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Structure and Detailed Syllabus

of the Undergraduate Course (B.Sc.) in Economics under CBCS
Department of Economics
Presidency University

Department of Economics
(Faculty of Natural and Mathematical Sciences)
Presidency University
Hindoo College (1817-1855), Presidency College (1855-2010)
86/1, College Street, Kolkata - 700 073
West Bengal, India

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY

Content
Topic Page No.
1. Introduction to Course Structure of Economics (Major) under CBCS 3
2. Semester-wise Modules of the Undergraduate Course in Economics (Major) & Generic Elective
4-5
Courses under CBCS
3. Credit Allocation and Marks Distribution for the Undergraduate Economics (Major) & Generic
6-7
Elective Courses
4. Detailed Syllabus and Suggested Reading List for respective Modules of CORE Courses 8 - 27
Introductory Microeconomics 8
Mathematical Methods In Economics - I 10
Introductory Macroeconomics 11
Mathematical Methods in Economics - II 12
Intermediate Microeconomics - I 13
Intermediate Macroeconomics - I 14
Statistical Methods for Economics 15
Intermediate Microeconomics - II 17
Intermediate Macroeconomics - II 18
Introductory Econometrics 19
Indian Economy I 21
Development Economics I 23
Indian Economy II 24
Development Economics II 26
5. Detailed Syllabus and Suggested Reading List for respective Modules of Discipline Specific
28 - 30
Elective (DSE) Courses [Group – I]
Applied Econometrics 28
Game Theory and Information Economics 29
Public Economics 30
6. Detailed Syllabus and Suggested Reading List for respective Modules of Discipline Specific
31 - 35
Elective (DSE) Courses [Group – II]
International Economics 31
Financial Economics 33
Environmental Economics 34
7. Detailed Syllabus and Suggested Reading List for respective Modules of Skill Enhancement
36 - 38
Courses (SEC)
Data Management and Presentation Using Microsoft Excel and R 36
Analyzing Contemporary Economic Issues 38
8. Detailed Syllabus and Suggested Reading List for respective Modules of Generic Elective Courses
39 - 47
in Economics
Introductory Microeconomics 39
Introductory Macroeconomics 41
Indian Economy I 42
Money and Banking 44
Indian Economy II 45
Public Finance 47

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DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY

Course Structure: There are a total of fourteen economics core courses that students are required to take across six
semesters. All the core courses are compulsory. In addition to core courses in economics, a student of B.Sc. (Hons.)
Economics will choose four Discipline Specific Elective (DSE) Courses. The Discipline Specific Elective (DSE) Courses
are offered in the fifth and sixth semesters and two such courses will be selected by a student from a set of courses
specified for each of these semesters (Groups I and II in the attached table).

Contact Hours: Each course has 5 lectures and 1 tutorial (per group) or 4 lectures and 4 practical classes per week.

Note on Course Readings: The nature of several of the courses is such that only selected readings can be specified in
advance. Reading lists will be updated and topic-wise readings should be specified at regular intervals, ideally on an
annual basis.

Academic Session: Each Semester shall contain at least 16 Teaching Weeks
Odd Semesters: Semesters One and Three - July to December
Even Semesters: Semesters Two and Four - January to June

Credit Structure
COURSE TYPE CREDITS
Total Papers Theory + Practical Theory + Tutorial
Core Courses 14 14x4 + 14x2 = 84 14x5 + 14x1= 84
Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2x4=8 2x4=8
Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4x4 + 4x2 = 24 4x5 + 4x1 = 24
Ability Enhancement Compulsory 1 1x4 = 4 1x4 = 4
Language Course
Ability Enhancement Compulsory 1 1x4 = 4 1x4 = 4
Environmental Science Course
Generic Elective Courses 4 4x4 + 4x2 = 24 4x5 + 4x1 = 24
Total 26 148 148

Total Marks Distribution
COURSE TYPE CREDITS
Total Papers Theory + Tutorial / Practical
Core Courses 14 14 x 100 = 1400
Skill Enhancement Courses 2 2 x 100 =200
Discipline Specific Elective Courses 4 4 x 100 = 400
Ability Enhancement Compulsory Language Course 1 1 x 100 = 100
Ability Enhancement Compulsory Environmental 1 1 x 100 = 100
Science Course
Generic Elective Courses 4 4 x 100 = 400
Total 26 2600

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DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY

Semester-wise Modules of the Undergraduate Course in Economics (Major) under CBCS

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER

Economics Core Course 1: ECON01C1 Economics Core Course 3: ECON02C3
Introductory Microeconomics [Credit 6] Introductory Macroeconomics [Credit 6]
Economics Core Course 2: ECON01C2 Economics Core Course 4: ECON02C4
Mathematical Methods for Economics-I [Credit 6] Mathematical Methods for Economics-II [Credit 6]

Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 1: AECC1 Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 2: AECC2
Environmental Science [Credit 4] English Communication /MIL [Credit 4]

Generic Elective (GE) Course-1 [Credit 6] Generic Elective (GE) Course-2 [Credit 6]

THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER

Economics Core Course 5: ECON03C5 Economics Core Course 8: ECON04C8
Intermediate Microeconomics-I [Credit 6] Intermediate Microeconomics-II [Credit 6]
Economics Core Course 6: ECON03C6 Economics Core Course 9: ECON04C9
Intermediate Macroeconomics-I [Credit 6] Intermediate Macroeconomics-II [Credit 6]
Economics Core Course 7: ECON03C7 Economics Core Course 10: ECON04C10
Statistical Methods for Economics [Credit 6] Introductory Econometrics [Credit 6]

Skill Enhancement Course 1: ECON03SEC1 Skill Enhancement Course 2: ECON04SEC2
Data management and presentation using Microsoft Analyzing contemporary economic issues [Credit 4]
Excel and R [Credit 4]

Generic Elective (GE) Course-3 [Credit 6] Generic Elective (GE) Course-4 [Credit 6]

FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER

Economics Core Course 11: ECON05C11 Economics Core Course 13: ECON06C13
Indian Economy-I Economics [Credit 6] Indian Economy-II [Credit 6]
Economics Core Course 12: ECON05C12 Economics Core Course 14: ECON06C14
Development Economics-I [Credit 6] Development Economics-II [Credit 6]

Discipline Specific Elective Course-I: ECON05DSE1 Discipline Specific Elective Course-III: ECON06DSE3
(From List of Group-I) [Credit 6] (From List of Group-II) [Credit 6]
Discipline Specific Elective Course-II: ECON05DSE2 Discipline Specific Elective Course-IV: ECON06DSE4
(From List of Group-I) [Credit 6] (From List of Group-II) [Credit 6]

Group-I (DSE1 and DSE2)
(A) Applied Econometrics
(B) Game Theory and Information Economics
(C) Public Economics

Group-II (DSE3 and DSE4)
(A) International Economics
(B) Financial Economics
(C) Environmental Economics

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DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Semester-wise Modules of the Undergraduate Generic Elective Courses in Economics under CBCS FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER Generic Elective in Economics 1: ECON01GE1 Generic Elective in Economics 2: ECON02GE2 Introductory Microeconomics [Credit 6] Introductory Macroeconomics [Credit 6] THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER Generic Elective in Economics 3: ECON03GE3 Generic Elective in Economics 4: ECON04GE4 (Select one from the following list) (Select one from the following list) ECON03GE3A: Indian Economy I [Credit 6] ECON04GE4A: Indian Economy II [Credit 6] ECON03GE3B: Money and Banking [Credit 6] ECON04GE4B: Public Finance [Credit 6] -5-|Page .

Credit Allocation and Marks Distribution for the Undergraduate Course in Economics (Major) under CBCS Credits Marks Sem Course Type Paper Code Course Name Theory Tutorial Practical Total Theory Tutorial Practical Total First Core Course ECON01C1 Introductory Microeconomics 5 1 6 80 20 100 First Core Course ECON01C2 Mathematical Methods for Economics-I 5 1 6 80 20 100 Second Core Course ECON02C3 Introductory Macroeconomics 5 1 6 80 20 100 Mathematical Methods for Economics- Second Core Course ECON02C4 5 1 6 80 20 100 II Third Core Course ECON03C5 Intermediate Microeconomics-I 5 1 6 80 20 100 Third Core Course ECON03C6 Intermediate Macroeconomics-I 5 1 6 80 20 100 Third Core Course ECON03C7 Statistical Methods for Economics 5 1 6 80 20 100 Skill Data management and presentation Third Enhancement ECON03SEC1 4 4 100 100 Course using Microsoft Excel and R Fourth Core Course ECON04C8 Intermediate Microeconomics-II 5 1 6 80 20 100 Fourth Core Course ECON04C9 Intermediate Macroeconomics-II 5 1 6 80 20 100 Fourth Core Course ECON04C10 Introductory Econometrics 4 2 6 70 30 100 Skill Analyzing contemporary economic Fourth Enhancement ECON04SEC2 4 4 100 issues 100 Course Fifth Core Course ECON05C11 Indian Economy-I Economics 5 1 6 80 20 100 Fifth Core Course ECON05C12 Development Economics-I 5 1 6 80 20 100 Department Select any two of the followings: Fifth Specific ECON05DSE1 6 70/80 0/20 30/0 100 Elective (A) Applied Econometrics 4/5 0/1 2/0 Department (B) Game Theory and Information Fifth Specific ECON05DSE2 Economics 6 70/80 0/20 30/0 100 Elective (C) Public Economics Sixth Core Course ECON06C13 Indian Economy-II 5 1 6 80 20 100 Sixth Core Course ECON06C14 Development Economics-II 5 1 6 80 20 100 Department Select any two of the followings: Sixth Specific ECON06DSE3 4/5 0/1 2/0 6 70/80 0/20 30/0 100 Elective .

