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AM50/55/50E/55E

Operator’s Manual

Altec Industries, Inc. reserves the right to improve models and change specifications without notice.
749-20143
August 2005
Copyright © 2005 by Altec Industries, Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used or reproduced by any means, or stored in a
database or retrieval system, without prior written permission of the publisher. Making copies of any part
of this publication for any purpose other than personal use is a violation of United States copyright laws.
Altec Industries, Inc.
Midwest Division
St. Joseph, Missouri
Safety Bulletin
Electrical Continuity Hazard
Always wear insulated protective equipment, use conductor cover-ups, and maintain required clearances
when in the vicinity of energized conductors.

Aerial devices and digger derricks with insulated booms can only isolate the operator from grounding through the
boom and vehicle. They cannot provide protection against phase-to-phase or phase-to-ground contacts occurring
at the boom-tip, above the insulated boom sections.

Boom-tips of aerial devices and digger derricks, of necessity, must contain metal components. Metal conducts
electricity. Moreover, under certain circumstances, and to varying degrees, electricity will track across or
through non-metallic components (fiberglass covers and structures, hoses, etc.). Electricity can even arc through
air. Thus, the boom-tip of an aerial device or a digger derrick must be considered conductive!

If any part of the boom-tip contacts an energized conductor, the entire boom-tip, including the control
handle, must be considered energized.

If any part of the boom-tip contacts a grounded object, the entire boom-tip, including the control handle,
must be considered grounded.

Hydraulic fluid is flammable. If electricity flows through the boom-tip, it can cause the hydraulic fluid to burn or
to explode. Contact by any part of the boom-tip with an energized conductor while the boom-tip also is in
contact with another energized source or a grounded object can cause the hydraulic fluid at the boom-tip
to burn or explode.

These are among the reasons aerial devices1 and digger derricks are never considered primary protection for the
operator from electrical contact. An operator’s primary protection comes through use of protective equip-
ment (insulated gloves, insulated sleeves, conductor cover-ups) and maintenance of appropriate clearances.

Do not rely on the boom-tip of an aerial device or digger derrick to protect you from an energized conduc-
tor or a ground. It cannot do so. Rely, instead, on the only things that can protect you, use of appropriate
protective equipment and maintenance of appropriate clearances.

1
Except ANSI Category A units
Warranty
Altec Industries, Inc.
Unit Registration

Important Unit Warranty Information


To insure the proper registration of your new Altec unit, send in the registration card when
the unit has been delivered or placed inservice. Please note that the 12 month warranty
period on your new ALTEC unit begins at the unit delivery/in-service date at your facility if
you mail this card.

If the card is not mailed within 60 days of the delivery of the unit, the unit invoice date
will be understood to be the in-service date.

In order to insure the correct processing of any warranty claim it is important that the at-
tached card be filled out and returned to the central processing center.

Place the proper postage on the card and place it in the mailbox.

Altec Unit Registration Card


Altec Model Number ______________________________

Altec Serial Number ______________________________

Company Name ________________________________________________


Address _______________________________________________________

City ____________________________ State ________ Zip __________

Contact Name __________________________________________________


Phone Number _________________________________________________

Email Address __________________________________________________

Date Placed in Service _______________ Customer Truck No. _________


FIRST CLASS
POSTAGE
REQUIRED

Altec Industries, Inc.


Sales Registration Administrator
2106 South Riverside Road
St. Joseph, MO 64507
Altec Industries, Inc.
Unit Registration
The attached registration card(s) are provided to assist a future purchaser to notify Altec of the change of
ownership This notification is part of the ANSI standard under Responsibilities of Owners - Transfer of
Ownership.

The ANSI Standard states “ When a change in ownership of a digger derrick or aerial device occurs, it
shall be the responsibility of the seller to provide the manufacturer’s manual(s) for the digger derrick or
aerial device to the purchaser. It is the responsibility of the purchaser to notify the manufacturer of the unit
model and serial number and the name and address of the new owner within 60 days.”

Please complete the information on the appropriate card, attach a stamp and mail to Altec. This allows
Altec to update the customer mailing list so that necessary manufacturer/user communications can be sent
to the new owner.

3rd Owner Altec Unit Registration Card


Altec Model Number ______________________________
Altec Serial Number ______________________________
Company Name ________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________________
City ____________________________ State ________ Zip __________
Contact Name __________________________________________________
Phone Number _________________________________________________
Email Address __________________________________________________
Date Placed in Service _______________ Customer Truck No. _________
Previous Owner _________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________________
City ____________________________ State ________ Zip __________

2nd Owner Unit Registration Card


Altec Model Number ______________________________
Altec Serial Number ______________________________
Company Name ________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________________
City ____________________________ State ________ Zip __________
Contact Name __________________________________________________
Phone Number _________________________________________________
Email Address __________________________________________________
Date Placed in Service _______________ Customer Truck No. _________
Previous Owner _________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________________
City ____________________________ State ________ Zip __________
FIRST CLASS
POSTAGE
REQUIRED

Altec Industries, Inc.


Sales Registration Administrator
2106 South Riverside Road
St. Joseph, MO 64507

FIRST CLASS
POSTAGE
REQUIRED

Altec Industries, Inc.


Sales Registration Administrator
2106 South Riverside Road
St. Joseph, MO 64507
Preface

This unit is the result of Altec’s advanced technology and quality awareness in design,
engineering, and manufacturing. At the time of delivery from the factory, this unit met or
exceeded all applicable requirements of the American National Standards Institute. All
information, illustrations, and specifications contained within this manual are based on the
latest product information available at the time of publication. It is essential that all personnel
involved in the use and/or care of this unit read and understand the Operator’s Manual.

Given reasonable care and operation, according to the guidelines set forth in the manuals
provided, this unit will provide many years of excellent service before requiring major
maintenance.

Impacts to and excessive forces on the hydraulic utility equipment, through vehicular
accidents, rollovers, excessive loading, and the like, may result in structural damage not
obvious during a visual inspection. If the hydraulic utility equipment is subjected to such
impacts or forces, a qualified person may need to perform additional testing such as acoustic
emissions, magnuflux or ultrasonic testing as applicable. If structural damage is suspected
or found, contact Altec for additional instructions.

Warning
Death or serious injury can result from component failure. Continued use of a mobile
unit with hidden damage could lead to component failure.

Never alter or modify this unit in any way that might affect the structural integrity or operational
characteristics without the specific written approval of Altec Industries, Inc. Unauthorized
alterations or modifications will void the warranty. Of greater concern, is the possibility that
unauthorized modification could adversely affect the safe operation of this unit, resulting in
personal injury and/or property damage.

Danger
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected contact with energized conductors.
Non-insulated units have no dielectric rating. Maintain safe clearances, as defined by
federal, state, and local authorities, and your employer, from energized conductors.

No unit can provide absolute safety when in proximity to energized conductors. No unit is
designed or intended to replace or supersede any protective device or safe work practice
relating to work in proximity to energized conductors. When in proximity to energized
conductors, this unit shall only be used by trained personnel using their company’s accepted
work methods, safety procedures, and protective equipment. Training manuals are available
from a variety of sources.

Set-up requirements, work procedures, and safety precautions for each particular situation
are the responsibility of the personnel involved in the use and/or care of this unit.

7-04
Table of Contents

Section 1 — Introduction
About This Manual… ..................................................................................................... 1

Section 2 — Unit Specifications


Purpose of the Unit ........................................................................................................ 3
General Specifications ................................................................................................... 3
Component Identification ............................................................................................... 5
Reach Diagrams ............................................................................................................ 6

Section 3 — Safety
Safety Instructions ....................................................................................................... 11
Capacity ....................................................................................................................... 11
Accident Prevention Signs ........................................................................................... 11
Accident Prevention Signs Diagram ...................................................................... 12

Section 4 — Before You Operate…


Capacity and Stability .................................................................................................. 19
Operation Near Energized Conductors ......................................................................... 20
Daily Preoperational Inspection ................................................................................... 21
Inspection Diagram ............................................................................................... 22
Preparing for Operation ................................................................................................ 24
Cold Weather Start-Up ................................................................................................. 25

Section 5 — Operation
Ground Level Controls ................................................................................................. 27
Machine/Outriggers Selector ................................................................................. 27
Outriggers .............................................................................................................. 27
Interlock System ................................................................................................... 28
Motion Alarm ......................................................................................................... 28
Lower Controls ............................................................................................................. 28
Upper Controls ............................................................................................................. 28
Emergency Stop .................................................................................................... 29
Single Handle Control ............................................................................................ 29
Booms ......................................................................................................................... 30
Lower Boom .......................................................................................................... 30
Upper Boom .......................................................................................................... 31
Boom Storage ....................................................................................................... 31
Rotation ....................................................................................................................... 31
Personnel Platform ...................................................................................................... 32
Platform Rotation .................................................................................................. 32
Platform Leveling System ..................................................................................... 33
Platform Tilt ........................................................................................................... 33
Lanyard Anchor ..................................................................................................... 33
Material Handling System ............................................................................................ 33
Telescopic Jib (Hydraulic Extend) ......................................................................... 34
Telescopic Jib (Manual Extend) ............................................................................ 35
Jib Adapter ............................................................................................................ 35
Winch .................................................................................................................... 35
Phase Lifter ........................................................................................................... 36
Lower Boom Lifting Eye ........................................................................................ 36
Tool System ................................................................................................................ 37
Remote Start/Stop System .......................................................................................... 38
Toggle Switch ........................................................................................................ 38
Captive Air Cylinder ............................................................................................... 38
Other Methods of Lowering/Stowing the Unit ............................................................... 38
Secondary Stowage DC Pump ..................................................................................... 39
Manually Lowering/Stowing the Unit ............................................................................ 39
Auxiliary Power Sources .............................................................................................. 42

Section 6 — Care of the Unit


Hydraulic System ........................................................................................................ 45
Fiberglass .................................................................................................................... 45
Single Handle Control and Control Handle Covers ....................................................... 45
Structures and Mechanical Systems ........................................................................... 45

Appendix
Glossary
Material Handling Capacity Charts
Troubleshooting Chart
Section 1 — Introduction

Additional copies of this manual may be ordered through


About This Manual… your Altec representative. Supply the model and serial
This manual provides instruction for the operation of the number found on the serial number placard and the manual
unit. The operator must be familiar with the unit and its part number from the front cover to assure that the correct
capabilities before using the unit on the job. This manual manual will be supplied.
is written to provide an understanding of the unit, safety,
proper set-up, and operation. This symbol is used throughout this manual to
indicate danger, warning, and caution instruc-
Charts and figures are provided to support the text. tions. These instructions must be followed to
Because options vary from one model to another, some reduce the likelihood of personal injury and/or property
figures may only be a representation of what is actually on damage.
the unit.
The terms danger, warning, and caution represent varying
Contact the following organizations for additional informa- degrees of personal injury and/or property damage that
tion. could result if the preventive instructions are not followed.
The following paragraphs from ANSI publications explain
• American National Standards Institute (ANSI) each term.
A92.2 for aerial devices; A10.31 for digger derricks
• American Public Power Association Danger
(Safety Manual for an Electric Utility) Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which,
• American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
• American Welding Society (AWS) This signal word is to be limited to the most
• European Committee for Standardization (CEN) extreme situations.
• Fluid Power Society (FPS)
• Hydraulic Tool Manufacturer’s Association (HTMA) Warning
• International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which,
• International Organization for Standardization (ISO) if not avoided, could result in death or serious
• Occupational Safety and Health Administration injury.
(OSHA)
Caution
Dealers, installers, owners, users, operators, rentors, Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which,
lessors, and lessees must comply with the appropriate if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate
sections of the applicable ANSI standard. injury. It may also be used to alert against unsafe
practices.
The Appendix contains reference items to assist in unit
operation. A glossary of industry terms is provided for your The term attention is used to alert personnel of special
convenience. This glossary provides an understanding of information to assist in the operation of the unit or
the industry terms and phrases used in Altec manuals. instructions that must be followed to prevent the possibil-
Throughout the manual, the term unit is used to describe ity of damage to structures, components, or other prop-
the Altec device, subbase, outriggers, and the associated erty.
interface with the vehicle.

Section 1 — Introduction • 1
2 • Section 1 — Introduction
Section 2 — Unit Specifications

Insulation or isolation capabilities depend on proper main-


Purpose of the Unit tenance and dielectric testing of the fiberglass compo-
This unit has been designed and built to function as an nents. As with any insulated unit, there are limits to
insulated aerial work platform. It can be used to raise protection that can be provided by the unit. Some of those
personnel and material to the workstation. limitations are presented in this manual in Section 4 under
Operation Near Energized Conductors.
General Specifications This unit may be ANSI rated for insulated aerial devices as
This unit uses a side-by-side boom design. Unit height Category A, B, or C. This ANSI rating is stamped on the
specifications are based on 40-inch (101.6 centimeters) serial number placard located on the pedestal. Dielectric
frame height, but common frame heights vary from 36 testing of the insulating components and proper mainte-
inches (91.44 centimeters) to 44 inches (111.76 centime- nance are necessary to maintain optimum dielectric pro-
ters). Figure 2.1 provides general unit specifications. tection.

Section 2 — Unit Specifications • 3


Item AM50 AM55 AM50E AM55E
Maximum ground to bottom of platform height 50.3′ (15.3 m) 55.3′ (16.9 m) 51.4′ (15.7 m) 56.0′ (17.1 m)
Working height 55.3′ (16.8 m) 60.3′ (18.4 m) 56.4′ (17.2 m) 61.0′ (18.6 m)
Maximum side reach — upper boom overcenter, lower boom at 0° 42.3′ (12.9 m) 47.3′ (14.4 m) 44.1′ (13.5 m) 48.8′ (14.9 m)
1 1 2
Maximum side reach — upper boom non-overcenter 31.5′ (9.6 m) 34.4′ (10.5 m) 39.7′ (12.1 m) 43.4′ (13.2 m)2
Travel height 11.3′ (3.4 m) 11.3′ (3.4 m) 11.3′ (3.4 m) 11.3′ (3.4 m)
Maximum hydraulic pressure setting 3,000 psi (207 bar) 3,000 psi (207 bar) 3,000 psi (207 bar) 3,000 psi (207 bar)
Rotation Continuous Continuous Continuous Continuous
Lower boom articulation 0° to 100° 0° to 100° 0° to 124° 0° to 124°

4 • Section 2 — Unit Specifications


Lower boom isolation 24″ (610 mm) 24″ (610 mm) 12″ (305 mm) 24″ (610 mm)
Upper boom articulation 0° to 210° 0° to 210° 0° to 200° 0° to 200°
Upper boom isolation 120″ (3048 mm) 150″ (3810 mm) 120″ (3048 mm) 150″ (3810 mm)
Winch capacity (full drum) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg)
Jib articulation -30° to 90° -30° to 90° -30° to 90° -30° to 90°
3
Maximum jib capacity (extended) 750 lb (340.2 kg) 750 lb (340.2 kg) 750 lb (340.2 kg) 750 lb (340.2 kg)
3
Maximum jib capacity (retracted) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg)
3
Maximum material handling capacity 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg)
3
Maximum lower boom lifting eye capacity 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) 2,000 lb (907.2 kg)
Synthetic winch line 80′ 80′ 80′ 80′
Maximum tool pressure 2,000 psi (138 bar) 2,000 psi (138 bar) 2,000 psi (138 bar) 2,000 psi (138 bar)
Maximum tool flow 8 gpm (30.3 l/min) 8 gpm (30.3 l/min) 8 gpm (30.3 l/min) 8 gpm (30.3 l/min)
3
Maximum platform capacity — one man 400 lb (181.4 kg) 400 lb (181.4 kg) 400 lb (181.4 kg) 400 lb (181.4 kg)
3
Maximum platform capacity — two man 800 lb (362.9 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg)
3
Maximum total platform capacity — dual one man, single control 800 lb (362.9 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg)
3
Maximum total platform capacity — dual one man, dual controls 800 lb (362.9 kg) 700 lb (317.5 kg) 800 lb (362.9 kg) 700 lb (317.5 kg)
Platform rotation 90° 90° 90° 90°
1
Lower boom at 100°
2
Lower boom at 124°
3
Refer to capacity placards
Figure 2.1 — Unit Specifications
Component Identification

Jib

Upper Controls

Winch

Upper
Platform
Boom Tip
Upper Boom

Upper Boom
Turntable Lower Boom Cylinders Elbow
Boom Pin

Platform Tilt
Cylinder

Lower Lower Boom


Controls Lower Boom Insulator Upper
Pedestal Cylinder Boom Drive
Mechanism

Outrigger
Controls Outriggers

Section 2 — Unit Specifications • 5


Reach Diagrams

AM50

6 • Section 2 — Unit Specifications


AM55

Section 3 — Safety • 7
AM50E

8 • Section 2 — Unit Specifications


AM55E

Section 2 — Unit Specifications • 9


10 • Section 2 — Unit Specifications
Section 3 — Safety

your employer’s safe work practices and the procedures in


Safety Instructions this manual when operating the unit.
This unit is designed and manufactured with many fea-
tures intended to reduce the likelihood of an accident. General Operating Information
Safety alerts throughout this manual highlight situations in • Do not operate the unit without proper training.
which accidents can occur. Pay special attention to all • Be sure that the unit is operating properly, and has
safety alerts. been inspected, maintained, and tested in accor-
dance with the manufacturer’s and government’s
requirements.
Danger • Use the personal fall protection system.
Death or serious injury will result from careless or • Be aware of the surroundings.
improper use of the unit. Do not operate the unit • Perform the Daily Preoperational Inspection before
without proper training. operating the unit each day.
• Apply the parking brake, chock the wheels, start the
engine, and engage the PTO. Properly set the outrig-
Warning gers.
Death or serious injury can result from careless or • Properly set up the unit before moving the booms
improper use of the unit. The operator bears ultimate from the rest.
responsibility for following all regulations and safety • Operate the controls smoothly, avoiding sudden
rules of their employer and/or any state or federal law. starts and stops.
• Never exceed the rated capacity values.
It is very important that all personnel are properly trained • Follow all of your employer’s work rules and applicable
to act quickly and responsibly in an emergency, knowing government regulations.
the location of the controls and how they operate. Keep
any tools or equipment needed to perform manual opera- Capacity
tions in a well-marked, designated area.
Platform capacity of the unit is the total weight of the
personnel, tools, material, and liner that may be lifted by
Danger the platform without overloading the unit. The platform
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected capacity can be found on the serial number placard located
contact with energized conductors. Maintain safe on the pedestal. Before lifting a load, determine the total
clearances from electrical power lines and apparatus. weight to be lifted by the unit, including personnel, tools,
Allow for platform or line sway, rock, or sag. material, and liner. Compare that total weight to the
capacity listed on the serial number placard.
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected
contact with energized conductors. This unit does not Capacity information for the material handling system can
provide protection from contact with or proximity to be found in Section 5.
an electrically charged conductor when you are in
contact with or proximity to another conductor or any Accident Prevention Signs
grounded device, material, or equipment. Maintain
safe clearances from energized conductors. This unit was equipped with accident prevention signs at
the time of manufacture. If any of these are lost or become
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected illegible, obtain replacements from your Altec representa-
contact with energized conductors. Operators must tive.
read and understand the contents of Section 4 in this
manual before operating the unit near energized con- The location, part numbers, and descriptions of all plac-
ductors. ards are listed in the Parts Manual. Refer to the Accident
Prevention Signs and Diagram for examples of the plac-
Knowledge of the information in this manual and proper ards and their locations.
training provide a basis for safely operating the unit. Follow

