7698 13.46 49509 86.54
00417-
2 Gurgaon Persons 977337 344832 35.28 21262 2.18 366094 37.46 611243 62.54
Males 528493 277434 52.50 13973 2.64 291407 55.14 237086 44.86
Females 448844 67398 15.02 7289 1.62 74687 16.64 374157 83.36
00418-
Farrukhna
3 gar Persons 134848 35511 26.33 10435 7.74 45946 34.07 88902 65.93
Males 70889 29114 41.07 5005 7.06 34119 48.13 36770 51.87
Females 63959 6397 10.00 5430 8.49 11827 18.49 52132 81.51
00419-
4 Manesar Persons 116606 37981 32.57 5720 4.91 43701 37.48 72905 62.52
Males 65540 33023 50.39 3424 5.22 36447 55.61 29093 44.39
Females 51066 4958 9.71 2296 4.50 7254 14.21 43812 85.79
00420-
5 Sohna Persons 165629 40661 24.55 10787 6.51 51448 31.06 114181 68.94
Males 88963 35707 40.14 4947 5.56 40654 45.70 48309 54.30
Females 76666 4954 6.46 5840 7.62 10794 14.08 65872 85.92
District:
Gurgaon Persons 1514432 487441 32.19 57275 3.78 544716 35.97 969716 64.03
(086)
Males 816690 400386 49.03 32070 3.93 432456 52.95 384234 47.05
Females 697742 87055 12.48 25205 3.61 112260 16.09 585482 83.91

Table 30 exhibits tahsil wise number and percentage of main workers, marginal
workers and non-workers by sex. 35.97 percent population is recorded as workers (32.19
percent main workers and 3.78 percent marginal workers). The proportion of male workers
(52.95 percent) is quite higher than female workers (16.09 percent). Although, there is not
wide variation among tahsils, the highest proportion of workers is noted in Manesar tahsil
(37.48 percent) followed by Gurgaon tahsil (37.46) and the lowest in Sohna tahsil (31.06
percent) followed by Pataudi tahsil (31.27). Proportions of male main workers are higher in
Gurgaon (55.14 percent), Manesar (55.61 percent), Farrukhnagar (48.13 percent) tahsils
relatively to Sohna (45.70 percent) and Pataudi (47.49 percent) tahsils. Proportions of non-
workers are higher among females (83.91 percent) than males (47.05 percent) in the district.
Ratios of non-workers are the highest among males in Sohna tahsil (54.30 percent) and
among females in Pataudi tahsil (86.54 percent).

50
Table 31: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers and non-workers by Sex in CD Blocks, 2011

Sr. Name of Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers (main and Non workers
No. CD Males/ popul marginal workers)
Block Females ation

Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

0105-
1 Pataudi Persons 135800 34349 25.29 10012 7.37 44361 32.67 91439 67.33

Males 71103 28959 40.73 4818 6.78 33777 47.50 37326 52.50

Females 64697 5390 8.33 5194 8.03 10584 16.36 54113 83.64
0106-
2 Gurgaon Persons 93197 28297 30.36 4520 4.85 32817 35.21 60380 64.79

Males 51822 24753 47.77 2910 5.62 27663 53.38 24159 46.62

Females 41375 3544 8.57 1610 3.89 5154 12.46 36221 87.54
0107-
Farukhn
3 agar Persons 113493 30421 26.80 9078 8.00 39499 34.80 73994 65.20

Males 59789 24714 41.34 4191 7.01 28905 48.35 30884 51.65

Females 53704 5707 10.63 4887 9.10 10594 19.73 43110 80.27
0108-
4 Sohna Persons 124685 30877 24.76 9512 7.63 40389 32.39 84296 67.61

Males 66113 26345 39.85 3802 5.75 30147 45.60 35966 54.40

Females 58572 4532 7.74 5710 9.75 10242 17.49 48330 82.51
0109-
5 Taoru Persons 5004 989 19.76 407 8.13 1396 27.90 3608 72.10

Males 2635 935 35.48 307 11.65 1242 47.13 1393 52.87

Females 2369 54 2.28 100 4.22 154 6.50 2215 93.50

Total Persons 472179 124933 26.46 33529 7.10 158462 33.56 313717 66.44

Males 251462 105706 42.04 16028 6.37 121734 48.41 129728 51.59

Females 220717 19227 8.71 17501 7.93 36728 16.64 183989 83.36

Table 31 details C.D. block-wise number and percentage of main workers, marginal
workers and non workers by sex. 33.56 percent of the rural population in the district is
recorded as workers (26.46 percent main workers and 7.10 percent marginal workers).
Percentage of workers is the highest in Gurgaon C.D. blocks (35.21 percent each) and the
lowest in Taoru C. D. block (27.90 percent). Male work-participation is the highest in
Gurgaon C. D. block (53.38 percent) while the female work participation is the highest in
Farrukhnagar C. D. block (19.73 percent) and lowest in Taoru C.D. block (6.50 percent).
Male non-workers ratios are the highest in Sohna C.D. block (54.40 percent) and the female
non-workers in Taoru C.D. block (93.50 percent).

51
Table 32: Number and percentage of main workers, marginal workers, and non-workers by sex in towns, 2011
Persons/ Total Main workers Marginal workers Total workers Non workers
Males/ population (main and
Sr. Name of
Females marginal workers)
No. town
Percentag
Number e Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
800427-
Hailey Mandi
1 (MC) Persons 20906 5263 25.17 931 4.45 6194 29.63 14712 70.37
Males 11052 4672 42.27 678 6.13 5350 48.41 5702 51.59
Females 9854 591 6.00 253 2.57 844 8.57 9010 91.43
800428-
2 Pataudi (MC) Persons 20418 4836 23.68 1015 4.97 5851 28.66 14567 71.34
Males 10693 4239 39.64 751 7.02 4990 46.67 5703 53.33
Females 9725 597 6.14 264 2.71 861 8.85 8864 91.15
800429-
Gurgaon (M
3 Corp. + OG) Persons 886519 319379 36.03 18138 2.05 337517 38.07 549002 61.93
Males 480042 255851 53.30 11911 2.48 267762 55.78 212280 44.22
Females 406477 63528 15.63 6227 1.53 69755 17.16 336722 82.84
062837-Garhi
Harsaru (46)
4 (CT) Persons 7894 2019 25.58 346 4.38 2365 29.96 5529 70.04
Males 4216 1828 43.36 240 5.69 2068 49.05 2148 50.95
Females 3678 191 5.19 106 2.88 297 8.08 3381 91.92
062838-
Badshahpur
5 (87) (CT) Persons 15593 3922 25.15 419 2.69 4341 27.84 11252 72.16
Males 8209 3490 42.51 371 4.52 3861 47.03 4348 52.97
Females 7384 432 5.85 48 0.65 480 6.50 6904 93.50
800430-
Farrukhnagar
6 (MC) Persons 13513 3513 26.00 606 4.48 4119 30.48 9394 69.52
Males 7075 3088 43.65 423 5.98 3511 49.63 3564 50.37
Females 6438 425 6.60 183 2.84 608 9.44 5830 90.56
062924-
Manesar (154)
7 (CT) Persons 23448 9563 40.78 357 1.52 9920 42.31 13528 57.69
Males 14381 9070 63.07 246 1.71 9316 64.78 5065 35.22
Females 9067 493 5.44 111 1.22 604 6.66 8463 93.34
800431-Sohna
8 (MC) Persons 36552 9130 24.98 1713 4.69 10843 29.66 25709 70.34
Males 19315 7860 40.69 1228 6.36 9088 47.05 10227 52.95
Females 17237 1270 7.37 485 2.81 1755 10.18 15482 89.82
062989-
Bhondsi (168)
9 (CT) Persons 17410 4883 28.05 221 1.27 5104 29.32 12306 70.68
Males 10245 4582 44.72 194 1.89 4776 46.62 5469 53.38
Females 7165 301 4.20 27 0.38 328 4.58 6837 95.42
District(Urban):
Persons 1042253 362508 34.78 23746 2.28 386254 37.06 655999 62.94
Gurgaon(086)
Males 565228 294680 52.13 16042 2.84 310722 54.97 254506 45.03
Females 477025 67828 14.22 7704 1.62 75532 15.83 401493 84.17

Table 32 charts out town-wise number and percentage of main workers, marginal
workers and non-workers by sex. Almost more than one-third (37.06 percent) of the urban
population of the district is reported as workers (34.78 percent main workers and 2.28 percent
marginal workers). Male main workers ratios (52.13 percent) are almost four times higher to
those of female main workers ratio (14.22 percent). Although proportions of male and female
marginal workers are 2.84 and 1.62 respectively but in all towns male main and marginal
workers ratio is higher than female main and marginal workers. Proportions of female non-
workers are strikingly higher (84.17 percent) than those of male non-workers (45.03
percent).The highest ratios of female non workers are noticed in Bhondsi Census Town
(95.42 percent) while male non-workers ratio is also the highest in Bhondsi Census Town
(53.38 percent).

52
Table 33: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Sub-District, 2011
Sr. Name of Sub- Persons Total Total Category of workers
No. District / Males/ populati workers
Female on (main +
s margina
l Household
Agricultural
workers Cultivators industry Other workers
labourers
) workers

Numb Perce Numb Perce Numb Perce Numb Perce


er ntage er ntage er ntage er ntage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

1 00416-Pataudi Persons 120012 37527 9408 25.07 5408 14.41 1434 3.82 21277 56.70

Males 62805 29829 6816 22.85 3709 12.43 1038 3.48 18266 61.24

Females 57207 7698 2592 33.67 1699 22.07 396 5.14 3011 39.11
00417-
2 Gurgaon Persons 977337 366094 8524 2.33 7942 2.17 12709 3.47 336919 92.03

Males 528493 291407 6943 2.38 6172 2.12 10051 3.45 268241 92.05

Females 448844 74687 1581 2.12 1770 2.37 2658 3.56 68678 91.95
00418-
3 Farrukhnagar Persons 134848 45946 15119 32.91 6262 13.63 1671 3.64 22894 49.83

Males 70889 34119 11428 33.49 3809 11.16 1001 2.93 17881 52.41

Females 63959 11827 3691 31.21 2453 20.74 670 5.67 5013 42.39
00419-
4 Manesar Persons 116606 43701 9341 21.37 1959 4.48 1170 2.68 31231 71.47

Males 65540 36447 6735 18.48 1492 4.09 725 1.99 27495 75.44

Females 51066 7254 2606 35.93 467 6.44 445 6.13 3736 51.50

5 00420-Sohna Persons 165629 51448 13654 26.54 5526 10.74 1244 2.42 31024 60.30

Males 88963 40654 9920 24.40 3931 9.67 949 2.33 25854 63.60

Females 76666 10794 3734 34.59 1595 14.78 295 2.73 5170 47.90
District:
Persons 1514432 544716 56046 10.29 27097 4.97 18228 3.35 443345 81.39
Gurgaon (086)

Males 816690 432456 41842 9.68 19113 4.42 13764 3.18 357737 82.72

Females 697742 112260 14204 12.65 7984 7.11 4464 3.98 85608 76.26

Table 33 details tahsil wise distribution of workers by sex in four categories of


economic activity. 544,716 (35.97 percent) population of the district is reported as workers.
Out of the total workers, 15.26 percent workers are engaged in agricultural pursuits, 3.35
percent in household industry and 81.39 percent in tertiary activities (other workers). Work
participation rate of females Cultivators and Agricultural labour sector is higher in Manesar
(35.93 percent) and in Pataudi (22.07 percent), whereas work participation rate of males
Cultivators and Agricultural labour sector is highest in Farrukhnagar 33.49 percent and in
Pataudi 12.43 percent respectively. The highest proportion of male workers (92.05 percent)
engaged in other workers activities are noticed in Gurgaon tahsil.

53
Table 34: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in CD blocks, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Persons/ Total Total Category of Workers
No. Block Males/ populati workers
Females on (main + Household
marginal Agricultural
Cultivators industry Other workers
workers) labourers
workers
Numb Percent Numb Perce Numb Perce Numb Perce
er age er ntage er ntage er ntage
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

1 0105-Pataudi Persons 135800 44361 14612 32.94 6247 14.08 1178 2.66 22324 50.32

Males 71103 33777 10508 31.11 4198 12.43 746 2.21 18325 54.25

Females 64697 10584 4104 38.78 2049 19.36 432 4.08 3999 37.78
0106-
2 Gurgaon Persons 93197 32817 6460 19.68 2442 7.44 1108 3.38 22807 69.50

Males 51822 27663 4850 17.53 1755 6.34 756 2.73 20302 73.39

Females 41375 5154 1610 31.24 687 13.33 352 6.83 2505 48.60
0107-
3 Farukhnagar Persons 113493 39499 14036 35.54 5383 13.63 1403 3.55 18677 47.28

Males 59789 28905 10509 36.36 3296 11.40 793 2.74 14307 49.50

Females 53704 10594 3527 33.29 2087 19.70 610 5.76 4370 41.25

4 0108-Sohna Persons 124685 40389 14281 35.36 4928 12.20 1085 2.69 20095 49.75

Males 66113 30147 10184 33.78 3490 11.58 663 2.20 15810 52.44

Females 58572 10242 4097 40.00 1438 14.04 422 4.12 4285 41.84

5 0109-Taoru Persons 5004 1396 699 50.07 52 3.72 33 2.36 612 43.84

Males 2635 1242 638 51.37 45 3.62 26 2.09 533 42.91

Females 2369 154 61 39.61 7 4.55 7 4.55 79 51.30


Total Persons 472179 158462 50088 31.61 19052 12.02 4807 3.03 84515 53.33

Males 251462 121734 36689 30.14 12784 10.50 2984 2.45 69277 56.91

Females 220717 36728 13399 36.48 6268 17.07 1823 4.96 15238 41.49

Table 34 depicts C.D. block-wise distribution of workers by sex in four major


categories of economic activity. As already discussed in table-31, 33.56 percent rural
population is recorded as workers in the district. Out of these total workers 43.63 percent are
engaged in agricultural pursuits, 56.36 percent in non-agricultural activities in rural areas of
the district. Female workers are dominant in cultivators (36.48 percent), Agricultural labour
(17.07 percent) and household industry (4.96) activities than males engaged in cultivators
(30.14 percent),Agricultural labour (10.50 percent) and household industry(2.45) activities
while the ratios of male other workers ( 56.91 percent) are higher than female other workers
(41.49 percent).In all the C.D. blocks, except Farrukhnagar and Taoru C.D. blocks ratio of
male cultivators are higher than female cultivators. Proportions of male workers are lower
than female workers in other workers sector in Taoru C.D. blocks.

54
Table 35: Distribution of workers by sex in four categories of economic activity in Towns, 2011
Sr. Name of town Persons/ Total Total Category of workers
No Males/ populatio worker
. Females n s (main Agricultural Household
Cultivators Other workers
+ labourers industry workers
margin Numb Percen Numb Percen Number Percenta Number Percenta
al er tage er tage ge ge
worker
s)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1 Persons 20906 6194 533 8.61 310 5.00 278 4.49 5073 81.90

800427-Hailey Males 11052 5350 460 8.60 205 3.83 227 4.24 4458 83.33
Mandi (MC) Females 9854 844 73 8.65 105 12.44 51 6.04 615 72.87
2 Persons 20418 5851 251 4.29 653 11.16 530 9.06 4417 75.49

800428-Pataudi Males 10693 4990 225 4.51 536 10.74 369 7.39 3860 77.35
(MC) Females 9725 861 26 3.02 117 13.59 161 18.70 557 64.69
3 Persons 886519 337517 3268 0.97 4790 1.42 11151 3.30 318308 94.31
800429-
Gurgaon (M Males 480042 267762 2813 1.05 3918 1.46 8966 3.35 252065 94.14
Corp. + OG) Females 406477 69755 455 0.65 872 1.25 2185 3.13 66243 94.97
4 Persons 7894 2365 113 4.78 232 9.81 135 5.71 1885 79.70
062837-Garhi
Harsaru (46) Males 4216 2068 103 4.98 179 8.66 105 5.08 1681 81.29
(CT) Females 3678 297 10 3.37 53 17.85 30 10.10 204 68.69
5 Persons 15593 4341 449 10.34 353 8.13 223 5.14 3316 76.39
062838-
Badshahpur (87) Males 8209 3861 413 10.70 281 7.28 193 5.00 2974 77.03
(CT) Females 7384 480 36 7.50 72 15.00 30 6.25 342 71.25
6 Persons 13513 4119 212 5.15 384 9.32 445 10.80 3078 74.73
800430-
Farrukhnagar Males 7075 3511 191 5.44 228 6.49 357 10.17 2735 77.90
(MC) Females 6438 608 21 3.45 156 25.66 88 14.47 343 56.41
7 Persons 23448 9920 132 1.33 108 1.09 170 1.71 9510 95.87
062924-
Manesar (154) Males 14381 9316 125 1.34 100 1.07 152 1.63 8939 95.95
(CT) Females 9067 604 7 1.16 8 1.32 18 2.98 571 94.54
8 Persons 36552 10843 634 5.85 1082 9.98 386 3.56 8741 80.61

800431-Sohna Males 19315 9088 459 5.05 758 8.34 319 3.51 7552 83.10
(MC) Females 17237 1755 175 9.97 324 18.46 67 3.82 1189 67.75
9 Persons 17410 5104 366 7.17 133 2.61 103 2.02 4502 88.21

062989-Bhondsi Males 10245 4776 364 7.62 124 2.60 92 1.93 4196 87.86
(168) (CT) Females 7165 328 2 0.61 9 2.74 11 3.35 306 93.29
District (Urban): Persons 1042253 386254 5958 1.54 8045 2.08 13421 3.47 358830 92.90
Gurgaon(086) Males 565228 310722 5153 1.66 6329 2.04 10780 3.47 288460 92.84
Females 477025 75532 805 1.07 1716 2.27 2641 3.50 70370 93.17

Table 35 reports town-wise distribution of workers by sex in four major categories of


economic activity. As already discussed in table-32, about one-third (37.06 percent) urban
population in the district is recorded as workers. As expected, proportions of workers
engaged in agricultural pursuits in urban areas of the district are very low (3.62 percent). 3.47
percent workers are engaged in household industry and 92.90 percent are other workers
(tertiary activities). The lowest proportions of workers engaged in agricultural pursuits are in
Gurgaon M.Corp.+OG (2.39 percent) and the highest in Badshahpur CT (18.47 percent). The
highest ratio of workers engaged in other workers activities is noted in Manesar CT (95.87
percent) and Gurgaon M.Corp.+OG (94.31 percent) and the lowest in Farrukhnagar MC
(74.73 percent). Although male workers proportions are dominant in tertiary sector but still
the proportions of female workers in some towns are so high that they are emulating male
workers ratios, like Bhondsi CT and Gurgaon M.Corp.+OG.

55
(vi) Brief analysis of the Village Directory and Town Directory data based on insets
tables 36 to 45

Table 36: Distribution of villages according to availability of different amenities, 2011


Sr. Name of CD Number Type of amenity available
No. Block of Education* Medical^ Drinking water Post office #
inhabited
villages

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 0105-Pataudi 73 72 ( 98.63) 44 ( 60.27) 73 ( 100) 29 ( 39.73)
2 0106-Gurgaon 34 33 ( 97.06) 25 ( 73.53) 34 ( 100) 8 ( 23.53)
3 0107-Farukhnagar 51 50 ( 98.04) 35 ( 68.63) 51 ( 100) 11 ( 21.57)
4 0108-Sohna 69 62 ( 89.86) 27 ( 39.13) 69 ( 100) 11 ( 15.94)
5 0109-Taoru 2 2 ( 100) 1 ( 50) 2 ( 100) 1 ( 50)
Total 229 219 ( 95.63) 132 ( 57.64) 229 ( 100) 60 ( 26.2)
Table 36: Distribution of villages according to availability of different amenities, 2011
Type of amenity available
Telephone ** Transport Banks@ Agricultural Approach by Power supply
$
communications credit pucca road
societies
8 9 10 11 12 13
73 ( 100) 73 ( 100) 5 ( 6.85) 4 ( 5.48) 70 ( 95.89) 73 ( 100)
34 ( 100) 34 ( 100) 5 ( 14.71) 2 ( 5.88) 34 ( 100) 34 ( 100)
51 ( 100) 51 ( 100) 8 ( 15.69) 7 ( 13.73) 51 ( 100) 51 ( 100)
69 ( 100) 69 ( 100) 5 ( 7.25) 2 ( 2.9) 69 ( 100) 69 ( 100)
2 ( 100) 2 ( 100) 0 ( 0) 0 ( 0) 2 ( 100) 2 ( 100)
229 ( 100) 229 ( 100) 23 ( 10.04) 15 ( 6.55) 226 ( 98.69) 229 ( 100)
Note:-
* Education includes all education facilities.
^ Medical includes all medical facilities.
# Post office includes post office, telegraph office and Post and telegraph office.
$ Transport communication includes bus service, rail facility and navigable waterways.
@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.
** Telephone includes Telephone,PCO and Mobile.