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Credits Marks Sem Course Type Paper Code Course Name Theory Tutorial Practical Total Theory Tutorial Practical Total Department (A) International Economics Sixth Specific ECON06DSE4 (B) Financial Economics 6 70/80 0/20 30/0 100 Elective (C) Environmental Economics Total 116 2000 Credit Allocation and Marks Distribution for the Undergraduate Generic Elective Courses in Economics under CBCS Credits Marks Sem Course Type Paper Code Course Name Theory Tutorial Practical Total Theory Tutorial Practical Total First Generic Elective ECON01GE1 Introductory Microeconomics 5 1 6 80 20 100 Second Generic Elective ECON02GE2 Introductory Macroeconomics 5 1 6 80 20 100 ECON03GE3 (Any one from A and B) Third Generic Elective ECON03GE3A Indian Economy I 80 20 100 5 1 6 ECON03GE3B Money and Banking Fourth Generic Elective ECON04GE4 (Any one from A and B) ECON04GE4A Indian Economy II 80 20 100 5 1 6 ECON04GE4B Public Finance Total 24 400 -7-|Page .

Existence. Rationing by Lotteries. and shifts in the demand curves b. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyze real-life situations. g.choice between leisure and consumption.factors influencing supply. optimum choice. Rationing by Coupons. opportunity cost and decision making. Supply and Demand: How Markets Work. Consumer surplus. choice by command and choice by market. Economic Systems 2. income consumption curve and Engel’s curve. budget constraint. The consumption decision – description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves) - properties of indifference curves. 3. Elasticity and its application f. Uniqueness and Stability of equilibrium (the Walrasian approach and Marshallian approach). demand for all other goods and price changes. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY DESCRIPTIONS OF CORE COURSES FIRST SEMESTER ECON01C1: INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS Credit . Prices and resource allocation e. Determination of equilibrium price in a competitive market . Exploring the subject matter of Economics Why study economics? Scope and method of microeconomics . Labour supply and savings decision . Substitution and income effects and law of demand – concepts of Marshallian and compensated demand curves d. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. Comparative statics: income and price changes – derivation of price consumption curve. firms and central authorities. price floor and commodity taxation. Government Interventions and their Effects on market equilibrium – price ceiling. The Households a. Decision takers. Alternatives to the price system – Rationing by Queues.reading and working with graphs. derivation of the supply curve.households. producer surplus and the efficiency of the markets. incentives and information – prices (absolute and relative prices) property rights and profits. b. Elementary theory of supply . -8-|Page . d. 1. and shifts in the supply curve c.06 [Theory: 05. Markets and Welfare a. Elementary theory of demand – determinants of household demand and market demand. The economic problem: Scarcity and choice . c.production possibility curve – trade off.

8th Edition. Monopoly and anti-trust policy. Joseph E. 4th Edition. Labour and land markets . d. Imperfect Market Structure a. 6. Cengage Learning India Private Limited. c..firm’s legal forms.W. a part of Cengage Learning. Principles of Economics. 2007. c. The Firm and Perfect Market Structure a. Input Markets a. Economics: Principles and Applications. W. Readings 1. Input demand curves.. 3. productivity of an input. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY 4. N. Costs and output in the long run. shifts in input demand curves. profit maximization hypothesis b. Pearson Education Inc. Case and Ray C. Behaviour of profit maximizing firms and the production process. Concepts of different forms of imperfect competition. India edition by South Western. Economics. b. Competitive labour markets. Inc. Norton & Company. b. Defining a firm. 5. government policies towards competition. marginal productivity of labour and marginal revenue product. d. Walsh. -9-|Page . 2. International Student Edition. 2007. New York. 2007. 4th edition. Stiglitz and Carl E. Gregory Mankiw. Labour markets and public policy.basic concepts of derived demand. Fair. Short run costs and output decisions. Karl E.

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON01C2: MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS . Mathematics for Economic Analysis. Homogeneous and homothetic functions Readings 1. The implicit function theorem. b. Second order derivatives: properties and applications d. exponential. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. statistics and econometrics set out in this syllabus. In this course. particular economic models are not the ends. polynomial. maximum. Differentiable functions: characterizations. c. Mathematics for Economists. K. lowest upper bound. composition of functions. Functions and correspondences. Derivatives of first and second order and their properties 4.06 [Theory: 05. d.I Credit . Basic set operations. A. scalar products. Linear transformations: properties. concave. orthogonality. macroeconomic theory. Continuous functions of different types and their graphs. properties and applications. 2. McGraw-Hill . 4. Systems of linear equations and Cramer’s Rule. power. Pearson Educational Asia: Delhi. convex sets. Functions of several variables a. properties with respect to various operations and applications c. into and onto functions. Determinants: characterization. Preliminaries: Sets and Functions a.quadratic. McGraw Hill. and application to comparative statics problems e. Real numbers. Functions of one variable a. homogeneous and homothetic functions. Geometric representations: graphs and level curves b.: Principles of Mathematical Analysis. McGraw Hill. b.Chiang & K. Linear algebra a.10 . Hammond. but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to economic theory in general. inverse functions. specifically the courses on microeconomic theory. Silberberg & Suen: The Structure of Economics. 3. 2002. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook. Sydsaeter and P. matrix representations and elementary operations. Rudin W.Wainwright: Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. quasi concave. Logic and proof techniques. norms. The objective of this sequence is to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level. Vector spaces: algebraic and geometric properties. c. d.| P a g e . and logarithmic b. E. 3. minimum. 2. 1. one to one correspondence between sets. 5. convex. Simon & Blume. Viva Books. greatest lower bound.

Oxford University Press. basic issues studied in macroeconomics. control of money supply by the central bank tools of monetary policy. and Startz. determination of money supply. circular flow of income. measurement of GDP. Macroeconomics. 3. Sikdar. Mankiw. R.. multiplier. microeconomic and macroeconomic approaches. S. and monetary and fiscal policies. money creation by commercial banks. Hicks. money. Oxford University Press. money multiplier. 12th edition. Money Definitions of money – M1. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course aims to introduce the students to the basic concepts of Macroeconomics. GDP. frictional unemployment . Determination of equilibrium income and interest rate.| P a g e . IS-LM model . 2010. Worth Publishers. 7th edition. involuntary and voluntary unemployment 4. S.quantity theory approach c. N.Keynesian consumption function. R. 5. National Income accounting for an open economy. M2. 2nd edition. investment. R. 2. 2005. problems encountered in measuring National Income. cost of inflation and hyper inflation b. Macroeconomics deals with the aggregate economy. NNP and NI.06 [Theory: 05.. 2nd edition. natural rate of unemployment. McGraw Hill.Investment function and IS curve. National Income as a measure of welfare. inflation. Principles of Macroeconomics. M3 and M4. Introduction to Macroeconomics and National Income Accounting Introduction to Macroeconomic variables.. The Closed Economy in the Short Run Simple Keynesian model of income determination . Dornbusch. Autonomous investment and Income-Expenditure equilibrium. Fischer.G.. Pearson Education Asia. balance of payments: current and capital accounts. GNP. Paradox of thrift. 2. WPI and GDP deflator. 1. 2011. Comparative Statics . 3. Money supply and Inflation .Monetary policies and fiscal policies Readings 1. Macroeconomics.. the Framework of the Indian Economy: An Introduction to Economics.. R. NDP. 2014.T. Asset market equilibrium and LM curve. Concepts of unemployment. Inflation and Unemployment a. real versus nominal GDP -CPI. Functions of money. Ghosh. Mukherjee and Syamal K. 1989 . This course discusses the preliminary concepts associated with the determination and measurement of aggregate macroeconomic variable like savings. 4. Froyen. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY SECOND SEMESTER ECON02C3: INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS Credit . J. structural unemployment.11 . Meaning of inflation. M. cyclical unemployment. Macroeconomics.

In this course. Hammond. 3. K. Sydsaeter and P. c. but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to economic theory in general. Cambridge University Press 4. Real Analysis a.II Credit . bounded sequences. macroeconomic theory. open. Definite integrals. Constrained optimization. closed. Single-variable and Multi-variable static optimization a.Wainwright: Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. the meaning of Lagrange multiplier. A.06 [Theory: 05. statistics and econometrics set out in this Syllabus. equality constraints: Lagrange’s method. Implicit functions and their derivatives. particular economic models are not the ends. 2. Integration of functions Methods of Substitution and by parts. This part is to be taught in Semester II following the first part in Semester I.| P a g e . 2002. limit points. Unconstrained optimization. 3. 4. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook. Binmore: Mathematical Analysis. Difference and Differential equations Difference and differential equations (first and second order) and their applications Readings 1. criteria of convergence.12 . McGraw Hill. continuity of functions and Weierstrass Theorem for existence of optima. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON02C4: MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS . Pearson Educational Asia: Delhi.a Straightforward Approach. The objective of this sequence is to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level.Chiang & K. monotone sequences. 2. maximum value function and Envelope Theorem. K. d. Mathematics for Economic Analysis. Inequality constraints: Kuhn Tucker conditions. Rudin W. b. specifically the courses on microeconomic theory. 1. Sequences and their limits. McGraw-Hill . Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course is the second part of a compulsory two-course sequence. necessary and sufficient conditions. b. Metric spaces. bounded and compact sets. global optima of convex and concave functions.: Principles of Mathematical Analysis.

utility function and expected utility. risk preference and risk aversion. co-payments/ deductibles. Compensating and equivalent variation.I Credit . 2010. c. Cengage . b. Cardinal & Ordinal utility b.demand for risky assets – measuring risk . Varian. e. a Modern Approach. Risk spreading: Role of the stock market . expansion path.13 . concept of sunk cost. Intermediate Microeconomics.| P a g e .06 [Theory: 05.isoquants and diminishing rate of factor substitution – elasticity of substitution –some examples of technology (fixed proportion. Economic / Opportunity cost and accounting cost. Revealed Preference approach: Strong and weak axioms of revealed preference – derivation of demand function. co-insurance. d. Cobb – Douglas Production Function. and consumer surplus.W. W. Choice under uncertainty: Expected utility theorem and attitude towards risk . Intertemporal choice. 8th edition. indifference curves. 1. Production and Costs a. Long run Equilibrium in Perfect Competition Equilibrium of the firm and the industry Readings 1. Axioms of rational choice. Consumer Theory a. 2. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY THIRD SEMESTER ECON03C5: INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS .–– relation between short run and long run cost. Fundamentals of Microeconomics. This course looks at the behaviour of the consumer and the producer and also covers the behaviour of a competitive firm.functional coefficient and shape of long run average cost. Slutsky equation. Risk Pooling. General concept of homogenous and homothetic production function and their properties. average product and marginal product –return to factor and returns to scale .trade off between risk and return. Since students are already familiar with the quantitative techniques in the previous semesters. Hal R. Nicholson. Snyder and W. budget constraint and consumer’s equilibrium. Substitution and income-effects and law of demand. 2. 3. time dimension of cost – cost in the short run – total cost – fixed and variable cost – marginal cost – average cost – derivation of short run cost - long run cost function . mathematical tools are used to facilitate understanding of the basic concepts. Technology and technological efficiency – general concept of production function – concepts of total product. concept of risk premium and certainty equivalence. CES Production Function). perfect substitute. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description The course is designed to provide a sound training in microeconomic theory to formally analyze the behaviour of individual agents. The workbook by Varian and Bergstrom may be used for problems. Norton and Company/Affiliated East-West Press (India). relation between expansion path and long run total cost curve. C. Reducing risk: demand for Insurance – fair premium.