Section 3 — Safety • 11
Accident Prevention Signs Diagram

2*

2
16* 10* 16* 10*

Single 2-man
Platform Only
11 6 7 22 5 4
21 19
3

14 9 13
18 All placards on top and
Top only bottom of boom tip cover

8*
Single 2-man
17 Platform Only
9

1
2
12 6 20
12

15

* Located on both sides of unit

12 • Section 3 — Safety
1

3 4

4-06 Section 3 — Safety • 13


6

5 7

14 • Section 3 — Safety
9 10

DANGER

12

13
11

4-06 Section 3 — Safety • 15


14 15

16

18 17

16 • Section 3 — Safety
20
19

22
21

Section 3 — Safety • 17
18 • Section 3 — Safety
Section 4 — Before You Operate…

All operators involved in the use and/or care of this unit such units, outriggers must be extended as instructed
must know the location and understand the operation of under Outriggers. Use outrigger pads on all unpaved
each control on the unit. Control locations are pointed out surfaces, asphalt pavement, and other soft surfaces.
in Component Identification. Operation of the controls is
explained in Section 5. It is impossible to foresee all situations and combinations
for set up of the unit. Establish criteria for stable operation
of the unit based on actual conditions, work procedures,
Capacity and Stability and experience. The owner and operator bear ultimate
Maximum capacity of the platform(s) is stated on the serial responsibility for insuring that the unit is properly set up.
number placard. This placard is mounted on the side of the
pedestal. Capacity values indicate the lift capacity of the
unit. Warning
Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes
unstable. Properly set the outriggers before moving
Warning the booms from the rest.
Death or serious injury can result from overloading
the unit. Do not exceed the rated capacity values. Understand the stability characteristics of this unit before
using it. As delivered, this unit will meet or exceed the
An upper boom angle indicator and a placard indicating requirements for stability as set forth in ANSI publications.
material handling lift capacities are located at the boom tip.
Sample material handling placards are shown in Figure Determine the weight of the material before moving it. Use
4.1. The values on the jib capacity placard indicate the placards on the unit and in the Operator’s Manual to
maximum structural capacity of the jib only. The values on determine the available rated lifting capacities. Do not
the lift capacity placard indicate the maximum load which exceed rated lift capacities.
can be lifted at various boom angles and configurations.
Refer to the material handling capacity chart, platform Using the unit in an unsafe manner or overloading the unit
mounted placards, and angle indicators for specific lift can cause weld fatigue and eventual failure.
information.
Stability, or resistance to tipping, is determined by many
factors including the size and weight of the chassis and the
Warning location of the unit mounting on the chassis. The unit is
Park on a firm surface before operating the unit. Use equipped with outriggers to help stabilize the unit while it
wheel chocks and parking brakes. On units equipped is in use.
with outriggers, use of outriggers is mandatory. On

Figure 4.1 — Sample Material Handling Capacity Charts

Section 4 — Before You Operate… • 19


(insulated gloves, insulated sleeves, hot sticks) and
Operation Near maintenance of appropriate clearance. The unit itself
Energized Conductors only provides secondary protection for the operator by
insulating the operator from grounding through the
Warning boom and vehicle.
Death or serious injury can result from careless or
improper use of the unit. The operator bears ultimate
responsibility for following all regulations and safety Danger
rules of their employer and/or any state or federal law. Death or serious injury will result from contact with or
proximity to an energized conductor. Maintain the
This unit is manufactured with an insulated upper boom dielectric characteristics of the insulating compo-
and lower boom insert. When these components are nents.
properly used and maintained, the unit will provide second-
ary insulation so that the unit will perform its function as an • The fiberglass boom and internal upper boom compo-
insulated aerial work platform. The unit is manufactured to nents are intended to provide the platform occupant
meet ANSI dielectric requirements in effect at the time of secondary protection from current flow to ground
its manufacture. The classification and dielectric rating of potential through the boom and vehicle. This protec-
the unit must be known and understood by its users. tion is provided only when they are clean, dry, free
Category B and C aerial devices are designed and manu- from tracking, and in good condition, as established
factured for work in which the boom is not considered as by dielectric testing. Utility poles, cross arms, hard-
primary insulation, but secondary to other protective ware, etc., must be considered to be grounded. This
equipment such as insulating (rubber) gloves, sleeves, unit cannot protect platform occupants against elec-
and hot sticks. trocution from body contact with two energized con-
ductors or a single energized conductor and any
This unit is equipped with an insulated single handle grounded equipment, including neutral wires.
control(s). The control, which is green in color, may offer
limited secondary dielectric protection. To maintain this • The fiberglass platform and other fiberglass or plastic
limited secondary protection it must be kept clean, dry, components (including covers) will not provide protec-
and in good condition with periodic tests of its dielectric tion against electrical current. Properly fitted with a
properties. Never rely on the insulating feature of the single liner, designed, tested, and maintained for the dielec-
handle control as a substitute for primary protection from tric rating, the platform will offer some protection for
electrical contact. the lower extremities of the occupant’s body when
they are entirely within the liner and not in contact with
Rubber control covers, used on upper control valve handles, other objects including the boom tip area. It cannot
do not insulate the controls, but may provide limited protect against contact between an occupant, directly
dielectric protection in certain circumstances. Never rely or through the boom tip, and either two conductors or
on the rubber control covers as protection from electrical a single conductor and grounded equipment. Never
hazards. rely on fiberglass or plastic components at the boom
tip as protection from electrical hazards.
Danger • The upper and lower boom insulated portions are
Death or serious injury will result from careless or defined by placards on the booms (refer to Figure 4.2).
improper use of the unit. Do not operate the unit These insulated portions are intended to provide the
without proper training. platform occupant secondary protection from current
flow to ground potential through the boom and vehicle.
All personnel using this unit must understand the hazards The placard on the upper boom farthest away from the
of contact with energized conductors, for the protection of elbow also defines the boom tip area as all compo-
themselves, their coworkers, and the public. nents beyond the placard (refer to Figure 4.2). The
boom tip area should be considered conductive and
• Electricity seeks earth ground by any means avail- does not provide any protection from contact with
able. Non-insulated units, or insulated units not known energized conductors or contact with an energized
to be in good condition, must not be taken close to conductor and any grounded equipment on or in
energized conductors. OSHA regulations prescribe contact with the pole, including neutral wires. Occu-
minimum clearances required for such equipment. pants of the platform must consider the boom tip a
conductive object subject to minimum approach dis-
• An operator’s primary protection from electrical con- tance rules (refer to the placard in the Accident
tact comes through the use of protective equipment Prevention Signs Diagram and on the unit).

20 • Section 4 — Before You Operate…


Elbow Conductive
Boom Tip Area
Insulated Portion

Band of Arrows Placards

Insulated Portion
Figure 4.2 — Insulated Portion of Booms and Conductive Boom Tip Area

with two energized conductors or an energized con-


Danger ductor and a ground.
Death or serious injury will result from failure to follow
safe electrical work practices. The OSHA minimum • Contact by any part of the boom tip with an energized
approach distances for qualified electrical workers conductor while the boom tip is also in contact with
and line clearance tree trimmers must be maintained. another energized source or a grounded object can
All other workers must stay at least 10 feet from cause the hydraulic oil at the boom tip to burn or
energized conductors. explode.

Only qualified electrical workers using appropriate • Tools, supplies, and metal components of the unit,
personal protective equipment (rubber gloves/sleeves) including the boom tip and controls, may be conduc-
may come closer than the minimum approach dis- tive and should be used with care.
tance to an unguarded energized conductor. When
using rubber gloves/sleeves to work on an energized • Hydraulic oil must be kept free of water and other
conductor, the minimum approach distance must be contaminants to maintain its dielectric properties.
maintained between the operator/aerial device and Sample and test the hydraulic oil periodically.
any other unguarded energized conductors.
In addition to these hazards, other hazardous situations
• Occupants of a fiberglass platform must not touch two may endanger personnel. Personnel must be aware of and
energized conductors, or an energized conductor and practice all regulations and safety rules of their employer
a grounded wire or components without using personal and/or any state or federal law.
protective equipment for primary protection. The boom
tip area should be considered conductive and at the
Daily Preoperational Inspection
same electrical potential as objects it is in contact with
or near. Inspect the unit at the beginning of each work day before
going out on the job to detect potential service and safety
• Contact by conductive components, or even any problems. Check the following items during the daily
nonconductive component, with an energized con- preoperational inspection (refer to Inspection Diagram). If
ductor may energize the entire vehicle. If the vehicle any problem is found, including oil leaks or improper
becomes energized, it is an extreme hazard to anyone operation, stop and have the problem corrected before
who might touch the vehicle or unit. All personnel must placing the unit in service.
remain clear of the vehicle or unit any time booms are
elevated near energized wires. 1. Position the unit on a level surface. With the booms
and outriggers stowed, check the oil level in the
hydraulic reservoir. The oil level must be between the
Danger Add and Full marks on the dipstick. If necessary, add
Death or serious injury will result from hydraulic oil oil as described in the Maintenance Manual. The need
burning or exploding. Avoid contact of the boom tip to add oil regularly indicates a leak in the hydraulic
system that should be corrected.

Section 4 — Before You Operate… • 21


Inspection Diagram
Material
Handling Jib Secondary
Stowage System

Platform/ Upper Controls


Liner
Covers

Winch Line
Platform
Mounting Bracket

Lower/Upper Boom
Fiberglass Sections

Weldments

Fasteners/
Cap Screws Counterbalance
Valves
Hoses

Pins

Lower Controls
Reservoir Cylinders Pins/
Secondary Stowage Steel Tubes Oil Level
DC Pump Fasteners

Outriggers

This diagram is for representational purposes only.


The operator bears ultimate responsibility for properly inspecting all components.

Spilled hydraulic oil creates slick surfaces and can


Warning cause personnel to slip and/or fall. Keep the unit and
Death or serious injury can result from hydraulic oil work areas clean.
being injected into the flesh. Do not use hands or other
body parts to check hydraulic lines and fittings for
leaks. Caution
Injury can result from slipping and falling. Use care
Seek medical attention if injured by escaping hydrau- and the handles and steps provided.
lic oil. Serious infection or reaction can result if
medical treatment is not given immediately.

22 • Section 4 — Before You Operate…


2. Visually inspect the unit for hydraulic leaks. Continue d. Moisture and/or oil.
to look for hydraulic leaks while performing the inspec-
tion.
Warning
3. Throughout the inspection, pay particular attention to Death or serious injury can result from falling from the
the following components, looking for proper operation platform. All platform occupants must properly use an
and any damage, cracks or corrosion, missing or appropriate OSHA approved personal fall protection
loose fasteners, cracked or broken inspection marks, system.
and excessive wear.
Keep the lanyard used with the OSHA approved per-
• Rotation bearing sonal fall protection system in place and in good
• Rotation gearbox condition. Never replace it with a lanyard made of
• Lower boom pin conductive material.
• Lower boom cylinder mounting pins
• Both upper boom cylinder mounting pins 7. Apply the parking brake, chock the wheels, start the
• Upper boom drive mechanism mounting pins engine, and engage the power take-off (PTO).
• Elbow area
• Leveling system Attention
• Platform tilt cylinder pins Do not put the unit in service and run the pump at
• Platform pin normal operating speeds until the hydraulic oil reser-
• Platform mounting bracket voir feels warm to the touch.
• Platform mounting fasteners
• Winch gearbox 8. If the temperature outside is below 32 degrees Fahr-
• Winch line and material handling attachment enheit (0 degrees Celsius), warm the hydraulic oil
• Personal fall protection system before operating the unit. The procedure for warming
• Covers the oil is described in this section under Cold Weather
Start-Up. Do not operate the pump or engine at more
4. Inspect all covers to make sure they are in place, than a fast idle until the hydraulic oil has warmed up.
secure, and in good condition.
9. Unlatch the manual upper boom restraint, if so equipped.
5. Check visual and audible safety devices for proper With the outriggers stowed, test the outrigger interlock
operation. Replace missing and/or illegible placards. system, if so equipped, by placing the upper boom
control in the Unfold position. If boom movement
occurs, the outrigger interlock system is not function-
Danger ing properly.
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected
contact with energized conductors. The platform and 10. Move the machine/outrigger selector switch to Outrig-
covers carry no dielectric rating. They cannot protect gers. Properly set the outriggers as described in
against contact between an operator and either two Section 5 under Outriggers. Check for proper opera-
conductors or a single conductor and grounded ele- tion and audible alarms.
ments of the pole. The fiberglass platform, properly
fitted with a platform liner, designed, tested, and
maintained for the dielectric rating, will offer some Danger
protection for the lower extremities of the occupant. Death or serious injury will result from unprotected
contact with energized conductors. Maintain safe
6. Inspect the fiberglass booms, single handle control, clearance from electrical power lines and apparatus.
control handle covers, boom tip covers, and platform(s) Allow for platform or line sway, rock, or sag.
for any conditions that could reduce the limited dielec-
tric properties, including the following items.
Caution
a. Dirt and foreign objects. Injury and property damage can result from contact of
the booms or platform with fixed objects. Make sure
b. Damage, including chipped or scratched surfaces. there is sufficient clearance before operating the unit.

c. Holes in the platform, liner, and control handle Injury and property damage can result from abrupt
covers. reversals in direction, starts, or stops. Operate the
controls smoothly.

Section 4 — Before You Operate… • 23


11. Move the machine/outrigger selector to the Machine 14. Test the interlock blocking valve.
position.
a. Operate the unit from the upper controls.
a. Unlatch the manual upper boom restraint, if so
equipped. b. Return to the lower controls.

b. The automatic upper boom restraint, if so equipped, c. With the control selector still in the Upper Controls
should disengage when the station selector is in position, move a control handle of one of the lower
Lower Controls. The automatic restraint will open controls. If boom movement occurs, the interlock
as the upper boom is raised. system is not functioning properly.

12. Test the operation of the lower controls with no Attention


personnel in the platform. The DC pump is for secondary stowage use only.

a. Operate each control with the control selector in the Damage to the pump and motor can result if the DC
Emergency Stop position. If movement occurs, the pump is operated more than three minutes continu-
emergency stop is not functioning properly. ously.

b. Operate each function through the full range of 15. Check the secondary stowage DC pump system for
motion. All functions must operate smoothly, con- proper operation.
sistently, and the controls must return to neutral
after being released. While the unit is operating,
look for malfunctioning components and oil leaks. Warning
Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes
c. When the control selector is in the lower control unstable. Properly stow the booms before raising the
position, all upper controls, except platform tilt, outriggers.
should not function. The lower controls must override
the upper controls. 16. Stow the booms, raise the outriggers, disengage the
PTO, and turn off the engine.
Caution
Preparing for Operation
Injury and property damage can result from abrupt
reversals in direction, starts, or stops. Fully engage Before using this unit each day, perform the daily preop-
the interlock trigger before moving the control. Center erational inspection. This unit may be operated in accor-
the control before releasing the trigger. dance with the following procedure on firm surfaces.
Consider the reach of the unit and the work to be done when
Attention positioning the unit.
When testing the operation of the interlock system,
position the platform and booms to prevent damage 1. Place the transmission in neutral and apply the
from unexpected movement. parking brake. Apply the supplemental holding brake,
if so equipped, and chock the wheels.
13. Test the operation of the upper controls.

a. Operate a control with the emergency stop pushed in. Warning


If movement occurs, the emergency stop is not Park on a firm surface before operating the unit. Use
functioning properly. wheel chocks and parking brakes. On units equipped
with outriggers, use of outriggers is mandatory. On
b. Operate the single handle control without engaging such units, outriggers must be extended as instructed
the interlock trigger. If boom movement occurs, the under Outriggers. Use outrigger pads on all unpaved
interlock system is not functioning properly. surfaces, asphalt pavement, and other soft surfaces.

c. Engage the single handle control interlock trigger. It is impossible to foresee all situations and combinations
The vehicle engine should throttle up. for set up of the unit. Establish criteria for stable operation
of the unit based on actual conditions, work procedures,
d. Operate each function. While the unit is operating, and experience. The owner and operator bear ultimate
look for oil leaks. responsibility for insuring that the unit is properly set up.

24 • Section 4 — Before You Operate…


2. Engage the PTO according to the manufacturer’s nent wear and affect the lubricating characteristics of
operating instructions. the oil.

3. If so equipped, move the truck/machine selector Do not put the unit in service and run the pump at
switch in the cab to the Machine position. normal operating speeds until the hydraulic oil reser-
voir feels warm to the touch.

Caution Cold, thick oil does not flow well and may cause delays in
Injury can result from slipping and falling. Use care response to control movement, as well as cavitation and
and the handles and steps provided. consequent pump damage.

Attention If the unit is equipped with a tool circuit, the hydraulic oil
Do not put the unit in service and run the pump at can be warmed up quickly using the following procedure.
normal operating speeds until the hydraulic oil reser-
voir feels warm to the touch. 1. Attach a 1/16″ (1.60 millimeters) orifice or needle valve
to a hydraulic hose that is 2′ to 3′ (60 to 100 centime-
4. If the temperature outside is below 32 degrees Fahr- ters) long.
enheit (0 degrees Celsius), warm the hydraulic oil
before operating the unit. The procedure for warming 2. Attach a quick disconnect coupler to each end of the
the oil is described in this section under Cold Weather hose. An oil warming kit (refer to Figure 4.3) containing
Start-Up. Do not operate the pump or engine at more all necessary parts for this assembly can be found
than a fast idle until the hydraulic oil has warmed up. under Service Tools and Supplies in the Maintenance
Manual Appendix.
5. Move the machine/outrigger selector to Outriggers.
Hydraulic
6. Properly set the outriggers as described in Section 5
Hose
under Outriggers.
Quick Coupler
7. Unlatch the manual upper boom restraint, if so equipped.

Cold Weather Start-Up


Needle Valve
When operating the unit in temperatures of 32 degrees
Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius) or below, use a cold
weather hydraulic oil in the hydraulic system. Refer to the
Maintenance Manual for oil recommendations.
Figure 4.3 — Oil Warming Kit

Warning 3. Connect each end of the hose to the unit’s lower or


Death or serious injury can result if the recommended upper tool circuit.
hydraulic oil is not used. Other fluids added to the
hydraulic system can affect the insulating capability of 4. Turn the tool function on. If the hose is equipped with
the unit. a needle valve, turn the needle valve clockwise (in)
until the engine throttles up.
Attention
Only use hydraulic oil as recommended. Other fluids 5. After the hydraulic oil has warmed up, turn the tool
added to the hydraulic system can increase compo- function off and disconnect the oil warming kit.