Table 36 shows C.D. block-wise distribution of villages according to availability of


different amenities in the district. Big proportions of villages having amenities like,
educational (95.63 percent), improved drinking water (100 percent), approach by pucca road
(98.69 percent), telephone (100 percent), and power supply (100 percent) are available in the
district. The lowest proportions of educational amenity are observed in Sohna (89.86 percent)
C. D. blocks. Availability of amenities such as medical (57.64 percent), Postal (26.2 percent),
banking (10.04 percent) and agricultural credit societies (6.55 percent) are very poor in the
district. Sohna possess the lowest proportions of villages having medical amenity (39.13
percent) and postal amenities (15.94 percent). Lowest Banking service is reported in Taoru
and Pataudi (0 and 6.85 percent) C.D. blocks of the district. Agricultural Credit Societies
availability is recorded lowest in Sohna (2.9 percent) C.D. block of the district.

56
Table 37: Number and percentage of rural population served by different amenities, 2011
Sr. Name of CD Total Type of amenity available
No. Block population of
inhabited Education* Medical^ Drinking Post office #
villages water
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 0105-Pataudi 135800 135769 ( 99.98) 99977 ( 73.62) 135800 ( 100) 77024 ( 56.72)

2 0106-Gurgaon 93197 93193 ( 100) 83332 ( 89.41) 93197 ( 100) 34327 ( 36.83)

3 0107-Farukhnagar 113493 112989 ( 99.56) 81068 ( 71.43) 113493 ( 100) 34470 ( 30.37)

4 0108-Sohna 124685 121780 ( 97.67) 66448 ( 53.29) 124685 ( 100) 44746 ( 35.89)

5 0109-Taoru 5004 5004 ( 100) 1648 ( 32.93) 5004 ( 100) 3356 ( 67.07)

Total 472179 468735 ( 99.27) 332473 ( 70.41) 472179 ( 100) 193923 ( 41.07)
Table 37: Number and percentage of rural population served by different amenities, 2011
Type of amenity available
Telephone Transport Banks@ Agricultural Approach by Power supply
** communications $ credit pucca road
8 9 10 11 12 13

135800 ( 100) 135800 ( 100) 32157 ( 23.68) 28267 ( 20.82) 131474 ( 96.81) 135800 ( 100)

93197 ( 100) 93197 ( 100) 20102 ( 21.57) 11016 ( 11.82) 93197 ( 100) 93197 ( 100)

113493 ( 100) 113493 ( 100) 23492 ( 20.7) 19180 ( 16.9) 113493 ( 100) 113493 ( 100)

124685 ( 100) 124685 ( 100) 14362 ( 11.52) 3314 ( 2.66) 124685 ( 100) 124685 ( 100)

5004 ( 100) 5004 ( 100) 0 ( 0) 0 ( 0) 5004 ( 100) 5004 ( 100)

472179 ( 100) 472179 ( 100) 90113 ( 19.08) 61777 ( 13.08) 467853 ( 99.08) 472179 ( 100)

Note:-

* Education includes all education facilities.

^ Medical includes all medical facilities.

# Post office includes post office, telegraph office and Post and telegraph office.

$ Transport communication includes bus service, rail facility and navigable waterways.

@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.

** Telephone includes Telephone,PCO and Mobile.

Table 37 presents C.D. block-wise number and percentage of rural population served
by different amenities. A very large segment of population is served by educational (99.27
percent), improved drinking water (100 percent), approach by pucca road (99.08 percent) and
power supply (100 cent percent) amenities. Medical amenity is available to 70.41 percent
population of the district but it is the poorest in Taoru C. D. block (32.93 percent). Similarly
postal and telephone amenities are available to 41.07 percent and 100 percent population
respectively in the district. Transport and communications amenity is noted to be serving 100
percent rural population of the district. Banking amenity serves only 19.08 percent rural
population .Agricultural Credit Societies serve 13.08 percent rural population in the district.

57
Table 38: Distribution of villages not having certain amenities, arranged by distance ranges from the
places where these are available, 2011
Village not having the Distance range of place from the villages where the amenity is available
amenity of

Less than 5 5-10 10+ Total (Col. 2-4)


kilometres kilometres kilometres
1 2 3 4 5
1. Education:-
(a) Primary school 8 2 0 10
(b) Middle school 65 14 0 79
(c) Degree college 32 84 105 221
2. Medical:-
(a) Hospital 36 64 116 216
(b) PHC 66 120 35 221
3. Post office- 169 0 0 169
4. Telephone 0 0 0 0
5. Bus service 0 0 0 0
6. Bank:-
(a) Commercial Bank 61 104 53 218
(b) Cooprative bank 88 98 24 210
7. Agricultural credit societies 88 96 30 214

Degree college includes Art,Engineering and Medicine


Hospital includes Allopathic & Alternative Medicine
Post office includes post office, telegraph office and post & telegraph office
Telephone includes Telephone,PCO and mobiles
Bus includes private and public

Table 38 gives distribution of villages, not having certain amenities, arranged by


distance ranges from the places where these are available during 2011. Out of 229 inhabited
villages, amenity of Primary School is available within 5 kms in 8 villages and at 5 to 10 kms
in 2 villages, whereas middle school is available within 5 kms in 65 villages and at 5 to 10
kms in 14 villages. Degree College is available in 32 villages within 5 kms, 84 villages at 5 to
10 kms distance and 105 villages at more than 10 kms distance. Similarly, medical amenity
of hospital is available in 36 villages within 5 kms, in 64 villages within 5 to 10 kms and in
116 villages at 10+ kms distance. PHC amenity is available in 66 villages within 5 kms, in
120 villages within 5 to 10 kms and it is available at more than 10 kms distance in 35
villages. Postal amenity is available at less than 5 kms in 169 villages. Telephone and Bus
service amenity are available in all villages of the district. A commercial banking service is
available within 5 kms in 61 villages, at 5 to 10 kms in 104 villages and at more than 10 kms
in 53 villages. Cooperative banks are available within 5 kms in 88 villages, at 5 to 10 kms in
98 villages and at more than 10 kms distance in 24 villages. Agricultural Credit Societies
amenity is available within 5 kms in 88 villages, at 5 to 10 kms in 96 villages and at more
than 10 kms in 30 villages.

58
Table 39: Distribution of villages according to the distance from the nearest statutory town and availability of different amenities,
2011
Distance Number\ Number of Type of amenity available
Range from Percentage Inhabited
the nearest Villages in Education* Medical^ Post Telephone Transport Banks Agricultural Approach
Statutory Each Range Office ** Communications @ Credit by Pucca
Town (In # $ Societies Road
Kilometres)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Less than 5 Number 19 18 8 3 19 19 0 0 19

Percentage 94.74 42.11 15.79 100 100 0 0 100

5 - 15 Number 179 170 106 48 179 179 20 12 176

Percentage 94.97 59.22 26.82 100 100 11.17 6.7 98.32

16- 50 Number 31 31 18 9 31 31 3 3 31

Percentage 100 58.06 29.03 100 100 9.68 9.68 100

51+ Number 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Percentage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Unspecified Number 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Percentage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Number 229 219 132 60 229 229 23 15 226

Percentage 95.63 57.64 26.2 100 100 10.04 6.55 98.69

Note:-

* Education includes all education facilities.

^ Medical includes all medical facilities.

# Post office includes post office, telegraph office and Post and telegraph office.

$ Transport communication includes bus service, railway facility and navigable waterways.

@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.

** Telephone includes Telephone,PCO and Mobile.

Table 39 shows distribution of villages according to the distance from the nearest
statutory town and availability of different amenities during 2011. There are 19 villages
which are at a distance of less than 5 kms, 179 villages at a distance of 5 to 15 kms and 31
villages at a distance of 16 to 50 kms from the nearest statutory town. No village falls in 51+
kms and unspecified categories. A trend is observed that as the distance of villages increases
from the nearest statutory town, the higher the proportion of amenities are available in case of
educational, medical, telephone, agricultural credit societies and approach by pucca road
amenities.

59
Table 40: Distribution of villages according to population range and amenities available, 2011
Population Number\ Number of Type of amenity available
range Percentage inhabited Education* Medical^ Drinking Post office #
1 2 villages in3 4 5 water6 7
1-499 Number 21 15 6 21 3
Percentage 71.43 28.57 100 14.29
500-999 Number 45 41 20 45 5
Percentage 91.11 44.44 100 11.11
1000 - 1999 Number 72 72 39 72 12
Percentage 100 54.17 100 16.67
2000 - 4999 Number 80 80 56 80 31
Percentage 100 70 100 38.75
5000 - 9999 Number 10 10 10 10 8
Percentage 100 100 100 80
10000 + Number 1 1 1 1 1
Percentage 100 100 100 100
District Total Number 229 219 132 229 60
Percentage 95.63 57.64 100 26.2
Table 40: Distribution of villages according to population range and amenities available, 2011
Type of amenity available
Telephone ** Transport Banks@ Agricultural Approach by pucca Power supply
$
8 communications9 10 credit societies
11 road
12 13
21 21 1 0 20 21
100 100 4.76 0 95.24 100
45 45 2 1 44 45
100 100 4.44 2.22 97.78 100
72 72 2 4 72 72
100 100 2.78 5.56 100 100
80 80 14 8 79 80
100 100 17.5 10 98.75 100
10 10 3 1 10 10
100 100 30 10 100 100
1 1 1 1 1 1
100 100 100 100 100 100
229 229 23 15 226 229
100 100 10.04 6.55 98.69 100
Note:-
* Education includes all education facilities.
^ Medical includes all medical facilities.
# Post office includes post office, telegraph office and Post and telegraph office.
$ Transport communication includes bus service, railway facility and navigable waterways.
@ Bank includes Commercial Bank and Cooperative Bank.
** Telephone includes Telephone,PCO and Mobile.

Table 40 details distribution of villages according to population range and amenities


available during 2011. As we proceed towards higher ranges, the higher the proportions of
villages having amenities are available. Improved drinking water and power supply amenities
are available in cent percent villages in 5000-9999 and 10,000+ populations. Proportions of
villages having other amenities are the highest in 10000+ population range and the lowest in
1-499 population range.

60
Table 41: Distribution of villages according to land use, 2011
Sr.No. Name of CD Block Number of Total area Percentage of
Percentage of
inhabited (in Hectares) cultivable area to irrigated area to
villages total area total cultivable
area
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 0105-Pataudi 73 23760.00 86.54 98.44
2 0106-Gurgaon 34 17084.00 67.26 88.85
3 0107-Farukhnagar 51 26727.00 85.34 100.00
4 0108-Sohna 69 28014.00 60.07 98.15
5 0109-Taoru 2 666.00 71.92 95.20
Total 229 96251.00 74.98 97.32
Note:- Culativable area= irrigated area + unirrigated area

Table 41 presents C.D. block-wise distribution of villages according to land use


during 2011 Census. Inhabited villages of the district have a total area of 96251 hectares out
of which 74.98 percent is cultivable and 97.32 percent of the total cultivable area is irrigated.
Pataudi C.D. block is at the top with 86.54 percent cultivable area followed by Farrukhnagar
(85.34 percent). Sohna C.D. block is at the lowest with only 60.07 percent cultivable area.
Farrukhnagar C.D. block (100 percent) has the highest ratio of irrigated area followed by
Pataudi C.D. block (98.44 percent). Rest of C.D. blocks have good irrigation facilities.

Table 42: Schools/ colleges per 10,000 population in towns, 2011


Sr. Name of the town Type of educational institution (Approx. numbers)
No. Primary Middle Secondary / Senior College*
matriculation secondary
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) 6 5 3 1 0
2 800428-Pataudi (MC) 7 5 3 2 0
800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. +
3 OG) 2 2 1 1 0
062837-Garhi Harsaru (46)
4 (CT) 6 4 3 3 0
5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) 3 3 3 3 0
6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) 11 8 6 4 0
7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) 4 3 2 2 0
8 800431-Sohna (MC) 3 2 2 2 0
9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) 5 4 2 2 0
District: Gurgaon (086) 3 2 1 1 0
Note- * College includes
Arts/ Science/ Commerce College (Degree Level and above)

Table 42 shows schools/ colleges per 10,000 populations in statutory towns. In


general, there are 3 primary, 2 middle, 1 secondary/matriculation, 1 senior secondary schools.
Farrukhnagar towns have the highest number of primary (11), middle schools (8),
secondary/matriculation schools (6), senior secondary (4) schools per 10,000 populations.

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Table 43: Number of beds in medical institutions in towns, 2011
Sr. No. Name of the town Number of beds in
medical institutions per
10,000 population
(Approx. numbers)

1 2 3
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) 11

2 800428-Pataudi (MC) 15

3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) 3

4 062837-Garhi Harsaru (46) (CT) 8

5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT) 4

6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) 18

7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) 0

8 800431-Sohna (MC) 8

9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT) 6

District: Gurgaon (086) 4

Table 43 depicts town-wise number of beds per 10,000 populations in medical


institutions. In all, there are 4 beds per 10,000 populations in the urban areas of the district.
Farrukhnagar M.C. has the highest number of beds (18) followed by Pataudi MC (15 beds)
and Hailey Mandi MC (11 beds) and the lowest number of beds are reported in Gurgaon
M.Corp.(3 beds) per 10,000 population.

Table 44: Proportion of slum population in towns, 2011


Sr.No. Name of the town having slum Total Slum population Percentage of slum
population population to total
population

1 2 3 4 5

1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) 20906 4063 19.43

2 800428-Pataudi (MC) 20418 326 1.60

3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) 886519 144754 16.33

4 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) 13513 3112 23.03

5 800431-Sohna (MC) 36552 5996 16.40

Total 977908 158251 16.18

Table 44 gives the proportion of slum population in towns of the district. In urban
area of the district proportion of slum population is 16.18 percent to total population. Slum
population is highest 23.03 percent in Farrukhnagar MC and lowest in Pataudi M.C. (1.60
percent).

62
Table 45: Most important commodity manufactured in towns, 2011
Sr. No. Name of the town Name of three most important
commodities manufactured
1 2 3
1 800427-Hailey Mandi (MC) Agri Tools, Iron Trunks, Sweet Boxes

2 800428-Pataudi (MC) Agri Tools, Oil & Flour

3 800429-Gurgaon (M Corp. + OG) It Software, Auto Spare Parts, Readymade Garments

4 062837-Garhi Harsaru (46) (CT)

5 062838-Badshahpur (87) (CT)

6 800430-Farrukhnagar (MC) Shoes, Muddha Making, Iron Trunk

7 062924-Manesar (154) (CT) Honda Motorcycle, Auto Spare Parts, Toffies Mfg.

8 800431-Sohna (MC) Sirki, Shoes

9 062989-Bhondsi (168) (CT)

Table 45 furnishes important commodity exported out of and manufactured in each


town of the district. It explains the industrial/occupational character of the towns. In Gurgaon
M Corp. pesticides and sports goods are manufactured and exported medicines, electronic
and industrial goods. Gurgaon rural is famous for exporting & manufacturing rubber parts.
Agricultural implements, trolleys for tractors and power thrashers are manufactured for local
use in hinterland area and agricultural produce is exported out from Hailey mandi town.
Shoes, Muddhas and iron trunks are manufactured in and exported out from Farrukhnagar
town. Agricultural implements, oil & flour are manufactured for local use in Pataudi towns,
shoes and sirkies are manufactured for local use in Sohna town.

(vii) Major Social and Cultural Events


Festivals and fairs are an integral part of religious life. The common festivals celebrated
by the people are Holi, Janam Ashtami, Dussehra and Diwali. The minor festivals are
Shivratri, Gugga Naumi, Solono (Raksha Bandhan) and Bhaiya Duj. Mela Masani Mata or
Sitla Mata is one of the most important fairs held in the district. Mela Pir, Mela Burha or
Mela Vankhandeshwar, Mela Suraj Kund, Mela of Ravan of Meos and Mela Jhirka are of
local importance Suraj Kund Mela is famous all over world.
The important festivals and fairs are celebrated by the people here as in other parts of the
State and the Country.
Gugga Naumi: It is a religious festival connected with snake worship observed on Bhadra
9 (August-September). A number of legends are famous for Gugga. He is also called Gugga
Pir, Zahir Pir (the Saint Apparent). Some refer to him as Baggarwala (He of the Bagar)
because of his grave near Dadrewa (Ganganagar district of Rajasthan) in the Bagar tract
which he is said to have ruled over. He is believed to have flourished about the middle of the
12th century. He was a Hindu and his proper name was Gugga Bir (Gugga, the Hero). The
Muslims also flock to his shrine and his name has been altered to Gugga Pir (Gugga Saint),
while in the opinion of many, he himself became a Muslim. Gugga had a peculiar power of
curing snake bite. Monday is his day, the 9th is his date and Bhadra 9th the date on which
Gugga descended into earth. To commemorate this event, fairs are held at his shrine every
year on this date. Those who do not attend the fair go out in search of holes that might
contain some snake and pour on it kachchi lassi (diluted milk) and sewian (cooked
vermicelli).

63
Gugga Pir’s shrine is distinguished by its square shape with minarets and domed roof and
is always known as amari. Some of the places where the festival is celebrated in the Gurgaon
district are Islampur, Gurgaon, Farrukhnagar, Nanu Kalan, Pataudi, Nai, Bissar and Rethora.
Mela Masani Mata or Sitla Mata ka Mela.-Chief among the fairs of the district is that of
the goddess of smallpox, Masani. Popularly known as Sitla Mata ka Mela, it is held in village
Gurgaon, suburb of Gurgaon town, at the temple of Sitla Mata. This goddess is believed to
help the devotees to ward off smallpox. There is a temple of another goddess in the village.
She is called Choganan Mata on account of her temple being located near the main crossing
(chogan) of the village. It is believed by some people that she is the younger sister of the
goddess Masani. This temple is stated to have been built by the sweepers of the village when
they were not allowed access to the temple of Masani Mata. It is, however, now visited by all
shades of visitors without any distinction of caste or sub-caste.
To the south of the village, lies a pond near the temple of Dronacharya. It is said that
Singha selected this spot as the site for installing the statue of goddess Masani but the
goddess urged him in one way or the other not to tresspass on the territory belonging to the
Guru. Therefore, Singha built the shrine to the north of the village. The village was divided
into twoportions known as 8 biswas and 12 biswas. Singha lived in the portion of 8 biswas,
whereas, the shrine was set up in the portion falling under 12 biswas.
The fair is held on two consecutive days in a week. i.e. Monday and Tuesday. The fame
of the shrine has spread to distant places. The pilgrims now come from all over India. The
attendance is at its peak during the month of Chaitra (March-April) when all the roads
leading to the village and the village site are found full of bustling humanity. More than one
lakh people are estimated to visit the fair on this occasion. It bespeaks of the faith that people,
especially the simple country folk, still repose in traditional fairs and miraculous cures. The
Railways and the Haryana Roadways Authorities provide special trains and buses from Delhi
to Gurgaon and back for the convenience of the pilgrims. The attendance is considerable
during the three succeeding months and then again in the Asuj navratras. However, in the
month of Srawana (July-August), members of the Scheduled Castes like Saperas and Sansis
alone come to attend the fair, other castes generally do not attend in that month.
In addition to this fair being celebrated in village Gurgaon, it is also held for one day at
Tihara village in the Gurgaon tahsil. This fair known as Budho Mata ka Mela or Mela Budho
Mata, is held for one day at two other villages of the same name, i.e. Mubarikpur, one in
Gurgaon tahsil and the other in Pataudi tahsil.
Mahadev ka Mela.-This religious fair is held for one day each once in the month of
Phalguna (February-March) and again in the month of Sravana (July-August) at village
Inchhapuri in the Gurgaon tahsil. It is attended by approximately 5,000 people. People
worship god Shiva and goddess Parvati and make offerings of milk, flowers and ganga water.
It is said that over a hundred years ago, while digging the earth people came across idols of
Shiva and Parvati which they failed to remove. Then they built a temple over them
considering them as spontaneous appearance of Shiva and Parvati.
Voluntary Organisations play a pioneer role in the provision of welfare service to the
vulnerable sections of society i.e. women, children and handicapped persons. Northern region
in the country is unfavourably placed as far as numbers of agencies working in this field are
concerned as compared to the Southern region. However, there has been remarkable increase
in the number of Voluntary Organisations after creation of Haryana State in 1966. These
organisations not only undertake programmes with their own resources, but also implement
projects sponsored by the State. Government also assigns importance to the welfare services
and helps them by sizeable allotments.