.Worker misperception model. 1996. Rational Expectations.. 2009. Dornbusch's overshooting model. 7th edition. S. 2005. Macroeconomics.Price Flexibility and Full Employment Classical system . R. R.neutrality of money. Blanchard. Sheffrin. Dichotomy between real sector and monetary sector . 12th edition. 2nd edition. S.Imperfect information model . and Bernanke. Short-run Keynesian approach .14 . Fischer. Wage . and the role of policy in this context. Macroeconomics. Macroeconomics. Dornbusch. adaptive and rational expectations. Inc... 2nd edition. 5. 3. Determination of income. Whinston. interaction of aggregate demand and supply.Say’s law. policy ineffectiveness debate.. Mankiw. 3. 2. 5. Cambridge University Press. 4. Macro policy in an open economy. Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply Curves Derivation of aggregate demand and aggregate and supply curves. The Macmillan Press Ltd.I Credit . 6.. B. 4. Labour market. Effect of devaluation.T. B.. Steven M.Mundell-Fleming model.role of the real exchange rate. . 2010. Readings 1.. Microeconomics. 3.06 [Theory: 05. It discusses various alternative theories of output and employment determination in a closed economy in the short run as well as medium run. Pearson Education. Macroeconomics. Solution of Complete Keynesian model. 2011. Macroeconomics. Comparative Statics. Open Economy Models Classical approach to open economy . Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course introduces the students to formal modeling of a macro-economy in terms of analytical tools. Explanation of aggregate supply curve with and without price or wage rigidity . 2.| P a g e . R. Exchange rate determination. Unemployment and Expectations Phillips curve. 2009. 2010. A. Friedman’s restatement of Quantity Theory of Money. N. purchasing power parity. B. Douglas Bernheim and Michael D. Green: Consumer Theory. Pearson ECON03C6: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS .G. Tata McGraw-Hill (India). and Startz. 5th edition. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Learning (India). Inc. Abel. Froyen. 1. 4. tariff and export subsidy on output and trade balance. Pearson Education Asia. wage and interest rate. 7th edition. McGraw Hill. Gravelle and Rees: Microeconomics. asset market approach. monetary approach to balance of payments. O. 2014. Pearson Education. saving and investment. It also introduces the students to various theoretical issues related to an open economy. Worth Publishers. Inflation. employment.

Elementary Probability Theory a. p-values. 4. Point and Interval Estimation a. t. Confidence intervals for population parameters. 6. Properties of random samples. chi-square. 2.and F-distributions c. the role of sampling theory. Sample spaces and events. followed by probability distributions of discrete and continuous random variables and of joint distributions. 1. Testing of Hypothesis Framing the null and alternative hypothesis.15 . Defining random variables. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON03C7: STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS Credit . 5. normal and exponential random variables). independence. b. b. Axiomatic Approach. This is followed by a discussion on sampling techniques used to collect survey data. 3. Jointly Distributed Random Variables Density and distribution functions for jointly distributed random variables. b. Poisson. computing expected values. It begins with the notion of probability. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This is a course on statistical methods for economics. properties of estimators.06 [Theory: 05. b. The semester concludes with some topics in statistical inference that include point and interval estimation. Sampling a. counting techniques. Random Variables and Probability Distributions a. probability axioms and properties. power of a test Simple applications of tests for the Mean and Variance of a univariate normal population and two independent normal populations .| P a g e . Properties of commonly used discrete and continuous distributions (uniform. methods of sampling. covariance and correlation coefficients. Type-I and Type-II Errors. binomial. Principal steps in a sample survey. Limitations of the Classical definition. expected values of random variables and of functions of random variables. conditional probability and Bayes’ rule. Frequency definition. Estimation of population parameters using methods of moments and maximum likelihood procedures. Derived distributions: Standard normal. probability distributions. The course introduces the notion of sampling distributions that act as a bridge between probability theory and statistical inference.

Statistical Inference. Charles J. Cochran. Charles J.M. 4. Delhi 2. Hoel.16 . Gupta and Dasgupta. 2002 5. Delhi 3. Sidney C. Fundamentals of Statistics. Sampling Techniques. William G. Stone: Statistical Theory. Paul G.A. Goon. Universal Book Store.. Paul G. World Press . Stone: Introduction to Probability Theory. 6. Duxbury Advanced Series. John Wiley.C. Pearson. McGraw Hill 7.| P a g e . 2. Port. Sidney C. Boes: Introduction to the theory of statistics. F. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Readings 1. Mood. Freund’s Mathematical Statistics with Applications. Universal Book Store.Greybill and D. A. Hoel. 2014. Volume 1. Port. G Casella and R L Berger. 2007. Cengage Learning. John E.

W. Threats – Commitments . Perloff. Norton and Company/Affiliated East-West Press (India). Cartel Instability.Coase Theorem. Equilibrium and efficiency under pure exchange and production.W. Intermediate Microeconomics.quality uncertainty and the market for Lemons: adverse selection and moral hazard. peak-load pricing. Overall efficiency and welfare economics. Markets with Asymmetric Information . Public policy towards externalities – regulation. Oligopoly and game theory: Prisoner’s dilemma and oligopolistic interdependence . Externalities and market inefficiency – difference between social costs and private costs – positive and negative externalities – private solution to externalities . General Equilibrium. c. Hal R. 2010. equilibrium of the firm. Implications of the Prisoners’ dilemma for oligopolistic pricing .Stackelberg Equilibrium.The workbook by Varian and Bergstrom could be used for problems. Snyder and W.Price Rigidity – Price Signaling and Price Leadership. The Irwin series in economics . Readings 1. Public Goods and the problem of preference revelation b. Jeffrey M. Fundamentals of Microeconomics. price discrimination. Efficiency and Welfare a. Addison Wesley. It covers general equilibrium and welfare. imperfect markets and topics under information economics. 3. concept of product group. Nicholson. 8th edition. 1. tradable permits. P. Market Structure and Game Theory a. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course is a sequel to Intermediate Microeconomics I. Gravelle and Rees: Microeconomics. 2010. b.| P a g e .Credibility and Cartel Stability.06 [Theory: 05.II Credit . 2. Simultaneous Quantity Setting .17 . Product differentiation in Bertrand model.Cournot Equilibrium. a Modern Approach. The emphasis will be on giving conceptual clarity to the student coupled with the use of mathematical tools and reasoning. Collusion and Formation of Cartel.concept of Nash equilibrium. Pearson 5. Market Failure a. Simultaneous Price Setting: Bertrand Equilibrium and Bertrand Paradox. 2. E.Quantity Leadership . DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY FOURTH SEMESTER ECON04C8: INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS . Cengage Learning (India). Monopolistic competition: Product differentiation and demand curve. Varian. Sequential game with perfect information . Gould: Microeconomic Theory.: Microeconomics – Theory and Application with Calculus. excess capacity and its interpretation c. Ferguson and J. multi-plant monopolist b. C. Pigovian tax and subsidies. Monopoly: Pricing with market power. 4. two-part tariff. C. 3.

Domar model and knife-edge instability. Macroeconomics. rules versus discretion: time consistency. Pearson Education. Consumption: Keynesian consumption function and Empirical findings on consumption-income relationship. Macroeconomics. Elements of endogenous growth. Jones. W. 2. monetary policy objectives and targets. Demand for money . Olivier Blanchard. 2010.. 5th edition. rational expectations and random-walk of consumption expenditure. McGraw Hill. Worth Publishers. Baumol-Tobin model of transaction demand for money 3.18 . Neoclassical theory of growth . In this course. technological progress. Theory of inventory investment – acceleration principle c. the government budget constraint. the students are introduced to the long run dynamic issues like growth and technical progress. Macroeconomics. Fiscal and Monetary Policy Active or passive. Tobin’s theory of speculative demand for money.Solow model -golden rule. It also provides the micro-foundations to the various aggregative concepts used in the previous course. New-Classicals and New-Keynesians. Microeconomic Foundations a. 3. 7th edition. Investment: Business fixed investment – neoclassical theory – Tobin’s Q. Schools of Macroeconomic Thoughts Keynes versus Classics. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course is a sequel to Intermediate Macroeconomics I. Fischer and Startz. 4.Keynesian theory of speculative demand for money. Readings 1. 2010. Inc. Theory of optimal intertemporal choice.II Credit .W.06 [Theory: 05. 2009. N. 2nd edition. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON04C9: INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS . government debt and Ricardian equivalence. 1. b. Gregory Mankiw. 11th edition. .| P a g e . 2. Dornbusch. life-cycle and permanent income hypotheses. 4. 2002. Economic Growth Harrod . Norton & Company. Charles I. Introduction to Economic Growth.

goodness of fit.19 . Essentials of Econometrics. properties of estimators .Gauss Markov Theorem. R2 and adjusted R2. CENGAGE 2. estimation of the error variance. Reverse Regression c. Heteroscedasticity c. Specification Analysis Omission of a relevant variable. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON04C10: INTRODUCTORY ECONOMETRICS Credit . deriving the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) Estimates. Johnston and Dinardo. Practical: 02] Course Description This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques. Simple Linear Regression Model: Two Variable Case a. Gujarati and D. properties of OLS estimators b. goodness of fit. Theory Credit: 04 Contact hours per week: 04 1. Statistical Inference in the Linear Regression Model – Confidence Intervals for the Estimated Parameters and the Testing of Hypotheses d. tests of specification errors.C. 3. McGraw Hill. Multicollinearity b. The course also covers the consequences of and tests for misspecification of regression models. partial regression coefficients c.06 [Theory: 04. The aims and methodology of Econometrics 2. Estimation of parameters. International Edition. Nature and Scope of Econometrics What is Econometrics? Economic and Econometric Models. D. Testing hypotheses – individual and joint d. b. McGraw Hill 3. Readings 1. . It covers statistical concepts of hypothesis testing. estimation and diagnostic testing of simple and multiple regression models. J. Prediction with the Simple Regression model. 4th edition. Woolridge. inclusion of irrelevant variable. Multiple Linear Regression Model a. Econometric methods. Violations of Classical Assumptions: Consequences. Porter. 2009.| P a g e . Serial correlation 5. Qualitative (dummy) independent variables 4. M: Econometrics. Specifications of the. Functional forms of regression models e. N. Detection and Remedies a.