Section 4 — Before You Operate… • 25


26 • Section 4 — Before You Operate…
Section 5 — Operation

Outriggers
Caution The controls for the outriggers are located at the tailshelf.
Injury and property damage can result from abrupt
reversals in direction, starts, or stops. Operate the
controls smoothly. Warning
Park on a firm surface before operating the unit. Use
Outriggers help stabilize the unit while it is in use. Before wheel chocks and parking brakes. On units equipped
operating the unit, follow the procedure in Section 4 under with outriggers, use of outriggers is mandatory. On
Preparing for Operation. Properly set the outriggers as such units, outriggers must be extended as instructed
described in the following section. under Outriggers. Use outrigger pads on all unpaved
surfaces, asphalt pavement, and other soft surfaces.
Warning It is impossible to foresee all situations and combinations
Park on a firm surface before operating the unit. Use for set up of the unit. Establish criteria for stable operation
wheel chocks and parking brakes. On units equipped of the unit based on actual conditions, work procedures,
with outriggers, use of outriggers is mandatory. On and experience. The owner and operator bear ultimate
such units, outriggers must be extended as instructed responsibility for insuring that the unit is properly set up.
under Outriggers. Use outrigger pads on all unpaved
surfaces, asphalt pavement, and other soft surfaces.
Warning
It is impossible to foresee all situations and combinations Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes
for set up of the unit. Establish criteria for stable operation unstable. Properly set the outriggers before moving
of the unit based on actual conditions, work procedures, the booms from the rest.
and experience. The owner and operator bear ultimate
responsibility for insuring that the unit is properly set up. Death or serious injury can result from contact with a
moving outrigger. Clear the area around the outrig-
gers before operating the unit.
Ground Level Controls
Machine/Outriggers Selector Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes
The machine/outriggers selector handle operates a hy- unstable. Properly stow the booms before raising the
draulic valve to make the outriggers or the unit functions outriggers.
operational. This control is located on the tailshelf of the
unit (refer to Figure 5.1). The surface that the outrigger shoe will rest on must be firm
and capable of supporting a substantial load in a concen-
trated area. If necessary, place outrigger pad supports
beneath each outrigger shoe to increase the support area
and load holding capability.

Downward movement on the outrigger control lowers the


outrigger and upward movement raises the outrigger. The
control returns to neutral when released.

Properly Setting on a Level Surface


With the booms stowed, lower the outriggers to a firm
footing.

Lower the outriggers as far as possible, while allowing the


vehicle to be level, with all tires maintaining contact with
the ground surface. Although the tire-to-surface contact
pressure may vary, extend the outriggers to remove the
bulge from the tires. Lower the outriggers approximately 3
inches (7.5 centimeters) after reaching ground level. This
will usually be enough to remove the bulge and still be able
to see some tire-to-surface contact at each tire.

Figure 5.1 — Ground Level Controls

Section 5 — Operation • 27
To insure proper outrigger spread when using outrigger platform occupant is guiding the lower controls op-
pads or blocks, extend the outriggers approximately 3 erator.
inches (7.5 cm) after reaching ground level (not pad
surface level). This may result in tires coming off the The lower control station is located on the turntable and is
ground. shown in Figure 5.2. This station has controls for the
following functions.
Properly Setting on a Sloping Surface
With the booms stowed, lower the low side outriggers to a • Boom function controls
firm footing. • Emergency stop control
• Auxiliary winch control
Lower the high side outriggers only after a firm footing has • Platform stow control for units with single two-man
been reached with the low side outriggers. Lower the high platform
side outriggers approximately 3 inches (7.5 cm) after • Control selector
reaching the ground level. Adjust outrigger extension to
establish a level vehicle. The following functions can be selected by the control
selector valve.
Lower the outriggers as far as possible, while allowing the
vehicle to be level, with all tires on the high side maintain- • Upper controls
ing contact with the ground surface. Tires on the low side • Lower controls
of the slope may not remain in contact with the ground, • Emergency stop
depending on how much slope is present.
Place the control selector in the Upper Controls position to
To insure proper outrigger spread when using outrigger operate the unit from the upper controls at the platform.
pads or blocks, extend the outriggers approximately 3
inches (7.5 cm) after reaching ground level (not pad Trapped air may lead to hesitancy in the control system or
surface level). This may result in tires coming off the poor metering of the control functions. When the selector
ground. handle is in the Upper Controls position, it will automati-
cally purge the system until the interlock trigger on the
Interlock System single handle control is engaged.
The unit may be equipped with an outrigger interlock
system. This system requires the outriggers to be de-
ployed before the booms can be moved from the boom Caution
rest. Operation of the turntable and boom functions is Injury and property damage to the unit can result from
prevented until the outriggers are deployed. The interlock uncontrolled movement. Move the control selector to
system does not assure full stability. The unit may also the Upper Controls position when the lower controls
have an outrigger interlock override control in the vehicle are not in use.
cab. This control overrides the interlocks until the PTO is
disengaged. The next time the PTO is engaged the Place the control selector in the Lower Controls position to
outrigger interlocks are reactivated. operate the unit from the lower controls at the turntable.
The upper controls at the platform, except platform tilt, are
Motion Alarm not operational while the selector is in the Lower Controls
The unit is equipped with an outrigger motion alarm. An position. After operating the unit from the lower controls
audible alarm alerts personnel in or near the work area that move the control selector to the Upper Controls position.
the outriggers are in motion. This prevents movement of the unit from accidental
movement of the lower control handles.
When an outrigger control handle is moved from neutral,
the warning is sounded. Returning the handle to neutral Place the control selector in the Emergency Stop position
turns the alarm off. to stop all functions from the lower controls.

Lower Controls Upper Controls


Various controls are used to operate unit functions from
Warning the upper control station (refer to Figure 5.3). Refer to the
Death or serious injury can result from unit operation appropriate section for operation of the secondary stow-
by someone other than the platform occupant. When age pump, start/stop system, platform, jib, winch, and tool
the platform is occupied, only use the lower controls functions.
to position the platform in an emergency or when the

28 • Section 5 — Operation 3-06


Pilot Pressure

Full Pressure
Figure 5.2 — Lower Controls

The following functions can be operated from the upper • Platform rotate
controls. • Platform tilt
• Jib extend/retract
• Lower boom raise/lower • Jib tilt
• Upper boom fold/unfold • Winch pay in/out
• Turntable rotate • Tools on/off
• Platform rotate
• Platform tilt Single Handle Control
• Jib extend/retract One or more functions may be operated at a time. The
• Jib tilt speed of movement is relative to the movement of the
• Winch pay in/out control.
• Tools on/off
• Emergency stop As the upper boom unfolds overcenter, platform move-
• Remote start/stop ment changes from raising to lowering with respect to the
• Secondary stowage DC pump ground.

Emergency Stop The following functions can be operated with the single
An emergency stop valve is located at the upper control handle control.
station(s) (refer to Figure 5.3). This valve blocks hydraulic
oil flow to stop all functions at the upper controls. • Lower boom raise/lower
• Upper boom fold/unfold
When the knob is pushed down, the following functions will • Turntable rotate
not operate.
Interlock
• Lower boom raise/lower The interlock system is intended to prevent unintentional
• Upper boom fold/unfold boom movement that might result from accidental bump-
• Turntable rotate ing of the single handle control.

3-06 Section 5 — Operation • 29


Outside, Above Hole

Outside, Below Hole

Figure 5.3 — Upper Controls

Caution Warning
Injury and property damage can result from abrupt Death or serious injury can result from improper use
reversals in direction, starts, or stops. Fully engage of the boom(s) or platform(s). Do not use the boom(s)
the interlock trigger before moving the control. Center or platform(s) to push or support objects such as
the control before releasing the trigger. poles, conductors, etc.

The interlock trigger can be engaged as a natural part of Lower Boom


grasping the single handle control. Operate the lower boom from the upper controls with the
single handle control for normal operation. Engage the
interlock trigger and move the control in the desired
Booms direction. Operate the lower boom from the lower controls
This unit is an overcenter type design with articulating side- when using the lower boom lifting eye, when testing, or
by-side booms. The booms may be positioned individually during an emergency.
or in coordination with one another. The boom functions may
be controlled from the lower or upper controls. A double-acting cylinder is used to raise and lower the
lower boom. The cylinder is held in position by two
The booms are made of steel and fiberglass. counterbalance holding valve cartridges in a block near the
base end of the cylinder. The holding valves are intended
to prevent oil from escaping from the cylinder if a hydraulic
line fails.

30 • Section 5 — Operation
Upper Boom are in the rest may also damage the booms and/or boom
Operate the articulating upper boom from the upper con- rest.
trols with the single handle control for normal operation.
Engage the interlock trigger and move the control in the The unit is equipped with a valve to limit the force applied
desired direction. Operate the upper boom from the lower to the lower boom rest while stowing the lower boom.
controls when using the lower boom lifting eye, when Downward force is limited by a mechanically activated
testing, or during an emergency. switch connected to a solenoid valve that reduces the
pressure to the retract side of the cylinder as the lower
Single-acting cylinders are used to raise and lower the boom nears its rest.
upper boom. The cylinders are held in position by counter-
balance holding valve cartridges in a block near the base
end of the cylinders. The holding valve is intended to Warning
prevent oil from escaping from the cylinder if a hydraulic Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes
line fails. unstable. Properly stow the booms before raising the
outriggers.
The unit will have either a manual or automatic upper boom
restraint to hold the boom in the rest. Attention
Follow the stowing procedure to prevent damage to
The automatic restraint (refer to Figure 5.4), if so equipped, the unit.
requires no action by the operator. The restraint locking
mechanism is automatically actuated by the following Tilt the jib parallel to the upper boom before stowing
actions. the boom.

• When the PTO is disengaged When stowing the booms, use the following procedure.
• When the machine/outrigger selector is in the
Outrigger position 1. Position the platform in its stowed position at the side
• When the control selector is in the Upper Controls of the boom tip.
position and the upper control interlock is not
engaged 2. Position the jib parallel to the upper boom.

3. Rotate the turntable to position the lower boom over


the boom rest.

4. Stow the lower boom.

5. Stow the upper boom. Make sure the platform and jib
clear any obstacles as the upper boom is placed in the
rest.

6. Fasten the upper boom strap, if so equipped.

Restraint
Rotation
The turntable can be rotated through 360 degrees continu-
ously after the booms are elevated.

Figure 5.4 — Upper Boom Restraint The rotation system is self-locking, intending to assure
that the turntable will remain in position when hydraulic
The automatic restraint may be connected to a light in the pressure is not applied to the motor. The system is
vehicle cab, which indicates when the upper boom is not capable of holding the turntable in position without the use
properly stowed. of a brake.

Boom Storage At the upper controls, engage the interlock trigger, raise
If the booms bounce while the vehicle is in motion, damage the booms to clear any obstacles, and move the single
may be caused to the booms, cylinders, turntable, and/or handle control in the appropriate direction to rotate the
the platform. Excessive downward force after the booms turntable. Return the control to neutral to stop rotation.

Section 5 — Operation • 31
At the lower controls, raise the booms to clear any Death or serious injury can result from improper use
obstacles, and move the control handle in the appropriate of the boom(s) or platform(s). Do not use the boom(s)
direction to rotate the turntable. Return the control to or platform(s) surfaces to push or support objects
neutral to stop rotation. such as poles, conductors, etc.

An extension shaft is provided on the gearbox to allow for Death or serious injury can result from falling from the
manual rotation. Other Methods of Lowering/Stowing the platform. All platform occupants must properly use an
Unit in this section describes this procedure. appropriate OSHA approved personal fall protection
system.
Personnel Platform
Keep the lanyard used with the OSHA approved per-
The unit is equipped with one of the following options. sonal fall protection system in place and in good
condition. Never replace it with a lanyard made of
• Single 1-man, side-mounted conductive material.
• Single 2-man, side-mounted
• Dual 1-man, side-mounted Death or serious injury can result from overloading
the unit. Do not exceed the capacity values.
Danger
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected Caution
contact with energized conductors. Operators must Injury can result from slipping and falling. Use care
read and understand the contents of Section 4 in this and the handles and steps provided.
manual before operating the unit near energized con-
ductors. Platform capacity of the unit is the total weight of the
personnel, material, and liner that may be lifted by the unit
Death or serious injury will result from unprotected without overloading it.
contact with energized conductors. The platform is
not considered insulated and carries no dielectric Platform Rotation
rating. The fiberglass platform cannot protect against Platform rotators are used to position the platform from the
contact between an operator and either two conduc- side of the boom to the boom tip. This allows increased
tors or a single conductor and grounded elements of reach and better access to the jib and winch. When
the pole. The fiberglass platform, properly fitted with stowing the unit, rotate the platform to its stowed position
a platform liner designed, tested, and maintained for before stowing the upper boom.
the dielectric rating, will offer some protection for the
lower extremities of the occupant. A control handle at the upper controls (refer to Figure 5.3)
is used to rotate the platform. Raise the control interlock
and move the control to rotate the platform. The single
Warning handle control interlock does not have to be engaged.
Death or serious injury can result from careless or
improper use of the unit. The operator bears ultimate The side-mounted platforms rotate 90 degrees toward the
responsibility for following all regulations and safety boom tip.
rules of their employer and/or any state or federal law.

Death or serious injury can result from contact with Caution


energized conductors. Do not operate the unit with a Injury and property damage can result from the plat-
hole in the platform or liner. form contacting the boom. Rotate the platform to the
side of the boom before moving the boom to an
Death or serious injury can result from falling from the overcenter position. Do not rotate the platform past the
platform. Do not use a ladder or other means to extend stop when the boom is overcenter.
reach from the platform.
Two-man, side-mounted platforms have a platform rota-
Death or serious injury can result from falling from the tion stop (refer to Figure 5.3). The stop keeps the platform
platform. Do not sit or stand on the platform rim. from being rotated into a position where it might contact the
boom as the upper boom goes overcenter. Release the
Death or serious injury can result from improper use stop to rotate the platform to the end of the boom when the
of the unit. Do not operate the unit or occupy the upper boom is not overcenter. Do not rotate the plat-form
platform while the vehicle is in motion. past the stop when the upper boom is overcenter.

32 • Section 5 — Operation
The two-man platform can be rotated to the stow position
from the lower controls (refer to Figure 5.2). Anchor Two-Man
Platform Anchor
Stow the platform in the side-mounted position.

Platform Leveling System


The platform leveling system continually adjusts the
position of the platform to keep the platform floor parallel
to the turntable base as the booms move.

Warning
Death or serious injury can result from a damaged
platform leveling system. Avoid contact of the booms
or platform with fixed objects such as tree limbs,
poles, buildings, etc.

Platform Tilt
Platform tilt may be used to remove injured personnel in an
emergency, to remove water or debris from the platform, Figure 5.5 — Lanyard Anchor
or to tilt the platform as desired by the operator. All
operators should become familiar with this procedure.
Material Handling System
The material handling systems provide mechanical power
Warning to lift materials such as transformers and conductors.
Death or serious injury can result from falling from the
platform. Do not operate the platform tilt when the The following material handling options are available.
boom functions are being operated.
• Hydraulic extend jib
Attention • Jib adapter
Damage to the leveling system can result if the unit is • 1-ton hook
transported while the platform is tilted. • Phase lifter
• Lower boom lifting eye
Engage the upper control interlock, lift up on the platform
tilt control interlock, and move the platform tilt control
(refer to Figure 5.3) in the direction desired. The platform Danger
may also be tilted by moving the control selector on the Death or serious injury will result from unprotected
turntable to the Lower Controls position, lifting up on the contact with energized conductors. This unit does not
platform tilt control interlock, and moving the tilt control in provide protection from contact with or proximity to
the desired direction. an electrically charged conductor when you are in
contact with or proximity to another conductor or any
On dual platform units, both platforms are tilted by the tilt grounded device, material, or equipment. Maintain
control. safe clearances from energized conductors.

Return the platform to a vertical position before operating


the unit. Warning
Death or serious injury can result when the jib con-
Lanyard Anchor tacts two energized conductors or an energized con-
The lanyard anchor (refer to Figure 5.5) is part of the ductor and a ground. Do not allow the jib to contact an
personal fall protection system. The lanyard must be energized conductor. Use a phase lifter or other
properly attached to the anchor. Occupants of the two- insulated tool to handle energized conductors.
man platform can use separate anchors.
Death or serious injury can result if the winch line
breaks. Stay clear of a load that is being moved or
lifted.

Section 5 — Operation • 33
Death or serious injury can result from improper use A removable double sheave head is attached to the end of
of the jib or winch. Never use a jib or winch to lift the jib for use with the winch line. The sheave head will
personnel. work either in the overcenter or non-overcenter positions
of the upper boom. Several lifting attachments are avail-
Death or serious injury can result from overloading able to lift insulator strings, conductors, or multiple con-
the unit. Do not exceed the rated capacity values. ductors.

Refer to Figure 2.1 for material handling capacities. Never Hydraulic Extension
lift an unknown load. Determine the weight of the material Move the jib extend control in the appropriate direction to
before moving it. Use the placards on the unit and this extend the jib. The jib may be extended with or without a
manual to determine the available rated lift capacities. Do load.
not exceed rated lift capacities.
The extension cylinder assembly may be pinned to the jib
Always move material slowly and deliberately. Smooth, in two positions. In either position, 18 inches of travel is
steady operation while handling heavy material will result available to hydraulically extend or retract the load.
in precise and efficient work methods.
Caution
Caution Injury can result from being pinched or trapped be-
Damage to the unit can result from side loading. Use tween moving components. Keep hands clear.
the material handling system for vertical lifting only.
Attention
Injury and property damage can result from loss of Damage to the jib, extension cylinder, or the support
load control. Use tools specifically designed for and bracket can result from failure to remove the second
properly attached to the lifting device when lifting pin when extending or retracting the jib. When the jib
materials. is under load, one of the pins must always be in place.
The second pin must only be in place for the shorten-
Do not attempt to physically assist the lifting device. ing and lengthening procedures.

Attention Use the following procedures to move the extension


Plan work procedures and mentally “walk through” cylinder from one jib pinning position to another under load.
them before moving or lifting any load.
Shortening the Jib
The jib, winch, and tool functions are not operational from 1. Retract the jib to near full cylinder extension. Extend-
the upper controls when the interlock trigger on the single ing the cylinder retracts the jib.
handle control is engaged or when the control selector is
in the Lower Controls position. 2. Extend or retract the jib to line up a transfer pin hole
with the hole in the jib support bracket.
The winch may be operated from the lower controls when
the control selector is in the Lower Controls position. 3. Insert the transfer pin stored on the platform bracket
cover through the support bracket and the jib.
Telescopic Jib (Hydraulic Extend)
The jib is a 4″ x 4″ (102 mm x 102 mm), fiberglass square 4. Extend or retract the jib slowly to remove any load
and is anchored to the support bracket with a detent pin. from the cylinder and onto the jib support bracket.
The jib may be tilted hydraulically through 120 degrees,
+90 degrees to -30 degrees with respect to the upper 5. Remove the pin that is through the extension guide.
boom. Operate the jib extend function to line up the extension
guide pin hole with the next jib pin hole. Install the pin
through the extension guide pin hole and the jib.
Warning
Death or serious injury can result from overloading 6. Extend or retract the jib slowly to remove any load
the jib. Do not exceed the values on the jib capacity from the transfer pin. Remove the transfer pin and
chart. return it to the holding bracket on the platform bracket
cover.
Attention
Property damage can result from failure to pay out the
winch line when extending or lengthening the jib.