64
As per Directory 2000, published by the Director, Social Justice & Empowerment,
Haryana, the following Welfare Organisations were functioning in different fields in the
district:.
1. District Council for Child Welfare, Gurgaon
Located in Civil Line, Gurgaon, it runs Bal Bhavan and a Computer Centre for children.
2. Ujjwal Niketan, Gurgaon
Located in New Colony Mor, Gurgaon, it runs a Home for homeless children.
3. Anand Bhartiya, 88-89, IDC, Gurgaon.
Located on Mehrauli Road, Gurgaon, it is engaged in the welfare of the children and for
improvement of environment.
4. Chhotu Ram Educational and Vocational Rural Society.
Located in Shivaji Nagar, Gurgaon, it is working for the welfare of destitute children.
5. All India Women Conference Jail Road, Gurgaon.
Located in Gurgaon, it is working for the welfare of women and children.
6. Distt. Red Cross Society, Jail Road, Gurgaon.
Located in Gurgaon, it runs a Working Women Welfare Centre.
7. All India Confederation of Blind, Gurgaon.
Located in village Behrampur, Gurgaon, it runs a School for Blind Children.
8. Sadhbhawana Charitable Trust Gurgaon.
Located in Sector 17, Gurgaon, it runs a School for Mentally Retarded Children.
9. Khusaboo Welfare Society, Gurgaon.
Located in Friends Colony, Gurgaon, it runs a Centre for Spastic Mentally Handicapped
Children.
10. Haryana Welfare Centre for Hearing and Speech Handicapped, Gurgaon.
Located on Mehrauli Road, Gurgaon, it runs a School for Deaf & Dumb Children.
11. Janta Blind Rehabilitation and Training Centre, Gurgaon.
Located in Bhimgarh Kheri, near Railway Station, Gurgaon, it runs a Training Centre for
Blind persons.
12. Indian Handicapped Association, Gurgaon.
Located in Urban Estate, Gurgaon, it is engaged in the welfare of Disabled persons.
13. National Association for the Blind, Gurgaon.
Located in New Colony, Gurgaon, it is working for the welfare of Blind persons.
14. Handicapped & Destitute Service Samiti, Pataudi Chowk, Gurgaon.
Located near Pataudi Chowk, Gurgaon, it is working for the Welfare of Handicapped.
15. Yuva Chetana Samiti, Gurgaon.
Located in Sector 31, Gurgaon, it organizes awareness camps and runs a Training Centre.
16. Swami Amar Dev Vidyalaya Trust, Amar Nagar, Pataudi
Located in Pataudi, it provides Training in Stenography, Typing and Knitting to women.

65
17. St. John Ambulance Association, Gurgaon Jail Road, Near Nehru Stadium, Gurgaon.
Located in Gurgaon, it provides Ambulance facilities to patients at Gurgaon,
18. T.B. Association of India, Gurgaon.
Located in Civil Hospital, Gurgaon, it is engaged in the welfare and treatment of T.B.
Patients.
19. Indian Medical Association, Gurgaon.
Located in Gurgaon, it provides medical facilities to patients.
20. Samanvit Gram Vikas Samiti, Gurgaon.
Located in Bhimgarh Kheri, Railway Station, Gurgaon, its activities are to promote skill
among women, Nutrition to mal-nourished children and pre-primary education and health
services to them.
21. Nav Jyoti, Delhi Police Foundation for Correction, De-addiction and Rehabilitation,
Village Bhondsi, Gurgaon.
Located in village Bhondsi, Gurgaon, it runs a Family Counselling Centre.

(viii) Brief description of places of religious, historical or archaeological importance and


places of tourist interest in the district:

Farrukhnagar
The town, a tahsil headquarters of the same name octagonal in shape, was founded by a
Baluch chief, Faujdar Khan, who was a Governor appointed by emperor Farrukhsiyar, after
whom the place was presumably named. Faujdar Khan assumed the title of Nawab in A.D.
1738 and the Nawabs of Farrukhnagar played an important part in the history of the tract till
its annexation by the British. The estate was confiscated in 1858 because the Nawab had
participated in the 1857 Uprising. A monument has recently been raised here in the memory
of martyrs.
The old buildings in the town include Shish Mahal and its attendant gateways built by
Faujdar Khan in A.D. 1733, baradari of Nawab, where the Municipal Committee is housed at
present, a fine mosque known as Jami Masjid and a large octagonal baoli( well ) with stone
staircases made during the Jt. occupancy. The tourist attraction is Jami Masjid built of Agra
redstone, which was constructed by Faujdar Khan. It is ornamented with commemorative
marble tablet. Besides, two slabs are inscribed with Arabic legends which date back to the
reign of Ghiyas-ud-din Balban, Sultan of Delhi.
There is also a shrine of Budho Mata situated at Mubarakpur, a village about 5 kilometres
from Farrukhnagar. It is a well-known shrine and a fair is held every Wednesday.

Gurgaon
The headquarters of the district of the same name, Gurgaon, is located to the west of
Delhi, at a distance of 32 kilometres from Delhi on Delhi-Bikaner railway route. The
population of the town is 172,955 persons according to the 2001 Census.
The town was first occupied by a cavalry unit posted to watch the army of Begum Samru
of Sirdhana, whose principal cantonment was at the village of Jharsa, 1.5 kilometres to the
south-east of the town. The civil offices were removed from Bharawas (tahsil Rewari ) in

66
1821, when the British frontier was advanced by the acquisition of the Ajmer territory.
About 1.5 kilometres away from the Gurgaon town is a village by the same name which is
known far and wide for its temple of Sitla Mata where a fair is held every Monday and
Tuesday.
The places of public utility include a police station, a post and telegraph office, a
telephone exhange, various branches of commercial banks, colleges, higher secondary/high
schools, middle schools, primary schools, an industrial training institute, an industrial school
for girls, a Government general hospital, a police hospital, a T.B. clinic, an E.S.I. dispensary,
a veterinary hospital, rest houses, 3 cinema houses and libraries etc. The town and its
surrounding areas have been identified for all-round industrial development.
Shama, a State-run tourist resort, is located on the national highway in Gurgaon town
itself, near the municipal committee. Facilities available here include guest-house, restaurant
and bar.
Pataudi
Pataudi, headquarters of tahsil of the same name lies at a distance of about 29 kilometres
from Gurgaon. the town was founded in the reign of Jalal-ud-din Khalji by a Mewati
Chieftain, Pata, who named it Patodhi, which seems to have been corrupted to Pataudi.
During Aurangzeb’s reign, it was made a pargana and was attached to Rewari. But in 1803,
it was granted as jagir to Faiz Talab Khan.
Sohna
Sohna town, also a tahsil headquarters of the same name, is situated on the highway from
Gurgaon to Alwar, 24 kilometres from Gurgaon and 56 kilometres from Delhi.
Sohna is a corrupted form of Sona meaning gold. The town is said to have derived its
name from the gold dust which was found after heavy rains in the beds of the neighbouring
torrents.
The town is of great antiquity and had been occupied in succession by three different
races, viz. the Kambhos, the Khanzadas and the Rajputs, traces of whom still exist in the
extensive ruins by which the town is surrounded. Tradition attributes the expulsion of
Kambhos to the Nawab Kutab Khan Khanzada who came with a large army from Indor near
Nuh and slaughtered the Kambhos in about A.D. 1570. The Khanzadas built a town further
to the east but were expelled in A.D 1620 by the Sisodia (Raghubansi) Rajputs of Jalandhar
(Jullundur). These Rajputs are stated to have migrated in obedience to a warning voice of
their patron saint, who according to a tradition, appeared in a dream and indicated Sohna as
the place where he wished them to settle. Their Raja, Sawan Singh, founded the present
town.
The town is specially remarkable for its hot springs. In ancient times, it was a place of
the rishisand the main ‘Kund’ (tank) was called Shiv Kund. During the Mughal period, Akbar
on his visit to this place had praised the place as one of the best in the surburbs of Delhi.
Famed for medicinal properties, these sulphur springs were visited by foreign tourists during
the British period. Now the State Government has developed this place into a tourist and
pilgrim centre.
The places of antiquarian or archaeological interest in the town are; the Khamba, lately
known as Gora Barak along with a mosque attached to it, is believed to date back to A.D.
1301; the Dargah of Nazzam-ul-Haqq, with a picturesque tomb and a mosque, made of red
and buff sandstone bearing the date A.D. 1461, and Qutb Khan-ki-Masjit, built of variegated
local stone with red-stone, now in ruins.

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Besides, mention may be made of the dome over the famous hot springs in the centre of
the town, said to be of great antiquity; tombs locally known as Lal and Kala Gumbaz lying to
the west of the town and extensive ruins of the Kamboh settlement. The fort on the top of the
rock in the south-west of the town was constructed by the Jats of Bharatpur. It was unfinished
when the British occupied it. The ruins of the fort are still seen at the brow of the hill
overhanging towards the town.
Sohna tourist resort, located atop a hill, commands a panoramic view with sprawling
green lawns dotted with flower beds and a rich variety of ever greens. Beautifully designed
bath complex provides the rare facility of sulphur bath apart from other facilities like
invigorating massage, sauna bath, steam bath and swimming. Facilities available include VIP
hut, motel, campers’ huts, restaurant, bar, cafeteria and arrangements for garden parties.
Damdama Lake at Sohna, is one of the biggest natural lakes of Haryana and is truly an
angler’s paradise. Facilities include kiosk, angling and boating.
Sultanpur Bird Sanctuary at Sultanpur (Tahsil Gurgaon)
It is situated at a distance of 46 kilometres from Delhi, a little away from the National
Highway No.8. A find of Peter Jackson, the world famous authority on birds, here is a bird
watcher’s delight. The sanctuary offers more than 100 different species of migratory birds
coming from Europe and Siberia. Mounds and extensive artificial plantation has been done to
help the bird visitors’ rest, nest and breed. A panelled library of bird books and stuffed birds
are available for reference. Observations hide and watch towers have been constructed to
facilitate bird watching. Facilities available include restaurant, bar, guest house, etc.
Dhankot ( Tahsil Gurgaon )
The village lies 11 kilometres west of Gurgaon on Gurgaon-Farrukhnagar Road.
Tradition has it that milk was supplied from this place to Guru Dronacharya and his pupils at
Gurugram (Gurgaon). It is also identified as Thullkottiha (of the Buddhist literature) and was
visited by Lord Buddha. The site has yielded Painted Grey Ware and other early historic
pottery. The burnt bricks found at the site measure 36.83 X 21.59 X 6.35 c.m. Besides,
beads of terracotta and bangles of shell, faience and glass were also recovered from the site.
Saiyad ( Tahsil Gurgaon )
This site lies 3 kilometres west of Gurgaon on Gurgaon-Dharampur Road. Traditionally,
the site is belived to be the residential place of Guru Dronacharya and his pupils. The site has
yielded Painted Grey Ware and late medieval remains. Besides, the pieces of faience and two
copper objects have also been recovered from the site.

(ix) Major characteristics of the district, contribution of the district in the form of any
historical figure associated with the district:
In the time of Akbar (A.D. 1556—1605), the area covered by the Gurgaon district
was contained in Subah of Delhi and Agra.

During the flourishing times of the Mughal empire, Gurgaon was not in the limelight
of history, but with its decay, mention of the district is again found in historical writings. In
1685, Aurangzeb had to send a powerful army under the command of Raja Jai Singh to
Mewat area against Ikram Khan who had started giving trouble to the Mughal administration.

With the decline of the Mughal empire after the death of Aurangzeb, the district was
torn between several contending powers.

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Under the Marathas, the greater part of the district was held by Generals De Boigne,
Perron and Boruquin. Begum Samru owned the pargana of Jharsa or Badshahpur, and George
Thomas had that of Firozpur assigned to him in 1793. George Thomas once plundered
Gurgaon but could not retain this possession. Apa Khande Rao, the Maratha Governor of the
Mewat country, west of Delhi, engaged George Thomas and placed a battalion of Sepoys
under him. He worked for Apa Khande Rao for four years from 1793 to 1797.

In 1801, the rising power of Daulat Rao Sindhia in North India was completely
broken by the British forces under General Lake in the second Maratha war. The Gurgaon
district, with other possessions of Sindhia, west of the Yamuna, passed on to the British East
India Company by the Treaty of Surji Arjungaon signed on December 30, 1803.

(x) Scope of Village and Town Directory:

Village Directory:
Concepts used in VD and TD of DCHB:
1. Educational Amenities:-The type of different educational facilities available in the village
is given in numbers. Both Government and private educational facilities / institutions are
considered for this-purpose. If there are composite schools like Middle schools with Primary
classes, or Secondary schools with middle classes, these are included in the number of
Primary and Middle schools respectively. For example, if in a village there are two Primary
schools and one Middle school with primary classes, the number of Primary schools in the
village are given as three and that of Middle school as one even though there may be only
three educational institutions so also in case of Secondary schools. For better understanding,
the distinctiveness of different types of schools is depicted hereunder:

1.1 Pre-primary (PP): Now-a-days, the children are sent to schools at a very early stage. Lot
of pre-primary schools, private schools in particular, have come up in villages and towns.
These may or may not be recognized by the competent authorities. Even many Secondary
schools have classes starting from pre primary level. Pre-primary classes include Nursery,
K.G., Pre-basic, Play school, etc.

1.2 Primary School (P): Schools providing education from Standard 1 and upward up to and
inclusive of Standard V are classified as Primary Schools.

1.3 Middle School (M): Schools providing education from Standard VI and upward up to
and inclusive of Standard VIII are classified as Middle Schools. A School with Class 1 to
VIII is treated as two units, i.e. one Primary School and one Middle School.

1.4 Secondary School (S): Schools providing education from Standard IX and upwards
up to and inclusive of Standard X are classified as Secondary Schools. A composite school
with 1 to X standard is treated as three separate units and counted separately under the
categories of Primary School, Middle School and Secondary School.

1.5 Senior Secondary School (SS): Schools and colleges that provide education for
Standards XI and XII and first and second year of the Pre-University Course fall under this

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category. There are Senior Secondary Schools with Standard I and upwards up to Standard
XII.

1.6. Degree College: (i) Arts/Science/Commerce: These are all educational institutions that
provide post-PUC level education leading to University degree/diploma in any subject or
combination of subjects and also post-graduate levels of education. The college offering
courses in Arts, Science or Commerce either separately or in combination are covered under
this category.

(ii) Engineering College (E): It is a graduate/post-graduate degree college providing


Bachelor of Engineering (BE) or Bachelor of Technology (B. Tech.) or post-graduate
engineering degrees like M.Tech.

(iii)Medical Colleges: These are graduate/post-graduate degree colleges providing MBBS or


equivalent degree in alternative medicine like Ayurveda, Unani, Homeopathy etc. or post-
graduate medical degrees like M.D or equivalent in the above branches of medicine.

1.7. Management College/ Institute (MI): It offers courses like Diploma in Management,
Post-Graduate Diploma in Management, Masters of Business Administration (MBA) and
specializations in different disciplines of Management like Marketing, Human Resources
Development (HRD) etc.

1.8. Polytechnic (Pt): An Institution providing certificate/diploma (not equivalent to degree)


in any technical subject like engineering, vocational courses like embroidery, fashion
designing etc. It may be both Government and Private.

1.9. Vocational School/ITI: It is a vocational training institute imparting trainings in specific


fields acquiring necessary skill, which will make the trainees employable or create them
opportunities of self-employment. Trainings offered by Industrial Training Institutes (ITI) fall
under this category.

1.10. Non-formal Education/Training Centre (NFTC): Non-vocational education centers,


established by the Central and State Governments provide educational facilities to the
interested persons irrespective of educational qualification, and age. These education centers
are open to all.

1.11. Special School for Disabled: There are Government and Government recognized
institutions/organizations engaged for providing education to different groups of disabled
persons.

2. Medical Facilities: 2.1 Hospital-Allopathic and Hospital-Alternative medicine: A


hospital is an Institution, where sick or injured are given medical or surgical care. Bed
strength differs from hospital to hospital ranging from 31 to 500 depending upon whether
these are sub-district, sub-divisional or district hospitals. If there are hospitals providing
facilities under different systems of medicines such as, Allopathy, Ayuveda, Unani and
Homeopathy etc., these details are given separately.

(a) Allopathy: The system of medical practice, which treats disease by the use of remedies
which produce effects different from those produced by the disease under treatment.

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(b) Ayurveda: Ayurveda means ‘Science of life’. The philosophy of Ayurveda is based on
the theory of Pancha Mahabhootas (Five elements) of which all the objects and living bodies
are composed of. The combination of these five elements is represented in the form of
Tridosha: Vata, Pitta and Kapha. These three ‘doshas’ are physiological entities of living
beings. Ayurveda developed into eight distinct specialities, i.e., Internal Medicine, Pediatrics,
Psychiatry, Eye and ENT, Surgery, Toxicology, Geriatrics and Science of virility. Two types
of treatments, Preventive and Curative, are given in Ayurveda.
(c) Unani: Treatment of Unani consists of three components, namely, preventive, promotive
and curative. Unani system of medicine has been found to be efficacious in conditions like
Rheumatic Arthritis, Jaundice, Filarisis, Eczema, Sinusitis and Bronchial Asthma. For the
prevention of the disease and promotion of health, the Unani System emphasizes six
essentials: pure air, food and water, physical movement and rest, psychic movement and rest,
sleep and wakefulness and retention of useful materials and evacuation of waste materials
from the body.
(d) Homoeopathy: Treatment in Homoeopathy, which is holistic in nature, focuses on an
individual’s response to a specific environment. Homoeopathic medicines are prepared mainly
from natural substances such as plant products, minerals and animal sources. Homoeopathic
medicines do not have any toxic, poisonous or side effects. Homoeopathic treatment is
economical as well and has a very broad public acceptance.
2.2 Community Health Centre (CHC): Community Health Centres are designed to provide
referral health care for cases from PHC and those in need of specialist health care approaching
the CHC directly. 4 PHCs are included under each CHC thus catering approximately 80,000
populations in tribal/hilly areas and 1, 20,000 populations for plain areas. CHC is a 30- bedded
hospital providing specialist care in Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Surgery and
Paediatrics.

2.3 Primary Health Centre (PHC): A Primary Health Centre is the first contact point
between a village community and the Government medical officer. A PHC covers a
population of 20,000 in hilly, tribal or difficult areas and 30,000 populations in plain areas
with 4-6 indoor/observation beds. It acts as a referral unit for 6 sub-centres. It has a medical
officer and para medical staff.

2.4 Primary Health Sub- Centre (PHS): A Primary Health Sub-centre is the first contact
point between the primary health care system and the community. As per the population
norms, one PHS is established for every 5,000 population in plain areas and 3,000 population
in hilly/ tribal/ desert areas. Each PHS has a sanctioned strength of one male and one female
heath worker.

2.5 Maternity and Child Welfare Centre (MCW): It provides pre-natal and post-natal
services for both mother and child. The services include regular check-up of pregnant women,
giving folic tablets, counselling, delivery, immunization of children with check-up etc.
2.6 TB Clinic (TBC): The diagnosis and treatment of TB are functions of the general health
services and hence it is a part and parcel of Primary Health Care. Specialized units such as the

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District Tuberculosis Centre (DTC) act as referral centres. TB clinics are established by the
Government of India under the National Tuberculosis Control Programme and implemented
through a network of DTC. The DTC is the nodal point for TB control activities in the district
and it also functions as a specialized referral centre. The functions of sub-district level
Tuberculosis Unit (TU) are implementation, monitoring and supervision of TB control
activities in its designated geographical areas.

2.7Health Centre: Clinic where medicine and medical supplies are dispensed. It has no in-
patient facility. A clinic (or an outpatient clinic) is a small private or public health facility that
is devoted to the care of outpatients, often in a community, in contrast to larger hospitals,
which also treat inpatients.

2.8Dispensary: Place where patients are treated and medicines provided but with no in-patient
facility. Immunizations, MCH Services and sometimes pathological tests are carried out here.
It may be of allopathic or any alternative medicine.
2.9Veterinary Hospital: Mostly run by the State Government or local body for treatment and
preventive measures against diseases of domestic animals like cows, buffaloes etc in rural
areas.
2.10Mobile Health Clinic: These are Mobile vans well equipped with a range of health
services to villages located far away from the CHCs, PHCs or any public health sources. The
vans visit villages on designated days to deliver the health care services. The services
generally offered are OPD, ante-natal and post-natal, B.P. examination, X-ray, ECG,
Immunization, First Aid etc.
2.11 Family Welfare Centre: Check-up and counselling is provided to the pregnant and
married women regarding small family norm and devices for having a small family.
Temporary and permanent contraceptive devices are provided here.
2.12Nursing Home: A nursing home is a long –term care facility licensed by the state that
offers 24-hour room and board and health care services including basic and skilled nursing
care, rehabilitation and a full range of other therapies, treatments and programs to old and sick
people. The difference between a hospital and a nursing home is that a nursing home gives
importance to convalescence from a disease while a hospital gives medical treatment for the
disease.
2.13Medicine Shop: A shop which sells drugs and medicines of any system of medicine viz.
allopathic, homeopathic, ayurvedic or unani medicines, is considered as a medicine shop.
Sometimes some shops and Paan shops also keep ordinary medicines, like Crocin, Burnol etc.
These shops are not taken as medicine shops.