ANOVA with Excel and R b. 3 rd edition. Christopher Dougherty. Indian edition.| P a g e . 2007. Oxford University Press. Introductory Econometrics with Excel and R Readings 1. Introduction to Econometrics. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Practical Credit : 02 Contact hours per week : 04 6. . Econometrics with software applications a.20 .

Different concepts of poverty and its measures. unemployment rates and growth rates.21 . with particular emphasis on paradigm shifts and turning points. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description Using appropriate analytical frameworks. Human development index and progress of human development. Education – literacy rate. multidimensional poverty. Population and Human Development a. causes and consequences of malnutrition. the reading list will have to be updated annually.gender discrimination in enrolment – trend in public expenditure for education. Population policy. Economic Development since Independence a. c. Five Years Plans: Objectives.06 [Theory: 05. Estimates of unemployment and its trend. sources of plan financing. Growth and inequality. an assessment of performance of different plans d. growth rate and ICOR 2. Employment Guarantee Act- 2005 4. mid-day meal programme and other policies of child and family welfare. rural urban disparity in income and wealth inequality. b. age. Human development and other indicators . Trend in public expenditure for health and hygiene. Government plans and programs for reducing unemployment. this course reviews major trends in economic indicators and policy debates in India in the post-Independence period. enrollment ratio. recent controversy of poverty reduction. International Comparisons Comparison of India with other countries with reference to GNI and its inequality. growth of large industrial houses and middle class. changing dimensions of unemployment. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY FIFTH SEMESTER ECON05C11: INDIAN ECONOMY I Credit . trend of nature and causes of income inequality in India. GDP and employment share. growth and development under different policy regimes. Demographic transition theory and dynamics of population in India. e. HDI for several states over time. sex composition and development issues. c. child health. measures of mobilization of domestic savings. regional disparities in growth rates b. Given the rapid changes taking place in India. b. nature. Major features of the economy at independence. assessment of the poverty alleviation policies since independence. Trend of savings and capital formation. economic reforms and poverty in India. Sector-wise growth profile and changes of its contribution in GDP.| P a g e . income poverty. Health as an indicator of human development. infant mortality. Growth and Distribution a. life expectancy. d. structural change in employment. right to education and education policies c. demographic dividend 3. public measures to combat against inequality in income and wealth. 1. relation between savings rate. different estimates of poverty.

2007. editors. Economic and Political Weekly. Economic andPolitical Weekly. eds. 2008. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Readings 1. 2. 1992-2005. Poverty and Development in India. Oxford University Press. 2011. 14. Himanshu. 2010. Jean Dreze and Amartya Sen. Class and Region.B. Kaushik Basu and A. editor. Economic and Political Weekly. 4. 2007. Maertens. ―Growth Record of Indian Economy: 1950-2008. Pulapre Balakrishnan. Food and Nutrition in India: Facts and Intepretations. ―Glorifying Malthus: Current Debate on Demographic Dividend in IndiaǁEconomic and Political Weekly. 9. ―Post Elementary Education. Kaushik Basu. T. S. Aniruddha Krishna and Devendra Bajpai. ―China and India: Idiosyncratic Paths to High Growth. in K. 2017 Datt and Sudharam’s Indian Economy (latest edition) 18. ―Inequities in Access to Health Services in India: Caste.L. ―India‘s Savings Performance since the Advent of Planning. 15. Government of India. September.Economic and Political Weekly. Human Development Reports UNDP ((latest) 20. Vaidyanathan. Oxford University Press. 11. 7. 17-18 19.22 . 16. 19thedition. K. Academic Foundation. 10. Geeta G. Jean Dreze and Angus Deaton. Macroeconomics of Post Reform India. International Journal of Educational Development. January. Rakshit. An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions. 2010. ―Employment Trends in India: A Re-examination. ―Lineal Spread and Radial Dissipation: Experiencing Growth in Rural India. 2011. Kingdon. 17 Datt and Mahajan. Economic and Political Weekly. Economic and Political Weekly. J. 2008. Rakesh Mohan. 5. 2007. Dyson. ―India‘s Public Distribution System: Utilisation and ImpactJournal of Development Studies. 2013. Shetty.L. 2011. ―India‘s Demographic Transition and its Consequences for Developmentǁ in Uma Kapila. ―The Progress of School Education in India. 2011. Krishna and A. Economic Survey. 12. Princeton University Press. Indian Economy Since Independence. Oxford Review of Economic Policy. 2007. A Story of Sustained Savings and Investment. 2009. February. 16-17. 3.| P a g e . 2015-16. September. Tilak.Economic and Political Weekly. Institutions and Markets in India’sDevelopment. 8. Himanshu. The New Oxford Companion to Economics. Towards New Poverty Lines for India. Economic and Political Weekly. M. 13. 6. James. 2013. 2009. The Recovery of India: Economic Growth in the Nehru Era. Rama Baru et al. 2008. . September.G. November. May. June. September. Reetika Khera.

Understanding Poverty. It then proceeds to aggregate models of growth and cross-national comparisons of the growth experience that can help evaluate these models. 4. Abhijit V. Development as Freedom. Measurement & Policy. Development Economics.23 . Cambridge University Press. Growth Models and Empirics The Solow model and its variants. Branko Milanovich.| P a g e . poverty measurement. Abhijit Banerjee. 2. government failures and corruption. OUP. characteristics of the poor. The World Bank. 1. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON05C12: DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS I Credit . Readings 1. The course ends by linking political institutions to growth and inequality by discussing the role of the state in economic development and the informational and incentive problems that affect state governance. Concepts of Development Alternative measures of development. Measures and Mechanisms Inequality axioms. increasing returns. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This is the first part of a two-part course on economic development. a comparison of commonly used inequality measures. mechanisms that generate poverty traps and path dependence of growth processes. 10. The Handbook on Poverty & Inequality. state ownership and regulation. Kaushik Basu. 2009. OUP. 2007. The axiomatic basis for inequality measurement is used to develop measures of inequality and connections between growth and inequality are explored. Amartya Sen. theories of balanced and unbalanced growth. 3. documenting the international variation in these measures. NY. OUP. Roland Benabou and Dilip Mookerjee. The Oxford Companion to Economics in India. 5. alternative institutional trajectories and their relationship with economic performance. Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. 4. 2000. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson. UP. Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization. Oxford University Press. Poverty and Inequality: Definitions. Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty. Martin Ravallion. endogenous growth models and evidence on the determinants of growth. Political Institutions and the Functioning of the State The determinants of democracy. connections between inequality and development. 2006. Debraj Ray. Jonathan Haughton & Shahidur Khandker. The course begins with a discussion of alternative conceptions of development and their justification. Public Affairs. The Economics of Poverty: History. Banerjee & Esther Duflo. 2006. 2016 6. 2. 2016 7. comparing development trajectories across nations and within them. 2011 8. 2009 . 3.06 [Theory: 05. Belknap Press. within-country differences in the functioning of state institutions. the role of history and expectations.

2010. Ramesh Golait and Pankaj Kumar. productivity. 27 4. P. NABARD and agricultural credit. hotel and restaurant. 2005. policy issues for major services like tourism. Goldar and S. public administration and defense. IT including software Readings 1. Trends and Performance in Services Composition of service sector in India. Shankar Acharya. Pavcnik and P. editors. RBI DEAP Study no. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 6 Course Description This course examines sector-specific polices and their impact in shaping trends in key economic indicators in India. shipping and port services. Policies and Performance in Agriculture Growth. Oxford University Press 2. research and development services. B. in Shankar Acharya and Rakesh Mohan. public sector.6 [Theory: 05. Oxford University Press 3. trade.| P a g e . competition policy. ―TradeLiberalisation and New Imported . trend of FDI in India’s services sector. Financial and monetary policies d. India’s Economy: Performancesand Challenges: Development and Participation. information and broadcasting. 2010. India’s Economy: Performancesand Challenges: Development and Participation. ―India‘s Financial Sector and Monetary Policy Reforms. land reforms 3. September 5. It highlights major policy debates and evaluates the Indian empirical evidence.N. financial services. Trade and investment policies c.ǁ inShankar Acharya and Rakesh Mohan. Rakesh Mohan. Policies and Performance in Industry Growth. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY SIXTH SEMESTER ECON06C13: INDIAN ECONOMY II Credit . productivity. ―Macroeconomic Performance and Policies 2000-8.C. Topalova. communication. Labour regulations 2. performance of the services in India’s services trade. ―AgriculturalGrowth in India Since 1991. N. the reading list will have to be updated annually. Given the rapid changes taking place in the country. 2008. housing and real estate. Aggarwal. Fiscal policy b. Special Economic Zones 4. 1. transport and storage. A. agrarian structure and technology. editors. Pulapre Balakrishnan. diversification. capital formation. foreign investment. Macroeconomic Policies and Their Impact a. Goldberg. share and growth of major services – tourism. Khandelwal. small scale industries. trend of growth and contribution of service sector in GDP. 2009. The Developing Economics. ―Trade Liberalisation and Price-CostMargin in Indian Industries.24 . pricing and procurement.