34 • Section 5 — Operation
Lengthening the Jib A removable double sheave head is attached to the end of
1. Extend the jib to near full cylinder retraction. Retract- the jib for use with the winch line. The sheave head will
ing the cylinder extends the jib. work either in the overcenter or non-overcenter positions
of the upper boom. Several lifting attachments are avail-
2. Extend or retract the jib to line up a transfer pin hole able to lift insulator strings, conductors, or multiple con-
with the hole in the jib support bracket. ductors.

3. Insert the transfer pin stored on the platform bracket The jib has three pinning positions for extension.
cover through the support bracket and the jib.
Attention
4. Extend or retract the jib slowly to remove any load Follow the stowing procedure to prevent damage to
from the cylinder and onto the jib support bracket. the unit.

5. Remove the pin that is through the extension guide. Tilt the jib parallel to the upper boom before stowing the
Operate the jib retract function to line up the extension boom. The jib must be tilted parallel to the upper boom so
guide pin hole with the next jib pin hole. Install the pin it does not contact the turntable or the lower boom when
through the extension guide pin hole and the jib. stowing the upper boom.

6. Extend or retract the jib slowly to remove any load Stowing the Jib
from the transfer pin. Remove the transfer pin and 1. Tilt the jib parallel to the upper boom.
return it to the holding bracket on the platform bracket
cover. 2. Remove the detent pin from the support bracket.

Attention 3. Slide the jib back into the support bracket.


Follow the stowing procedure to prevent damage to
the unit. 4. Align the pin hole and install the detent pin in the
support bracket.
Tilt the jib parallel to the upper boom before stowing the
boom. The jib must be tilted parallel to the upper boom so Jib Adapter
it does not contact the turntable or the lower boom when An adapter may be fastened to the jib to accept hot line
stowing the upper boom. tools.

Stowing the Jib Winch


1. Tilt the jib parallel to the upper boom. The hydraulic powered winch can be operated by the winch
control handle at the upper or the lower controls.
2. Shorten the jib.
The lower control station winch control is for emergency
3. Fully retract the jib. operation of the winch or stability testing only.

Telescopic Jib (Manual Extend) The upper control station is equipped with a winch control
The jib is a 4″ x 4″ (102 mm x 102 mm), fiberglass square valve. To operate the winch line from the upper controls,
that has two pinning positions and is anchored to the jib move the winch control handle in the desired direction.
support bracket with a detent pin. The jib may be tilted
hydraulically through 120 degrees, +90 degrees to -30 The winch is equipped with a mechanical brake intended
degrees with respect to the upper boom. to prevent unintentional movement of the load. The winch
has an average line speed of 40 feet/minute (12.2 m/min).
Warning
Death or serious injury can result from overloading Warning
the jib. Do not exceed the values on the jib capacity Death or serious injury can result from falling loads.
chart. Winch cable anchors are not designed to hold rated
capacity. Keep a minimum of four wraps on the drum.
Attention
Property damage can result from failure to pay out the The standard winch line is 1/2″ (12.7 m) diameter line and
winch line when extending or lengthening the jib. 80′ (24.4 m) long.

Section 5 — Operation • 35
It is impossible to foresee all situations and combinations
for attaching the winch line to the load. The operator bears Warning
ultimate responsibility for assuring that the line is properly Death or serious injury can result when the jib con-
attached to the load. tacts two energized conductors or an energized con-
ductor and a ground. Do not allow the jib to contact an
energized conductor. Use a phase lifter or other
Warning insulated tool to handle energized conductors.
Death or serious injury can result if the synthetic
winch line contacts an energized conductor and a Lower Boom Lifting Eye
ground. Do not allow the winch line to contact an The lower boom lifting eye (refer to Figure 5.7) adapts the
energized conductor. lower boom for light duty material handling. This attach-
ment provides a secure mounting for a shackle on the end
The synthetic winch line is not considered an insulator. of the lower boom.
Contact between an energized conductor and the ground
can result when the winch line is extended to the ground.
Warning
Death or serious injury can result from overloading
Warning the unit. Do not exceed the rated capacity values.
Death or serious injury can result from overloading
the jib. Do not exceed the values on the jib capacity The lower boom lifting eye capacity placard is located near
chart. the base end of the lower boom. Do not exceed the
capacity values indicated on the capacity placard.
Death or serious injury can result from overloading
the unit. Do not attempt to lift or pull loads that are
attached to the ground or structures. Warning
Death or serious injury can result from overloading
Phase Lifter the unit. Do not occupy or leave tools in the platform
The phase lifter is a jib attachment for raising a single when using the lifting eye.
conductor using the hydraulic jib. The load applied to the
phase lifter must not exceed the least of the applicable The platform must not be occupied when using the lower
values of the phase holder capacity, the jib structural boom lifting eye.
capacity, or the material handling capacity of the unit.

Figure 5.6 — Phase Lifter

36 • Section 5 — Operation
Lower Boom Angle
To Lift a Load of Must be at Least
800 pounds (362.9 kg) 0 degrees (horizontal)
1,000 pounds (453.6 kg) 30 degrees
1,500 pounds (680.4 kg) 45 degrees
2,000 pounds (907.2 kg) 60 degrees

2,000 Lb

1,500 Lb

60°

45°
1,000 Lb

30°

800 Lb

Figure 5.7 — Lifting Eye

Keep the upper boom as near to the rest position as The lower tool circuit quick disconnects may be mounted
possible. Do not strike the unit or other obstacles with the stationary on the tailshelf or on a hose reel. The upper tool
platform. circuit quick disconnects are located at the platform. The
tool circuit will accommodate open or closed center tools
such as impact wrenches, saws, or other hydraulic tools.
Tool System HTMA quick disconnect fittings allow for easy attachment
Hydraulic tool connections may be available at ground and removal of the tool.
level and at the platform. The tool circuits are factory set
at 8 gpm (30.3 l/min) and 2,000 psi (138 bar). To use the tool circuit, connect the tool and place the tools
control handle in the On position.
The pressure and flow of the tool circuits are adjustable to
accommodate hydraulic tools with various pressure and
flow requirements. Pressure and flow adjustments of the Danger
tool circuits are covered in the Maintenance Manual. Death or serious injury will result from hydraulic oil
burning or exploding. Avoid contact of the boom tip
with two energized conductors or an energized con-
ductor and a ground.

Section 5 — Operation • 37
Captive Air Cylinder
Caution To start the engine, push the captive air cylinder rod in and
Injury can result from hydraulic oil being injected into hold until the engine is running. If the engine does not start,
the flesh when loosening or disconnecting hydraulic push the captive air cylinder rod in again and release. Then
components. Remove the pressure before loosening repeat the procedure.
or disconnecting hydraulic components.
To turn off the engine, push the captive air cylinder rod in
Seek immediate medical attention if injured by escap- and release.
ing hydraulic oil. Serious infection or reaction can
result if medical treatment is not given immediately.
Other Methods of
Lowering/Stowing the Unit
Spilled hydraulic oil creates slick surfaces and can
cause personnel to slip and/or fall. Keep the unit and Use the lower controls to lower the platform and/or stow the
work areas clean. boom if the upper controls are not operational.

Return the tool control handle to the Off position when the
tool circuit is not being used. This prevents pressure from Danger
becoming trapped in the tool hose and allows for easy Death or serious injury will result from contact with
disconnect of the tool. Always place the control handle in equipment that has become electrically charged. De-
the Off position before disconnecting a tool. termine that the unit is not energized before making
contact with the unit.
Remote Start/Stop System
Death or serious injury will result from contact with, or
The remote start/stop system may be used to start and proximity to equipment that has become electrically
stop the vehicle engine from a remote location. This energized. Maintain safe clearances from all ener-
system can be controlled by a toggle switch at the gized conductors and any grounded device, material,
turntable or an air operated cylinder at the platform. If the or equipment.
unit is equipped with a DC pump, the same controls may
be used to operate it. Refer to Secondary Stowage DC
Pump in this section for more information. Caution
Injury and property damage can result from contact of
For a remote start/stop system to operate, the truck/ the booms or platform with fixed objects. Make sure
machine selector in the vehicle cab, if so equipped, must there is sufficient clearance before operating the unit.
be in the Machine position.
After determining that it is safe to touch the vehicle, use
the lower controls for boom and platform movement. Move
Caution the control selector handle to the Lower Control position to
Injury and property damage can result from vehicle operate the unit from the lower controls.
movement if the transmission is not in neutral or park
when the engine is started. Make sure the transmis- If the unit cannot be operated due to a loss of hydraulic
sion is in neutral or park before remotely starting the power, such as engine or pump failure, there are three
engine. methods for lowering and/or stowing the unit. Refer to the
following sections for the appropriate procedure.
Attention
Release the start/stop control immediately after the • Secondary Stowage DC Pump
engine has started to prevent damage to the starter. • Manually Lowering/Stowing the Unit
(Counterbalance holding valve adjustment)
Toggle Switch • Auxiliary Power Sources
To start the engine, push the switch until the engine is (Using another unit to supply hydraulic power)
running and then release. If the engine does not start, push
the toggle switch and release. Then repeat the procedure.
Warning
To turn off the engine, push the toggle switch and release. Death or serious injury can result from unexpected
movement. Counterbalance valves that have had the

38 • Section 5 — Operation
relief setting changed must be replaced or reset to the • Units Without Remote Engine Start/Stop
proper setting using an Altec test block before the unit To start the pump, push the toggle switch and con-
is operated. tinue holding while operating the control handles.
Releasing the switch stops the pump.
Secondary Stowage DC Pump
Power is supplied to the pump from the vehicle battery or • Units With Remote Engine Start/Stop and DC Pump
an auxiliary battery. The length of time the pump can be There is only one toggle switch to perform the engine
operated depends on the capacity of the battery. start/stop and pump functions. To start the pump,
push the toggle switch during the stop cycle. After five
seconds, the pump will start. The pump will operate as
Caution long as the toggle switch is held up.
Injury and property damage can result from contact of
the booms or platform with fixed objects. Make sure Captive Air Cylinder
there is sufficient clearance before operating the unit. The captive air cylinder is located at the platform (refer to
Figure 5.9).
Attention
The DC pump is for secondary stowage use only.

Damage to the pump and motor can result if the DC


pump is operated more than three minutes continu-
ously.

The pump can be controlled by a toggle switch at the


turntable or an air operated cylinder at the platform.

The pump can be heard while it is operating. The functions


will move slowly when using the pump because of the flow Air Cylinder
capacity of the pump.

Toggle Switch
The toggle switch is located on the turntable (refer to
Figure 5.8) or at the tailshelf.

Figure 5.9 — Secondary Stowage


DC Pump Control (Captive Air Cylinder)

• Units Without Remote Engine Start/Stop


Push the captive air cylinder rod in and hold to operate
the pump.

• Units With Remote Engine Start/Stop and DC Pump


Switch There is only one captive air cylinder to perform the
engine start/stop and pump functions. To start the
pump, push the captive air cylinder rod in and hold
during the stop cycle. After five seconds, the pump
will start. The pump will operate as long as the cylinder
rod is pushed in.

Manually Lowering/Stowing the Unit


The following text explains how to manually rotate the
turntable and to retract the hydraulic cylinders that operate
Figure 5.8 — Secondary Stowage the booms and outriggers.
DC Pump Control (Toggle Switch)

Section 5 — Operation • 39
Some boom positions will not allow the booms to be
Danger stowed manually. In these situations, use the DC pump or
Death or serious injury will result from improper use an alternate hydraulic power source as described under
of the unit. Do not manually operate the unit without Auxiliary Power Sources.
proper training.
Rotating the Turntable
1. Locate the double counterbalance holding valve block
Warning attached to the rotation motor (refer to Figure 5.10).
Death or serious injury can result from being trapped
between moving components while adjusting the
holding valve. Allow an exit path from the area.

Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes


unstable. If the unit loses hydraulic power, remove the
load on the winch line before manually stowing the Motor
unit.

Death or serious injury can result if the unit becomes


unstable. Properly stow the booms before raising the
outriggers.
Extension Counterbalance
Caution Shaft Valve Block

Injury and property damage can result from contact of Figure 5.10 — Rotation Gearbox
the booms or platform with fixed objects. Make sure
there is sufficient clearance before operating the unit.
Warning
Attention Death or serious injury can result from uncontrolled
If either of the booms are overcenter, the booms movement. Secure the booms before adjusting the
cannot be stowed manually. Stow the booms using an rotation motor counterbalance valves.
alternate hydraulic power source as described under
Auxiliary Power Sources. 2. Adjust the counterbalance holding valves to the open
position. Unlock the jam nut and turn the adjusting
The manual stowing procedure may not work in all screw inward (clockwise).
boom positions due to different unit options. Use the
DC pump or an auxiliary power source to stow the unit.
Warning
When a counterbalance valve is adjusted to the open Death or serious injury can result from being trapped
position, the boom will lower in the direction of the load. In between moving components. Maintain a safe dis-
an overcenter position, the booms may be manually tance while components are in motion.
lowered to place the platform near the ground to rescue the
platform occupants only. Manually stowing the booms can 3. Use a 7/8″ socket and wrench on the extension shaft
be accomplished only if the booms are not in an overcenter of the worm gear shaft to manually rotate the turntable.
position.

If the unit has a load on the winch line, it may cause the Warning
unit to become overloaded or unstable when the turntable Death or serious injury can result from unexpected
is manually rotated and the booms lowered. Remove the movement. Counterbalance valves that have had the
load with other heavy equipment. relief setting changed must be replaced or reset to the
proper setting using an Altec test block before the unit
Manually lowering the booms is accomplished by adjust- is operated.
ing one of the cylinder counterbalance valves. With a
counterbalance valve adjusted open, the boom will lower 4. After the manual lowering/stowing procedure is com-
in the direction of the load. pleted, replace or properly adjust the rotation counter-
balance valves to their original settings.

40 • Section 5 — Operation
Lowering the Upper Boom Upper Boom Non-Overcenter
Attention
Warning Wedge a block between the two upper boom cylinders
Death or serious injury can result from unexpected to prevent damage as the bottom cylinder extends.
movement. Counterbalance valves that have had the
relief setting changed must be replaced or reset to the 1. Wedge a 6″ to 12″ (152 mm to 304 mm) long 4″ x 4″
proper setting using an Altec test block before the unit (102 mm x 102 mm) or 6″ x 6″ (152 mm x 152 mm)
is operated. wood block tightly between the two upper boom
cylinders.
To lower the upper boom, adjust the counterbalance
holding valve to the open position. Another unit may be As the bottom cylinder extends, the top cylinder will
needed to access the counterbalance valve. not retract. Consequently, the top walking links will
fold over and downward. It is important that the linkage
fold up and away from the bottom cylinder, so that it
Warning does not damage the bottom cylinder.
Death or serious injury can result from being trapped
between moving components. Maintain a safe dis- 2. Locate the counterbalance holding valve on the bot-
tance while components are in motion. tom side of the bottom upper boom cylinder valve
block (refer to Figure 5.11).
Take care when turning the counterbalance valve adjust-
ing screw. As the adjusting screw is turned, the boom will 3. Adjust the counterbalance holding valve to the open
begin to lower. The rate of movement will increase as the position. Unlock the jam nut and turn the adjusting
boom is lowered. screw inward (clockwise).

The rate of movement can be adjusted by how far the 4. Manually operate the lower control valve to allow oil to
counterbalance valve adjusting screw is turned after flow from the top cylinder. Control the rate of descent
movement of the boom starts. by turning the counterbalance valve adjusting screw.

Valve Block Valve Blocks

Figure 5.11 — Counterbalance Valve Locations

Section 5 — Operation • 41
Observe the movement of the linkage and the boom 3. Manually operate the lower control valve to allow oil to
as it is lowered into the boom rest. The top cylinder flow from the cylinder. Control the rate of descent by
linkage must fold up and away from the bottom turning the counterbalance valve adjusting screw.
cylinder.

5. After the manual lowering/stowing procedure is com- Warning


pleted, replace or properly adjust the counterbalance Death or serious injury can result from unexpected
valves to their original settings. movement. Counterbalance valves that have had the
relief setting changed must be replaced or reset to the
Upper Boom Overcenter proper setting using an Altec test block before the unit
1. Locate the counterbalance holding valve on the bot- is operated.
tom side of the top upper boom cylinder valve block.
4. After the manual lowering/stowing procedure is com-
2. Adjust the counterbalance holding valve to the open pleted, replace or properly adjust the counterbalance
position. Unlock the jam nut and turn the adjusting valve to its original setting.
screw inward (clockwise).
Raising the Outriggers
3. Manually operate the lower control valve to allow oil to The outriggers may be manually raised by performing the
flow from the top cylinder. Control the rate of descent following procedure.
by turning the counterbalance valve adjusting screw.
Attention
4. After the manual lowering/stowing procedure is com- Follow the stowing procedure to prevent damage to
pleted, replace or properly adjust the counterbalance the unit.
valve to its original setting.
1. Stow the booms.
Lowering the Lower Boom
To lower the lower boom if it is not in an overcenter 2. If the equipment is available, raise the vehicle to
position, adjust the retract counterbalance holding valve to remove the load from the outrigger leg.
the open position.
3. Locate the two pilot operated check valves installed
1. Locate the counterbalance holding valve in the valve near the base end of the cylinder (refer to Figure 5.12).
block on the base end of the lower boom cylinder (refer One of the check valves has a screw in the top of the
to Figure 5.11). The counterbalance holding valve to cartridge. Turn the screw in (clockwise) until the
adjust is on the rod side of the block. cylinder begins to retract. Control the speed of cylin-
der retraction using the hex screw.
Warning 4. When there is no vehicle weight on the outrigger, lift
Death or serious injury can result from being trapped the outrigger leg with a come-along or a pry bar. Block
between moving components. Maintain a safe dis- up the outrigger shoe at intervals if lifting in succes-
tance while components are in motion. sive steps with a pry bar. Use the come-along to
completely retract the extended outrigger leg.
Take care when turning the counterbalance valve adjust-
ing screw. As the adjusting screw is turned, the boom will 5. Secure the outrigger legs in the stowed position until
begin to lower. The rate of movement will increase as the the hydraulic system is again operational.
boom is lowered.
6. Turn the screw out (counterclockwise) to close the
The rate of movement can be adjusted by how far the check valve before using the outrigger.
counterbalance valve adjusting screw is turned after
movement of the boom starts. 7. Perform a structural test as described in the Mainte-
nance Manual before returning the unit to service.
2. Adjust the counterbalance holding valve to the open
position. Unlock the jam nut and turn the adjusting Auxiliary Power Sources
screw inward (clockwise). If the unit is disabled by engine or pump failure, it can be
stowed for travel by using hydraulic power from another
unit. The operating unit must have a hydraulic system with
similar pressure and flow rates and a lower tool circuit.