3. Drinking water: The following are the main source of drinking water facility (ies)
available in the village.

3.1 Tap Water-treated: This source of drinking water refers to a source of drinking water
which is provided to the villagers through pipes within their premises or to the villagers
through common taps (public taps/community water points) by the Government departments,

72
local bodies, panchayats, public or private estate agencies, etc. after treatment. Such a source
is treated as ‘Tap water from treated source’.

3.2 Tap Water-un-treated: If the villagers are drawing drinking water through pipes either
directly from a well or bore well or after pumping the well or tube well water, or the water is
supplied through pipes to the households of the village or through public taps without
treatment. Such a source is treated as ‘Tap water from un-treated source’.

3.3 Covered Well (CW): A well that is (1) covered on sides from run-off water (i.e., excess
water from rain, snowmelt or other sources flows over the land) through a wall lining or
casting that is raised above ground level on a platform that diverts spilled water away from the
well and (2) covered so that bird droppings and animals cannot fall down the hole. It is
considered as covered well.

3.4 Un-covered Well (UW): A well which is (1) un-covered on sides from runoff water, (2)
un-covered from bird droppings and animals; or (3) both.

3.5 Hand Pump (HP): Hand pump means where ground water is taken out manually by
operating a hand pump.

3.6 Tube Well / Borehole (TW): Tube well denotes the ground water source from where
ground water is taken out through electrical or diesel pump. Spring, River/Canal,
Tank/Pond/Lark are self explanatory.

4. Community Toilet Complex: Community Toilet may be constructed and maintained by


Gram Panchayats or Private NGOs like Sulabh Sauchalaya or likes.

5.Rural Sanitary Mart or Sanitary Hardware Outlet (RSM): It is an outlet dealing with the
materials, hardware and designs required for the construction of not only sanitary latrines but
other sanitary facilities such as compost pit, washing platform and other sanitation and
hygiene accessories required for individuals, households and the environment in the rural
areas.

6. Community bio-gas or recycle of waste for productive use: Many of the solid wastes
having economic values but put for disposal can be recycled for reuse. For example, food, cow
dung, leaves, vegetable, paper, wood, plastics, old cloth etc. However, some of the wastes are
not recyclable. These are carbon paper, thermo coal etc. When recyclable solid wastes are
subjected to decomposition, bio-gas could be produced under favourable conditions. These
systems of recycling may be there at the village level organized by Gram Panchayats with
technical support from Governments or non-government organizations.

7. Communication and transport Facilities:

7.1 Post Office (PO): Self-explanatory.

7.2 Sub-Post Office (SPO): Sub-post office includes Extra Departmental Post Offices and
those providing franchise postal services and also part time services in lieu of some
honorarium. The limited postal services include sale of stamps, receipt of letters and money
orders and also distribution of letters.

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7.3 Post & Telegraph Office (PTO): Telegraph office is set up by the Government to enable
people to send or receive telegrams. If the phonogram facility is available (though the
Telegraph office may not be equipped with Morse Code Transmitters), the village is
considered to be having telegraph facility.

7.4 Telephones (landlines): If the village is having the Public Call Office (PCO) either run by
the Post Office or by individuals or by a private shop, then the village is considered to be
having telephone facility.

7.5 Public Call Office (PCO)/Mobile PCO: Self explanatory.

7.6 Mobile Phone Coverage: Mobile phones are now very common particularly in urban
areas. Some villages by virtue of being in close proximity to the urban areas also enjoy the
benefits of the mobile phone services. Even if a few villagers avail the services of mobile
phones, then the village is considered to be having access to mobile phone.

7.7 Internet Cafes/Common Service Centres (CSC): If the village is having the facility of
Cyber Cafes or shops owned by private individuals providing the facility of surfing of the
internet, then the village is considered to be having access to internet/cyber cafe facility.
Government of India formulated the scheme of CSC with the vision of providing all
government services in an integrated manner at the door step of the citizen at an affordable
cost even in the remotest corners of the country through a combination of it based as well as
non-IT based services.

7.8 National Highway (NH): These are main highways running through the length and
breadth of the country. Each NH is numbered like NH-1, NH-2 for easy identification.

7.9 State Highway (SH): These are roads of a state linking district headquarters and
important cities within a State and connecting them with NHs or Highways of the neighboring
States.

7.10 Major District Roads (MDR): These are important roads within a district, serving
areas of production and markets and connecting these with each other or with the main
Highways.

7.11 Other District Roads (ODR): These are roads serving rural areas of production and
providing them with outlet to market centres, taluka headquarters, block development head
quarters or other main roads.

7.12 Village Road: The approach to village refers to the state of road etc., leading to the
village. This is to see whether the village is approachable both in fair and foul weather, and
whether it is inaccessible only for some time in the year.

7.13. Black-Topped (Pucca) Road (BTR): A road provided with a bituminous surfacing.

7.14 Gravel (Kuchha) Road (GR): A road constructed using well compacted crushed rock
or gravel material (coarse sand, small stones), which is fairly resilient and does not become
slippery when wet.

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7.15 Water Bound Macadam (WBM): This is the road layer made of crushed or broken
mixture of sand and rock fragments mechanically interlocked by rolling and voids filled with
screening and binding material with the assistance of water.

7.16 Foot Path (FP): A trodden path for the use by pedestrians and in some cases bicycles.
The Foot Paths are not suitable for vehicular traffic except bicycles in some cases. Most of
the interior/forest villages are connected by Foot Paths.

8. Banks and Credit Societies: -Banking facility means a place where a person can operate a
bank account.
8.1 Commercial Bank (CB): These may be banks wholly owned by the Government of
India or by Indian or Foreign Companies.
8.2 Cooperative Banks (Coop. B): A co-operative bank is a financial entity which belongs
to its members, who are at the same time the owners and the customers of their bank.
Cooperative banks are often created by persons belonging to the some local or professional
community or sharing a common interest. These banks are registered under the Cooperative
Societies Act. The cooperative banks are regulated by RBI and are covered by the Banking
Regulations Act, 1949.
8.3 Agricultural Credit Society (ACS): Major objectives of the ACS are to supply
agricultural credit to meet the requirements of funds for agricultural production, the
distribution of essential consumer commodities, the provision of storage and marketing
facilities and for light agricultural implements and machinery.
8.4 Non-Agricultural Credit Society (NCS): These societies include consumer cooperative
societies and also credit cooperative societies of certain categories of persons like teachers,
health workers, etc.

9. Miscellaneous Facilities:
9.1 Self-help Group (SHG): Self-Help Groups are groups of between 10-25 women created
by either NGOs or under the SGSY (Swarnjayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana) for the purposes
of meeting local credit needs. They are sometimes called Mahila Mandals in villages.

9. 2. Public Distribution System (PDS) shop: The shops through which some essential
commodities are sold by the government at subsidized rates. They may also be known as
ration shops and control shops.

9.3. Mandis/Regular Market: These are those clusters of shops with or without fixed
premises which are open on at least six days a week and opens at least from morning hours to
dusk.

9.4. Weekly Haat: These are those clusters of shops with or without fixed premises which
are open once a week.

9.5. Agricultural Marketing Society: It is a common platform to analyse the issues among
all the individuals and institutions in the field of agricultural marketing.

9.6. Nutrition Centre: Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS): The Integrated
Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme set up by the Government of India with the
objective of providing following package of services to the children under 6 years and
pregnant and lactating mothers in villages such as; Immunization, Health Check-up, Referral
Services, Pre-school Non-formal Education and Nutrition & Health Education.

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9.7. Anganwadi Centre: Each centre under the ICDS scheme is run by an Anganwadi
Worker. One Anganwadi worker is appointed for specified population of the village. They
are basically local women. They are assisted by Anganwadi helper. They provide pre-school
non-formal education at the Centre and provide food to the children.

9.8. Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA): ASHA is a health activist in the
community who will create awareness on health and its social determinants and mobilize the
community towards local health planning and increased utilization and accountability of the
existing health services. She would be a promoter of good health practices. She will also
provide a minimum package of curative care as appropriate and feasible for that level and
make timely referrals. She will act as a motivator of different types of health related
activities. Unlike ANM, she will not be involved in any clinical activities like immunization.

9.9. Sports Club/Recreation Centre: Indoor and out-door games are arranged by the Club
and activities like wrestling, Judo Karate etc. are also done there.

9.10. Cinema/Video Hall (CV): If a regular cinema house licensed by Government is


available, then the town/village is considered to be having the facility of Cinema Hall. Video
hall owners screen films in their own or hired premises.

9.11. Public Library: Books are kept there which can be accessed by the public on loan
basis. These may be sponsored by Government or Local Body or Panchayat or any influential
person. Free service or nominal charges are made for using the facility.

9.12. Public Reading Room: Here the public may read newspapers and magazines. These
may be sponsored by Government or Local Body or Panchayat or any influential person.

9.13. Newspaper Supply: The availability of the Newspaper(s), both in English or


vernacular, in the village is considered to having the said facility.

10. Availability of Electricity/Power. If power is actually available, whatever may be the


form of its use, it is indicated affirmative. If the village is having electricity for domestic
purposes and the residents are using the same for domestic use, then it is considered that
domestic power supply is available. If the electricity authority has not given domestic supply
to the households on their request and people are using unauthorized electricity either by
stealthily or misuse the supply meant for agricultural or industrial purposes, then it is not
considered as availability of electricity for domestic purposes. However, if the village goes
out of power due to temporary technical problems such as, transformer failures, theft of
electrical equipment, etc., it is considered that electricity is available. Supply of electricity is
considered available even when there is a temporary ban on new domestic connections.
Connections to residential houses, bungalows, clubs, hostels and hospitals run on non-
commercial basis, charitable, educational and religious institutions are included in the
domestic category.

10.1 Power Supply for domestic use: This category includes electricity used only for
domestic consumption.

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10.2 Power supply for agricultural use: This category includes all electricity connections
given to the farmers for conducting various agricultural activities including irrigation.

10.3 Power supply for commercial use: This category includes electricity connections
given for workshops, industries etc. or for any commercial purposes.

10.4 Power supply for all uses: This category includes electricity connection is available
for domestic use, agricultural use, and for any commercial purposes.

11. Land Use Pattern: The land use area of the villages is given in hectares. The land use
pattern in the Village Directory conforms to the pattern of classification of land use as
recommended by the Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India. The Ministry has
recommended the maintenance of records of land use pattern under the 9 categories as indicated
in the Village Directory.

12. System of drainage: Generally, by drainage system, we mean the network of mains and
branches of underground conduits for the conveyance of sewerage to the point of disposal.
Sewers that carry only household and industrial wastage are called separate sewers; those that
carry storm water from roofs, streets and other surfaces are known as storm water drains, while
those carrying both sewage and storm water are called combined sewers. However, in towns,
which are not provided with such underground sewerage system, it is mentioned whether it has
open drainage system. There may be possibility of the town having both closed as well as open
drainage systems.

13. Type of latrines: The data on various types of latrines both public and private together are
collected. The three types of latrines considered here are, Pit Latrine, Flush/Pour Flush Latrine
and Service Latrine.

(i) Pit System: The latrines are attached to the pit that is dug into the ground for the reception of
night soil, are reckoned as pit latrine.

(ii) Flush/pour flush: A flush latrine uses a cistern or holding tank for flushing water and has a
water seal, which is a U-shaped pipe, below the seat or squatting pan that prevents the passage
of flies and odours. A pour flush latrine uses a water seal, but unlike a flush latrine, a pour flush
latrine uses water poured by hand for flushing (no cistern is used).

(iii) Service: Type of latrine from where night soil is removed manually by scavengers. All
other types of latrines are covered under “Others” category.

14. Protected Water Supply- Source and capacity of Storage system: There are various
sources of water supply and its storage system in the town.

14.1 Service Reservoir: A service reservoir is a water storage container that holds clean
water after it has been treated in a water plant, and before it is piped to the end users. These
containers are covered, and are designed to keep the water safe from contamination. Their
main purpose is to provide a buffer within the water supply system so that water supplies can
be maintained across periods of varying demand.
14.2 River Infiltration Gallery: Infiltration Galleries are capable of supplying large
quantities of water, and are used where wells are unable to supply water needs, i.e. where an

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impermeable rock barrier affects well efficiency, or where surface water sources are too
shallow for intake screens. Infiltration galleries are one or more horizontal screens placed
adjacent to (on-shore), or directly underneath (bed-mounted), a surface water source.
14.3 Bore Well Pumping System: A bore well is a well of 6" to 12" in diameter drilled into
the earth for retrieving water. The depth of a bore well can vary from 50 feet to 3000 feet.
Water is pumped out to surface through electricity/generator.
14.4 Pressure Tank: Tank that is used to ensure consistent water pressure and for storage of
water. Usually located in basement of house but sometimes (in older settings) located in well
pit.
15. Road lighting (Points): Road lighting means the number of street lights that are
maintained in the town.

16. Home Orphanage: Orphanageis the name to describe a residential institution devoted to
the care of orphans–children whose parents are deceased or otherwise unable to care for
them. Parents, and sometimes grandparents, are legally responsible for supporting children,
but in the absence of these or other relatives willing to care for the children, they become a
ward of the state, and orphanages are a way of providing for their care and housing.

17. Working women's hostel: These may be recognised or non-recognised by any public
authority. The data on number of working women's hostels available in the town are collected
with number of seats.

18. Old Age Home: There are two types of Old Age Homes in India. One is the "Free" type
which cares for the destitute old people who have no one else to care for them. They are
given shelter, food, clothing and medical care. The second type is the "Paid" home where
care is provided for a fee. Nowadays, such "Retirement" homes have become very popular in
India and they are well worth considering.

19. Stadium: A stadium is a place, or venue, for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts or other
events, consisting of a field or stage partly or completely surrounded by a structure designed
to allow spectators to stand or sit and view the event.

20. Auditorium/Community Hall: These are the places where meetings, social functions etc.
are organised.

Town Directory:
There are seven statements in the Town Directory. These statements have been compiled
from the information supplied by the local bodies of the State and the contents thereof are as
follows:

Statement I:
This statement gives class, name and civic administration status of the town and its
location code which runs into eight digits, name of tahsil, name of C.D. block in case of non-
municipal (Census) towns, number of households, population and decadal growth rate of the
towns 1901 - 2011 density of population and sex ratio for the last three decadal Censuses.

78
Statement II:
This statement provides data on physical aspects viz; rainfall, temperature of towns,
location of town with respect to its distance from State/district/ /tahsil headquarters, from the
nearest city/railway station/ bus route, etc.
Statement III:
This statement indicates civic and other amenities available in each town of the district.
The details given under civic and other amenities include availability of road leanth in km,
both kutcha and pucca, system drainage, number of latrines and method of disposal of night
soil, protected water supply, fire fighting service and number of electric connections available
in the town.
Statement 1V:
Statement 1V explains the states of medical facilities in each town. The medical
facilities cover number of hospitals (allopathics& other)/dispensaries/ health center / family
welfare center/ maternity and child welfare centers.
Statement V:
Statement V explains the status of medical, educational, recreational and cultural facilities
in the town. The medical facilities cover number of hospitals/dispensaries/TB clinics. The
number of beds available under each type of medical institutions is also given. Similarly, the
educational facilities shown include availability of Arts/Science/Commerce/Law/Other
colleges of degree level and above, medical colleges, polytechnics, shorthand, typewriting
and vocational training institutions, higher secondary/intermediate/PUC/Junior college level,
secondary/matriculation, junior secondary/middle school, primary school and adult literacy
classes/centres. This statement also includes information on working women’s hostels along
with number of seats and number of recreational and cultural centres, like stadia, cinema,
auditorium/theatre/community halls, public libraries reading rooms etc.
Statement VI:
This statement deals with industry and banking data in 2009.Townwise information is
depicted on three most important commodities manufactured, commercial, co-operative
banks and number of agricultural and non-agricultural credit societies in each town.
Statement VII:
In view to collect exhaustive information in slum demography etc., this separate statement
has been introduced. Slum data collected in this Statement will be used as an aid and tool for
urban planning of the towns. Various types of information viz., name of the slum area, total
number of households and population of the slum areas, availability of paved roads (in kms.)
in the slum area, system of sewerage, number of latrines (private and community) available,
method of disposal of night soil, number of tap points installed for the supply of protected
water and electric connections available for domestic road lighting and other purposes have
been collected in this statement.

79
80
Village and Town Directory

81
82
Brief Note on the Village and Town Directory for the DCHB, Census of India, 2011.

Village Directory 2011 Census:-

The Village Directory is being compiled for both inhabited and un-inhabited villages.
In the village directory both private and government facilities/institutions have been given. In
case of un-inhabited /depopulated villages, the location code number, name and area of the
village is being given universally in Village Directory and Village PCA. The columns
relating to the amenities and land use pattern, etc. being left blank and it will be noted against
the name of the village that it is un-inhabited/depopulated. The Appendices to Village
Directory and Inset Tables based on village Directory data are also prepared for inhabited
villages.

In the Village Directory format for 2011 Census there are 121 columns and the details
thereon are as follows:

Columns 1: Serial Number: - Self explanatory. All the villages within the CD block are
presented serially in the ascending order of their location code number.

Columns 2: Name of village: - Self explanatory. The names of the villages are shown
against this column. This also includes the forest and uninhabited villages.

Columns 3: Location Code Number of village. The location code numbers of the villages are
shown against this column.

Columns 4: Area of the Village: - The area of the villages has been given in hectares.

Column 5: Total Population: -The total population of the village as per 2011 Census has
been given against this column.

Column6: Number of Households: -The numbers of households as per 2011 Census have
been given in this column.

Amenities: - The availability of different infrastructural amenities such as education, medical,


drinking water, post, telegraph, banks, credit societies, recreation and cultural facilities,
communication, power, etc. in each village have been given in the Village Directory.
Wherever the amenities are not available in the village, the distance range code viz; ‘a’ for <5
Kms, ‘b’ for 5-10 Kms and ‘c’ for 10+ Kms of the nearest where facility is available is
given. Column wise details are given below:

Columns No. 7 – 20 Educational Facilities: - All the different educational facilities available
in the village have been given under these columns. Nursery/LKG//UKG classes are
included in Pre-Primary Schools, Classes up to class V included in Primary School; Classes
from VI to VIII are included in the Middle school. Classes from IX and X included in
Secondary School. Classes from XI and XII are included in Senior Secondary School. In
case of composite schools like middle school with primary school or secondary school with
middle school, these are also included in the number of primary and middle schools,

83
respectively. The information on the entire educational institutes is given under these
columns.

Columns No. 21 to 38 - Medical Facilities: - All the different medical facilities available in
the village have been given under these columns.

Columns No. 39 to 46 -Drinking Water: - The information on availability of various types of


the drinking water facility within the village has been given under these columns.

Columns No. 47 to 50 – Availability of Toilet and others:- The information on availability of


toilet and Bio-Gas etc. available in the village has been given under these columns.

Columns No. 51 to 67 Communication (Post & Telegraph and transport):- The information
on communication and Post Office, Sub-Post Office, & Telegraph Office, Village PIN Code
number, Phone-Landlines, Mobile Phone, Private Courier Facility, Internet Café, etc;
available in the village has been given under these columns. The information on all various
transport facilities whether public/private transport like Bus, Railway Station, or Navigable
waterways, Taxi , Van, Tractors etc. available in the village has also been given under these
columns.

Columns No.68 to 79 – Village connected to High ways, Village Roads, Banks and Credit
Societies: - The information on all roads connected to village has been given under these
columns. These include National Highway, State Highway, District Roads and other district
roads connected to the village, Pucca roads, Kutcha Roads, Water Bounded Macadam Roads,
Navigable Water Ways and Foot Paths has been given under these columns. Further, the
information on availability of banks, ATM and Agricultural Credit societies in the village has
been given under these columns.

Column No. 80 to 96 Miscellaneous Facilities: - The information on various miscellaneous


facilities available in the village has been given under these columns. These includes Self -
Help Group, Public Distribution Shop (PDS), Mandi /Regular Market, Weekly Haat,
Agricultural Marketing Society, Nutrition Centre(ICDS), Anganwadi Centre, ASHA,
Community Centre, Sports Fields, Sports Club/Recreation Centre, Cinema/Video Halls,
Public Library, Public Reading Room, News Paper Supply, Assembly Polling Station, Birth
and Death Registration Office.

Columns No. 97 to 100 – Electricity: - Availability of Power Supply in the village, whatever
may be the form of its use has been given in these columns. These include Electricity for
Domestic Use, Electricity for Agriculture Use Electricity for Commercial Use, and Electricity
for all purpose Domestic Uses.