Economic and Political Weekly. Ramesh Chand.25 . editor. in D. Enforcement andAdjudication in Indian Labour Markets: Origins. ―Trade.| P a g e . 2010. ―Organised Manufacturing Employment: Continuingthe Debateǁ. ―Understanding the Nature and Causes of Food Inflation. Foreign Direct Investment and IndustrialTransformation in India. American Economic Review. The New Oxford Companion toEconomics in India. ïnPremachandraAthukorala. Pages and T. Maertens. Labour Marketsand Inequality in India. Dennis Rajakumar. 2013.ǁEconomic and Political Weekly. Dipak Mazumdar and Sandeep Sarkar. Globalization. J. Roy. editors. 2008. April 10. The Rise of Asia. 2009. 2012 14 Economic Survey (Latest) . A. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Inputs. Economic and Political Weekly. ―Legislation. Indian Journal of LabourEconomics 9. OUP. Kunal Sen.Routledge 7. Ahsan. Kaushik Basu and A. February 11. Routledge 8. Chetan Ghate (Ed). Mazumdar and S. Oxford University Press 13. May 6. Sarkar.The Oxford Handbook of the Indian Economy. April 12. 2011. eds. BishwanathGoldar. 2011. ―Size and Growth of Private Corporate Sector inIndian Manufacturing. Consequences and the WayForward. ―The Employment Problem in Indiaand the Phenomenon of the ‗Missing Middleǁ. Papersand Proceedings. 2010. C.

birth and death rates. economic activity and climate change. gender bias in preferences and outcomes and evidence on unequal treatment within households. 5. a brief history of environmental change. Demography and Development Demographic concepts. land acquisition. 2009. migration. Globalization Globalization in historical perspective. common-pool resources. governance in organizations and in communities.| P a g e . 2. Kaushik Basu. 2. trade. 1.06 [Theory: 05. Individuals. Debraj Ray. fertility choices and human capital accumulation. It begins with basic demographic concepts and their evolution during the process of development. The course ends with reflections on the role of globalization and increased international dependence on the process of development. 4. informational problems and credit contracts. 3. multiple social equilibria. individual responses to organizational inefficiency. The governance of communities and organizations is studied and this is then linked to questions of sustainable growth. inter-linkages between rural factor markets. Development Economics. the economics and politics of multilateral agreements. financial instability in a globalized world. land reform and its effects on productivity. 1998 .26 . nutrition and labor productivity. connections between income. Analytical Development Economics. contractual relationships between tenants and landlords. Communities and Collective Outcomes Individual behavior in social environments. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This is the second module of the economic development sequence. Environment and Sustainable Development Defining sustainability for renewable resources. environmental externalities and state regulation of the environment. Oxford University Press. microfinance. fertility and mortality. The structure of markets and contracts is linked to the particular problems of enforcement experienced in poor countries. mortality. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON06C14: DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS II Credit . OUP. age structure. Labor and Credit Markets The distribution of land ownership. demographic transitions during the process of development. Land. production patterns and world inequality. Readings 1.

Bordo. 1996 8.| P a g e . 2011. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY 3. Jean-Marie Baland and Jean-Philippe Plateau. Alan M. 6. 7. 2010. Oxford University Press. States and Democracy Can’t Coexist. Michael D. Abhijit Banerjee.27 . Raghuram Rajan. Taylor and Jeffrey G.). The Place of Nature on Economic Development. OUP. Roland Benabou and Dilip Mookerjee. 2006. Partha Dasgupta. The Globalization Paradox: Why Global Markets. Dani Rodrik. 2003. SANDEE . Fault Lines: How Hidden Fractures Still Threaten the World Economy. Globalization in Historical Perspective. University of Chicago Press. 5. 4. Williamson (ed. Understanding Poverty. OUP. Halting Degradation of Natural Resources.

Wooldridge.ucla. G. official site: http://www. Panel Data.S.Deterministic and Stochastic Trend. CENGAGE Learning. J. Dinardo: Econometric Methods. Regression Diagnostics and Specification a. Johnston. UCLA: https://stats.idre. 4. Stationarity and tests of unit root. and J. Kohler & F.| P a g e . Box-Jenkins Methodology. Practical Credit: 02 Contact hours per week: 04 5. functional forms. Time Series with Trend .06 [Theory: 04.html . U.eviews. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. 2. Applications of Econometric Software Packages Econometrics with STATA & E-VIEWS Readings 1. Kreuter Data analysis using Stata.28 . Modeling Univariate Time Series Stochastic Time Series. 2. J. Review of Multiple Linear Regression Model b. this course requires understanding of econometric software and computing skills. Since the emphasis is on application of methods. Fixed Effect vs. model selection. 3. Practical: 02] Course Description The aim of this course is to provide a foundation in applied econometric analysis and develop skills required for empirical research in economics. c. Maddala. McGraw Hill.: Econometrics. EVIEWS Tutorials.edu/stata/ 3. Instrumental variable estimation 2. Theory Credit: 04 Contact hours per week: 04 1. Static Panel Data Models Pooled vs. Stata Press. Website of Institute for Digital Research and Education. Misspecification. M.: Introduction to Econometrics. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC ELECTIVE (DSE) COURSES [ECON05DSE1 and ECON05DSE2] GROUP – I A: APPLIED ECONOMETRICS Credit .com/Learning/index. Random Effect Models Readings 1.

1992. other applications 2. commitment. Relation between strategic and axiomatic approaches. other applications. backward induction in finite games. Students learn the concept of Bayesian and Perfect Bayesian equilibrium. Bayesian Nash equilibrium. Martin J. one- step deviation property. An Introduction to Game Theory. applications 5. Oxford University Press. 3rd edition. Princeton University Press. Information economics Adverse selection. Microeconomics. Axiomatic approach due to Nash.| P a g e . Game Theory for Applied Economists. strategies. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course deals with repeated games and games with complete and incomplete information. New Delhi. 4. The course ends with the application of game theory to analyse moral hazard. 2004. 1. Prajit Dutta. history dependent strategies. MIT Press. Readings 1.Theory and Practice. subgame perfection. moral hazard. bargaining. 3. 2. 2004.06 [Theory: 05. Robert Gibbons. 4. Review of Extensive form Games with Perfect Information The game tree. Bargaining Bargaining as an extensive game.29 . Princeton University Press. Repeated Games Finitely repeated games and backward induction. . Strategies and Games . Hugh Gravelle and Ray Rees. infinitely repeated games. beliefs and sequential equilibrium. Game theory: An introduction. signaling games 6. adverse selection and signaling problems. Simultaneous move games with incomplete information (Bayesian games) Strategies. idea of folk theorem. auctions. Osborne. Tadelis. illustrations. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY B: GAME THEORY AND INFORMATION ECONOMICS Credit . Ideas related to complete as well as asymmetric information among the interacting economic agents would be the main focus of this course. S. Extensive form games with imperfect information Strategies. 3. 1999 5. the repeated Prisoners’ dilemma. Pearson Education.

Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description Public economics is the study of government policy from the points of view of economic efficiency and equity. distribution. Amaresh (ed) Readings in Public Finance. Rosen. Median voter. Flexibility. 2000. Stiglitz. Musgrave. 2. PHI Learning. OUP. Ghosh and C. 5th edition. W. Inefficiency of majority voting equilibrium. Hindriks. Economic efficiency. Public Finance in Theory & Practice. McGraw Hill Publications. 4. stabilization b. public debt. Norton & Company. Government of India (Latest). J. Fairness: The Benefit Approach. 8. T. Principles of fiscal federalism with reference to India Readings 1. McGraw-Hill/Irwin. this study involves a formal analysis of government taxation and expenditures. Single-peaked preferences. distribution and stabilization. Indian Central and State budgets in practice c. (ii) The tax route: The Benefit Approach to taxation and expenditure. Gayer: Public Finance. Public Finance in India a. Administrative simplicity. 3rd edition. R. H. Premise for the Public Sector a. MIT Press. Condorcet paradox. Inherently. 2009. Principles of Taxation and Welfare Implication a. 1989.06 [Theory: 05. Tax System: structure and reforms b.| P a g e .The problem of preference revelation: (i) The voting route: Majority voting and the Juror's theorem.30 . Myles: Intermediate Public Economics.W.B. 5. Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem. The paper includes both the theory of public economics and the Indian public finances. Economics of the Public Sector.A. Joseph E. The paper deals with the nature of government intervention and its implications for allocation. Ability-to-pay Approach (horizontal and vertical equity). 3. 9th ed. Incidence of taxation b. 2006. Lindahl model & Pareto efficiency. 2. optimal taxation c. Musgrave and P. Public goods (social wants) provisioning . 3. political responsibility d. A. G. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY C: PUBLIC ECONOMICS Credit . Musgrave’s three branches: allocation. 1. 7. 6. preference revelation mechanism revisited. Report of the Finance Commission (Latest). Economic Survey. 2014 . Bagchi. market failures and externalities. The subject encompasses a host of topics including public goods. Ghosh: Public Finance.. Budget items and different concepts of deficits and surpluses.

Doctrine of Comparative Cost Advantage and GFT. Autarkic terms of trade. factor intensity reversal. Relation between Commodity Price and Factor-Price (One-to-one correspondence). direction. It concludes with an analytical account of the causes and consequences of the rapid expansion of international financial flows in recent years. Factor Price Equalization theorem and its sources of disruptions (complete specialization. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC ELECTIVE (DSE) COURSES [ECON06DSE3 and ECON06DSE4] GROUP – II A: INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Credit .Trade as a positive-sum game . Necessary and sufficient conditions of GFT: Tangency and convexity conditions c. Heckscher-Ohlin theorem: Factor abundance as basis for international trade.Arbitrage and basis of trade.| P a g e . and consequences of international trade. focusing on national policies as well as international monetary systems. 1. factor intensity reversal. b. It then builds on the models of open economy macroeconomics developed in courses 08 and 12. non-traded good). students will also be exposed to real-world examples and case studies.Gains from Trade theorem. different sources of Comparative Advantage. One-factor economy: Production Possibility Frontier. and the determinants and effects of trade policy. b. Although the course is based on abstract theoretical models. many country. Theories of International Trade a. substitution possibilities in production and consumption and magnitudes of GFT. Introduction a. Relation between factor endowment and output (Rybsczynski Effect or the supply shift). GFT theorem and Pareto optimality. Effect of trade on income distribution (price magnification effect). Leontief Paradox: Testing the model empirically.Offer curve under increasing opportunity costs: Derivation and Elasticity. Ricardian Model of Trade . Trade in Ricardian model: Technology as basis of trade. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course develops a systematic exposition of models that try to explain the composition. What is international economics about? An overview of world trade. Comparative (price) advantage. Offer curve under constant opportunity cost and distribution of GFT between large and small countries. Trade and Income Distribution .06 [Theory: 05. Absolute versus comparative Advantage. Basis for and Gains from trade . . International Equilibrium . International Equilibrium and determination of terms of trade. Extensions of Ricardian model: many commodity. Factor Abundance.31 . complete specialization.Two factor economy: Factor abundance. illustration and its meaning. Large and small countries revisited. Decomposition of GFT. Gains from Trade . Relative demand and supply. Stability of International Equilibrium: Marshal-Lerner Condition 2. factor immobility.