42 • Section 5 — Operation
Screw Pilot Operated
Check Valve

Base End

Pilot Operated
Check Valve Rod End

A-Frame Outriggers

Base End

Rod End
Pilot Operated
Check Valve
Radial Outriggers

Figure 5.12 — Pilot Operated Check Valve Locations

4. Disconnect the sense line connected to the compen-


Warning sator at the pump (refer to Figure 5.13). Cap and plug
Death or serious injury can result from hydraulic oil the connections.
being injected into the flesh when loosening or dis-
connecting hydraulic components. Remove the pres- 5. Release pressure from the pressure line to the pump.
sure before loosening or disconnecting hydraulic Move the machine/outriggers selector to the Outrigger
components. position. Move an outrigger control in both directions
several times to release the pressure in the line.
Seek immediate medical attention if injured by escap-
ing hydraulic oil. Serious infection or reaction can 6. Disconnect the pressure line from the pump.
result if medical treatment is not given immediately.
7. Connect a pressure line from the operational unit to the
Spilled hydraulic oil creates slick surfaces and can pressure line of the disabled unit. The lower tool circuit
cause personnel to slip and/or fall. Keep the unit and hose reel or an extension hose from a pressure outlet
work areas clean. on the operational unit may be used.

A few plumbing connections will need to be made. After the appropriate plumbing connections are made, use
the following procedure to stow the unit.
1. Close the shutoff valve in the return line at the
reservoir. 1. Start the engine and pump on the operational unit.

2. Disconnect the return line. 2. Move the tools control handle to the On position.

3. Connect a return line from the operational unit to the 3. Stow the disabled unit using its normal controls or
return line of the disabled unit. The lower tool circuit lower controls, as necessary.
hose reel or an extension hose from a return inlet on
the operational unit may be used. 4. Move the tools control handle to the Off position.

Section 5 — Operation • 43
Pressure Port
Pressure Port

Compensator Compensator
Position for Left Position for Right
Hand Rotation Hand Rotation

Sense Line Port for Sense Line Port for Sense


Left Hand Rotation Right Hand Rotation Line Port
Vickers Parker

Figure 5.13 — Pump Connections

5. Turn off the engine and pump on the operational unit.

6. Return all hydraulic connections on both units to their


normal positions.

Attention
The return line can rupture causing a large quantity of
oil to spill under pressure. Open the manual shutoff
valve before starting a disabled unit.

7. Open the shutoff valve on the disabled unit.

44 • Section 5 — Operation
Section 6 — Care of the Unit

An alert operator can contribute to the care of the unit. The Immediately report any unusual hydraulic system noise
observation and correction of minor maintenance prob- observed during operation so the cause can be identified
lems, as they occur, may prevent costly repairs and and corrected.
lengthy downtime and improve safety.
Fiberglass
At no time should an Altec unit be altered or modified
without specific written approval from Altec Industries, Keep the fiberglass upper boom and lower boom sections
Inc. clean and dry to maintain the nonconductive properties of
the fiberglass. Periodically clean the fiberglass with mild
detergent in warm water. Do not scratch the boom surface.
Hydraulic System
The condition of the hydraulic oil is a major factor in Do not contact fixed objects such as poles and trees with
obtaining long life and trouble-free service from the hydrau- the fiberglass platform. Periodically clean the platform
lic system components. The oil temperature, level, and with mild detergent in warm water.
cleanliness must be properly maintained.
Single Handle Control
Attention
and Control Handle Covers
Do not put the unit in service and run the pump at
normal operating speeds until the hydraulic oil reser- Keep the green insulated single handle control clean, dry,
voir feels warm to the touch. in good condition, and periodically tested to maintain its
limited dielectric properties. Wipe any contaminants or
The minimum temperature at which oil will flow to the pump moisture from the surface of the control handle assembly
varies with the type of oil in the reservoir. Regardless of the and dashboard covers with a clean, dry cloth. Lower the
hydraulic oil used, improper start-up can quickly damage bellows and wipe contaminants or moisture from the
the pump. Always allow the oil to warm up before putting insulating linkages. Make sure the control area is free of
the unit in service. Section 4 under Cold Weather Start-Up foreign objects and reposition the bellows. Replace any
describes this procedure. damaged components with replacement parts from your
Altec representative and perform a dielectric test on the
The maximum temperature at which the hydraulic system control.
can operate depends on the hydraulic oil used. Cold
weather oil should not exceed 160 degrees Fahrenheit Keep the rubber control valve handle covers in place and
(71.11 degrees Celsius) and warm weather oil should not in good condition. Replace damaged covers with replace-
exceed 180 degrees Fahrenheit (82.22 degrees Celsius). ment parts from your Altec representative.

If overheating occurs during normal use, identify the cause


Structures and Mechanical Systems
and have it corrected immediately.
Report any unusual noises, loose, cracked, or corroded
fasteners, lockwires, pins, pin retainers, etc., so the cause
Warning can be determined and corrected.
Death or serious injury can result if the recommended
hydraulic oil is not used. Other fluids added to the
hydraulic system can affect the insulating capability of
Caution
the unit. Spilled hydraulic oil creates slick surfaces and can
cause personnel to slip and/or fall. Keep the unit and
Attention work areas clean.
Only use hydraulic oil as recommended. Other fluids
added to the hydraulic system can increase compo- Proper lubrication on a regular basis will increase the life
nent wear and affect the lubricating characteristics of of the unit and help to prevent maintenance problems.
the oil. Report any sign of lubricant leaking from a gearbox so the
cause can be determined and corrected.
Check the oil level in the hydraulic reservoir daily. When
checking the oil level, the vehicle should be on level Avoid shock loads and overloading. These conditions can
ground, booms and outriggers stowed. The oil level must present hazards to the unit and personnel. Start and stop
be between the Add and Full marks on the dipstick. If oil all operations as smoothly as possible. Do not allow
must be added, use the proper type as described in the debris, tools, etc. to accumulate on the unit. The booms
Maintenance Manual. must be free to raise and lower without obstruction.

Section 6 — Care of the Unit • 45


When cleaning with high pressure washers or steam
cleaning equipment, do not directly spray the electrical
components or control panels. All electrical connections
are sealed and designed for outside use. However, high
pressure fluids can force their way past the seals and
cause corrosion to start.

46 • Section 6 — Care of the Unit


Appendix
Glossary
2nd stage boom — see intermediate boom. articulating-boom aerial device — an aerial device with two or more
3rd stage boom — see upper boom. boom sections that are connected at joint(s) which allow one boom to
pivot with respect to the adjacent boom.
A-frame outrigger — an extendible outrigger having two diagonal
members which are connected at the top and joined near the midsec- ASTM — American Society for Testing and Materials.
tion by a horizontal cross piece. Resembles a broad based “A.” atmosphere (one) — a pressure measure equal to 14.7 psi.
above rotation — in reference to a position on or about a unit that is atmospheric pressure — pressure on all objects in the atmosphere
vertically above the rotation bearing. because of the weight of the surrounding air. At sea level, about 14.7
absolute — a measure having as its zero point or base the complete psi absolute.
absence of the item being measured. atmospheric vents — a vacuum prevention device designed to allow
absolute pressure — a pressure scale with the zero point at a perfect air to enter a hydraulic line that has encountered an internal pressure
vacuum. below that of the atmosphere (vacuum).
accumulator — a container used to store fluid under pressure as a attention — information that must be followed to reduce the likelihood
source of hydraulic power or as a means of dampening pressure of property damage. Property damage could include structural damage
surges. to the unit, component failure, or damage to nearby property.
actuator — a device for converting hydraulic energy into mechanical auger — the hole boring tool of the digger, consisting of a hollow tube
energy, such as a motor or cylinder. with hardened teeth attached at one end to dig into and break up soil
and/or rock as the auger is rotated. Several turns of flighting are welded
adapter — a device used to connect two parts of different type or to the tube to carry the loose material away from the teeth.
diameter.
auger extension shaft — a shaft which fits into the auger tube to
adjusting stud — a component of a cable drive system that is threaded connect the digger output shaft to the auger.
on both ends and has a hex adjusting flat in the center. It secures the
drive cable to the cylinder rod and can be used to adjust the tension of auger rotation hydraulic system — the hydrostatic system on a
the drive cable. pressure digger which operates the auger transmission gearbox.
aeration — the entrapment of air in hydraulic fluid. Excessive aeration auger stow bracket — the bracket on a digger derrick lower boom
may cause the fluid to appear milky and components to operate which stores the digger and auger assembly when it is not in use.
erratically because of the compressibility of the air trapped in the fluid. auger stow switch — a limit switch which is actuated by the auger to
aerial control valve — the control valve on the turntable of an elevator shut off digger operation in the stowing direction when the auger
unit which operates the movement functions of the aerial device. reaches its fully stowed position in the auger stow bracket.
aerial device — a vehicle-mounted device with a boom assembly auger transmission gearbox — the gearbox mounted on the mast
which is extendible, articulating, or both, which is designed and used to weldment of a pressure digger that is used to rotate the kelly bar.
position personnel. The device may also be used to handle material, if auger tube — the hollow tube at the centerline of an auger to which the
designed and equipped for that purpose. auger flighting is welded.
Allen wrench — a six-sided wrench that fits into the hex socket of a cap auger windup sling — the cable or strap attached to the auger stow
screw or set screw. bracket which is used to store the digger and auger.
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) — a self-governing auxiliary engine — a separately mounted engine that is used to
body of professionals whose primary objective is to prevent accidents provide power for the unit’s hydraulic system.
by establishing requirements for design, manufacture, maintenance, auxiliary hydraulic system — the secondary hydraulic system of a
performance, use and training for manufactured goods including aerial pressure digger that operates all the hydraulic functions except auger
devices and digger derricks. rotation.
anaerobic adhesive — a bonding agent or adhesive that cures in the AWS — American Welding Society.
absence of air.
back pressure — pressure existing in the discharge flow from an
analog signal — an electrical signal that communicates information by actuator or hydraulic system. It adds to the pressure required to operate
the continuous variation of voltage or current level within a defined an actuator under a given load.
range, in proportion to an input parameter such as pressure or control
lever position. backlash — the clearance at the tooth contact point between the
adjacent gear teeth of two or more meshing gears.
annular area — a ring shaped area. Usually refers to the piston area
minus the cross-sectional area of the rod of a hydraulic cylinder. baffle — a device, usually a plate, installed in a reservoir to separate
the return line inlet from the suction line outlet.
ANSI — see American National Standards Institute.
band of arrows — decals used on extendible and articulating upper
antirotation fork — a two-pronged retainer which is fastened to the booms to define the boom tip area and the insulated portions of the
inside of the turntable and used to prevent movement of the rotary joint upper boom and lower boom insert.
outer housing.
bare-hand work — a technique of performing live line maintenance on
antifoam additive — an agent added to hydraulic fluid to inhibit air energized conductors and equipment whereby one or more authorized
bubbles from forming and collecting together on the surface of the fluid. persons work directly on an energized part after having been raised and
antiwear additive — an agent added to hydraulic fluid to improve the bonded to the energized conductors or equipment.
ability of the fluid to prevent wear on internal moving parts in the barrel — the hollow body of a hydraulic cylinder into which the piston
hydraulic system. and rod are assembled.
arbor bar — the shaft or spindle that is used to support a cable reel. base boom — see lower boom.
arbor bar collar — a cylindrical device that is used to secure a cable base end — 1: the closed end of a hydraulic cylinder, opposite from the
reel on an arbor bar. end that the rod extends from. 2: the end of an extendible boom that is
arm — 1: the primary load-carrying structure of an articulating arm. 2: closest to the turntable. 3: the end of an articulating boom that remains
the primary load-carrying structure of a single elevator. 3: the articulat- positioned closest to the turntable when the boom is fully unfolded.
ing structure which supports the arbor bar for reel lifting. basket — see platform.
arm cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the arm of a single battery charger — a device used to restore the electrical charge in a
elevator up and down. battery.
articulating arm — a system located between the turntable and lower bearing — a machine part that is installed between two adjacent
boom of an aerial device which is used for lifting the boom assembly to machine parts to allow those parts to rotate or slide with respect to each
increase the platform working height. This system includes the arm, other. Commonly used to decrease friction or wear on components.
link(s), riser and articulating arm cylinder.
behind cab mount — a pedestal mounting position located immedi-
articulating arm cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves an ately behind the vehicle cab on the longitudinal centerline of the
articulating arm up and down. chassis.

3-05 1 Appendix — Glossary


below rotation — in reference to a position on or about a unit that is breather — a device that permits air to move in and out of a container
vertically below the rotation bearing. or component to maintain atmospheric pressure.
below rotation controls — controls that are located on the chassis, bridge mount — a unit mounting configuration in which the turntable
used for operating some or all of the functions of the unit. is mounted on a pedestal structure which forms a bridge over the cargo
bleed-off — to reduce the trapped pressure in a hydraulic system, line, area.
or component, to a zero state by allowing fluid to escape under broadband — a high speed telecommunication system utilizing fiber
controlled conditions through a valve or outlet. optic and/or coaxial cable.
blocking valve — a two-position, two-way valve that blocks pump flow bucket — see platform.
to a hydraulic circuit or system when it is not actuated, and opens to buckeye — see forged pin retainer.
allow fluid when actuated.
bullwheel assembly — an assembly of steel rollers used as a portion
body — a structure containing compartments for storage of tools, of a cable stringing system.
materials, and/or other payload which is installed on a vehicle frame or
subbase. burst pressure — the minimum internal pressure that will cause a
hose, tube, cylinder, or other hydraulic or pneumatic component to
body belt — a component in a personal fall protection system consist- rupture or split open.
ing of a strap which is secured about the waist of a person, with a means
for attaching it to a lanyard. (As of January 1, 1998, the use of a body button head — a type of cap screw with a rounded head containing a
belt for personal fall protection is prohibited by OSHA.) socket into which a tool can be inserted to turn the cap screw.
body harness — a component in a personal fall protection system bypass — a secondary passage for fluid flow.
consisting of an assembly of straps which are secured about the waist, bypass valve — a hydraulic valve that allows for an alternate passage
chest, shoulders, and legs of a person, with a means for attaching the for fluid flow.
assembly to a lanyard.
cable — 1: a wire or wire rope by which force is exerted to control or
bolt — a cylindrical fastener with external screw threads at one end and operate a mechanism. 2: an assembly of two or more electrical
a head configuration such hexagonal, square, or round at the other end, conductors or optical fibers laid up together, usually by being twisted
which conforms to the dimensional and material specifications pub- around a central axis and/or by being enclosed within an outer covering.
lished for bolts. (These specifications are different from those for cap
screws.) cable chute — a device used to guide cable into strand for lashing the
cable to the strand when placing cable. A trolley allows the device to ride
boom — a movable, mechanical structure that is used to support a on the strand as cable is fed through the chute.
platform, material handling components and/or other attachments on a
unit. cable drive system — an upper boom drive mechanism which utilizes
cables to produce upper boom movement.
boom angle indicator — a device which indicates the angle between
the boom centerline and a horizontal plane. cable guide — a bracket which is mounted on a boom to guide the
winch line.
boom flares — steel structures mounted on the boom tip of a digger
derrick which are used to protect the boom tip from loads and support cable keeper — 1: a mechanical device attached to a cable that is used
poles carried on the winch line. to maintain the position of the cable on a sheave. 2: a component used
to prevent a cable or winch line from coming off a sheave.
boom functions valve — the control valve on a digger derrick that
directs hydraulic pressure and flow to the boom functions (boom, cable lasher — a mechanical device which wraps lashing wire in a
rotation, intermediate boom, upper boom) hydraulic circuits. spiral configuration around a length of suspension strand and adjacent
communication cable.
boom pin — the horizontal pin that connects the lower boom to the
turntable or riser. cable lug — a mechanical device attached to a cable that is used to
maintain the position of the cable on a sheave.
boom rest — the structural member attached to the chassis or body to
support the lower boom in the travel or rest position. cable placer — a type of aerial device which contains a cable stringing
system and associated components for use in erecting overhead
boom stow switch — a limit switch which is actuated to shut off the communication cable.
boom lower function when the boom reaches its stowed position in the
boom rest. cable slug — the steel end fitting at each end of the drive cable in an
upper boom drive system. One end is attached to the cylinder rod and
boom stow valve — a mechanically actuated hydraulic valve that limits the other is secured in a pocket on the elbow sheave.
the downward pressure of a boom as it is placed in its rest.
cable stringing system — the group of steel rollers, bullwheel assem-
boom tip — the area at the end of an extendible or articulating upper blies, strand sheave assemblies and fairlead which directs communi-
boom that is farthest from the turntable when the boom assembly is cation cable or suspension strand from the reel it is stored on to the
extended or unfolded. This area includes all components at the end of working position of the operator.
the boom above the band of arrows.
calibrate — to check, adjust, or determine by measurement in compari-
boom tip idler sheave — the upper sheave in a digger derrick upper son with a standard, the proper value of each scale reading or setting
boom tip containing two sheaves, which carries the winch line as it on a meter or other device.
travels from the winch to the lower sheave (boom tip sheave).
caliper — a measuring instrument with two legs or jaws that can be
boom tip pin — a horizontal pin at the upper boom tip. Platform adjusted to determine the distance between two surfaces.
mounting bracket(s) and material handling devices are fastened to this
pin. cam — a rotating or sliding piece that imparts motion to a roller moving
against its edge or to a pin free to move in a groove on its face or that
boom tip sheave — 1: the sheave in a digger derrick upper boom tip receives motion from such a roller or pin.
containing only one sheave, which carries the winch line as it travels
from the winch to the load. 2: the lower sheave in a digger derrick upper candling — a method of inspecting filament wound fiberglass booms
boom tip containing two sheaves, which carries the winch line as it by slowly passing a light through the inside of the boom in a darkened
travels from the upper sheave (boom tip idler sheave) to the load. area. Cracks, crazing, and other damage show up as dark spots or
shadows.
boom tip tools — see upper tool circuit.
cap — a device located on the hand of a reel lifter that is used to retain
boom tip winch — a winch located at the tip of a boom. the arbor bar.
bore — the inside diameter of a pipe, tube, cylinder barrel, or cylindrical cap end — see base end.
hole in any of various other components.
cap screw — a cylindrical fastener with external screw threads at one
boss — protruding material on a part which adds strength, facilitates end and a head configuration such as hexagonal, hex socket, flat
assembly, provides for fastenings, etc. countersunk, round, or slotted at the other end, which conforms to the
brake — a device used to slow or stop the rotation or movement of a dimensional and material specifications published for cap screws.
component such as a rotation gearbox, winch, gravity leveled platform, capacitive coupling — the transfer of electrical energy from one circuit
or arbor bar. to another through a dielectric gap.