Column No. 101 and 102 -Nearest Town: - The name of the nearest town along with the
distance range code has been in these columns.

84
Land use and Irrigation: - The land use pattern in the Village Directory conforms to the pattern
of classification of land use as recommended by the Ministry of Agriculture, Government of
India. The Ministry has recommended the maintenance of records of land use pattern under the
following 9 categories.

(i)-Column No. 103 -Forests:-This includes all lands classed as forest under any legal
enactment dealing with forests or administered as forests, whether state-owned or private, and
whether wooded or maintained as potential forest land. The area of crops raised in the forest
and grazing lands or areas open for grazing within the forests remain included under the
forest area.

(ii)-Column No. 104- Area under non-agricultural use:-This includes all lands occupied by
buildings, roads and railways or under water, e.g. rivers and canals and other lands put to uses
other than agriculture.

(iii)-Columns No. 105-Barren and un-culturable land:-This includes all barren and
unculturable land like mountains, deserts, etc. land which cannot be brought under cultivation
except at an exorbitant cost should be classed as unculturable whether such land is in isolated
blocks or within cultivated holdings.

(iv)-Column No. 106- Permanent Pastures and other Grazing Lands:-This includes all
grazing lands whether they are permanent pastures and meadows or not. Village common
grazing land is included under this head.

(v)-Column No. 107-Land under Miscellaneous Tree Crops, etc.:- This includes all
cultivable land which is not included in ‘Net area sown’ but is put to some agricultural uses.
Lands under Causing trees, thatching grasses, bamboo bushes and other groves for fuel, etc.
which are not included under ‘Orchards’ are classed under this category.

(vi)-Column No. 108- Culturable Waste Land: - This includes lands available for cultivation,
whether not taken up for cultivation or taken up for cultivation once but not cultivated during
the current year and the last five years or more in succession for one reason or other. Such
lands may be either fallow or covered with shrubs and jungles which are not put to any use.
They may be assessed or unassessed and may lie in isolated blocks or within cultivated
holdings. Land once cultivated but not cultivated for five years in succession is also included
in this category at the end of the five years.

(vii)-Column No. 109- Fallow Lands other than Current Fallows: - This includes all lands
which were taken up for cultivation but are temporarily out of cultivation for a period of not
less than one year and not more than five years.

(viii)-Column No. 110- Current Fallows: - This represents cropped area, which is kept
fallow during the current year. For example, if any seeding area is not cropped against the
same year it may be treated as current fallow.

85
(ix)-Column No. 111- Net Area Sown: -This represents the total area sown with crops and
orchards. Area sown more than once; in the same year is counted only once.

Column No. 112- Total Irrigated Land Area: - It includes all land which is cultivable and
irrigated by any source of irrigation. The total irrigated area of the village has been given
under this column.

Column No. 113- Total Un-Irrigated land Area: - Un-Irrigated area includes all land which is
cultivable but not irrigated by any source of irrigation. The total un-irrigated land area of the
village has been given under this column.

Column No. 114 to 118 Area Irrigated by source: - The area irrigated by various source of
irrigation in the village have been given under these columns. The different source of
irrigation facilities available in the village are as follows:

(i)-Canals(C)-Govt. or Pvt., (ii)-Wells/Tube-wells (W/TW), (iii)-Tanks/Lake(T/L), (iv)-


Waterfall,(WF) and (v)-Others(O).

Columns No.119 to 121-Three most important commodities manufactured:-The names of


three most important commodities manufactured in the village are indicated in this column.

C.D. Block level totals of the Village Directory:-

At the end of entries for the Village Directory of each C.D. Block, the totals of different
columns are being given wherever possible. However, in case of some of the columns, it may
not be possible to work out the CD Block level totals, in such cases the particular of relevant
columns are being left blank against C.D. Block level.

Appendices to Village Directory: - The Village Directory also includes the following
appendices:

Appendix –I: Summary showing total number of villages having Educational, Medical and

other amenities in villages – C.D. Block level.

Appendix I A: Villages by number of Primary Schools.

Appendix I B: Villages by Primary, Middle and Secondary Schools.

Appendix I C: Villages with different sources of drinking water facilities available.

Appendix II: Villages with 5,000 and above population which do not have one or more

amenities available.

Appendix -III: Land utilization data in respect of Census towns.

86
Appendix -IV: C.D. Block wise list of inhabited villages where no amenity other than

drinking water facility is available.

Appendix -V: Summary showing number of Villages not having Scheduled Caste population.

Appendix -VI: Summary showing number of Villages not having Scheduled Tribe
population.

Appendix -VII A: List of villages according to the proportion of the Scheduled Castes to the
total population by ranges.

Appendix- VII B: List of villages according to the proportion of the Scheduled Tribes to the
total population by ranges.

Appendix -VIII: Number of villages under each Gram Panchayat (C.D. block wise).

.............

Note explaining the abbreviations used in Town Directory 2011 Census:-

Statement I :- Status and Growth History:

Column 1 – Serial Number:- Self explanatory

Column 2:- Class, Name and civic status of town:- The Class is presented according to
population of the towns in 2011 Census as follows:

Population Class Population Class

100,000 and above I 10,000 – 19,999 IV

50,000 – 99,999 II 5,000 – 9,999 V

20,000 – 49,999 III Below - 5,000 VI

The following abbreviations are used to denote the Civic Status of the town.

Civic Status Codes Civic Status Codes


i-Municipal Corporation M.Corp. xii – Notified Town Area NTA
ii-Municipal Committee MC xiii – Industrial Notified Area INA
iii-Municipal Council M Cl xiv – Industrial Township ITS
iv-City Municipal Council CMC xv – Township TS

87
v-Town Municipal Council TMC xvi – Town Panchayat TP
vi- Municipal Board MB xvii – Nagar Panchayat NP
Vii –Municipality M xviii – Town Committee/ Town TC
Area Committee
viii- Cantonment CB xix – Small Town Committee ST
Board/Cantonment
ix- Notified Area NA xx – Estate Office EO
x –Notified Town NT xxi –Gram Panchayat GP
xi - Notified Area Committee/ NAC xxii – Census Town CT
Notified Area Council

Column 3 - 25: - These columns are self explanatory

Statement II: - Physical Aspects and Location of town, 2009.

Column 1 - 2 Serial number and Name of town: - Self explanatory

Columns 3 to 5 - Physical Aspects:-In these columns the Rainfall and Maximum and
Minimum Temperature of the town is recorded.

Columns 6 to 12:- Name and road distance of the town (in kms.) from the State headquarters,
District headquarters, Sub-divisional/Taluk/Tahsil/ Police station/Development Block/Island
HQ., Nearest city with population of one lakh and more, Nearest city with population of five
lakh and more, Railway station and Bus route is recorded in these columns respectively. If
the names mentioned in these columns are the same as the referent town itself, the distance is
recorded as (0) zero.

Statement III – Civic and other Amenities, 2009:-

Column 1 - 2 Serial number and Name of town: - Self explanatory

Column 3 – Road length (in km.):- The information about the road length (in km.) within the
limit of the town is recorded in this column.

Columns 4 to 7- System of drainage: - The system of drainage available in the town is


indicated in these columns by the following codes:

System of drainage Codes

Open drains OD

Closed drains CD

Both drains BD

Columns 8 to 11-Number of latrines: - The number of various types of latrines available in


the town is indicated in these columns.

88
Columns No. 12 & 13 – Protected water supply: - The information on source of water supply
and system of water storage with capacity available in the town are given in these columns in
the following codes:

Column 12 (Source of water supply):-

(i) Tap water T


(ii) Tube-well water TW
(iii) Tank Water TK
(iv) Well water W

Column 13 (System of water storage):-

(i) Over Head Tank OHT


(ii) Service Reservoir SR
(iii) River Infiltration Gallery RIG
(iv) Bore Well Pumping System BWP
(v) Pressure Tank PT

The information on 2 major source of water supply is given in column 12 and the system of
water storage with capacity against each in kilo-litres (in bracket) is presented in column 13.

Columns 14 Fire Fighting Service: - In case the fire fighting service is available in the
referent town, `yes’ is recorded. If the facility is not available within the town, the name of
the nearest place having this facility with its distance from the referent town has been
recorded.

Columns 15 to 19- Electrification (Number of connections):-Different types of electric


connections have been shown in these columns, i.e., Domestic, Industrial, Commercial, Road
lighting (points) & others.

Statement IV: Medical Facilities, 2009:-

Columns 1 - 2 Serial number and Name of town: - Self explanatory

Columns 3 to 13 :- The number of various medical institutions such as Hospitals,


Dispensaries, Health Center, Family Welfare Center, Maternity and Child Welfare Center,
Maternity Homes, T.B. Hospital/clinic, Nursing Homes, Charitable Hospital/Nursing Home,
Mobile Health Clinic and Others as available in the town, are indicated in these columns
(along with number of beds in brackets).

If a medical facility is not available in the town, the name of the nearest place and its distance
in kilometers from the town where the facility is available is mentioned.

Column 14 - Veterinary Hospital:-The Number of Veterinary Hospitals available in the town


is given in this column.

89
Column 15 - Medicine Shop:-The number of Medicine shops available in the town is given in
this column.

Statement V: Educational, Recreational and Cultural Facilities, 2009:-

Columns 1 - 2 Serial number and Name of town: - Self explanatory

Columns 3 to 15 Educational Facilities:- The information on number of Primary school,


Middle school, Secondary school, Senior Secondary school, Arts/Science/ Commerce
colleges (of degree level and above), Medical colleges, Engineering colleges, Management
Institute/Colleges, Polytechnics, Recognized Shorthand, Typewriting and vocational training
Institutions, Non-formal Education Center (Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan Center), Special School
for disabled and Others available in the town, are indicated in these columns.

If an educational facility is not available in the town, the name of the nearest place and its
distance in kilometers from the town where the facility is available is mentioned.

Columns 16 to 23 – Number of Social, Recreational and Culture Facilities :- The information


on No. of Home Orphanage, Working women’s hostels (with No. of seats in bracket), No. of
Old Age Home, Stadium, Cinema Theatre, Auditorium/Community halls, Public libraries and
Reading rooms available in the town are given under these column.

Statement VI: Industry and Banking 2009:-

Columns 1 - 2 Serial number and Name of town: - Self explanatory

Columns 3 to 5 - Names of three most important commodities manufactured:-The names of


three most important commodities manufactured in the town are given under these columns.

Columns 6 to 8 - Number of banks: - The number of banks available in the referent town both
Commercial and Co-operative banks are recorded against these columns.

Columns 9 & 10 – Number of Agricultural and Non Agricultural Credit Societies: - The
number of Agricultural and Non Agricultural Credit Societies available in the referent town
are given in these columns.

Statement VII: Civic and other Amenities in Slums, 2009:-

This statement VII provides information on civic and other amenities in all slums whether
notified or not and for all towns having statutory bodies, like Municipality, Municipal
Corporation, Town area committee etc.

90
Section I - Village Directory

91
92
(a) List of Villages merged in towns and outgrowths at 2011 Census.

Name of village 2011 Census location code No. Name of town/outgrowth 2011

Daultabad(53) OG(Fully)
Garhi Harsaru(46) Census Town
Ghata(81) OG(Fully)
Manesar(154) CT Census Town
Naya Behram Pur (OG) OG(Fully)
Bhondsi (168) (CT) 062989 Census Town
Badshahpur(87) 062838 Census Town
Bhrempur(80) OG(Part)

93
94
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Alphabetical list of Villages (C.D. block wise)
Name of the District: Gurgaon
Sl. Name of village 2011 Census location code 2001 Census location code
No. number number
1 2 3 4
Name of CD Block: Pataudi
Name of Sub-Dist: Pataudi
1 Ahmdpur(270) 062776 00583000
2 Bahmanwas(10) 062747 00580100
3 Balewa(271) 062777 00583100
4 Bapas(266) 062771 00582500
5 Barheri Rehnwa(261) 062756 00581000
6 Bas Padamka (41) 062798 00585200
7 Bastpur(25) 062784 00583800
8 Bhogpuri(269) 062778 00583200
9 Bir Khurd(42) 062800 00585400
10 Brijpura(18) 062755 00580900
11 Chhawan(2) 062765 00581900
12 Chhilarki(14) 062753 00580700
13 Dadawas(20) 062757 00581100
14 Darapur(288) 062788 00584200
15 Daultabad(28) 062779 00583300
16 Dewlawas(5) 062763 00581700
17 Gadaipur(30) 062780 00583400
18 Gagli(267) 062770 00582400
19 Ghilnawas(273) 062774 00582800
20 Ghudana(9) 062748 00580200
21 Goriawas(33) 062792 00584600
22 Haliaki(13) 062745 00579900
23 Hansaka(35) 062790 00584400
24 Haqdarpur(19) 062758 00581200
25 Hera Heri(36) 062794 00584800
26 Husainka(15) 062749 00580300
27 Inchhapuri(264) 062760 00581400
28 Jasat(17) 062754 00580800
29 Khalilpur(272) 062773 00582700
30 Khanpur(34) 062793 00584700
31 Khetiawas(268) 062772 00582600
32 Khor(32) 062767 00582100
33 Lohaka(39) 062795 00584900
34 Lohchap(26) 062785 00583900
35 Lokra(289) 062789 00584300
36 Lokri(287) 062786 00584000
37 Mangwaki(11) 062746 00580000

97
Sl. Name of village 2011 Census location code 2001 Census location code
No. number number
1 2 3 4
Name of CD Block: Pataudi
Name of Sub-Dist: Pataudi
38 Mao(297) 062787 00584100
39 Mehaniawas(22) 062775 00582900
40 Milakpur(3) 062761 00581500
41 Mirzapur(4) 062762 00581600
42 Mozamabad (21) 062769 00582300
43 Mubarikpur(6) 062764 00581800
44 Mumtajpur(38) 062796 00585000
45 Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 062751 00580500
46 Nanu Khurd(29) 062782 00583600
47 Nanukalan(27) 062791 00584500
48 Narhera(44) 062803 00585700
49 Nurgarh(12) 062744 00579800
50 Pahari(265) 062768 00582200
51 Rajpura(8) 062750 00580400
52 Rampur(45) 062802 00585600
53 Ransika(31) 062766 00582000
54 Said Shahpur(24) 062783 00583700
55 Sapedar Nagar(37) 062799 00585300
56 Shahpur Jat(263) 062759 00581300
57 Sherpur(16) 062752 00580600
58 Telpuri(23) 062781 00583500
59 Turkapur(40) 062797 00585100
60 Uncha Majra(43) 062801 00585500
Name of CD Block: Pataudi
Name of Sub-Dist: Farrukhnagar
1 Tatarpur(27) 062842 00587800
2 Bahora Kalan(134) 062839 00585800
3 Fakharpur(133) 062840 00587600
Name of CD Block: Pataudi
Name of Sub-Dist: Manesar
1 Bahora Khurd(136) 062891 00586000
2 Bhudka(142) 062897 00586600
3 Bhun Karka(137) 062892 00586100
4 Bilaspur(146) 062901 00587000
5 Binola(147) 062902 00587100
6 Chandla Dungerwas(148) 062903 00587200
7 Danokri(141) 062896 00586500
8 Fazalwas(149) 062905 00587400
9 Gwaliar(150) 062904 00587300

98
Sl. Name of village 2011 Census location code 2001 Census location code
No. number number
1 2 3 4
Name of CD Block: Pataudi
Name of Sub-Dist: Manesar
10 Kukrola(151) 062906 00587500
11 Langra(145) 062900 00586900
12 Nurpur Bahora(135) 062890 00585900
13 Pathrari(143) 062898 00586700
14 Prasoli(138) 062893 00586200
15 Rathiwas(140) 062895 00586400
16 Sidhrawali(139) 062894 00586300
17 Udepuri(144) 062842 00586800

99
Census of India 2011-
Amenities and Land
Name of District:-Gurgaon
Name of CD Block:-Pataudi
Number of educational amenities

Total area of the village ( in hectares rounded up to one decimal place)


available. (If not available within the
village , the distance range code viz; a
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+
kms of nearest place where facility is
available is given).

Degree college of arts science & commerce (ASC)


Number of households (2011 census)
Total population ( 2011 census )

Senior Secondary school (SS)

Management institute (MI)


Engineering college(EC)
Pre-Primary school (PP)

Medical college (MC)


Secondary School (S)
Primary school (P)
Middle school (M)
Location code no.
Name of Village
Serial Number

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
1 Nurgarh(12) 062744 480 1822 384 a 1 1 1 1 b c c c
2 Haliaki(13) 062745 177 810 156 1 2 2 2 2 b c c c
3 Mangwaki(11) 062746 190 675 128 1 2 2 2 2 b c c c
4 Bahmanwas(10) 062747 88 339 73 1 2 2 2 2 b c c c
5 Ghudana(9) 062748 263 2075 416 1 2 2 b b b c c c
6 Husainka(15) 062749 186 1079 202 1 2 a b a b c c c
7 Rajpura(8) 062750 342 999 212 a 1 a a a a c c c
8 Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 062751 282 1464 311 b 1 a a a b c c c
9 Sherpur(16) 062752 437 2207 422 1 2 2 2 2 b c c c
10 Chhilarki(14) 062753 236 772 157 a 1 1 1 a b c c c
11 Jasat(17) 062754 359 1177 212 1 2 1 1 1 b c c c
12 Brijpura(18) 062755 178 554 113 1 2 1 1 1 c c c c
13 Barheri Rehnwa(261) 062756 274 939 193 1 2 a a a c c c c
14 Dadawas(20) 062757 172 824 163 1 2 1 1 a b c c c
15 Haqdarpur(19) 062758 304 1334 240 1 2 2 2 2 b c c c
16 Shahpur Jat(263) 062759 176 988 174 1 2 2 1 a b c c c
17 Inchhapuri(264) 062760 304 1831 368 a 1 1 a a b c c c
18 Milakpur(3) 062761 174 912 178 b 1 1 1 b b c c c
19 Mirzapur(4) 062762 149 1355 269 a 1 1 1 a a c c c
20 Dewlawas(5) 062763 81 391 82 b 1 b b b b c c c
21 Mubarikpur(6) 062764 55 Uninhabited
22 Chhawan(2) 062765 254 808 159 b 1 1 a b b c c b
23 Ransika(31) 062766 138 973 169 b 1 a a a b c c c

100
Village Directory
use (As in 2009)
Location CodeNo:-086
Location CodeNo:-0105
Number of Medical Amenities available. (If not
available within the village , the distance range
code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for
10+ kms of nearest place where facility is available
is given).

Maternity and child welfare centre (MCW)

Hospital-alternative medicine (HO)


Non-formal training centre (NFTC)
Special school for disabled (SSD)

Community health centre (CHC)

Primary health sub centre (PHS)


Vocational training school /ITI

Family welfare centre (FWC)


Primary health centre (PHC)

Mobile health clinic (MHC)


Veterinary hospital (VH)
Hospital-allopathic (HA)
T.B. clinic (TBC)

Name of Village
Polytechnic (Pt)

Others (specify)

Dispensary (D)

Serial Number
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2 1
c c c c c b 1 b c c c c c c c Nurgarh(12) 1
c c c c c b b b c c c c b c c Haliaki(13) 2
c c c c c b b b b c c c 1 c c Mangwaki(11) 3
c c c c c b b b b c c c c c c Bahmanwas(10) 4
c c c c c b 1 b c c c c c c c Ghudana(9) 5
c c c c c b b b b c c c c c c Husainka(15) 6
c b c a b a a a c c c c b c b Rajpura(8) 7
c b c a b 1 b b c c c c b b b Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 8
c c b b c b 1 b b c c c c c c Sherpur(16) 9
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Chhilarki(14) 10
c c b c c b 1 b b c c c c c c Jasat(17) 11
c c c c b c b b b c c c b c c Brijpura(18) 12
c c c c c c c c c c c c b c c Barheri Rehnwa(261) 13
c a c c b b a a c c 1 1 a c a Dadawas(20) 14
c c c c c b c c c c c c b c c Haqdarpur(19) 15
c a c c b a a a b c c c a c b Shahpur Jat(263) 16
c a c c b b a a a c c c a c a Inchhapuri(264) 17
c c c c c b b b c c c c a c c Milakpur(3) 18
c c c c b a a b b c c c b c c Mirzapur(4) 19
c c c c c b b b b c c c b c c Dewlawas(5) 20
Uninhabited Mubarikpur(6) 21
c b c c c a a a a c c c a c c Chhawan(2) 22
c c c c b b b b b c c c b c c Ransika(31) 23

101
Number of Non- Availability of drinking water - Availability of
Government Medical Yes / No toilet & others Yes
Amenities available. / No

Community bio- gas or recycle of waste for productive use.