Pearson Education.Specific Factor Model: Commodity Price. Caves. R. P.. Readings: 1. 2007 4. Krugman. J. 2nd edition.VER. effective rate of protection. 2.. Frankel. Trade Policy Partial equilibrium analysis of tariff. 9th edition. maintaining full employment under flexible-coefficient production. Addison-Wesley (Pearson Education Indian Edition). wage gap debate. infant industry argument for protection. Heller. financial globalization and financial crises. M. tariff and income distribution. 5. 2011. domestic distortion and policy interventions. J. 10th edition. Theory and Empirical Evidence. Prentice Hall. M. H R.N. optimum tariff. Effect of Growth on Trade Factor growth and production possibility. tariff and alternative policy measures for special objectives. Bhagwati.MIT Press.| P a g e .W. and Melitz. Metzler’s paradox. general equilibrium analysis: tariff in small and large country. . 10th edition. and Jones. 2012.. Panagariya. environmental regulations as non- tariff barriers 4.32 .E. International Trade. Dominick Salvatore. 3.. trade and growth induced by technical progress. 1968. terms-of- trade and welfare 5. Alternative interpretation: Specific Factor model as “short run” Heckscher-Ohlin model. 1998. Specific Factor Model . other trade and non-trade barriers (concepts only) .. Obstfeld. R. John Wiley International Student Edition. International Economics: Trade and Finance.. Factor Price. and Srinivasan. Relative price change and Income Distribution 3.A. tariff-quota equivalence (under perfect competition and monopoly). tariff and quota. International Economics: Theory and Policy. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY c. Lectures on International Trade.. international monetary systems. A. Factor Allocation.N. T. International Macroeconomic Policy Fixed versus flexible exchange rates. Growth. World trade and payments: An introduction.

use of the CAPM model in investment analysis and as a pricing formula. portfolio mean and variance.06 [Theory: 04. Capital structure and the cost of capital. options. 2. forward and future prices. Introduction to option trading strategies: spreads. R.. factors affecting option prices. internal rate of return.. 4th edition. risk-free assets and the one-fund theorem. T. b. McGraw-Hill. David G. Prentice Hall. USA. interest rate sensitivity and duration. c. Corporate Finance Patterns of corporate financing: common stock. corporate debt and dividend policy.C. strips and straps. Some of the basic models used to benchmark valuation of assets and derivatives are studied. Luenberger. the principle of arbitrage. stock index futures. Futures and Other Derivatives. duration-based hedging strategies.F. Practical: 02] Course Description This course introduces students to the economics of finance. 12th edition. Pearson Education. CAPM The capital market line. The course ends with a brief introduction to corporate finance. Options.. call and put options. Financial Theory and Corporate Policy.33 ..A. Deterministic cash-flow streams. spot rates and forward rates. forward and futures contracts. mean-variance portfolio analysis: the Markowitz model and the two-fund theorem.| P a g e .Miller theorem and its modifications. and the Binomial Option Pricing models. Investment Theory and Portfolio Analysis a. 3. Investment Science. the capital asset pricing model. discounting and present value. Single-period random cash flows Random asset returns. bond prices and yields. the use of futures for hedging. straddles. 1997.E. 2005. Brealey. 6th edition. J. strangles. 2017. 2003. 4. Copeland. The theoretical learning is supplemented by some relevant practical application Theory Credit: 04 Contact hours per week: 04 1. preferences. Options and Derivatives Introduction to derivatives and options. security market line. 3. portfolios of assets. F. evaluation criteria. S. 2. Oxford University Press. Weston. interest rate futures. fixed-income securities. convertibles. debt. the Modigliani. John C. other derivatives.. feasible combinations of mean and variance. the term structure of interest rates. . Principles of Corporate Finance. these include the CAPM. option markets. Myers.K. put-call parity. discrete processes and the binomial tree model. and Shastri. and Allen. the beta of an asset and of a portfolio. immunisation. Hull. Readings 1. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY B: FINANCIAL ECONOMICS Credit . yield curves. risk-neutral valuation.

and Bailey..org. S. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course aims to provide an understanding about the application of economic theory and tools of policy analysis on various environmental issues. G. W. applications in derivative market Readings 1. McGraw-Hill.A. Applications related to theories of corporate finance.com. 6th edition. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY 5. Practical Applications Evaluation of bonds and stocks. moneycontrol. 7. Econometrics for Finance. sustainable development. Sustainable Development: Club of Rome Report—Entropy Laws—Economics of the coming spaceship earth—Daly’s steady state growth—Growth versus Environment: Environmental Kuznets’ curve—Brundlandt Commission Report.. W. Theory of externalities: Pollution as externality b. nseindia. The course also introduces analytical concepts and theory concerning environmental externalities and optimal allocation of natural resources. financial statement analysis. J. Sharpe. B. Practical Credit: 02 Contact hours per week: 04 1.G. construction of portfolio and performance analysis. Alexander. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance. 1.| P a g e . Westerfield. international finance and financial markets using MS- Excel and Eviews with data from bseindia.com. 6. Trans-boundary pollution: Distinctive features of trans-boundary pollution—Climate change and Planetary boundary conditions—Institutional response—Pollution Haven hypothesis . Contemporary environmental issues including climate change.in and other relevant database C: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS Credit .com.D. Theory of environmental externalities a. Investments. b. A Random Walk Down Wall Street. 2003. 2. Oxford University Press 2. Ross.W.06 [Theory: 05. Norton & Company. and Jordan.34 . 7th edition. 2005. Prentice Hall of India. Economic theory of efficient pollution control: Regulatory instruments and strategies to control pollution— Tax. rbi. Malkiel. 2003. Brooks. and transboundary pollution shall also be discussed.W. Different valuation techniques shall also be discussed which shall enable students to recognize and apply them for non-marketed inputs and outputs. An ecological perspective: Environment as natural capital—Issue of macroeconomic scale—Economy and the environment.. Standard and Marketable permits—Property rights c. B. Changing perspectives on the environment a. estimation of market models. R. C.

Bateman (1993) Environmental Economics—An elementary introduction. Yue Ma. Kolstad C. Cropper and Wallace E. John Hopkins Press. Optimal exploitation of natural resources a. 2. 4. ME Sharpe Armonk. R.35 . 1992. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. Field and M. Robert N.M. 5th edition. 8. Maureen L. Roach (2013) Environmental and Resource Economics—A contemporary approach. Field (2013) Environmental Economics.ǁ Journal of Economic Literature. Roger Perman. ―Environmental Economics: A Survey. Economic Benefit-Cost analysis: principles—Incorporating environment into the exercise—Discounting 5. Economics of the Environment: Selected Readings. D. (2011): Intermediate Environmental Economics. Norton. 3rd edition. Routledge. Pearson Education/Addison Wesley. Turner and I. Volume 30:675-740. 3. Valuing the environment: Total economic value—Overview of valuation techniques b. Alternative indicators: Genuine Savings—Environmental asset accounts—Gross Eco-system product— Ecological footprint Readings 1. 2003. Harris and B. Oates. Roach. Common property. Environmental and natural resource economics: A contemporary approach.W. Stavins (ed. J. Harris and B. James McGilvray and Michael Common.D. W. fisheries. 6. 7. B. Pearce. 3/e.| P a g e . Valuing the environment a. forests and water. National income and environmental accounting a. d. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY 3. OUP 5. Principles: Greening the National Income Accounts— Environmentally adjusted Net Domestic Product b. 2005. The Mcgraw-Hill. 6/e. . Non-renewable resource: Hotelling’s rule and discounting over time c.). Principles of renewable resource management—Selected examples from bio-diversity loss. open access and property rights 4. J.K. Natural resource: Types and classification b.

Data Management: Data transformation: arithmetic operation. d. 1.formula space. multiplication. mode.Eigen value. b.Formulae and function.36 . log transformation.Advantages and disadvantages of the use of excel for statistical analysis.Rename of the workbook and worksheet. sum. SD.cell-cell formatting. Trim mean. Moments and Order statistics: skewness. which is an open access software.addition. partial correlation. Descriptive Statistics: (i) Univariate Data: Measures of Central Tendency: mean. Data management and presentation using Microsoft Excel a. large value of the data set. sort row wise /column wise. The students will first learn how to handle data and solve basic algebraic problems using Excel. This exercises will be followed by introduction of R. The course shall inculcate the skill of presentation of data using different types of graphs Using solver in excel student will be able to solve linear equation system and LPP and NLPP. Filter of the data set and create sub sample. rank correlation. geometric mean. matrix – transpose. CV.nested if. Location of heading/title bar. Use of ‘If’ function. text to numeric and numeric to text using if function.04 Course Description It is a laboratory based hands-on practical training course followed by practical test. squaring and square root.menu bar. quartile deviation. harmonic mean. median. Scatter diagram and Curve fitting e. averageifs. c. kurtosis. Basics of Microsoft Excel: Opening of Excel file-Workbook and worksheet. Lookup functions.filter according to text filter data according to numeric values or conditions. They will learn different logical and statistical functions in Excel to compute descriptive statistics of a univariate and multivariate data set. max. concatenate. sumif. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY SKILL ENHANCEMENT COURSES (SEC) THIRD SEMESTER ECON03SEC1 DATA MANAGEMENT AND PRESENTATION USING MICROSOFT EXCEL AND R Credit .| P a g e .inverse– solution of a linear system . Graphical Presentation of Data: Different types of charts and their applications. exponential.ascending and descending. Gini coefficient. min. Brief history of Excel workbook. Measures of Dispersion: Range. Sort . Eigen vector . rank and percentile (ii) Multivariate Data: Covariance and correlation matrix. saving the filtered data in separate worksheet. A-Z. count countifcountifs. Matrix and determinants: Computation of determinant of a square matrix. paste special – paste value-paste formula-paste transpose of the data set. average averageif.data entry-data clearing-copy-cut-paste. indices. subtraction. tool bar.