Appendix — Glossary 2 3-05


capacity chart — a table or graph showing the load capacity, rated come-along — a device for gripping and putting tension into a length
capacity, or rated load capacity figures for a unit or accessory. of cable, wire, rope, or chain by means of two jaws or attaching devices
captive air system — a closed circuit, low pressure pneumatic system which move closer together when the operator pulls on a lever.
used to actuate a pressure switch by means of a manually operated air communication cable — a copper wire, coaxial, or fiber optic cable
plunger. used for conducting telecommunication signals.
cartridge — 1: the replaceable element of a fluid filter. 2: the compensating link — a mechanical linkage that serves as a connector
replaceable pumping unit of a vane pump, composed of the rotor, ring, between the turntable and the upper boom drive mechanism. As the
vanes and side plates. 3: A removeable hydraulic valve that is screwed lower boom is raised or lowered, this linkage causes the upper boom to
into place in a cavity in a hydraulic manifold or cylinder. maintain its relative angle in relationship to the ground.
catrac — see hose carrier. compensator — a valve spool that is used to maintain a constant
caution — information that indicates a potentially hazardous situation pressure drop regardless of supply or load pressure.
which, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury. It may also compensator control — a control for a variable displacement pump
be used to alert against unsafe practices. that alters displacement in response to pressure changes in the system
cavitation — the formation of gaseous voids in hydraulic fluid caused as related to its adjusted pressure setting.
by a low pressure condition which typically occurs when inlet starvation component — a single part or self-contained assembly.
prevents the pump from filling completely with fluid. The characteristic compressibility — the change in volume of a unit volume of a fluid
sound of cavitation is a high pitched scream. when it is subjected to a unit change in pressure.
center mount — see behind cab mount. conductive — having the ability to act as a transmitter of electricity.
center of gravity — the point in a component or assembly around Electricity will flow through metal, therefore metal is conductive.
which its weight is evenly balanced. conductive shield — a device used to shield the lower test electrode
centerline of rotation — the vertical axis about which the turntable of system from capacitive coupling.
a unit rotates. conductor — a wire, cable, or other body or medium that is suitable for
centrifugal pump — a pump in which motion and force are applied to carrying electric current.
fluid by a rotating impeller within a housing. constant resistivity monitor — device used to continuously measure
chain — a series of identical rigid segments connected to each other the electrical resistance of the wash water in the tank of an insulator
at joints which allow each segment to pivot with respect to adjacent washer.
segments, used to transmit mechanical force. contaminate — to render unfit or to soil by introduction of foreign or
chain extension system — a mechanical system consisting of a unwanted material.
motor, gearbox, chains, and sprockets that is used to extend and retract continuous rotation — a rotation system in which the turntable is able
an extendible upper boom. to rotate an unlimited number of revolutions about the centerline of
chain sling — an inverted Y-shaped length of chain used for lifting a rotation without restriction.
strand reel with an aerial device and placing it in a strand carrier. control — a device, such as a lever or handle, which is actuated by the
chamber — a compartment within a hydraulic component that may operator to regulate the direction and speed of one or more functions
contain elements to aid in operation or control, such as a spring of a unit.
chamber or drain chamber. control station — a position where controls for unit operation are
channel — a fluid passage that has a large length dimension compared located. These positions may include the platform, upper boom tip,
to the dimension of the cross-section. turntable, pedestal or vehicle tailshelf.
charge — to fill an accumulator with fluid under pressure. control valve — a directional valve controlled by an operator, used to
charge pressure — the pressure, above atmospheric pressure, at control the motion or function of an actuator or system.
which replenishing fluid is forced into the hydraulic system. cooler — a heat exchanger used to remove heat from the hydraulic
charge pump — the hydrostatic hydraulic system pump that provides fluid.
fluid at low pressure to make up for internal leakage, provides cooling corner mount — a pedestal mounting position located behind the rear
fluid flow, and tilts the hydrostatic pump swash plate. axle(s) with the centerline of rotation located to one side of the chassis.
chassis — a vehicle on which a unit is mounted, such as a truck, trailer, corona ring — see gradient control device.
or all-terrain vehicle. counterbalance valve — a load holding valve that can be opened to
check valve — a valve that permits flow of fluid in one direction, but not allow flow in the normally blocked direction by applying hydraulic
in the reverse direction. pressure to a pilot port, and which contains a relief capability to allow
circuit — the complete path of flow in a hydraulic or electrical system. flow from the blocked direction if the blocked pressure exceeds a
certain value.
circuit breaker — a form of electrical switch which opens (trips) to
interrupt a circuit when it senses excessive current flow that may be cracking pressure — the pressure at which a pressure actuated valve,
caused by a short circuit, to protect wiring and components from such as a relief valve, begins to pass fluid.
damage. Some types of circuit breakers reset automatically when the crazing — a network of fine cracks on or below the fiberglass surface.
excessive current discontinues and others must be reset manually. Crazing often occurs when the fiberglass is struck with a blunt object,
clevis — a U-shaped fastening device secured by a pin or bolt through sometimes causing deformation and breakdown of the fiberglass resin.
holes in the ends of two arms. crosstalk — a form of interference in which one circuit or channel
closed center — a directional valve design in which pump output is receives some unintentional signal from another.
blocked by the valve spool(s) when the valve spool(s) is in the center cross-ported — a hydraulic path connected between the two opposite
or neutral operating condition. flow paths of a hydraulic circuit that allows a route for flow between the
clutch — the device on a reel lifter which allows the connection and two paths in lieu of flow thru an actuator. To allow sensing of the
disconnection of the arbor bar and the driver. pressure in one path by a component installed in the other path.
coaxial cable — a type of shielded cable used for conducting telecom- cSt (centistoke) — a metric unit of kinematic viscosity. In customary
munication signals, in which the signal carrier is a single wire at the core, use, equal to the kinematic viscosity of a fluid having dynamic viscosity
surrounded by a layer of insulating material, which is in turn surrounded of one centipose and a density of one gram per cubic centimeter.
by a metallic, conductive layer which serves as a shield, with an overall curb side — the side of a vehicle which is opposite from oncoming
outer layer of insulation. traffic when the vehicle is traveling forward in the normal direction in a
combined digger derrick and platform use — the stability criteria for lane of traffic.
a digger derrick mobile unit which indicates that the load capacity chart cushion — a device built into a hydraulic cylinder that restricts the flow
and stability requirements apply to the use of the derrick for lifting of of fluid at the outlet port to slow the motion of the rod as it reaches the
loads with the winch line at the upper boom tip or material handling jib end of its stroke.
tip, with the platform occupied.

3-05 3 Appendix — Glossary


custom option — an option which is not shown on a standard order directional valve — a valve that selectively directs or prevents fluid
form and which requires additional engineering work to supply. flow through desired passages.
cylinder — a device that converts fluid power into linear mechanical displacement — the quantity of fluid that can pass through a pump,
force and motion. It usually consists of a moveable piston and rod, or motor or cylinder in a single revolution or stroke.
plunger, operating within a cylindrical bore. docking station — a device used to mount a remote control transmitter
danger — information that indicates an imminently hazardous situation on a platform.
which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury. This signal dog clutch — see drum clutch.
word is to be used in the most extreme situations.
double-acting cylinder — a cylinder in which fluid pressure can be
DC pump — a pump which is powered by a direct current electric motor. applied to either side of the piston to move the rod in either direction.
dead band — the area or range near the center rest position of a hand double elevator — an elevator lift with two load carrying arms. The
control where the function does not respond to movement of the lever double elevator system includes a lower pedestal, lower arm, lower arm
or handle. cylinder(s), riser, upper arm, upper arm cylinder(s), and upper pedestal,
decal — a thin sheet of flexible material which is attached to another plus parallel links in both the lower and upper sections.
surface by adhesive, and is used to convey instructions, information double-pole, double-throw (DPDT) switch — a six-terminal electrical
and warnings. switch or relay that connects, at the same time, one pair of terminals to
deenergize — to remove electrical power from a device, as from the coil either of two other pairs of terminals.
of a solenoid valve. double-pole, single-throw (DPST) switch — a four-terminal electrical
delivery — the volume of fluid discharged by a pump in a given time, switch or relay that, at the same time, opens or closes two separate
usually expressed in gallons per minute (gpm). circuits or both sides of the same circuit.
demulsibility — the ability of a liquid to expel another type of liquid. down load — the downward force created when an external force is
Commonly used to describe a fluid’s ability to cause water to separate exerted on the boom, such as a winch pulling cable on a cable placer.
out rather than being held in suspension. drain — a passage or a line from a hydraulic component that returns
design voltage — the maximum rated line voltage for which an aerial leakage fluid to the reservoir.
device has been designed, and for which it can be qualified. drift — 1: a gradual, uncontrolled change from a set position of an
detent — a device for positioning and holding one mechanical part in actuator or component. 2: a tool for ramming or driving something.
relation to another so that the device can be released by force applied driver — the gearbox and motor assembly on a reel lifter which is
to one of the parts. connected to and disconnected from the arbor bar through the clutch
diagnostic — relating to the practice of investigation or analysis of the assembly.
cause or nature of a condition, situation, or problem. drop pocket — an open top tool storage area on the chassis of a unit.
diagonal brace — the structural member attached near the top of a drum clutch — a clutch consisting of two or more drive lugs that engage
corner mount pedestal and extending downward and forward to a point similar driven lugs to transmit torque. Commonly used between the
of attachment on the subbase or vehicle frame between the pedestal gearbox and cable drum on front or bed mounted winches.
and the vehicle cab.
dump valve — a normally open, two-position, two-way valve that sends
dial indicator — a meter or gauge with a calibrated circular face and pump flow through a path going directly to the reservoir or bypassing
a spring-loaded plunger, used as a measuring device. hydraulic circuit when it is not actuated, preventing operation of the
diegrinder — a small, hand held, rotary grinding tool. hydraulic system or circuit. When it is actuated, it closes off this path,
dielectric — nonconductive to electrical current. redirecting flow to the hydraulic system or circuit to allow operation.
differential cylinder — any cylinder that has two opposed piston areas dynamometer — an instrument for measuring mechanical force or
that are not equal. power.
digger — the mechanism which drives the auger. earth anchor — see screw anchor.
digger bail — a tubular housing attached to the gearbox portion of a eccentric ring — a ring with the center hole located in a position off the
digger, which surrounds the motor and provides an attachment point to geometric center, commonly used to adjust the position of the rotation
the digger link. pinion with respect to the rotation bearing gear teeth.
digger derrick — a multipurpose, vehicle-mounted device with an eccentric ring lock — a device which engages a hole or notch in an
extendible boom which may accommodate components that dig cylin- eccentric ring to prevent the ring from rotating.
drical holes, set utility poles, and position materials, apparatus, and/or efficiency — the ratio of output to input. Volumetric efficiency of a pump
personnel. is the actual output in gpm divided by the theoretical or design output.
digger derrick use — the stability criteria for a digger derrick mobile The overall efficiency of a hydraulic system is the output power divided
unit which indicates that the load capacity chart and stability require- by the input power. Efficiency is usually expressed as a percent.
ments apply to the use of the derrick for lifting of loads with the winch elbow — the structure on an articulating-boom aerial device that
line at the upper boom tip or material handling jib tip, with the platform connects the upper boom to the lower boom. The elbow allows the
stowed or removed, if so equipped. upper boom to pivot relative to the lower boom.
digger hanger bracket — the structural member on a digger derrick elbow bearing — the rotating member that allows the upper boom to
which supports the digger link on the extendible boom. rotate around the end of the lower boom. Used on aerial devices with
digger latch mechanism — a mechanism which secures the digger to the upper and lower booms mounted side by side.
the lower boom when it is stowed and to the extendible boom when it elbow pin — the horizontal pin that attaches the upper boom to the
is unstowed. lower boom on an articulating-boom aerial device. Used on aerial
digger link — the structural member which attaches the digger to the devices with the upper boom mounted over the lower boom.
digger hanger bracket. electrical harness — an assembly of electrical wires that is used to
digger/winch valve — the control valve on a digger derrick that directs deliver electrical current between components.
hydraulic pressure and flow to the digger and winch hydraulic circuits. electrocution — receiving an electrical shock resulting in death.
digital signal — an electrical signal that communicates information by electrohydraulic — a combination of electric and hydraulic control
the use of two distinct levels of voltage or current, a high “on” level and mechanisms in which an electrically controlled actuator is used to shift
a low “off” level, which are sent in a series of pulses. The timing of the the spool in a hydraulic control valve.
pulses is used to indicate the level of an input parameter such as control electrohydraulic control system — a control system in which the
lever position, or information such as the address setting of a radio function control handles are connected to electric controls. The electric
control transmitter linking it to its receiver. controls actuate electrohydraulic valves to operate the functions of the
diode — an electrical component that allows current flow in one unit.
direction but not in the reverse direction.

Appendix — Glossary 4 3-05


electrohydraulic valve — a directional valve that receives a variable flange — on a flange and lug pin retaining system, an end plate that is
or controlled electrical signal which is used to control or meter hydraulic welded to one end of the pin. The purpose of the flange is to position the
flow. pin in the connection.
elevator lift — a system located between the turntable and subbase of flange and lug pin retaining system — a connecting pin retention
an aerial device which is used for lifting the aerial device to increase the system in which an end plate is welded to one end of the pin and a
platform working height. This system may be configured as a single retaining plate is attached with cap screws to the other end to hold the
elevator or a double elevator. pin in position.
elevator unit — the overall device including the subbase, elevator lift flashover — a disruptive electrical discharge at the surface of electrical
and the aerial device. insulation or in the surrounding medium, which may or may not cause
emergency operating DC pump — see secondary stowage DC pump. permanent damage to the insulation.
emergency operating system — see secondary stowage system. flats from finger tight (F.F.F.T.) — a method of counting the number
of wrench flats when tightening a hydraulic adapter to establish a torque
end gland — a hollow, cylindrical part that screws into or is retained in value.
the open end of a hydraulic cylinder barrel, through which the rod
protrudes. flat-shoe outrigger — an outrigger which has a shoe that is fixed in a
horizontal position.
end-mounted platform — a platform which is attached to a mounting
bracket that extends beyond the boom tip, positioning the platform (and flighting — a curved plate or series of curved plates welded together,
platform rotation pivot, if so equipped) beyond the end of the upper spiraling along the axis of an auger tube or screw anchor rod.
boom. flow — the movement of fluid generated by pressure differences.
energize — to send electrical power to a device, as to the coil of a flow control valve — a valve that regulates the rate of fluid flow.
solenoid valve. flow rate — the volume, mass or weight of a fluid passing through any
energized conductor — an apparatus that is transmitting electric conductor per unit of time.
current. flow straightener — a component part of a nozzle used to straighten
energy — the ability or capacity to do work, measured in units of work. or remove any swirling motion of fluid going through the nozzle.
engine protection system — a system which detects when the flowmeter — an instrument used to measure the flow rate of fluid in a
auxiliary engine oil pressure or temperature is out of the proper range hydraulic tube or hose.
and shuts the engine off. fluid — a liquid that is specially compounded for use as a power
extendible — capable of linear movement of one or more portions of transmitting medium in a hydraulic system.
an assembly to increase the overall length or reach of the assembly. fold — to move a pivoting structure such an articulating upper boom
extendible-boom aerial device — an aerial device with a telescopic toward its stowed position.
or extendible boom assembly. fold-up shoe outrigger — an outrigger which has a shoe that pivots
extension cylinder — a hydraulic cylinder which extends and retracts into a vertical position when the outrigger is fully retracted.
an extendible boom(s). force — any push or pull measured in units of weight.
fairlead — the group of steel rollers at the platform of a cable placer forged pin retainer — a pin retainer made from forged steel, consisting
which guide the cable or suspension strand during the placing process. of a slender, cylindrical body with a flattened, circular head at one end,
fall protection system — a system consisting of a body harness or with a mounting hole through the head perpendicular to the body. The
body belt, a decelerating lanyard, connectors, and an anchor point at body is inserted through a hole in the pin to be retained, and the head
the boom tip, used to catch and hold a person who falls from a platform. is fastened to the adjacent structure with a cap screw.
(As of January 1, 1998, the use of a body belt for personal fall protection four-way valve — a valve having four ports for direction of fluid flow.
is prohibited by OSHA.)
FPS — Fluid Power Society.
feedback (feedback signal) — the return of part of an output signal to
the input for the purpose of modification and control of the output. frequency — the number of times an action occurs in a unit of time.
feeder tube — a telescopic hydraulic tube assembly mounted on an gasket — a packing made of a deformable material, usually in the form
extendible boom which carries pump flow to a device mounted on the of a sheet or ring, used to make a pressure tight fit between stationary
extendible portion of the boom such as a digger or boom tip winch. parts.
fiber optic cable — a type of cable used for conducting control or gate valve — see shutoff valve.
telecommunication signals, in which the signal carrier(s) is one or more gauge pressure — a pressure scale that ignores atmospheric pres-
optical fibers, enclosed within an outer covering. sure by establishing atmospheric pressure as its zero point. Its zero
fiber optics — the use of transparent fibers of glass or plastic which point is 14.7 psi absolute.
transmit light signals throughout the length of the fiber. Commonly used gauge snubber — see snubber valve.
to transmit signals from a remote control.
gearbox — an assembly with internal speed changing gears; a trans-
fiberglass — glass in fibrous form added as a reinforcement to a plastic mission. Gearboxes are commonly used to transmit power from a
for use in making various products. hydraulic motor to operate a function through an output shaft.
filler breather cap — the component on the top of a reservoir that gelcoat — a protective coating used on fiberglass components to
allows air to enter and exit the reservoir as the fluid level changes, and prevent the wicking of moisture into the fiberglass strands and to retard
which can be removed to access a fill hole when adding hydraulic fluid the degrading effect of ultraviolet light on the fiberglass.
to the reservoir.
GFI — ground fault interrupter.
filter — a device through which fluid is passed to remove and retain
insoluble contaminants from a fluid. gin pole — a vertical phase-holding apparatus which is attached to a
platform or upper boom tip.
filter cart — a portable device which can be connected to a unit’s
hydraulic system to filter water and/or other contaminants out of the gpm — gallons per minute.
hydraulic system fluid. gradient control device — a device at the upper end of an insulating
filter cartridge — a component containing filtration material which is boom that reduces electrical stress level(s) below that considered to be
installed within a filter housing or attached to a filter receptacle for use, disruptive.
and can be removed and replaced as a self-contained unit. gravity leveling system — a system which uses the force of gravity to
firm footing — outrigger placement and extension in accordance with keep the bottom of a platform parallel to level ground as the boom is
the instructions in a unit’s operator’s manual to ensure proper leveling raised or lowered. One means of accomplishing this is by allowing the
of the vehicle and adequate stability when operating the unit. platform to pivot freely about a horizontal shaft attached above the
platform’s center of gravity.
fixed displacement pump— a pump in which displacement is con-
stant, so that the output flow can be changed only by varying the drive grease fitting — a small fitting that acts as the connection between a
speed. grease gun and the component to be lubricated.