Rural manitary mart or sanitary hardware outlet available near the village.
Charitable non Govt. hospital/Nursing home.

(Covered / Uncovered well)


Traditional practitioner and faith healer .
Medical practitioner with MBBS Degree
Medical practitioner with other degree
Medical practitioner with no degree

Community toilet including bath.


Community toilet excluding bath.
Tap water (Treated/Untreated)

Tube wells / Bore well

Tank / Pond / Lake


Name of Village

Medicine Shop
Serial Number

River / Canal
Hand Pump
Well water
Others

Others
Spring

1 2 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
1 Nurgarh(12) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
2 Haliaki(13) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
3 Mangwaki(11) 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
4 Bahmanwas(10) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
5 Ghudana(9) 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
6 Husainka(15) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
7 Rajpura(8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
8 Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
9 Sherpur(16) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
10 Chhilarki(14) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
11 Jasat(17) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
12 Brijpura(18) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
13 Barheri Rehnwa(261) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
14 Dadawas(20) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
15 Haqdarpur(19) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
16 Shahpur Jat(263) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
17 Inchhapuri(264) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
18 Milakpur(3) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
19 Mirzapur(4) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
20 Dewlawas(5) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
21 Mubarikpur(6) Uninhabited
22 Chhawan(2) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
23 Ransika(31) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No

102
Communication and transport facilities (If amenities available code -Yes
is given except for Village Pin Code ,If not available within the village , the
distance range code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms
of nearest place where facility is available is given).

Cycle-pulled rickshaws(Manual & Machine driven)


Internet cafes/ Common service centre (CSC)
Post & Telegraph office (P&TO)

Bus service (Public & Private)


(Land lines)
Public call office (PCO)

Carts driven by animals


Sea /River ferry service
Mobile phone coverage

Private courier facility


Sub post office (SPO)

Auto/Modified Autos
Village Pin Code

Name of Village
Railway stations

Taxis and Vans


Post office(PO)

Serial Number
Telephones

Tractors

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 2 1
Yes Yes 123504 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes b b Yes Nurgarh(12) 1
c Yes 122504 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes c Yes Yes c c Yes Haliaki(13) 2
c Yes 123504 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes c c Yes c c Yes Mangwaki(11) 3
c Yes 123504 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes c Yes Yes c c Yes Bahmanwas(10) 4
c Yes 123502 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes b b Yes Ghudana(9) 5
b Yes 123502 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes b b Yes Husainka(15) 6
a a 123502 Yes Yes Yes a a Yes a a a Yes c Yes Rajpura(8) 7
b a 123502 b b Yes b b Yes a b b Yes b Yes Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 8
b Yes 123502 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes a b Yes b b Yes Sherpur(16) 9
c c 123504 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes a a a a a Yes Chhilarki(14) 10
c Yes 123502 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b b b b b Yes Jasat(17) 11
Yes c 123502 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes b b b b b Yes Brijpura(18) 12
b Yes 123502 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes b b b b b Yes Barheri Rehnwa(261) 13
a a 123502 b b Yes b b Yes b b b b b Yes Dadawas(20) 14
Yes b 123502 Yes Yes Yes b a Yes b b b b b Yes Haqdarpur(19) 15
b a 123502 b b Yes b b Yes a b b b c Yes Shahpur Jat(263) 16
a Yes 123414 b b Yes b b Yes Yes b b Yes c Yes Inchhapuri(264) 17
b b 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes a b b Yes b Yes Milakpur(3) 18
b Yes 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes a b b b b Yes Mirzapur(4) 19
b Yes 123414 b b Yes b b Yes b b b b b Yes Dewlawas(5) 20
Uninhabited Mubarikpur(6) 21
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes a a Yes b a a Yes c Yes Chhawan(2) 22
Yes b 123103 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes b b Yes Ransika(31) 23

103
Village connected to highways,village roads, banks & credit
societies (If amenities available code -Yes is given, If not
available within the village , the distance range code viz; a
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest
place where facility is available is given).

Connected to major district road (MDR)

Water bounded macadam(WBM) roads

Navigable waterway (river/canal)(NW)

Public distribution system (PDS) shop


Connected to national highway(NH)

Commercial & Co-operative Banks


Connected to others district road
Connected to state highway(SH)

Agricultural Credit Societies

Mandis / Regular market


Self-Help Group (SHG)
Name of Village

Kutchcha roads
Serial Number

Footpaths (FP)
Pucca roads

ATM
1 2 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82
1 Nurgarh(12) c b c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
2 Haliaki(13) c b c c Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes Yes b
3 Mangwaki(11) c b c b Yes Yes a Yes b b b Yes Yes b
4 Bahmanwas(10) c b c a Yes Yes a Yes b b b Yes Yes b
5 Ghudana(9) c b c b Yes Yes a Yes b b b Yes Yes c
6 Husainka(15) c b c a Yes Yes a Yes b b b Yes Yes b
7 Rajpura(8) c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes a a a Yes a a
8 Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) c b b Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b a Yes b b
9 Sherpur(16) c b b c Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes Yes b
10 Chhilarki(14) c a c a Yes a b Yes c c c Yes b b
11 Jasat(17) c c c a Yes Yes c Yes c c c Yes Yes c
12 Brijpura(18) c c c b Yes Yes c Yes c c c Yes Yes b
13 Barheri Rehnwa(261) c c c c Yes Yes c Yes c b c Yes Yes c
14 Dadawas(20) c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes b b
15 Haqdarpur(19) c b b b Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes Yes b
16 Shahpur Jat(263) c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes b b
17 Inchhapuri(264) c Yes Yes Yes Yes a a Yes b b b Yes b b
18 Milakpur(3) c a b c Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes Yes b
19 Mirzapur(4) c a b c Yes Yes c Yes a a b Yes Yes b
20 Dewlawas(5) c a b c Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes b b
21 Mubarikpur(6) Uninhabited
22 Chhawan(2) c a Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes a a a Yes Yes a
23 Ransika(31) c a b a Yes Yes a Yes b b b Yes Yes b

104
Availability of miscellaneous facilities (If amenities available code -Yes is
given, If not available within the village , the distance range code viz; a for
< 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest place where facility
is available is given).
Integrated Child Development Scheme (Nutritional Centres)

ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist)


Anganwadi Centre (Nutritional Centres)

Community centre with/without TV

Birth & Death Registration Office


Sports Club / Recreation Centre
Agricultural marketing society

Others (Nutritional Centres)

Assembly Polling station


Public Reading Room
Cinema / Video Hall

Newspaper Supply

Name of Village

Serial Number
Public Library
Weekly Haat

Sports Field,

83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 2 1
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b c c c c Yes Yes b Nurgarh(12) 1
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes b Haliaki(13) 2
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Mangwaki(11) 3
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Bahmanwas(10) 4
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Ghudana(9) 5
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Husainka(15) 6
c a Yes Yes Yes Yes a Yes c c c c Yes Yes a Rajpura(8) 7
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes b b c c c c Yes Yes Yes Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 8
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Sherpur(16) 9
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Chhilarki(14) 10
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Jasat(17) 11
b c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Brijpura(18) 12
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Barheri Rehnwa(261) 13
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes c c b b Yes a b Dadawas(20) 14
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes b Haqdarpur(19) 15
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes c c b b Yes b a Shahpur Jat(263) 16
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes c c b b Yes Yes b Inchhapuri(264) 17
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Milakpur(3) 18
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Mirzapur(4) 19
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Dewlawas(5) 20
Uninhabited Mubarikpur(6) 21
c a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c Yes a a Chhawan(2) 22
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes b Ransika(31) 23

105
Availability of Land
electricity Nearest Town Area under different types of land use (
(Yes/No) in hectares rounded up to one decimal
place)

Distance range code i.e. a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10

Permanent Pastures and Other Grazing Lands

Land Under Miscellaneous Tree Crops etc.


Power Supply for Agricultural Use (EAG)
Power Supply for Commercial Use (EC)

Fallow lands other than current fallows


Power Supply for Domestic Use (ED)

Area under Non-agricultural Uses


Power Supply for All Uses (EA)

Barren and Un-cultivable land


Kms and c for 10+ kms .

Culturable Waste Land


Name of Village
Serial Number

Forests
Name

1 2 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110
1 Nurgarh(12) Yes Yes Yes Yes HAELYMANDI b 0 56 7 0 0 0 0
2 Haliaki(13) Yes Yes Yes Yes HAELYMANDI b 1 17 5 0 0 0 0
3 Mangwaki(11) Yes Yes Yes Yes HAELYMANDI b 0 20 2 0 0 0 0
4 Bahmanwas(10) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI b 1 9 0 0 0 0 0
5 Ghudana(9) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI b 0 29 10 0 0 0 0
6 Husainka(15) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI b 0 35 0 0 0 0 0
7 Rajpura(8) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI a 6 23 0 0 0 1 0
8 Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI b 3 39 0 0 0 0 0
9 Sherpur(16) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 5 49 1 0 0 0 0
10 Chhilarki(14) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 2 24 6 0 0 0 0
11 Jasat(17) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 5 28 5 0 0 0 0
12 Brijpura(18) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 16 5 0 0 0 0
13 Barheri Rehnwa(261) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 30 0 0 0 0 0
14 Dadawas(20) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 22 0 0 0 1 0
15 Haqdarpur(19) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 10 35 0 0 0 0
16 Shahpur Jat(263) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI a 0 37 0 3 0 0 0
17 Inchhapuri(264) Yes Yes Yes Yes HALEYMANDI b 9 41 0 0 0 4 0
18 Milakpur(3) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 22 0 0 0 0 0
19 Mirzapur(4) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 17 0 0 0 0 0 0
20 Dewlawas(5) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 10 0 0 0 0 0 0
21 Mubarikpur(6) 0 4 0 0 0 0 0
22 Chhawan(2) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 12 44 0 0 0 9 0
23 Ransika(31) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 16 0 0 0 0 0

106
Name of three most important
Use
commodities manufactured
Area irrigated by source (in
hectare).
Total Un-irrigated Land Area

Wells/Tube-wells(W/TW)
Total Irrigated Land Area

Tanks/Lakes(T/L)
Water Falls(WF)
Current Fallows

Net Area Sown

Canals ( C )

Name of Village

Serial Number
Others(O)

Second

Third
First

111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 2 1

0 417 417 0 0 417 0 0 0 Nurgarh(12) 1

0 154 154 0 0 154 0 0 0 Haliaki(13) 2

0 168 168 0 0 168 0 0 0 Mangwaki(11) 3

0 78 78 0 0 78 0 0 0 Bahmanwas(10) 4

0 224 224 0 0 224 0 0 0 Ghudana(9) 5

0 151 151 0 0 151 0 0 0 Husainka(15) 6

0 312 280 32 0 280 0 0 0 Rajpura(8) 7

1 239 177 62 0 177 0 0 0 Muzaphara Alias Mandpura(262) 8

0 382 382 0 0 382 0 0 0 Sherpur(16) 9

0 204 204 0 0 204 0 0 0 Chhilarki(14) 10

0 321 321 0 0 321 0 0 0 Brick Klin Jasat(17) 11

0 157 157 0 0 157 0 0 0 Brijpura(18) 12

0 244 244 0 0 244 0 0 0 Atta Chakki Barheri Rehnwa(261) 13

0 149 149 0 0 149 0 0 0 Dadawas(20) 14

0 259 259 0 0 259 0 0 0 Haqdarpur(19) 15

0 136 129 7 0 129 0 0 0 Shahpur Jat(263) 16

0 250 241 9 0 241 0 0 0 Inchhapuri(264) 17

0 152 152 0 0 152 0 0 0 Milakpur(3) 18

0 132 132 0 0 132 0 0 0 Mirzapur(4) 19

0 71 71 0 0 71 0 0 0 Dewlawas(5) 20

0 51 51 0 0 51 0 0 0 Mubarikpur(6) 21

0 189 189 0 0 189 0 0 0 Chhawan(2) 22

0 122 122 0 0 122 0 0 0 Ransika(31) 23

107
Number of educational amenities

Total area of the village ( in hectares rounded up to one decimal place)


available. (If not available within the
village , the distance range code viz; a
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+
kms of nearest place where facility is
available is given).

Degree college of arts science & commerce (ASC)


Number of households (2011 census)
Total population ( 2011 census )

Senior Secondary school (SS)

Management institute (MI)


Engineering college(EC)
Pre-Primary school (PP)

Medical college (MC)


Secondary School (S)
Primary school (P)
Middle school (M)
Location code no.
Name of Village
Serial Number

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
24 Khor(32) 062767 555 4933 888 3 4 4 4 4 b c c c
25 Pahari(265) 062768 297 2160 410 a 1 1 1 b b c c c
26 Mozamabad (21) 062769 170 1211 234 a 1 1 a a b c c c
27 Gagli(267) 062770 80 Uninhabited
28 Bapas(266) 062771 231 1609 316 a 1 1 1 a c c c c
29 Khetiawas(268) 062772 206 1291 239 a 1 1 a a c c c c
30 Khalilpur(272) 062773 236 1716 376 a 1 1 1 1 c c c c
31 Ghilnawas(273) 062774 170 651 129 a 1 a a a c c c c
32 Mehaniawas(22) 062775 165 628 127 a 1 1 1 a c c c c
33 Ahmdpur(270) 062776 182 Uninhabited
34 Balewa(271) 062777 72 2409 470 a 1 1 1 a c c c c
35 Bhogpuri(269) 062778 98 Uninhabited
36 Daultabad(28) 062779 174 1288 237 3 6 4 1 1 c c c c
37 Gadaipur(30) 062780 174 1056 205 1 2 2 1 1 c c c c
38 Telpuri(23) 062781 148 793 152 b 1 b b b c c c c
39 Nanu Khurd(29) 062782 229 1036 190 a 1 a a a c c c c
40 Said Shahpur(24) 062783 203 365 63 a 1 1 a a c c c c
41 Bastpur(25) 062784 148 806 161 b 1 2 b b c c c c
42 Lohchap(26) 062785 194 1442 301 b 1 a a b c c c c
43 Lokri(287) 062786 385 2402 406 a 2 2 2 b c c c c
44 Mao(297) 062787 614 2265 362 1 2 2 2 b c c c c
45 Darapur(288) 062788 164 1203 236 b 1 a a b c c c c
46 Lokra(289) 062789 341 2093 422 a 1 1 1 b a c c c
47 Hansaka(35) 062790 251 Uninhabited
48 Nanukalan(27) 062791 469 4095 765 a 1 1 1 b c c c c
49 Goriawas(33) 062792 123 509 101 a 1 a a a c c c c
50 Khanpur(34) 062793 161 745 171 a 1 a a a b c c b
51 Hera Heri(36) 062794 277 947 177 a 1 a a a b c c c

108
Number of Medical Amenities available. (If not
available within the village , the distance range
code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for
10+ kms of nearest place where facility is available
is given).

Maternity and child welfare centre (MCW)

Hospital-alternative medicine (HO)


Non-formal training centre (NFTC)
Special school for disabled (SSD)

Community health centre (CHC)

Primary health sub centre (PHS)


Vocational training school /ITI

Family welfare centre (FWC)


Primary health centre (PHC)

Mobile health clinic (MHC)


Veterinary hospital (VH)
Hospital-allopathic (HA)
T.B. clinic (TBC)

Name of Village
Polytechnic (Pt)

Others (specify)

Dispensary (D)

Serial Number
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2 1
c c c c b b b b c c c c 1 c c Khor(32) 24
c a c c b b a a c c c c a c b Pahari(265) 25
c 1 c c b b 1 1 c c c c 1 c b Mozamabad (21) 26
Uninhabited Gagli(267) 27
c c c c b b b b b c c c b c c Bapas(266) 28
c c c c c c c c c c c c b c c Khetiawas(268) 29
c c c c c b 1 b b c c c b c c Khalilpur(272) 30
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Ghilnawas(273) 31
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Mehaniawas(22) 32
Uninhabited Ahmdpur(270) 33
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Balewa(271) 34
Uninhabited Bhogpuri(269) 35
c c c c c 1 1 1 b c 1 1 1 c c Daultabad(28) 36
c c c c b b 1 b c c b c b c b Gadaipur(30) 37
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Telpuri(23) 38
c c c c b b b 1 c c a b b b b Nanu Khurd(29) 39
c c c c b b b b b b b c b b b Said Shahpur(24) 40
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Bastpur(25) 41
c c c c c c c c c c c c c c Lohchap(26) 42
c c c c c b 1 b c c b b b c b Lokri(287) 43
c c c c c b b b c c b b b b b Mao(297) 44
c c c c c b b b c b c c b c Darapur(288) 45
c b c c c b 1 1 b c c b b c Lokra(289) 46
Uninhabited Hansaka(35) 47
c c c c b b 1 1 c c 1 1 b b b Nanukalan(27) 48
c c c c b b b b c c b b b b b Goriawas(33) 49
c b c c c b b b b c c b a c b Khanpur(34) 50
c c c c c b b b b c c b b c Hera Heri(36) 51

109
Number of Non- Availability of drinking water - Availability of
Government Medical Yes / No toilet & others Yes
Amenities available. / No

Community bio- gas or recycle of waste for productive use.


Rural manitary mart or sanitary hardware outlet available near the village.
Charitable non Govt. hospital/Nursing home.

(Covered / Uncovered well)


Traditional practitioner and faith healer .
Medical practitioner with MBBS Degree
Medical practitioner with other degree
Medical practitioner with no degree

Community toilet including bath.


Community toilet excluding bath.
Tap water (Treated/Untreated)

Tube wells / Bore well

Tank / Pond / Lake


Name of Village

Medicine Shop
Serial Number

River / Canal
Hand Pump
Well water
Others

Others
Spring
1 2 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
24 Khor(32) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
25 Pahari(265) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
26 Mozamabad (21) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
27 Gagli(267) Uninhabited
28 Bapas(266) 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
29 Khetiawas(268) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
30 Khalilpur(272) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
31 Ghilnawas(273) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
32 Mehaniawas(22) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
33 Ahmdpur(270) Uninhabited
34 Balewa(271) 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
35 Bhogpuri(269) Uninhabited
36 Daultabad(28) 2 0 5 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
37 Gadaipur(30) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
38 Telpuri(23) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
39 Nanu Khurd(29) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
40 Said Shahpur(24) 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
41 Bastpur(25) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
42 Lohchap(26) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No Yes Yes No
43 Lokri(287) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
44 Mao(297) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
45 Darapur(288) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
46 Lokra(289) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No Yes No
47 Hansaka(35) Uninhabited
48 Nanukalan(27) 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
49 Goriawas(33) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
50 Khanpur(34) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
51 Hera Heri(36) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No Yes No No No

110
Communication and transport facilities (If amenities available code -Yes
is given except for Village Pin Code ,If not available within the village , the
distance range code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms
of nearest place where facility is available is given).

Cycle-pulled rickshaws(Manual & Machine driven)


Internet cafes/ Common service centre (CSC)
Post & Telegraph office (P&TO)

Bus service (Public & Private)


(Land lines)
Public call office (PCO)

Carts driven by animals


Sea /River ferry service
Mobile phone coverage

Private courier facility


Sub post office (SPO)

Auto/Modified Autos
Village Pin Code

Name of Village
Railway stations

Taxis and Vans


Post office(PO)

Serial Number
Telephones

Tractors

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 2 1
b Yes 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes a Yes Yes b b Yes Khor(32) 24
b Yes 123502 b b Yes b b Yes a b b Yes c Yes Pahari(265) 25
a a 123502 Yes b Yes b b Yes a b b Yes c Yes Mozamabad (21) 26
Uninhabited Gagli(267) 27
a a 123502 Yes Yes Yes b Yes Yes a a Yes b b Yes Bapas(266) 28
c a 123502 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes a a Yes c c Yes Khetiawas(268) 29
Yes Yes 123502 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes Khalilpur(272) 30
c a 123502 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes a a Yes a a Yes Ghilnawas(273) 31
c a 123502 Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes a a Yes a a Yes Mehaniawas(22) 32
Uninhabited Ahmdpur(270) 33
c a 123502 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes a a Yes a c Yes Balewa(271) 34
Uninhabited Bhogpuri(269) 35
Yes b 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes b b Yes Daultabad(28) 36
b a 123502 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes a b Yes a Yes Yes Gadaipur(30) 37
a a 123414 Yes a Yes c c Yes b a a Yes Yes Yes Telpuri(23) 38
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b b Yes Yes Yes Yes Nanu Khurd(29) 39
Yes Yes 123414 Yes a Yes b b Yes b a a c Yes Yes Said Shahpur(24) 40
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes b c Yes Yes Yes Yes Bastpur(25) 41
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes b b c Yes c Yes Lohchap(26) 42
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes c b Yes Yes b Yes Lokri(287) 43
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes c b b Yes b Yes Mao(297) 44
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes c Yes Yes Yes c Yes Darapur(288) 45
a a 123414 Yes b Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Lokra(289) 46
Uninhabited Hansaka(35) 47
Yes b 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Nanukalan(27) 48
a a 123414 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes a a a Yes Yes Yes Goriawas(33) 49
b b 123103 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Khanpur(34) 50
b a 123414 Yes b Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Hera Heri(36) 51

111
Village connected to highways,village roads, banks & credit
societies (If amenities available code -Yes is given, If not
available within the village , the distance range code viz; a
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest
place where facility is available is given).