Box-Plots. 6. Data Frames. Pearson 2008 2. . Complex and Raw. Paasche and Ideal index numbers. User Interface. Attributes of Objects. Adler. CPI and implicit deflators 2. Loading Packages. Cleaning. Objects. Lists. b. OUP 2007 4. Changing values. Installing R and RStudio: R Versions. 5ed. Readings 1. Matrices. Saving R Files. Working Directory. Data Editor (RStudio). Arrays. Character. Special Values. Subsetting. Loading and Saving data in R: Entering Data within R. Symbols. Loading Packages. Sorting and Summarizing Data. G. Inc. Customizing Charts.| P a g e . Updating R and its Packages. Timothy C. 2014 “Hands-On Programming with R”. Getting Help. Logical Subsetting. RStudio. Binning. 2012 “R In A Nutshell”.. Stephan. Grolemund. Preparing Data: Combining. 2013 3. c. Working with Environments. Bar Plots. Integers. Hilfiger. Berenson. ii. Prentice Hall. Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft Excel. HTML data links. J. Overview: Expressions. Joseph Schmuller Statistical Analysis with Excel For Dummies 3RD EDITION. Index Numbers: Laspeyres. the read Family. WPI. Data management and presentation using R a. Introduction i. ii. David Whigham. Boolean Operators. Working with data i. Graphics Base Graphics: Scatter Plots. Finding and Installing Packages Inside R and other Repositories. Martin Lee Abbott. O’Reilly Media Inc. Time Series Plots. Packages and Help: The R Console. The Global Environment. The R Language i. Factors. Functions. Class. J.37 . Coercion. Krehbiel Mark L. Business Data Analysis Using Excel. Levine David F. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY f.. R Environment: Symbols. iii. Missing Information and removing NAs. John Wiley & Sons. Dates and Time. R Packages: Listing Packages in Local Libraries.David M. Datasets in R. Histogram. R Objects: Vectors. Package Repositories. iii. Installing Packages. R Files. Transforming. ii. Loading files from other programs. 2011 5. 2016 “Graphing Data with R”. O’Reilly Media Inc. O’Reilly Media Inc. Inc. Understanding Educational Statistics Using Microsoft Excel and SPSS JohnWiley & Sons. d. 7. Logical. 2ed. Download and install R. Excel Spreadsheets and R.

Students will be expected to present their analysis in the form of a written report. The New Oxford Companion to Economics in India. in K. Finance Commission Report .nic. Budget At A Glance.in. 1. Basu and A.in 4. Monthly Economic Data .nic.in/reports/FunClass201415. RBI. Analysis of contemporary Indian Economic Data and Policies Economic survey. “Budget Making”.com/ .nic. Review of Literature c. available at http://finmin.nic. http://www. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY FOURTH SEMESTER ECON04SEC2 ANALYZING CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES Credit .http://finmin. group discussions.04 Course Description The course proposes to develop the capacity of students to analyze and appreciate contemporary economic issues and policy pronouncements. https://www. Pranab Mukherjee (2012). Analyzing economics in the news Writing article about contemporary economic event (National &/or Global) using knowledge of economic theory 3.38 . all available at indiabudget.unionbudget. The Key to Budget Documents.in 6. 3. Economic and Social Classification of the Budget. Macroeconomic Framework Statement. and group presentations. Maertens (eds). 2. Guidance for project writing a. budget.pdf. Writing Project Report – Referencing Styles and use of referencing software 2. Subsequent modules will involve inter-active lectures.economist. The course will start with an introduction to the basic principles of report writing.Ministry of Finance Readings 1. The Economists.| P a g e . annual policy data. OUP. Medium Term Fiscal Policy Statement and Fiscal Policy Strategy Statement . 5. Identifying the topic b.

Elasticity and its application f. 3. g. derivation of the supply curve. Alternatives to the price system – Rationing by Queues. Consumer surplus. choice by command and choice by market. and shifts in the demand curves b.firm’s legal forms. b.choice between leisure and consumption.factors influencing supply. The economic problem: Scarcity and choice . 4. Rationing by Coupons. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. Defining a firm. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyze real-life situations. The consumption decision – description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves) - properties of indifference curves. Comparative statics: income and price changes – derivation of price consumption curve. income consumption curve and Engel’s curve. Exploring the subject matter of Economics Why study economics? Scope and method of microeconomics . The Firm and Perfect Market Structure a. Government Interventions and their Effects on market equilibrium – price ceiling. Economic Systems 2. optimum choice.| P a g e . price floor and commodity taxation. d. Prices and resource allocation e. Rationing by Lotteries. incentives and information – prices (absolute and relative prices) property rights and profits.06 [Theory: 05. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY GENERIC ELECTIVE COURSES IN ECONOMICS FIRST SEMESTER ECON01GE1: INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS Credit . firms and central authorities. demand for all other goods and price changes. budget constraint. Markets and Welfare a.households.Existence. Determination of equilibrium price in a competitive market . and shifts in the supply curve c. producer surplus and the efficiency of the markets.production possibility curve – trade off. Elementary theory of supply . Substitution and income effects and law of demand – concepts of Marshallian and compensated demand curves d. c. opportunity cost and decision making. The Households a. Decision takers.reading and working with graphs. Supply and Demand: How Markets Work.39 . Elementary theory of demand – determinants of household demand and market demand. 1. Labour supply and savings decision . Uniqueness and Stability of equilibrium (the Walrasian approach and Marshallian approach). profit maximization hypothesis .

government policies towards competition. d. Input demand curves. 3. 2. Economics: Principles and Applications. a part of Cengage Learning. New York. 4th edition. shifts in input demand curves. Monopoly and anti-trust policy.. Principles of Economics. Behaviour of profit maximizing firms and the production process. Joseph E. International Student Edition. Stiglitz and Carl E. b. Karl E. d. productivity of an input. Pearson Education Inc. Costs and output in the long run. Labour and land markets . marginal productivity of labour and marginal revenue product. India edition by South Western. Walsh. Concepts of different forms of imperfect competition. Readings 1. W. Case and Ray C.basic concepts of derived demand. 4th Edition. b. Input Markets a.| P a g e . 2007. Short run costs and output decisions.40 . Labour markets and public policy. Imperfect Market Structure a. 8th Edition. 2007. c.W. Economics. 5. . Gregory Mankiw. Cengage Learning India Private Limited.. c. Inc. Competitive labour markets. N. Norton & Company. 2007. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY b. Fair. 6.

determination of money supply.quantity theory approach c. and Startz. structural unemployment. R. Paradox of thrift. Macroeconomics. 4. 2010. Hicks. Money supply and Inflation . 1. Froyen. Determination of equilibrium income and interest rate. frictional unemployment . multiplier. involuntary and voluntary unemployment 4. Concepts of unemployment. 2. money creation by commercial banks. Inflation and Unemployment a.Monetary policies and fiscal policies Readings 1. 3.41 . McGraw Hill. GDP. Macroeconomics deals with the aggregate economy. Money Definitions of money – M1. problems encountered in measuring National Income. This course discusses the preliminary concepts associated with the determination and measurement of aggregate macroeconomic variable like savings.06 [Theory: 05. GNP. the Framework of the Indian Economy: An Introduction to Economics. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course aims to introduce the students to the basic concepts of Macroeconomics. R. NDP. measurement of GDP. M2. 12th edition.. 2011. Fischer. Introduction to Macroeconomics and National Income Accounting Introduction to Macroeconomic variables.Keynesian consumption function. Macroeconomics. M3 and M4..Investment function and IS curve. 3. basic issues studied in macroeconomics. Principles of Macroeconomics. Ghosh. 2014. Functions of money. Macroeconomics. National Income as a measure of welfare. Meaning of inflation. R. 2. Mankiw. Worth Publishers. circular flow of income. cyclical unemployment. J. M. The Closed Economy in the Short Run Simple Keynesian model of income determination . Dornbusch. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY SECOND SEMESTER ECON02GE2: INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS Credit .G. WPI and GDP deflator.. S. Mukherjee and Syamal K. 7th edition.T. Comparative Statics . 5. 2nd edition. money multiplier. real versus nominal GDP -CPI. R.. National Income accounting for an open economy. NNP and NI. 2005.. Oxford University Press. natural rate of unemployment. N. control of money supply by the central bank tools of monetary policy. Autonomous investment and Income-Expenditure equilibrium. microeconomic and macroeconomic approaches. 1989 . 2nd edition. Pearson Education Asia. balance of payments: current and capital accounts. S. investment.| P a g e . and monetary and fiscal policies. IS-LM model . Oxford University Press. cost of inflation and hyper inflation b. Asset market equilibrium and LM curve.. inflation. Sikdar. money.

Employment Guarantee Act- 2005 4. regional disparities in growth rates b. demographic dividend 3. Trend in public expenditure for health and hygiene. c. Population policy. economic reforms and poverty in India. sources of plan financing. Sector-wise growth profile and changes of its contribution in GDP. multidimensional poverty. International Comparisons Comparison of India with other countries with reference to GNI and its inequality. e. Demographic transition theory and dynamics of population in India. Government plans and programs for reducing unemployment. changing dimensions of unemployment. Given the rapid changes taking place in India. Five Years Plans: Objectives. 1. age. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY THIRD SEMESTER ECON03GE3A: INDIAN ECONOMY I Credit . Major features of the economy at independence. unemployment rates and growth rates. recent controversy of poverty reduction. nature. right to education and education policies c. d. trend of nature and causes of income inequality in India. measures of mobilization of domestic savings.06 [Theory: 05. b. the reading list will have to be updated annually. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description Using appropriate analytical frameworks. different estimates of poverty. Population and Human Development a. Growth and Distribution a. Education – literacy rate. Estimates of unemployment and its trend.42 . growth rate and ICOR 2.| P a g e . GDP and employment share. enrollment ratio. an assessment of performance of different plans d. structural change in employment. Human development index and progress of human development. mid-day meal programme and other policies of child and family welfare. this course reviews major trends in economic indicators and policy debates in India in the post-Independence period. b. Different concepts of poverty and its measures. income poverty. HDI for several states over time. rural urban disparity in income and wealth inequality. assessment of the poverty alleviation policies since independence. infant mortality. Growth and inequality. life expectancy.gender discrimination in enrolment – trend in public expenditure for education. Trend of savings and capital formation. relation between savings rate. causes and consequences of malnutrition. Economic Development since Independence a. Health as an indicator of human development. with particular emphasis on paradigm shifts and turning points. growth and development under different policy regimes. sex composition and development issues. c. Human development and other indicators . growth of large industrial houses and middle class. child health. public measures to combat against inequality in income and wealth.