3-05 5 Appendix — Glossary


gripper tool — a component used for grasping an object or electrical hydraulically extendible jib — a jib boom that may be extended or
lines through the use of an articulated mechanism. retracted by hydraulic power.
ground — 1: a large conducting body with a potential of zero volts used hydraulics — an engineering science pertaining to liquid pressure and
as a common current return for an electric circuit. 2: an object that flow.
makes an electrical connection with a ground or with the earth. hydrostatic hydraulic system — any hydraulic drive in which a
ground fault interrupter (GFI) — a fast acting form of circuit breaker positive displacement pump and motor transfer rotary power by means
that opens to interrupt an electrical circuit if it senses a very small of fluid under pressure.
current leakage to ground, to protect personnel against a potential individual address setting — the code that identifies a specific
shock hazard from defective electrical tools or wiring. It does this by transmitter as the one emitting the signal corresponding to a specific
monitoring for any difference in current flow between the hot and neutral receiver’s reception address.
wires in the circuit. An imbalance exceeding a very small preset value
indicates that current is finding an improper path to ground, and causes in-line — the installation of a component in series between two portions
the breaker to trip. of a hydraulic line or electrical conductor so that flow in the line or
conductor toward the component passes through the component and
guard ring — see conductive shield. continues on in the line or conductor on the other side.
hand — an extension of the reel lifter arm that allows for loading the instability — a condition of a mobile unit where the sum of the moments
arbor bar. tending to overturn the mobile unit is equal to or exceeds the sum of the
hand control — a hand operated control lever or handle located at a moments tending to resist overturning.
control station used to regulate a function of a unit, where the speed of insulated aerial device — an aerial device with dielectric components
the function is proportional to the distance the control is moved. designed and tested to meet the specific electrical insulating rating
heat — the form of energy that has the capacity to create warmth or to consistent with the manufacturer’s name plate.
increase the temperature of a substance. Any energy that is wasted or insulated digger derrick — a digger derrick designed for and manu-
used to overcome friction is converted to heat. Heat is measured in factured with a fiberglass boom(s) for use around energized conductors
calories or British thermal units (Btu). One Btu is the amount of heat at a maximum of 46 kV phase to phase.
required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree
Fahrenheit. insulated liner — see platform liner.
heat exchanger — a device that transfers heat through a conducting insulated portions — those sections which are designed, maintained,
wall from one fluid to another or into the atmosphere. and tested in accordance with the electrical requirements of ANSI
A92.2.
hertz (Hz) — a unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second.
insulator — a device that isolates the energized conductor of a power
high tooth — the individual tooth out of all the gear teeth on a rotation line from the support structure.
bearing at which the minimum backlash occurs with the rotation pinion.
This is because of a slight difference between the actual and theoretical intercom system — a transmitter and receiver system that allows two-
tooth pitch lines due to manufacturing tolerances. way verbal communication between a platform operator and a person
at ground level.
HLIW — hot line insulator washer.
interference — any energy that inhibits the transmission or reception
holding valve — see load holding valve. of electrical or radio signals.
HOP — see hydraulic overload protection system. intermediate boom (INT BOOM) — an extendible boom section which
horsepower (HP) — the power required to lift 550 pounds one foot in is located between the upper boom and the lower boom in an extendible
one second or 33,000 pounds 1 foot in one minute. One horsepower is boom assembly.
equal to 746 watts or to 42.4 British thermal units per minute. ISO — International Standards Organization.
hose carrier — a flexible component which contains hydraulic, electri- jam nut — a nut that is screwed down firmly against another nut to
cal, and/or air lines, usually mounted inside or along the side of an prevent loosening.
extendible boom. As the boom is extended, the hose carrier unfolds in
a rolling motion to allow the lines to extend with the boom. jaw clutch — see drum clutch.
hose carrier tube — a rigid, enclosed tube which contains hydraulic, jib — an auxiliary boom which attaches to the upper boom tip to extend
electrical, and/or air lines, and may contain components for upper the reach of the boom.
controls. It is usually attached to a hose carrier on the side of an JIC — Joint Industry Conference.
extendible boom.
joystick — a two or three axis control lever which allows the operator
hot line insulator washer (HLIW) — a vehicle-mounted device which to simultaneously control multiple functions.
is designed and used for cleaning pole and structure mounted transmis-
sion and distribution insulators. junction box — an enclosed central connecting point for electrical
wiring.
HTMA — Hydraulic Tool Manufacturer’s Association.
kelly bar — 1: for derricks see auger extension shaft. 2: the auger drive
Huck bolt — a bolt-like fastener that is placed in position and then shaft of a pressure digger which is extendible from the ram cylinder.
stretched while an end fitting is swaged on. Commonly used to attach
a pedestal, subbase, and/or outriggers to a vehicle frame. key — a parallel-sided piece that fits into grooves in two adjacent parts
to prevent movement between the parts. Often used as the driving
hydrant — a discharge pipe with a valve and spout at which water may member between a shaft and a sheave or winch drum.
be drawn from a water main.
keyway — a groove that is cut in a shaft or bore for a key to fit into.
hydraulic control — a control that is actuated by hydraulically induced
forces. kilovolts (kV) — a unit of potential difference equal to 1,000 volts.
hydraulic leveling system — an automatic hydraulic control system knuckle — see elbow.
which keeps the bottom of a platform parallel to or at a fixed angle to the L-bracket — an L-shaped weldment that is used to connect a splicer
turntable base plate as the boom is raised or lowered. One means of platform to the upper boom tip.
accomplishing this is by transferring hydraulic fluid between a master lanyard — a component in a personal fall protection system consisting
cylinder actuated by movement of the lower boom and a slave cylinder of a flexible, nonmetallic strap or rope with a connector at each end for
mounted between the platform and the upper boom. connecting a body harness or body belt to a specified anchor point
hydraulic overload protection (HOP) system — the system on a provided at the boom tip, used to catch and decelerate a person in a fall
digger derrick that shuts off certain functions to help prevent damage from the platform. (As of January 1, 1998, the use of a body belt for
to the digger derrick structure when an overload is applied to the boom personal fall protection is prohibited by OSHA.)
in the downward direction. lashing wire — a thin, solid wire which is wrapped in a helix configu-
hydraulic schematic — a drawing that uses common hydraulic ration around a length of suspension strand and adjacent communica-
symbols to represent the hydraulic system of the unit. tion cable so that the suspension strand carries the weight of the cable.
hydraulic swivel — a fluid conducting fitting having two joined parts lay — the length of wire rope in which one strand makes one complete
that are capable of pivoting freely about each other to accommodate spiral around the rope.
motion of an attached hydraulic line.

Appendix — Glossary 6 3-05


layer — all wraps of winch line on a winch drum which are on the same lower control valve — the hydraulic valve on the vehicle, turntable, or
level between drum flanges. pedestal of an aerial device used for operating some or all of the
leakage monitor system — a means by which current leakage is functions of the aerial device.
measured through the insulated section(s) of a boom to confirm of lower controls — the controls on the vehicle, turntable, or pedestal,
dielectric integrity. used for operating some or all of the functions of the unit.
leveling cable — the wire rope portion of a mechanical leveling system lower pedestal — the structure within an elevator lift that connects the
that passes over the sheaves. elevator lift to the subbase.
leveling chain — the chain portion of a mechanical leveling system that lower test electrode system — a system on an insulated aerial device
passes over the sprockets. utilizing conductive bands installed permanently on the inside and
leveling cylinder — 1: a cylinder that is used in a master/slave outside surfaces of the insulated portion of the upper boom and
arrangement in a hydraulic leveling system to hydraulically level the conductive connections to components inside that portion of the boom
platform. 2: the hydraulic cylinder that is used to tilt the pivot and mast such as leveling rods and hydraulic lines. All the bands and component
weldments of a pressure digger to either side of the vertical position. connections are connected to a common pickup point for use in
measuring current leakage to confirm of dielectric integrity.
leveling rod — a slender, round, fiberglass rod used in a mechanical
leveling system that passes through a unit’s boom to connect the lower tool circuit — a hydraulic tool circuit with quick disconnect
leveling chains or cables at each end of the boom. couplings located on the pedestal or on the vehicle.
leveling system — see platform leveling system. lug — a metal part which serves as a cap, handle, support, or fitting
connection.
leverage — a gain in output force over input force; mechanical
advantage or force multiplication. magnetic suction separator filter — see magnetic suction strainer.
lift cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the lower boom up and magnetic suction strainer — a suction filter consisting of a strainer
down on a digger derrick or extendible-boom aerial device. which contains one or more magnets to trap ferrous metallic contami-
nants that are small enough to pass through the strainer.
lifter cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the reel lifter arms.
mainframe — see pedestal.
lifting eye — a shackle or weldment used for attaching chain, cable,
rope, etc. to a boom for material handling. man-and-a-half platform — an oversized one-man platform.
light emitting diode (LED) — a semiconductor diode that emits light manifold — a fluid conductor that provides multiple connection ports.
when subjected to an applied voltage. LEDs are used for electronic manual lowering valve — a manually operated hydraulic valve used
display. to lower the boom in the event of power failure.
line — a tube, pipe or hose used as a passageway to move hydraulic manual override — a means of manually actuating an automatically or
fluid. remotely controlled device.
linear — in a straight line. manually extendible jib — a jib that is capable of being extended and
linear actuator — a device for converting hydraulic energy into linear retracted by human force.
motion such as a cylinder or ram. mast — the structure on a pressure digger which supports the auger
linear position transducer — an extendible length measuring device transmission gearbox, ram cylinder, kelly bar, and pole setter.
which produces a variable electrical signal that is proportional to the master control panel — the primary derrick lower control panel which
length to which the device is extended. contains the electrical connections between the derrick control system
liner — see platform liner. and components such as the power module and the dump or blocking
valve. The master control panel is used in conjunction with a slave panel
link — the secondary load-carrying structure of an articulating arm. to provide dual station lower controls.
load capacity — (as defined by ANSI for digger derricks) the maximum master cylinder — a cylinder in which motion of the piston under an
load, specified by the manufacturer, that can be lifted by the mobile unit external force transfers hydraulic fluid to a slave cylinder to produce
at regular intervals of load radius or boom angle, through the specified corresponding motion.
ranges of boom elevation, extension and rotation, with options installed
and inclusive of stability requirements. material handling — having the ability to use the boom or attachments
on the boom to lift and position materials.
load holding valve — a hydraulic valve which blocks fluid flow from a
hydraulic actuator, such as a cylinder or motor, to prevent motion when material handling system — the system on an aerial device that
the control valve is not being operated or in case of a hydraulic line consists of a jib and winch used to lift material to the upper boom tip.
failure. mechanical leveling system — a mechanical system which keeps the
load radius — the horizontal distance from the centerline of rotation to bottom of a platform parallel to or at a fixed angle to the turntable base
the winch line load attachment point. plate as the boom is raised or lowered. One means of accomplishing
this is by utilizing a parallelogram arrangement of leveling rods attached
lock washer — a solid or split washer that is placed underneath a nut to cables or chains operating around sheaves or sprockets at boom
or cap screw to help prevent loosening by exerting pressure against the pivot points.
fastener.
mercury switch — a switch that is closed or opened when an internal
locknut — see self-locking nut. globule of mercury moves to or away from the contacts when the switch
lockwire — a wire that is installed to prevent loosening of fasteners or is tilted.
components. meter — to regulate the amount of fluid flow.
lower arm — the primary load-carrying structure of a double elevator meter-in — to regulate the amount of fluid flow into an actuator or
which is located between the lower pedestal and the riser. system.
lower arm cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the lower arm meter-out — to regulate the flow of the discharge fluid from an actuator
of a double elevator up and down. or system.
lower boom (LWR BOOM) — the boom section in a boom assembly micron (micrometer) — one-millionth of a meter or about 0.00004″.
which is attached to the turntable or riser, and which supports the upper
boom or intermediate boom. micron rating — the minimum size of the particles that a filter is
designed to remove.
lower boom cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the lower
boom about its pivot point on an articulating-boom aerial device. microswitch — a small electrical device that is used to turn an electrical
current on or off, or to change the connections in a circuit.
lower boom insulator — the part of the lower boom made of high
dielectric strength material (usually fiberglass reinforced plastic or minimum approach distance — the three dimensional area surround-
equivalent) to interrupt the conductive path for electricity through the ing a conductor into which a person may not enter nor bring any
lower boom. conductive object unless they are: qualified electrical workers, wearing
insulating gloves (and sleeves when required), protected against
lower boom winch — a winch that is located on the lower boom. contact with any other objects at a different electrical potential.

3-05 7 Appendix — Glossary


mobile operation — the use of the aerial device or digger derrick while NPT — National Pipe Thread.
the mobile unit is traveling. NPTF — National Pipe Thread Fluid, a pipe thread form which is
mobile unit — the combination of a unit, its chassis and related modified from the NPT form to improve the resistance to fluid leakage
permanently attached equipment. through the threads in a connection.
modified A-frame outrigger — an extendible outrigger that is config- O-ring — a ring of material with a circular cross section that is used as
ured like a large broad based “A” with an open top. a gasket, usually made of synthetic rubber.
modulation ratio — the “on” time vs. the “off” time of a pulse width ohmmeter — an instrument used to measure the resistance in ohms
modulated digital signal. This ratio is determined by dividing the on time between two points in an electrical component or circuit.
during one cycle by the total cycle time. on/off circuit — circuit that supplies constant electrical power to a
moly — see molybdenum disulfide. solenoid or other component when a relay or switch is closed and
molybdenum disulfide — a black inorganic chemical that is used as removes the power when the relay or switch is opened.
a dry lubricant and as an additive for grease and oils. Molybdenum one-man platform — a platform designed to carry one person. It is
disulfide has a very high melting point and is insoluble in water. usually 24″ wide x 30″ wide or 24″ wide x 24″ wide.
molydisulfide — see molybdenum disulfide. open center — a directional valve design in which pump output returns
moment — a force multiplied by the perpendicular distance from the freely to the reservoir when the valve spool(s) is in the center or neutral
line of action of the force to an axis or point. The force may be the weight position.
of an item, with the vertical line of action located at the item’s center of open circuit — an electric circuit that has infinitely high resistance,
gravity. Moment is measured in units of force times distance; for resulting in no current flow. An open circuit may be caused by a loose
example, pound-feet or foot-pounds. connection, broken wire, corrosion or poor contact where an electrical
monitor head — remotely controlled articulated assembly with a component is grounded to the unit structure.
nozzle, mounted at the upper end of an HLIW. operator — a person trained, authorized and engaged in the operation
motor — a device that converts hydraulic or electrical energy into of the unit.
continuous rotary motion and torque. optical fiber — a thin strand of transparent glass or plastic used to
multiple-part line — the arrangement of the winch line on a digger transmit signals using light throughout the length of the strand.
derrick in which the winch line is routed between the boom tip and the orifice — a restriction in a hydraulic or pneumatic circuit, the length of
load two or more times. A snatch block is used at the load and a snatch which is small in respect to its diameter.
block or additional boom tip sheave(s) is used on the boom to reverse OSHA — Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
the direction of the winch line. The end of the winch line is connected
to a stationary attachment point on the boom or lower snatch block. A out and down outrigger — an outrigger that has independently-
multiple-part line is used to reduce the tension in the winch line to a controlled horizontal and vertical extendible outrigger legs.
value below the winch line rated working load when a lifting load that outboard bearing — a bearing which supports the end of a gearbox
exceeds the winch line rated working load. output shaft farthest from the gearbox.
multiplexing — a process by which signals from multiple inputs are output signal — a radio wave intended to pass communication from a
combined and transmitted simultaneously over a single channel. source to a destination.
multiviscosity — the viscosity characteristic of a fluid which contains outrigger — a structural member, which when properly extended or
additives that increase the viscosity index. The fluid does not become deployed on firm ground or outrigger pads, assists in stabilizing the
as thin at high temperatures or as thick at low temperatures as a fluid mobile unit.
without these additives. This allows the fluid to be used over a wider
temperature range. outrigger controls — the controls for operating the outriggers.
nonconductive — the characteristic of a substance that allows it to outrigger cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder which extends and retracts
transmit electricity only in a very small degree when it is clean, dry and or unfolds and folds an outrigger leg.
properly maintained. outrigger interlock system — a system which requires all outriggers
noncontinuous rotation — a rotation system in which the turntable is to be extended to a specified position before other unit functions are
prevented from rotating more than approximately one revolution about allowed to operate.
the centerline of rotation. outrigger interlock valve — a valve which prevents above rotation
non-insulated aerial device or digger derrick — an aerial device or sense line signals from reaching the pump until the outriggers have
digger derrick which is not designed, manufactured, or tested to meet been lowered.
any dielectric rating. outrigger leg — 1: the moveable structural component of an outrigger
nonmetallic — formed of materials which are not any type of metal. which extends or unfolds to position the outrigger shoe on the ground,
and which retracts or folds to return the outrigger shoe to the stored
non-overcenter aerial device — a type of articulating-boom aerial position. 2: the stationary structural component of an extendible outrig-
device on which the upper boom will not unfold from the stored position ger from which the moveable outrigger leg extends.
to beyond a vertical position regardless of the position of the lower
boom. outrigger motion alarm — an audible warning system to alert person-
nel that outriggers are being lowered or moved.
nontransferable boom flares — boom flares that are permanently
attached to the boom tip of a digger derrick. outrigger pad — a portable piece of rigid material which is placed
under an outrigger shoe to increase the contact area with the ground
nontransferable upper controls — an upper control panel on a digger surface when the ground surface is not firm enough to support direct
derrick that is permanently attached to the upper boom tip. contact from the outrigger shoe.
normally closed switch — a switch which is closed to allow current to outrigger shoe — the component of an outrigger that is attached to the
flow through it when it is not actuated, and opens to interrupt current flow moveable leg and that contacts the ground or outrigger pad to stabilize
when actuated. the mobile unit.
normally closed valve — a two-way valve which is closed to block fluid outrigger signal valve — a valve used to provide a signal to the pump
from flowing through it when it is not actuated, and opens to allow flow when the outriggers are being operated and to allow a separate signal
when actuated. system to control the aerial device operation.
normally open switch — a switch which is open to prevent current from outrigger spread — the distance between the outer edges on fixed
flowing through it when it is not actuated, and closes to allow current shoes, or between pin centerlines on pivoting shoes, of opposite
flow when actuated. outriggers which have been extended or deployed to a given position.
normally open valve — a two-way valve which is open to allow fluid to over travel — movement of a mechanism beyond its normal stopping
flow through it when it is not actuated, and closes to block flow when point.
actuated.
overcenter aerial device — a type of articulating-boom aerial device
nozzle — a tube-like device for accelerating and directing the dis- on which the upper boom can unfold from the stored position to beyond
charge flow of fluid. a vertical position.