Connected to major district road (MDR)

Water bounded macadam(WBM) roads

Navigable waterway (river/canal)(NW)

Public distribution system (PDS) shop


Connected to national highway(NH)

Commercial & Co-operative Banks


Connected to others district road
Connected to state highway(SH)

Agricultural Credit Societies

Mandis / Regular market


Self-Help Group (SHG)
Name of Village

Kutchcha roads
Serial Number

Footpaths (FP)
Pucca roads

ATM
1 2 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82
24 Khor(32) c Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
25 Pahari(265) c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
26 Mozamabad (21) c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes b b
27 Gagli(267) Uninhabited
28 Bapas(266) c b b a Yes Yes Yes Yes b b c Yes Yes c
29 Khetiawas(268) c c c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b c b Yes Yes c
30 Khalilpur(272) c b b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
31 Ghilnawas(273) c c c a Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c Yes Yes c
32 Mehaniawas(22) c c c a Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c Yes Yes c
33 Ahmdpur(270) Uninhabited
34 Balewa(271) c c c a Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c Yes Yes c
35 Bhogpuri(269) Uninhabited
36 Daultabad(28) b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c c Yes Yes c
37 Gadaipur(30) c b Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
38 Telpuri(23) b b a a Yes Yes Yes Yes c c a Yes Yes c
39 Nanu Khurd(29) c b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes c
40 Said Shahpur(24) b b a a Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
41 Bastpur(25) c b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c Yes Yes c
42 Lohchap(26) c b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c Yes Yes c
43 Lokri(287) a b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes c
44 Mao(297) a b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes c
45 Darapur(288) b b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes c
46 Lokra(289) c b b Yes Yes b c Yes a b a Yes Yes c
47 Hansaka(35) Uninhabited
48 Nanukalan(27) b b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b Yes Yes Yes Yes
49 Goriawas(33) c c a a Yes Yes Yes Yes b b a Yes Yes a
50 Khanpur(34) c b a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
51 Hera Heri(36) c b b Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b b Yes Yes b

112
Availability of miscellaneous facilities (If amenities available code -Yes is
given, If not available within the village , the distance range code viz; a for
< 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest place where facility
is available is given).
Integrated Child Development Scheme (Nutritional Centres)

ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist)


Anganwadi Centre (Nutritional Centres)

Community centre with/without TV

Birth & Death Registration Office


Sports Club / Recreation Centre
Agricultural marketing society

Others (Nutritional Centres)

Assembly Polling station


Public Reading Room
Cinema / Video Hall

Newspaper Supply

Name of Village

Serial Number
Public Library
Weekly Haat

Sports Field,

83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 2 1
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Khor(32) 24
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes c c b b Yes Yes b Pahari(265) 25
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes c c b b Yes Yes b Mozamabad (21) 26
Uninhabited Gagli(267) 27
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Bapas(266) 28
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Khetiawas(268) 29
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b c c c c Yes Yes b Khalilpur(272) 30
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Ghilnawas(273) 31
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Mehaniawas(22) 32
Uninhabited Ahmdpur(270) 33
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes c Balewa(271) 34
Uninhabited Bhogpuri(269) 35
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c Yes Yes Yes Daultabad(28) 36
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Gadaipur(30) 37
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes a c Telpuri(23) 38
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes b Nanu Khurd(29) 39
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes a b Said Shahpur(24) 40
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c Yes Yes Yes c Bastpur(25) 41
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Lohchap(26) 42
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Lokri(287) 43
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Mao(297) 44
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Darapur(288) 45
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Lokra(289) 46
Uninhabited Hansaka(35) 47
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Nanukalan(27) 48
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes a b Goriawas(33) 49
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c Yes Yes b Khanpur(34) 50
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c Yes a b Hera Heri(36) 51

113
Availability of Land
electricity Nearest Town Area under different types of land use (
(Yes/No) in hectares rounded up to one decimal
place)

Distance range code i.e. a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10

Permanent Pastures and Other Grazing Lands

Land Under Miscellaneous Tree Crops etc.


Power Supply for Agricultural Use (EAG)
Power Supply for Commercial Use (EC)

Fallow lands other than current fallows


Power Supply for Domestic Use (ED)

Area under Non-agricultural Uses


Power Supply for All Uses (EA)

Barren and Un-cultivable land


Kms and c for 10+ kms .

Culturable Waste Land


Name of Village
Serial Number

Forests
Name

1 2 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110
24 Khor(32) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 80 0 0 2 0 0
25 Pahari(265) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 6 64 0 0 0 6 0
26 Mozamabad (21) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 31 0 0 0 0 0
27 Gagli(267) 0 7 0 0 0 0 0
28 Bapas(266) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 29 0 0 0 0 0
29 Khetiawas(268) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 30 0 0 0 0 0
30 Khalilpur(272) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 42 0 0 0 2 0
31 Ghilnawas(273) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 24 0 0 0 4 0
32 Mehaniawas(22) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 18 0 0 0 3 0
33 Ahmdpur(270) 0 11 0 0 0 3 0
34 Balewa(271) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 23 0 0 0 0 0
35 Bhogpuri(269) 0 6 0 0 0 0 0
36 Daultabad(28) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 60 0 0 0 0 0
37 Gadaipur(30) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 18 0 0 0 0 0
38 Telpuri(23) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 2 10 0 0 0 0 0
39 Nanu Khurd(29) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 3 18 0 0 0 0 0
40 Said Shahpur(24) Yes Yes Yes Yes 0PATAUDI b 2 18 0 0 0 0 0
41 Bastpur(25) Yes Yes Yes Yes P;ATAUDI c 0 10 0 0 0 0 0
42 Lohchap(26) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 23 0 0 0 0 0
43 Lokri(287) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 35 0 0 0 0 0
44 Mao(297) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 73 0 0 0 0 0
45 Darapur(288) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 22 0 0 0 0 0
46 Lokra(289) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 35 6 0 0 0 0
47 Hansaka(35) 3 7 0 0 0 0 0
48 Nanukalan(27) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 56 0 0 5 0 0
49 Goriawas(33) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 2 12 0 0 0 0 0
50 Khanpur(34) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 6 13 0 0 0 0 0
51 Hera Heri(36) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 10 19 23 0 0 0 0

114
Name of three most important
Use
commodities manufactured
Area irrigated by source (in
hectare).

Total Un-irrigated Land Area

Wells/Tube-wells(W/TW)
Total Irrigated Land Area

Tanks/Lakes(T/L)
Water Falls(WF)
Current Fallows

Net Area Sown

Canals ( C )

Name of Village

Serial Number
Others(O)

Second

Third
First

111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 2 1

0 473 473 0 0 473 0 0 0 Khor(32) 24

0 221 213 8 0 213 0 0 0 Pahari(265) 25

0 139 138 1 0 138 0 0 0 Atta Chakki Mozamabad (21) 26

0 73 73 0 0 73 0 0 0 Gagli(267) 27

0 202 202 0 0 202 0 0 0 Oil Mill Bapas(266) 28

0 176 176 0 0 176 0 0 0 Khetiawas(268) 29

0 192 192 0 0 192 0 0 0 Khalilpur(272) 30

0 142 142 0 0 142 0 0 0 Ghilnawas(273) 31

0 144 144 0 0 144 0 0 0 Mehaniawas(22) 32

0 168 168 0 0 168 0 0 0 Ahmdpur(270) 33

0 49 49 0 0 49 0 0 0 Balewa(271) 34

0 92 92 0 0 92 0 0 0 Bhogpuri(269) 35

0 114 114 0 0 114 0 0 0 Daultabad(28) 36

0 156 156 0 0 156 0 0 0 Atta Chakki Gadaipur(30) 37

0 136 136 0 0 136 0 0 0 Telpuri(23) 38

0 208 208 0 0 208 0 0 0 Nanu Khurd(29) 39

0 183 183 0 0 183 0 0 0 Said Shahpur(24) 40

0 138 138 0 0 138 0 0 0 Bastpur(25) 41

0 171 171 0 0 171 0 0 0 Lohchap(26) 42

0 350 350 0 0 350 0 0 0 Lokri(287) 43

0 541 541 0 0 541 0 0 0 Mao(297) 44

0 142 142 0 0 142 0 0 0 Darapur(288) 45

0 300 300 0 0 300 0 0 0 Lokra(289) 46

0 241 241 0 0 241 0 0 0 Hansaka(35) 47

0 408 408 0 0 408 0 0 0 Nanukalan(27) 48

0 109 109 0 0 109 0 0 0 Goriawas(33) 49

0 142 142 0 0 142 0 0 0 Khanpur(34) 50

0 225 225 0 0 225 0 0 0 Hera Heri(36) 51

115
Number of educational amenities

Total area of the village ( in hectares rounded up to one decimal place)


available. (If not available within the
village , the distance range code viz; a
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+
kms of nearest place where facility is
available is given).

Degree college of arts science & commerce (ASC)


Number of households (2011 census)
Total population ( 2011 census )

Senior Secondary school (SS)

Management institute (MI)


Engineering college(EC)
Pre-Primary school (PP)

Medical college (MC)


Secondary School (S)
Primary school (P)
Middle school (M)
Location code no.
Name of Village
Serial Number

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
52 Lohaka(39) 062795 38 Uninhabited
53 Mumtajpur(38) 062796 208 1315 268 1 2 2 1 1 b c c c
54 Turkapur(40) 062797 153 884 173 1 2 1 1 1 b c c c
55 Bas Padamka (41) 062798 376 3338 651 a 1 1 1 2 b b b b
56 Sapedar Nagar(37) 062799 102 207 34 a 1 a a a b c c a
57 Bir Khurd(42) 062800 121 Uninhabited
58 Uncha Majra(43) 062801 378 3857 689 a 1 1 1 a b b b b
59 Rampur(45) 062802 609 2692 521 a 1 1 a a b c c c
60 Narhera(44) 062803 960 4414 867 a 1 1 a a b b c b
61 Bahora Kalan(134) 062839 2630 18961 3413 12 19 13 10 4 c 1 c 1
62 Fakharpur(133) 062840 227 1688 295 1 1 1 1 b c c c c
63 Tatarpur(27) 062842 311 1479 254 b 1 b b b c c c c
64 Nurpur Bahora(135) 062890 172 1223 218 b 1 b b b b b c b
65 Bahora Khurd(136) 062891 566 1942 324 a 2 a a a a a c a
66 Bhun Karka(137) 062892 254 1268 231 b 1 1 a a b b c c
67 Prasoli(138) 062893 173 1504 295 b 1 a a b b b c b
68 Sidhrawali(139) 062894 811 5506 1073 1 5 4 4 4 2 b c b
69 Rathiwas(140) 062895 483 3502 600 a 1 1 1 a a b c b
70 Danokri(141) 062896 292 957 155 a 1 a a a a b c b
71 Bhudka(142) 062897 272 1493 272 1 1 a a a a b c b
72 Pathrari(143) 062898 915 5014 884 1 3 3 2 1 b 1 c c
73 Udepuri(144) 062899 143 31 6 c a a a a c a c b
74 Langra(145) 062900 256 1377 241 a 1 1 a a b a c b
75 Bilaspur(146) 062901 586 3392 572 1 1 1 1 a a 2 c 2
76 Binola(147) 062902 338 834 201 b 2 1 1 1 b a c c
77 Chandla Dungerwas(148) 062903 281 1997 392 c 1 a a a b b c b
78 Gwaliar(150) 062904 617 1259 240 1 2 a a a b a c a
79 Fazalwas(149) 062905 189 1866 349 3 4 4 4 1 b a c a

116
Number of Medical Amenities available. (If not
available within the village , the distance range
code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for
10+ kms of nearest place where facility is available
is given).

Maternity and child welfare centre (MCW)

Hospital-alternative medicine (HO)


Non-formal training centre (NFTC)
Special school for disabled (SSD)

Community health centre (CHC)

Primary health sub centre (PHS)


Vocational training school /ITI

Family welfare centre (FWC)


Primary health centre (PHC)

Mobile health clinic (MHC)


Veterinary hospital (VH)
Hospital-allopathic (HA)
T.B. clinic (TBC)

Name of Village
Polytechnic (Pt)

Others (specify)

Dispensary (D)

Serial Number
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2 1
Uninhabited Lohaka(39) 52
c b c c c a a a a c c a a c a Mumtajpur(38) 53
c b c c c b b b b c c b b c Turkapur(40) 54
c c c c a a a a c c c c a c a Bas Padamka (41) 55
c b c c c a a a a c c a a c a Sapedar Nagar(37) 56
Uninhabited Bir Khurd(42) 57
c c c c a a a c c c c c a b a Uncha Majra(43) 58
c c c c c a a a c c a a a a a Rampur(45) 59
c c c c a a a a c c a a a a a Narhera(44) 60
c c c c b 1 1 1 b b b b 1 b c Bahora Kalan(134) 61
b c c c c c c c c c c c b c c Fakharpur(133) 62
b c c c c c c c c c c c b c c Tatarpur(27) 63
c c c c c b b b c c c c b c c Nurpur Bahora(135) 64
b b b c b a a a a c b c a c c Bahora Khurd(136) 65
c c c c c b b b c c c c b c b Bhun Karka(137) 66
c b b c c b b b c c c c b c c Prasoli(138) 67
c b b c c b 1 b c c c c a c c Sidhrawali(139) 68
c c c c c b 1 b c c c c a c c Rathiwas(140) 69
c c c c c a a c c c b c a c c Danokri(141) 70
c c c c c b a b c c c c a c c Bhudka(142) 71
c c c c c b 1 b c c b c 1 c c Pathrari(143) 72
c c c c c b b b c c c c a c c Udepuri(144) 73
c c c c c b a a a c c b a c c Langra(145) 74
c c c c c a a a c c b c a c c Bilaspur(146) 75
b c c c c a b a c c c c b c c Binola(147) 76
b c c c c b b a c c b c a c c Chandla Dungerwas(148) 77
b c c c c c b a c c c c a c c Gwaliar(150) 78
b c c c c c b c c c c b a c c Fazalwas(149) 79

117
Number of Non- Availability of drinking water - Availability of
Government Medical Yes / No toilet & others Yes
Amenities available. / No

Community bio- gas or recycle of waste for productive use.


Rural manitary mart or sanitary hardware outlet available near the village.
Charitable non Govt. hospital/Nursing home.

(Covered / Uncovered well)


Traditional practitioner and faith healer .
Medical practitioner with MBBS Degree
Medical practitioner with other degree
Medical practitioner with no degree

Community toilet including bath.


Community toilet excluding bath.
Tap water (Treated/Untreated)

Tube wells / Bore well

Tank / Pond / Lake


Name of Village

Medicine Shop
Serial Number

River / Canal
Hand Pump
Well water
Others

Others
Spring
1 2 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
52 Lohaka(39) Uninhabited
53 Mumtajpur(38) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
54 Turkapur(40) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
55 Bas Padamka (41) 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
56 Sapedar Nagar(37) 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
57 Bir Khurd(42) Uninhabited
58 Uncha Majra(43) 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
59 Rampur(45) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
60 Narhera(44) 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 Yes No Yes Yes No No No No No No No No
61 Bahora Kalan(134) 1 4 1 5 2 1 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
62 Fakharpur(133) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
63 Tatarpur(27) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
64 Nurpur Bahora(135) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
65 Bahora Khurd(136) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
66 Bhun Karka(137) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
67 Prasoli(138) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
68 Sidhrawali(139) 0 3 3 0 0 1 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
69 Rathiwas(140) 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
70 Danokri(141) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
71 Bhudka(142) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
72 Pathrari(143) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
73 Udepuri(144) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
74 Langra(145) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
75 Bilaspur(146) 0 2 2 2 0 1 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
76 Binola(147) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
77 Chandla Dungerwas(148) 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
78 Gwaliar(150) 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No
79 Fazalwas(149) 0 1 0 8 0 4 0 Yes No Yes No No No No No No No No No

118
Communication and transport facilities (If amenities available code -Yes
is given except for Village Pin Code ,If not available within the village , the
distance range code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms
of nearest place where facility is available is given).

Cycle-pulled rickshaws(Manual & Machine driven)


Internet cafes/ Common service centre (CSC)
Post & Telegraph office (P&TO)

Bus service (Public & Private)


(Land lines)
Public call office (PCO)

Carts driven by animals


Sea /River ferry service
Mobile phone coverage

Private courier facility


Sub post office (SPO)

Auto/Modified Autos
Village Pin Code

Name of Village
Railway stations

Taxis and Vans


Post office(PO)

Serial Number
Telephones

Tractors

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 2 1
Uninhabited Lohaka(39) 52
a a 123003 Yes a Yes a b Yes b a a Yes c Yes Mumtajpur(38) 53
b a 123003 Yes b Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Turkapur(40) 54
Yes a 123003 Yes c Yes a a Yes a a a Yes Yes Yes Bas Padamka (41) 55
a a 123003 Yes a Yes a b Yes b a a Yes c Yes Sapedar Nagar(37) 56
Uninhabited Bir Khurd(42) 57
a Yes 123003 Yes c Yes Yes a Yes b a a Yes Yes Yes Uncha Majra(43) 58
a a 123003 Yes Yes Yes a a Yes a a Yes Yes Yes Yes Rampur(45) 59
Yes a 123003 Yes Yes Yes a a Yes b a a Yes a Yes Narhera(44) 60
Yes Yes 123413 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Bahora Kalan(134) 61
c a 123413 Yes Yes Yes b a Yes c Yes Yes Yes a Yes Fakharpur(133) 62
b a 123502 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes c Yes Yes Yes c Yes Tatarpur(27) 63
c b 123413 b b Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Nurpur Bahora(135) 64
b a 123413 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes c b b Yes c Yes Bahora Khurd(136) 65
b a 123003 b b Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Bhun Karka(137) 66
c b 123003 b b Yes b b Yes b b b Yes c Yes Prasoli(138) 67
b Yes 123413 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes c b b Yes c Yes Sidhrawali(139) 68
a a 122105 Yes b Yes b b Yes c Yes Yes Yes c Yes Rathiwas(140) 69
a a 123413 Yes b Yes b b Yes c a b Yes c Yes Danokri(141) 70
b b 123413 Yes b Yes b b Yes c a b Yes b Yes Bhudka(142) 71
c Yes 123413 a Yes Yes b b Yes c Yes Yes Yes c Yes Pathrari(143) 72
b a 122105 b a Yes b b Yes c a a a c a Udepuri(144) 73
a a 123413 a Yes Yes a Yes Yes c b b Yes c Yes Langra(145) 74
b a 123413 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes c Yes Yes Yes c Yes Bilaspur(146) 75
c b 123413 a a Yes a a Yes c c a Yes c Yes Binola(147) 76
c Yes 123413 Yes b Yes b b Yes c c a c c Yes Chandla Dungerwas(148) 77
c a 123413 Yes Yes Yes b b Yes c b Yes Yes c Yes Gwaliar(150) 78
c a 123413 Yes Yes Yes c c Yes c Yes Yes Yes c Yes Fazalwas(149) 79

119
Village connected to highways,village roads, banks & credit
societies (If amenities available code -Yes is given, If not
available within the village , the distance range code viz; a
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest
place where facility is available is given).