An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions. Dyson. Rakshit. Vaidyanathan.G. Krishna and A. M. Economic and Political Weekly. Kingdon. September. ―The Progress of School Education in India. Kaushik Basu and A. ―Inequities in Access to Health Services in India: Caste. eds. Economic andPolitical Weekly. Economic and Political Weekly.| P a g e . editor. ―India‘s Public Distribution System: Utilisation and ImpactJournal of Development Studies. ―Growth Record of Indian Economy: 1950-2008.43 . Himanshu. Princeton University Press. Economic and Political Weekly. 8. Shetty. 4. Economic and Political Weekly. Oxford University Press. 9. 7.L. 2011.B. September. in K. Academic Foundation. 2013. 19thedition. 14. 2010. Maertens. International Journal of Educational Development. 2011. January. Aniruddha Krishna and Devendra Bajpai. 2007. June. May. 2007. Food and Nutrition in India: Facts and Intepretations. 2009. Reetika Khera. The Recovery of India: Economic Growth in the Nehru Era. ―Employment Trends in India: A Re-examination. ―India‘s Savings Performance since the Advent of Planning. 2008. February. Institutions and Markets in India’sDevelopment. . November. 2011. James. ―Post Elementary Education. Government of India. 16-17.Economic and Political Weekly. A Story of Sustained Savings and Investment. Macroeconomics of Post Reform India. 11. ―Lineal Spread and Radial Dissipation: Experiencing Growth in Rural India. 2.Economic and Political Weekly. 2009. 2008. Geeta G. Oxford University Press. 2015-16. Rakesh Mohan. Economic Survey. 2007. ―Glorifying Malthus: Current Debate on Demographic Dividend in IndiaǁEconomic and Political Weekly. 15. 2011. 2017 Datt and Sudharam’s Indian Economy (latest edition) 18. Indian Economy Since Independence. 2008. 2013. 17-18 19. S. 16. The New Oxford Companion to Economics. Class and Region. Poverty and Development in India. 6. Economic and Political Weekly. 13. Jean Dreze and Amartya Sen. 3. September. ―India‘s Demographic Transition and its Consequences for Developmentǁ in Uma Kapila. Human Development Reports UNDP ((latest) 20. 17 Datt and Mahajan. Tilak. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY Readings 1. Rama Baru et al. 2010. J. editors. 1992-2005. Kaushik Basu. 5. September. ―China and India: Idiosyncratic Paths to High Growth. Jean Dreze and Angus Deaton. 12. K. Himanshu. 2007. 10. Towards New Poverty Lines for India. Oxford Review of Economic Policy. Pulapre Balakrishnan. T.L.

Financial Institutions and Markets. 3. monetary management and instruments of monetary control.I. 2014 3. Y. F. 2011. 5. targets. F. F. Annual Reports. The Economics of Money. M. 4. Bhole and J. Balance sheet and portfolio management. b. role of financial derivatives and other innovations. Interest Rates Determination. Financial and banking sector reforms and monetary policy with special reference to India are also covered. banking sector reforms. b. F. balance sheet. G. . Mishkin. 6. functions. Fabozzi.B. S. Mishkin and S. Tata McGraw Hill. problem of asymmetric information – adverse selection and moral hazard. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course exposes students to the theory and functioning of the monetary and financial sectors of the economy. Role of financial markets and institutions. 1. Financial Institutions. current monetary policy of India. Readings 1. 11th edition. S. Banking and Financial Markets. Money and capital markets: organization. Reports on Currency and Finance and Reports of the Working Group. sources of interest rate differentials. structure and role of financial markets and institutions. J. goals. Money Concept. M. Foundations of Financial Markets and Institutions. Mahukud. Various latest issues of R. Pearson Education. Indian banking system: Changing role and structure. 4.44 . Instruments and Financial Innovations a. Bulletins. 3rd edition. Eakins.| P a g e . Central Banking and Monetary Policy Functions. Markets. measurement. 6th edition. Tata McGraw Hill. IMF Staff Papers. structure and reforms in India. It highlights the organization. 5. It also discusses interest rates. Jones. G. Pearson Education. monetary management in an open economy. Modigliani. J. Pearson Education. 2. 2009. theories of term structure of interest rates. M. Financial Markets and Institutions. 5th edition. 2009. indicators and instruments of monetary control. Ferri. financial crises. 2011. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON03GE3B: MONEY AND BANKING Credit . 7th edition. 2. Banking System a. F. theories of money supply determination. interest rates in India. Khan. L.06 [Theory: 05. Indian Financial System.

Fiscal policy b.ǁin Shankar Acharya and Rakesh Mohan. Special Economic Zones 4. Pulapre Balakrishnan.N. Topalova. Goldberg.| P a g e . trend of FDI in India’s services sector. 2010. public administration and defense. editors. 5. research and development services. N. ―Macroeconomic Performance and Policies 2000-8. P. Khandelwal. share and growth of major services – tourism. Rakesh Mohan. 2005. small scale industries. productivity. Oxford University Press. ―AgriculturalGrowth in India Since 1991. Trends and Performance in Services Composition of service sector in India. Financial and monetary policies d. shipping and port services. editors. ―TradeLiberalisation and New Imported Inputs. IT including software Readings 1. Pavcnik and P. India’s Economy: Performancesand Challenges: Development and Participation. trade. 2. Policies and Performance in Agriculture Growth. A. capital formation. transport and storage. performance of the services in India’s services trade. NABARD and agricultural credit. The Developing Economics. .06 [Theory: 05. public sector. pricing and procurement. Trade and investment policies c. land reforms 3. 2009. Aggarwal. productivity. housing and real estate. India’s Economy: Performancesand Challenges: Development and Participation. 3. competition policy. American Economic Review. May. trend of growth and contribution of service sector in GDP.C. Goldar and S. Papersand Proceedings. policy issues for major services like tourism. information and broadcasting. September. 1. Shankar Acharya. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY FOURTH SEMESTER ECON04GE4A: INDIAN ECONOMY II Credit . foreign investment. financial services. It highlights major policy debates and evaluates the Indian empirical evidence. hotel and restaurant. Macroeconomic Policies and Their Impact a. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course examines sector-specific polices and their impact in shaping trends in key economic indicators in India. Given the rapid changes taking place in the country. ―India‘s Financial Sector and Monetary Policy Reforms. Ramesh Golait and Pankaj Kumar. the reading list will have to be updated annually. Labour regulations 2.45 . diversification. Oxford University Press. Policies and Performance in Industry Growth.ǁ inShankar Acharya and Rakesh Mohan. RBI DEAP Study no. B. 2010. ―Trade Liberalisation and Price-CostMargin in Indian Industries. communication. agrarian structure and technology. 4. 27. 2008.

Maertens. Kaushik Basu and A. 12. ―Understanding the Nature and Causes of Food Inflation.46 .| P a g e . 11. Pages and T.Routledge. Economic Survey (Latest) . Mazumdar and S. The New Oxford Companion toEconomics in India. OUP. 2010. editor. editors. C. Routledge. 9. The Rise of Asia. BishwanathGoldar. 8. A. Oxford University Press. February. Dipak Mazumdar and Sandeep Sarkar. Roy. 13. Foreign Direct Investment and IndustrialTransformation in India. Sarkar. 2009. April. ―Size and Growth of Private Corporate Sector inIndian Manufacturing. 2008.The Oxford Handbook of the Indian Economy. Enforcement andAdjudication in Indian Labour Markets: Origins. J. Ramesh Chand. 2011. 2012 14. 7. ―Legislation. April. Economic and Political Weekly. ―The Employment Problem in Indiaand the Phenomenon of the ‗Missing Middleǁ.ǁEconomic and Political Weekly. Chetan Ghate (Ed). Consequences and the WayForward. in D. 10. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY 6. 2011. ―Organised Manufacturing Employment: Continuingthe Debateǁ. eds. Labour Marketsand Inequality in India. 2010. Globalization. ―Trade. Kunal Sen. Indian Journal of LabourEconomics. ïnPremachandraAthukorala. Dennis Rajakumar. 2013. Economic and Political Weekly. Ahsan.

and A. Report of the 13th Finance Commission. The course does not require any prior knowledge of economics.47 . Gayatri Publications. Economic Survey.Graw Hill. 4. R. c. Tools of Normative Analysis.).A. Musgrave. Reserve Bank of India (latest). c. Tutorial: 01] Contact hours per week: 06 Course Description This course is a non-technical overview of government finances with special reference to India. Current Issues of India’s Tax System. The Oxford Companion to Economics in India.06 [Theory: 05. Government Budgeting in India. Elementary Theories of Product and Factor Taxation (Excess Burden and Incidence). Overview of Fiscal Functions. Shankar Acharya. states and the local governments and the issues of fiscal federalism and decentralisation in India. . DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS PRESIDENCY UNIVERSITY ECON04GE4B: PUBLIC FINANCE Credit . Government of India. 2. b. 2. M. business and journalism. Equity and the Social Welfare. State Finances: A Study of Budgets. 3. 5. It will look into the efficiency and equity aspects of taxation of the centre. Musgrave. 2007. Pareto Efficiency. Commonwealth Publishers. Fiscal Federalism in India e. Public Finance in Theory and Practice. Government of India (latest).B. 6.| P a g e . Analysis of Budget and Deficits d. Maertens (ed. State and Local Finances Readings 1. “Value Added Tax: Experience of India and Other Countries”. Economic and Political Weekly. Mahesh Purohit . Oxford University Press. 8. and P.M Sury. “Thirty years of tax reform” in India. 1990. Market Failure. b. 7. Mc. Kaushik Basu. The course will be useful for students aiming towards careers in the government sector.2007. policy analysis. Issues from Indian Public Finance a. 1. Working of Monetary and Fiscal Policies. Theory a. May 2005. 1989. Public Good and Externalities.