Connected to major district road (MDR)

Water bounded macadam(WBM) roads

Navigable waterway (river/canal)(NW)

Public distribution system (PDS) shop


Connected to national highway(NH)

Commercial & Co-operative Banks


Connected to others district road
Connected to state highway(SH)

Agricultural Credit Societies

Mandis / Regular market


Self-Help Group (SHG)
Name of Village

Kutchcha roads
Serial Number

Footpaths (FP)
Pucca roads

ATM
1 2 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82
52 Lohaka(39) Uninhabited
53 Mumtajpur(38) b a a Yes Yes Yes c Yes a a c Yes Yes a
54 Turkapur(40) a b a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes b
55 Bas Padamka (41) b a b c c c Yes Yes a a a Yes Yes a
56 Sapedar Nagar(37) c a a Yes Yes Yes c Yes a a a Yes b a
57 Bir Khurd(42) Uninhabited
58 Uncha Majra(43) b b c c Yes Yes Yes Yes a a a Yes Yes a
59 Rampur(45) c a a a Yes Yes a Yes a a a Yes Yes a
60 Narhera(44) b a a a Yes Yes Yes Yes a a a Yes Yes Yes
61 Bahora Kalan(134) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes
62 Fakharpur(133) a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b c b Yes Yes c
63 Tatarpur(27) a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b c b Yes Yes c
64 Nurpur Bahora(135) b a a Yes Yes Yes a Yes b b b Yes a b
65 Bahora Khurd(136) Yes a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes a a a Yes a b
66 Bhun Karka(137) b b b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes a c
67 Prasoli(138) a b a Yes Yes Yes a Yes a b b Yes b b
68 Sidhrawali(139) Yes b Yes c Yes Yes a Yes a a a Yes b b
69 Rathiwas(140) Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b Yes Yes b
70 Danokri(141) a b b Yes b Yes Yes Yes a b b Yes Yes b
71 Bhudka(142) a b b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes a b b Yes b b
72 Pathrari(143) b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes Yes b
73 Udepuri(144) b a Yes Yes a Yes a Yes b b b Yes b b
74 Langra(145) b a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes a a b Yes Yes a
75 Bilaspur(146) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c a
76 Binola(147) Yes a Yes Yes Yes Yes a Yes a a a Yes Yes c
77 Chandla Dungerwas(148) a a Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b a Yes Yes c
78 Gwaliar(150) a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes b b a Yes Yes c
79 Fazalwas(149) Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes a a a Yes Yes c

120
Availability of miscellaneous facilities (If amenities available code -Yes is
given, If not available within the village , the distance range code viz; a for
< 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest place where facility
is available is given).
Integrated Child Development Scheme (Nutritional Centres)

ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist)


Anganwadi Centre (Nutritional Centres)

Community centre with/without TV

Birth & Death Registration Office


Sports Club / Recreation Centre
Agricultural marketing society

Others (Nutritional Centres)

Assembly Polling station


Public Reading Room
Cinema / Video Hall

Newspaper Supply

Name of Village

Serial Number
Public Library
Weekly Haat

Sports Field,

83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 2 1
Uninhabited Lohaka(39) 52
c a Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Mumtajpur(38) 53
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Turkapur(40) 54
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Bas Padamka (41) 55
a a Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c Yes Yes a Sapedar Nagar(37) 56
Uninhabited Bir Khurd(42) 57
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Uncha Majra(43) 58
a a Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Rampur(45) 59
Yes b Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Narhera(44) 60
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b Yes Yes Yes Bahora Kalan(134) 61
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Fakharpur(133) 62
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes c Tatarpur(27) 63
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b c c c c Yes Yes b Nurpur Bahora(135) 64
b b Yes Yes Yes Yes c a c c c c Yes Yes a Bahora Khurd(136) 65
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c a c c c c Yes b b Bhun Karka(137) 66
b c Yes Yes Yes Yes c b b c c c Yes Yes b Prasoli(138) 67
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes b Yes b b b b Yes Yes b Sidhrawali(139) 68
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes b Rathiwas(140) 69
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Danokri(141) 70
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c a b c c c Yes Yes b Bhudka(142) 71
c b Yes Yes Yes Yes b b b c c c Yes Yes b Pathrari(143) 72
c b c Yes Yes Yes b a c c c c Yes b b Udepuri(144) 73
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes b b a c c c Yes Yes b Langra(145) 74
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c a c c c c Yes Yes a Bilaspur(146) 75
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes a Binola(147) 76
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c c c c c c Yes Yes b Chandla Dungerwas(148) 77
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c Yes c c c c Yes Yes c Gwaliar(150) 78
c c Yes Yes Yes Yes c a c c c c Yes Yes c Fazalwas(149) 79

121
Availability of Land
electricity Nearest Town Area under different types of land use (
(Yes/No) in hectares rounded up to one decimal
place)

Distance range code i.e. a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10

Permanent Pastures and Other Grazing Lands

Land Under Miscellaneous Tree Crops etc.


Power Supply for Agricultural Use (EAG)
Power Supply for Commercial Use (EC)

Fallow lands other than current fallows


Power Supply for Domestic Use (ED)

Area under Non-agricultural Uses


Power Supply for All Uses (EA)

Barren and Un-cultivable land


Kms and c for 10+ kms .

Culturable Waste Land


Name of Village
Serial Number

Forests
Name

1 2 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110
52 Lohaka(39) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
53 Mumtajpur(38) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 2 21 1 0 0 0 0
54 Turkapur(40) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 2 15 0 0 0 0 0
55 Bas Padamka (41) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 76 0 0 0 0 0
56 Sapedar Nagar(37) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 1 7 0 0 0 0 0
57 Bir Khurd(42) 0 35 0 0 0 0 0
58 Uncha Majra(43) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI a 0 78 0 0 0 0 0
59 Rampur(45) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI a 4 0 55 5 5 0 0
60 Narhera(44) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI a 0 100 0 0 0 0 0
61 Bahora Kalan(134) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI b 0 182 0 0 0 3 0
62 Fakharpur(133) Yes Yes Yes Yes FARRUKHNAGAR c 0 21 0 0 0 4 0
63 Tatarpur(27) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATAUDI c 0 19 0 0 0 0 0
64 Nurpur Bahora(135) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 12 0 0 0 2 0
65 Bahora Khurd(136) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 48 0 0 0 22 0
66 Bhun Karka(137) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 45 0 0 0 1 0
67 Prasoli(138) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 12 0 0 0 3 0
68 Sidhrawali(139) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATODI b 0 74 0 0 0 0 2
69 Rathiwas(140) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATODI c 0 25 0 0 0 3 0
70 Danokri(141) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATODI c 0 41 0 0 0 0 0
71 Bhudka(142) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATODI c 0 16 0 0 0 4 0
72 Pathrari(143) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATODI c 0 48 0 0 0 1 0
73 Udepuri(144) Yes Yes Yes Yes TAORU c 0 6 0 0 0 0 0
74 Langra(145) Yes Yes Yes Yes TAORU b 0 13 0 0 0 5 0
75 Bilaspur(146) Yes Yes Yes Yes PATODI c 0 40 0 0 0 5 0
76 Binola(147) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 51 0 0 0 24 0
77 Chandla Dungerwas(148) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 32 0 0 0 1 0
78 Gwaliar(150) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 235 0 0 0 108 0
79 Fazalwas(149) Yes Yes Yes Yes GURGAON c 0 25 0 0 0 16 0

122
Name of three most important
Use
commodities manufactured
Area irrigated by source (in
hectare).

Total Un-irrigated Land Area

Wells/Tube-wells(W/TW)
Total Irrigated Land Area

Tanks/Lakes(T/L)
Water Falls(WF)
Current Fallows

Net Area Sown

Canals ( C )

Name of Village

Serial Number
Others(O)

Second

Third
First

111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 2 1

0 38 38 0 0 38 0 0 0 Lohaka(39) 52

0 184 184 0 0 184 0 0 0 Mumtajpur(38) 53

0 136 136 0 0 136 0 0 0 Turkapur(40) 54

0 300 300 0 0 300 0 0 0 Bas Padamka (41) 55

0 94 94 0 0 94 0 0 0 Sapedar Nagar(37) 56

0 86 86 0 0 86 0 0 0 Bir Khurd(42) 57

0 300 300 0 0 300 0 0 0 Uncha Majra(43) 58

0 540 540 0 0 540 0 0 0 Rampur(45) 59

0 860 860 0 0 860 0 0 0 Narhera(44) 60

0 2445 2393 52 0 2393 0 0 0 Bahora Kalan(134) 61

0 202 202 0 0 202 0 0 0 Fakharpur(133) 62

0 292 292 0 0 292 0 0 0 Tatarpur(27) 63

0 158 158 0 0 158 0 0 0 Nurpur Bahora(135) 64

0 496 496 0 0 496 0 0 0 Bahora Khurd(136) 65

0 208 208 0 0 208 0 0 0 Bhun Karka(137) 66

0 158 158 0 0 158 0 0 0 Prasoli(138) 67

0 735 735 0 0 735 0 0 0 Sidhrawali(139) 68

0 455 455 0 0 455 0 0 0 Rathiwas(140) 69

0 251 251 0 0 251 0 0 0 Danokri(141) 70

0 252 202 50 0 202 0 0 0 Bhudka(142) 71

0 866 850 16 0 850 0 0 0 Pathrari(143) 72

0 137 135 2 0 135 0 0 0 Udepuri(144) 73

0 238 237 1 0 237 0 0 0 Langra(145) 74

0 541 526 15 0 526 0 0 0 Bilaspur(146) 75

0 263 261 2 0 261 0 0 0 Binola(147) 76

0 248 247 1 0 247 0 0 0 Chandla Dungerwas(148) 77

0 274 238 36 0 238 0 0 0 Gwaliar(150) 78

0 148 143 5 0 143 0 0 0 Atta Chakki Oil Mill Fazalwas(149) 79

123
1
Serial Number

Block T O T A L :
80 Kukrola(151)
2
Name of Village

Location code no.

3
062906
Total area of the village ( in hectares rounded up to one decimal place)

4
308
24585
5
Total population ( 2011 census )

1819
135800

124
Number of households (2011 census)

6
315
25452
1
7

44
Pre-Primary school (PP)
1
8

127
a
Primary school (P)
9

86
Middle school (M)
a
63
10

Secondary School (S)


a
35
11

Senior Secondary school (SS)


2
b
12

Degree college of arts science & commerce (ASC)


available is given).

a
4
13

Engineering college(EC)
0
c
14

Medical college (MC)


Number of educational amenities
available. (If not available within the

kms of nearest place where facility is

3
c
village , the distance range code viz; a

15

Management institute (MI)


for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+
0
b
16
Polytechnic (Pt)

1
c
17
Vocational training school /ITI

0
c
18
Non-formal training centre (NFTC)

0
c
19
Special school for disabled (SSD)

0
20
Others (specify)

0
c
21
Community health centre (CHC)

3
c
22
Primary health centre (PHC)
is given).

1
16
23
Primary health sub centre (PHS)

6
c
24
Maternity and child welfare centre (MCW)

0
c
25
T.B. clinic (TBC)

125
0
c
26
Hospital-allopathic (HA)

3
c
27
Hospital-alternative medicine (HO)

3
b
28
Dispensary (D)

a
6
29
Veterinary hospital (VH)

0
c
30
available within the village , the distance range

Mobile health clinic (MHC)


Number of Medical Amenities available. (If not

0
c
code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for

31
10+ kms of nearest place where facility is available

Family welfare centre (FWC)


2

Name of Village
Kukrola(151)
1
80

Serial Number
1
Serial Number

Block T O T A L :
80 Kukrola(151)
2
Name of Village

4
0
32
Charitable non Govt. hospital/Nursing home.

0
13
33
Medical practitioner with MBBS Degree

1
23
34
Medical practitioner with other degree

0
51
35
Medical practitioner with no degree

3
0
36
Traditional practitioner and faith healer .
Number of Non-

1
10
37
Medicine Shop
Amenities available.
Government Medical

0
0
38
Others

126
73
39
Tap water (Treated/Untreated)

0
40
Well water (Covered / Uncovered well)

73
41
Hand Pump

20
42
Tube wells / Bore well

0
43

Spring
Yes / No

0
44

River / Canal
0
45

Tank / Pond / Lake


0
46

Others
Yes No Yes No No No No No
1
47
No

Community toilet including bath.


1
48
No

Community toilet excluding bath.


/ No

2
49

Rural manitary mart or sanitary hardware outlet available near the village.
No
Availability of drinking water - Availability of

0
50

Community bio- gas or recycle of waste for productive use.


No
toilet & others Yes
c
11
51
Post office(PO)

22
52
Yes
Sub post office (SPO)

0
53
Post & Telegraph office (P&TO)

73
54
Village Pin Code

60
55
Telephones (Land lines)

48
56
Public call office (PCO)

73
57
Mobile phone coverage

123505 Yes Yes Yes


3
b
58
Internet cafes/ Common service centre (CSC)

3
b
59
Private courier facility

73
60
Bus service (Public & Private)

Yes
2
c
of nearest place where facility is available is given).

61
Railway stations

c
18
62
Auto/Modified Autos

127
32
63
Taxis and Vans

Yes
b
44
64
Tractors

c
11
65
Cycle-pulled rickshaws(Manual & Machine driven)

72
66
Carts driven by animals

Yes
Communication and transport facilities (If amenities available code -Yes

distance range code viz; a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms
is given except for Village Pin Code ,If not available within the village , the

0
67
Sea /River ferry service
2

Name of Village
Kukrola(151)
1
80

Serial Number
1
Serial Number

Block T O T A L :
80 Kukrola(151)
2
Name of Village

8
68
Yes
Connected to national highway(NH)

15
69
Yes
Connected to state highway(SH)

24
70
Yes
Connected to major district road (MDR)

37
71
Yes
Connected to others district road

70
72
Yes
Pucca roads

69
73
Yes
Kutchcha roads

128
38
74
Yes
Water bounded macadam(WBM) roads

0
75
Navigable waterway (river/canal)(NW)
place where facility is available is given).

73
76
Yes
5 Footpaths (FP)
b
77

Commercial & Co-operative Banks


2
b
78

ATM
for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest
societies (If amenities available code -Yes is given, If not
Village connected to highways,village roads, banks & credit

4
available within the village , the distance range code viz; a

79
Yes

Agricultural Credit Societies


73
80
Yes

Self-Help Group (SHG)


56
81
Yes

Public distribution system (PDS) shop


c
3
82

Mandis / Regular market


c
1
83
Weekly Haat

c
0
84
Agricultural marketing society

72
85
Integrated Child Development Scheme (Nutritional Centres)

Yes
73
86
Yes
Anganwadi Centre (Nutritional Centres)

73
87
Yes
Others (Nutritional Centres)

73
88
Yes
ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist)

c
7
89
Community centre with/without TV

c
17
90
Sports Field,

c
1
91
Sports Club / Recreation Centre
is available is given).

c
0
92
Cinema / Video Hall

c
0
93
Public Library

129
c
1
94
Public Reading Room

73
95
Yes
Newspaper Supply

64
96
Yes
Assembly Polling station

c
3
Availability of miscellaneous facilities (If amenities available code -Yes is

97
given, If not available within the village , the distance range code viz; a for
< 5 Kms, b for 5-10 Kms and c for 10+ kms of nearest place where facility

2
Birth & Death Registration Office

Name of Village
Kukrola(151)
1
80

Serial Number
1
Serial Number

Block T O T A L :
80 Kukrola(151)
2
Name of Village

73
98
Power Supply for Domestic Use (ED)

73
99
Power Supply for Agricultural Use (EAG)

73
Power Supply for Commercial Use (EC)
(Yes/No)
electricity
Availability of

73
100 101
Yes Yes Yes Yes
Power Supply for All Uses (EA)
Name

0
102
GURGAON

130
Distance range code i.e. a for < 5 Kms, b for 5-10
Nearest Town

c
0
103
Kms and c for 10+ kms .

0
114
104
91 Forests
105

2733

Area under Non-agricultural Uses


0
161
106

Barren and Un-cultivable land


8
0
place)

Permanent Pastures and Other Grazing Lands


107
0
12
108

Land Under Miscellaneous Tree Crops etc.


7
242
109

Culturable Waste Land


2
0
in hectares rounded up to one decimal
Area under different types of land use (

110

Fallow lands other than current fallows


Land
1
0
111
Current Fallows Use

210
112

21312
Net Area Sown

189
113

20992
Total Irrigated Land Area

21
320
114
Total Un-irrigated Land Area

0
0
115
Canals ( C )

189
116

20992
Wells/Tube-wells(W/TW)

0
0
117
Tanks/Lakes(T/L)
hectare).

0
0
118
Water Falls(WF)

0
Area irrigated by source (in

119
Others(O)

131
120
First

121 Second
commodities manufactured
Name of three most important

Third
122

Kukrola(151)
2

Name of Village
1

Serial Number
80
i
INDIA

lh
E

To
lh

De
HARYANA

De
hi
el

To
D
813
L

To
C.D. BLOCK GURGAON
(PARTS OF TAHSIL GURGAON, TAHSIL MANESAR D ] !(
D
AND TAHSIL SOHNA) )

DISTRICT GURGAON 810


! !
KILOMETRES 812
2 1 0 2

8
811 !
645584

NH
DAULTABAD
062809
(O.G.)

H
)!]
816
! (

A R
817
GU RG AO N
PART OF C.D. BLOCK (M . C OR P. ) To Del hi
FARRUKHNAGAR
P 800429
SH 15A
B
(
] 818
RS
F ro m h n a g a r T !)
) (
D )!
k 821 ]

N A G
F a rr u (
819
Fr
o ]! GARHI

H
Sa m V
r b a i ll a 822 HARSARU
s ir g e
pu (C.T.)
r

K
062837
G
I

h
at 925
a N a la
823 820 !]
Fr ( RS 26
B!]
( 645585

SH 13
Fa om SH
rru GHATA

R U
kh
na
ga (O.G.) 926
r ( ]!

R
828 814
om ri (
D )! ]
F r ew a ) !B ( ! B
(
R 824 815 (
D!]
062927
825 ! !

F A
8
! 826 908
So

NH
om

!
Fr hna

om di 062907 909
AD

Fr tau
827 !
Pa )!]
] 910 O C K
RIC

S O
]! L H
911 N
! B
IDAB T

062921 A
BOUNDARY, STATE .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
R

(
D !]
.

" DISTRICT.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
DIST
A

L O C K
" TAHSIL.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
D
F

" C.D. BLOCK .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
913 917 " VILLAGE WIT H MDDS CODE ... ... ... 062809

B
MANESAR
.

(
D)
! (C.T.) ]! HEADQUARTERS: DISTRICT ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... P
( #
B !(
POPULATION SIZE OF VILL AGES: BELOW 200,
] 912 062924 ( ! ! ! !
C

200-499, 500-9 99, 1000-4999, 500 0 AND ABOVE ..

.
! URBAN AREA W ITH M DDS CODE ... ... ... ... ... ... 800429
914
! 062837
916 CENSUS TOW N W ITH MDDS CODE . ... ... ... ... ...

D
OUT GROW TH WITH MDDS CODE ... ... ... ... ... ... 645585
NATIONAL HIGHWAY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... NH 8

.
915 STAT E HIGHWAY... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... SH 26
om a ! IM PORTANT METAL LED ROADS .. ... ... ... ... ... ...

C
Fr uher RS
C.T. ... ... ... CENSUS TOWN ar RAILWAY LINE WIT H STATION, BROAD GAUGE...
h
DI
D S RIVER & STREAM ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
O.G. ... ... ... OUT GROWTH
C. D
. HIGH SCHOOL /SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL... ]
K
ME T RIC
C TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... T
)
U

District headquarters is also the


PAT BLOCK WA T
O
R

L T BANK ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... B
(
AUD
Tahsil/C.D. Block headquarters.
O

I .B DISPENSARY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... (
D
TA

D
C. PRIMARY HEALTH CENT RE.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... #
(
OT HER M EDICAL SERVICES ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... )
Alphabetical list of Villages (C.D. block wise)
Name of the District: Gurgaon
Sl. No. Name of village 2011 Census location code 2001 Census location code
number number
1 2 3 4
Name of CD Block: Gurgaon
Name of Sub-Dist: Gurgaon
1 Adampur(90) 062814 00595400
2 Babupur(60) 062812 00593500
3 Bajghera(61) 062813 00593900
4 Chandu(44) 062821 00597700
5 Dhankot(49) 062818 00597300
6 Dharampur(59) 062810 00593300
7 Dhorka(120) 062825 00598100
8 Ghasula(88) 062815 00595500
9 Gopalpur(47) 062819 00597400
10 Hamirpur(116) 062823 00597900
11 Harsaru(107) 062820 00597500
12 Hayatpur(114) 062828 00598600
13 Kankrola(128) 062827 00598300
14 Kharki Majra Dhankot(52) 062817 00597200
15 Mankrola(42) 062809 00593100
16 Meoka(121) 062826 00598200
17 Mohmadheri(58) 062811 00593400
18 Sadhrana(45) 062822 00597800
19 Tikampur(54) 062816 00597100
20 Wazirpur(115) 062824 00598000
Name of CD Block: Gurgaon
Name of Sub-Dist: Manesar
1 Badha(113) 062908 00598500
2 Bar Gujar(156) 062916 00599600
3 Kasan (129) 062912 00599100
4 Khoh(153) 062913 00599200
5 Lakhnola(110) 062910 00598900
6 Naharpur Kasan (111) 062911 00599000
7 Nainwal(155) 062915 00599500
8 Navrangpur(157) 062917 00599700
9 Nawada Fatehpur(112) 062907 00598400
10 Sehrawan(152) 062914 00599300
11 Sikanderpur Badha(109) 062909 00598800
12 Shikohpur(160) 062921 00607800
Name of CD Block: Gurgaon
Name of Sub-Dist:Sohna
1 Balola(78) 062926 00600900
2 Bandhwari(79) 062927 00601000
3 Gual Pahari(77) 062925 00600800

135
Census of India 2011-