Appendix — Glossary 8 3-05


overframe — an outrigger weldment mounting position located above platform liner — a component made of material having a high dielectric
the vehicle chassis frame. strength which is designed to be inserted into a platform to cover the
overload — the condition existing when a load greater than the rated walls and bottom of the platform.
capacity or design lead is applied to a unit or component. platform pin — the horizontal pin that is used to fasten a platform
override — the takeover of boom movement control functions from the mounting bracket to the upper boom tip. The mounting bracket pivots
platform controls by the activation of the lower control station controls. about this pin for platform leveling or positioning.
overtighten — to torque a threaded fastener beyond the recom- platform rest — the structural member attached to the chassis or body
mended torque value. to support and cushion the platform in the travel or rest position.
oxidation — the reaction of a substance with oxygen. platform ring — a metal band around the lip of a splicer platform which
supports and guides the platform as it is rotated about its vertical
parallel link — the secondary load-carrying structure of an elevator lift. centerline.
particle count — a visual count of the numbers of particulate contami- platform rotation override system — a system which allows the zone
nants in a quantity of a hydraulic fluid. of platform rotation to extend beyond a predetermined limit when
passage — a machined or cored fluid conducting path that lies within actuated by the operator.
or passes through a component. platform rotator — a system which allows the operator to rotate the
payload — any tools, materials, fuel and occupants carried by the platform about a vertical axis. This permits the position of the platform
mobile unit that are not permanently attached. to be changed with respect to the boom tip.
pedestal — the stationary base of a unit that supports the turntable and platform tilt system — a system which allows the operator to adjust the
is attached to the subbase or vehicle frame. orientation of the platform about a horizontal axis. Some systems allow
the operator to adjust the working position of the platform floor and tilt
pedestal mount — a mounting configuration for an aerial device in the platform for cleaning. Other systems allow tilting of the platform for
which the turntable is mounted on a pedestal consisting of a box-like cleaning but do not provide for operator adjustment of the working
structure. position.
penetration — the distance the vehicle frame is lifted after the outrig- platform use — the stability criteria for a digger derrick mobile unit
gers contact the ground surface. which indicates that the load capacity chart and stability requirements
phase — a conductive wire or cable used for transmitting high voltage apply to the use of the derrick with the platform occupied, with no lifting
electrical current. The phrase “phase to phase” can be referenced as of loads with the winch line.
any two conductors of a three-phase electrical power line system. plunger — a cylindrically shaped part that is used to transmit thrust; a
pilot operated — condition in which a valve is actuated by hydraulic ram.
fluid pressure. pole — a long cylindrical piece of material such as wood, metal, or
pilot operated check valve — a check valve that can be opened to concrete which is installed in a vertical position for use as a support
allow flow in the normally blocked direction by applying hydraulic structure for power and communication lines.
pressure to a pilot port. pole guide — a mechanism at the tip of a boom used for guiding and
pilot pressure — auxiliary pressure used to actuate or control hydrau- stabilizing a utility pole while using the winch line to raise or lower the
lic components. pole.
pilot valve — an auxiliary valve used to control the operation of another pole guide tilt cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder which is used to tilt
valve. (raise or lower) the pole guide.
pin — a cylindrical structural device used to allow a pivoting joint or to pole guide tong cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder which opens and
connect mating parts. closes the pole guide tongs.
pin retainer — a device which is used to hold a pin in place in an pole guide tongs — moveable arms on a pole guide used to stabilize
assembly. and guide a utility pole as it is being raised or lowered with the winch line.
pinch point — a particular location in which a human body or a part of pole puller — an apparatus consisting of a hydraulic cylinder, chain
the body may become pinched or pinned between moving mechanical and other components used to loosen a utility pole from the ground.
parts. pole setter — an assembly attached to the mast of a pressure digger
pinion — a gear with a small number of teeth that has been designed that is used to pick up, position, and set a pole.
to mesh with a larger gear. polyethylene — a moisture proof plastic.
piston — a cylindrically shaped part that fits within a cylinder or poppet — that part of certain valves that prevents flow when it closes
cylindrical bore and transmits or receives linear motion by means of a against a seat and allows flow when it moves away from the seat.
connecting rod or other component.
port — an internal or external opening for intake or exhaust of fluid in
piston pump — a pump in which motion and force are applied to fluid a component.
by a reciprocating piston(s) in cylindrical bore(s).
portable resistivity tester — a device used for testing the electrical
pivot weldment — the structure located above the slide frame on a resistance of water. Commonly used for testing the wash water for
pressure digger which supports the mast. insulator washers.
placard — 1: a thin sheet of rigid material which is attached to another position — a term which describes the number of possible positions a
surface by adhesive and/or mechanical fasteners, and is used to valve spool or mechanism can be shifted to.
convey instructions, information and warnings. 2: May also refer to a
decal. post mount — a mounting configuration for an aerial device in which
the turntable is mounted on a pedestal which utilizes a round vertical
planetary gear set — an assembly of meshed gears consisting of a tube as its primary load-carrying structure.
central gear (sun gear), a coaxial internal tooth ring gear and several
intermediate pinions (planet gears) supported on a revolving carrier. potentiometer — a variable resistor that is connected to act as an
electrical voltage divider.
planetary gearbox — a gearbox containing one or more planetary gear
sets. pour point — the lowest temperature at which a fluid will flow or pour
under specific conditions.
platform — the personnel-carrying component of a unit, mounted at the
upper boom tip. power — work per unit of time, measured in horsepower (HP) or watts.
platform heater — an electrically powered device mounted in a splicer power module — the central connection point between the chassis
platform which is used to warm the occupant. and unit electrical systems. This device is used to provide battery power
to the unit when the truck/machine selector is in the machine position.
platform leveling system — a system which keeps the bottom of a
platform parallel to or at a fixed angle to the base plate of the turntable, power take-off (PTO) — a supplementary mechanism enabling ve-
or parallel to level ground, as the boom is raised or lowered. The system hicle engine power to be used to operate non-automotive apparatus
may be mechanically, hydraulically, or gravity operated. such as a pump.

3-05 9 Appendix — Glossary


precharge pressure — the pressure of compressed gas in an accumu- ram cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that is used to retract and extend
lator before any fluid is added. the kelly bar on a pressure digger.
pressure — the force applied in a given area. It can be expressed in range diagram — a diagram which shows the load radius and sheave
pounds per square inch (psi). height of a digger derrick at all the configurations of boom extension and
pressure compensator — a device on a variable displacement pump boom angle covered by the corresponding load capacity chart.
that adjusts pump output flow to develop and maintain a preset rated capacity — (as defined by ANSI for digger derricks) the maxi-
maximum pressure. mum load, specified by the manufacturer, that can be lifted by the digger
pressure differential — the difference in pressure between two points derrick at regular intervals of load radius or boom angle, through the
in a system or component. specified ranges of boom elevation and extension, with specified
options installed, and exclusive of stability requirements.
pressure drop — the reduction in pressure between two points in a line
or passage due to the energy required to maintain flow. rated line voltage — the nominal voltage, phase to phase, at which
electrical systems are rated.
pressure gauge — an instrument which displays the hydraulic or
pneumatic pressure sensed at a port on the device. rated load capacity — (as defined by ANSI for aerial devices) the
maximum loads, specified by the manufacturer, which can be lifted by
pressure line — the line carrying fluid from a pump outlet to the the aerial device through the specified range of boom elevation and
pressurized port of a valve or actuator. extension with specified options installed and in consideration of
pressure override — the difference between the cracking pressure of stability requirements.
a valve and the pressure reached when the valve is passing full flow. reach diagram — a drawing that shows the horizontal and vertical
pressure reducing valve — a pressure control valve whose primary limits of travel of the platform, upper boom tip, and/or jib tip throughout
function is to limit its outlet pressure. all possible configurations of lower boom angle, boom extension, upper
boom angle, articulating arm travel, and/or elevator lift travel.
pressure switch — an electric switch which is actuated when the
hydraulic or pneumatic pressure applied to a port on the switch reaches rear mount — a pedestal mounting position located over or near the
a specified value. rear axle(s) on the longitudinal centerline of the chassis.
pressure transducer — a pressure measuring device which produces receiver — a device that converts radio waves into electrical signals for
a variable electrical signal that is proportional to the hydraulic pressure communication and/or control purposes.
applied to a port on the device. reel brake — a component of the reel driver which prevents the
proportional circuit — a circuit that supplies a varying voltage to a coil overrunning of cable reels carried by a strand carrier and reel lifter. The
in a pilot valve as electrical current applied to the circuit is varied by a brake is used to maintain tension in the cable or suspension strand
hand control. when used with the reel driver.
proximity alarm — a system which measures the distance from a reel driver — a component of a strand carrier and reel lifter used for
detector to another object, and sounds an alarm when this distance is paying in or paying out cable or suspension strand.
less than a specified value. Commonly used to inform the operator of reel lifter — a device used to support and move cable reels from the
an HLIW of the distance between the boom tip nozzle and a power line ground to the vehicle.
insulator or support structure.
reel lifter arms — the structure on a reel lifter used to lift and store reels
psi — pounds per square inch. of cable or suspension strand on the chassis.
PTO — see power take-off. reengage — to repeat the activation of a function after it has been
pullout upper controls — an upper control panel on a digger derrick momentarily halted.
which is mounted on a housing that can be extended from inside an relay — an automatic switch with contacts that can be closed or opened
outer housing when additional length is needed, such as to attach the by electrical current in a coil.
control panel to a personnel jib with the outer housing attached to the
upper boom tip, or to attach the upper control panel to the upper boom relief valve — a pressure operated valve that bypasses pump delivery
tip with the outer housing attached to the transferable boom flares. to the reservoir to limit system pressure to a predetermined maximum
value.
pulse width modulation (PWM) — a means of transmitting a digital
signal in continuous cycles of pulses where the total length of time for remote arm — a remotely operated jib used to handle equipment or
a cycle of one “on” pulse and the following “off” period is constant, and electrical lines.
the length of time (width) of the “on” pulse within each cycle is varied remote assist — a vehicle-mounted device with a boom assembly
(modulated) in proportion to the level of an input parameter such as which is extendible, articulating, or both, which is designed and used to
control lever position. accommodate attachments for performing operations such as support-
pump — a device that converts mechanical force and motion into ing or cutting electrical conductors, lifting or holding objects, or cutting
hydraulic flow and pressure. tree branches. It is operated by remote control from the ground or from
the platform of an adjacent personnel lifting device. It may be mounted
purge system — a system of check valves that allows hydraulic fluid on the vehicle by itself or in addition to a personnel lifting device.
flow in a reverse manner through the hydraulic system, usually from the
lower control valve to the upper controls. This actions frees or purges remote control system — a system used for operating some or all of
the control system of any trapped air and restores a solid column of fluid the functions of a unit from a portable control station. The control station
for precise control. The purge system may also be used to warm up the may be a transmitter which sends signals by radio waves to a receiver
control system in cold weather conditions if the fluid in the reservoir is on the unit, or a control module which sends signals through a fiber optic
warm. or electrical cable to the unit.
purge/upper/lower controls selector valve — a valve which is used remote operated auxiliary control system (ROACS) — a radio
to direct hydraulic fluid to the purge system, the upper control valve, or controlled system for starting and stopping certain functions of the
the lower control valve. mobile unit.
PWM — pulse width modulation. remote start/stop system — the components used to actuate a
function of the unit from a location other than for normal operation. The
quick disconnect couplings — hydraulic fittings designed for fast and most common functions controlled are engine start/stop and the sec-
easy attachment and separation. ondary stowage DC pump.
radial ball bearing — an antifriction bearing with rolling ball contact in reservoir — a container for storage of liquid in a fluid power system.
which the direction of action of the load transmitted is perpendicular to
the axial centerline of the bearing. resistance — the opposition to the flow of electricity or hydraulic fluid.
radial outrigger — an outrigger in which the moveable outrigger leg restriction — a reduced cross-sectional area in a line or passage that
pivots in an arc around a pin connection between the leg and a produces a pressure drop.
supporting structure as the leg is lowered and raised. retaining ring — a hardened, washer-like ring that may be spread apart
radio communication — communication by means of radio waves. or compressed and installed into a groove or recess to serve as a
retaining device.
ram — 1: a single-acting cylinder with a single diameter plunger rather
than a piston and rod. 2: the plunger in a ram-type cylinder.

Appendix — Glossary 10 3-05


return line — a hydraulic line used to carry discharge flow from a screw anchor — a rod with an eye on one end and auger flighting on
hydraulic system or actuator back to the reservoir at low pressure. the opposite end. It is designed to screw into the ground and serve as
return line filter — a filter located in a hydraulic system return line or an anchor to hold an attached cable such as a guy wire.
at the inlet of a hydraulic reservoir which cleans fluid flowing from the seating in — an initial microscopic surface deformation of components
hydraulic system to the reservoir. that are clamped together with threaded fasteners. This causes a slight
reversing valve — a four-way directional valve used to change the reduction in the dimension of the components, reducing the clamping
direction of movement of a double-acting cylinder or reversible motor. force applied by the fasteners.
ribbon hose — a group of hoses that are attached side by side to secondary stowage DC pump — a low flow hydraulic pump driven by
produce a flat bundle. Commonly used to carry hydraulic fluid, air and/ a direct current electric motor. This pump is used to provide hydraulic
or electrical cable(s) to the boom tip or upper controls. flow to stow the unit when the system for normal operation has failed.
riding seat — an operator’s control station attached to the side of the secondary stowage system — those components used to stow the
turntable, with a seat on which the operator rides with the rotation of the unit when the system for normal operation has failed.
unit. selector switch — a switch which is used to direct electrical current to
riser — 1: the structure on a double elevator that connects the lower one of two or more electrical circuits.
elevator arm to the upper elevator arm. 2: the structure within an selector valve — a valve which is used to direct hydraulic fluid to one
articulating arm to which the lower boom is connected. of two or more hydraulic circuits.
ROACS — see remote operated auxiliary control system. self-locking nut — a nut which contains a built-in device or shape to
rod — the cylindrically shaped part of a cylinder which extends and increase thread friction so as to resist loosening due to vibration or
retracts from the barrel to actuate or move a component. repeated loading.
rod end — the end of a cylinder that the extending component or rod self-lubricating bearing — an antifriction bearing in which lubricating
is on. material is incorporated in the bearing.
roller — a cylindrical device which spins freely about a pin or shaft, used sense line — a line that carries a hydraulic pressure signal from a valve
to guide the motion of another component. or actuator to the compensator control on a variable displacement
pump.
rollpin — a pin that has been formed by rolling up a thin, flat strip of
metal to form a cylinder. Commonly used by being driven into a hole to sense selector valve — a valve which prevents hydraulic fluid in the
serve as a retaining device. sense line from reaching the pump until a certain function(s) is oper-
ated.
rope — a stout, flexible cord, which consists of many strands of wire
or fibers that are twisted or braided together. sequence — 1: the order of a series of operations or movements. 2: to
divert flow to accomplish a subsequent operation or movement.
rotary actuator — a device for converting hydraulic energy into rotary
motion and torque in which the rotary motion is restricted to within sequence valve — a pressure operated valve that diverts flow to a
certain angular limits. secondary actuator while holding pressure on the primary actuator at a
predetermined minimum value after the primary actuator completes its
rotary joint — a multiple port manifold that has a rotating portion and travel.
a stationary portion, used to provide a continuous hydraulic connection
between rotating and stationary hydraulic lines. Commonly used at the sequential extension — the operation by which one boom section in
centerline of rotation of units equipped with continuous rotation. an extendible boom assembly reaches full extension or retraction
before the next boom section begins movement.
rotate frame — the structure located above the stationary frame on a
pressure digger that is used to support and rotate the slide frame. set screw — a short screw, typically with an Allen type head, that is
used as a clamp to bind parts together.
rotating platform — a platform which can be rotated about a vertical
axis to change its position in relationship to the boom tip. shackle — see clevis.
rotation bearing — the rotating member, usually a shear ball bearing, shear — an action or stress resulting from opposing applied forces that
located between the pedestal and the turntable which allows the attempt to separate a part into two pieces that would then slide along
turntable to rotate and which contains gear teeth that mesh with the each other in opposite directions along the plane of separation.
rotation pinion. shear ball bearing — an antifriction bearing with rolling ball contact in
rotation chain — a chain attached to the stationary frame of a pressure which the direction of load transmitted through the balls is parallel to the
digger that is used by the rotation gearbox to rotate the rotate frame. axial centerline of the bearing, producing shear loading on the balls.
The bearing can support axial, radial, and tilt loading. Commonly used
rotation gearbox — the gearbox which drives the rotational motion of as a rotation bearing.
the turntable.
shear pin — a replaceable pin which prevents motion between two
rotation pinion — the gear on the output shaft of the rotation gearbox adjacent parts by the production of shear loading in the pin, and which
which meshes with the rotation bearing gear teeth and drives the may be designed to fail under overload to protect other parts.
turntable rotational motion.
shear stability — resistance of a hydraulic fluid viscosity index im-
rotation resistant wire rope — wire rope which is constructed to resist prover additive to shearing.
the tendency to untwist or rotate when carrying a suspended load. This
is accomplished by laying the outer strands in the opposite direction to shearing — molecular damage or breakdown of the viscosity index
the lay of the inner strands or core. improver additive in hydraulic fluid. Shearing can occur when the fluid
flows through fine clearances at high velocity. Shearing can cause
rotation system — the system which drives the rotation of the turntable permanent loss in fluid viscosity.
about the centerline of rotation. It typically consists of a rotation bearing,
rotation gearbox, hydraulic motor, and load holding valve. sheave — a grooved wheel used to support and guide a winch line or
leveling cable at a point of change in the direction of motion of the line
rpm — revolutions per minute. or cable.
running torque — the torque produced by a rotating device such as a sheave height — the vertical distance from ground level to the
motor or gearbox at a specified rotational speed. centerline of the boom tip sheave in a digger derrick upper boom tip.
SAE — Society of Automotive Engineers. short circuit — an inadvertent path of low resistance established
safety belt — see body belt. between two points of an electrical circuit. A short circuit will result in
excessive current flow.
saybolt universal viscosity — A measure of viscosity equal to the time
it takes in seconds for 60 milliliters of fluid to flow through a capillary tube shutoff valve — a device which is used to stop hydraulic fluid flow.
in a Saybolt universal viscosimeter at a given temperature. shuttle valve — a three-port valve that accepts hydraulic fluid pressure
scissor link — the mechanical linkage on a reel lifter used to connect from two inlets and allows only the highest pressure fluid to pass
the lifter cylinder to the arm. through it to a single outlet while keeping the inlet fluid pressure isolated
from one another.
side gun — a hand held water nozzle and hose that can be used from
the ground for washing or fire fighting.

3-05 11 Appendix — Glossary


side load — an external horizontal load placed on a boom from one spline — one of a number of equally spaced, load carrying teeth that
side. have been cut on the outside diameter of a shaft or inside diameter of
side load protection system — the system on a digger derrick that a bore, parallel to the shaft or bore centerline.
helps prevent damage to the digger derrick structure when excessive spool — a moving, cylindrically shaped part of a hydraulic valve that
side loads are applied to the booms. moves to direct flow through the valve.
side-mounted platform — a platform which is attached to a mounting spring lockouts — a mechanical system which is engaged to keep a
bracket that extends from one side of the boom tip, positioning the vehicle’s suspension system from flexing during operation of the unit.
platform (and platform rotation pivot, if so equipped) beside the boom sprocket — a wheel with teeth along the circumference which are
tip. shaped so as to engage with a chain, used to support and guide the
sideslip — sideways motion of a component caused by an externally chain at a point of change in the direction of motion of the chain.
applied sideways force which overcomes resistive forces from hydrau- SSU (Saybolt Second Universal) — the unit of measure for Saybolt
lics, friction, etc. Commonly used to describe rotation of a digger derrick universal viscosity.
boom caused by side loading which exceeds the side load protection
setting. stability — a condition of a mobile unit in which the sum of the moments
which tend to overturn the mobile unit is less than the sum of the
signal — a command or indication of a desired position, velocity, flow moments tending to resist overturning; the mobile unit’s ability to resist
or pressure. tipping.
signal line — see sense line. stabilize — to provide adequate stability for a mobile unit to allow
single-acting cylinder — a cylinder in which fluid pressure can be operation of the vehicle-mounted device(s).
applied to move the rod in only one direction. Return motion is produced stabilizer — a device used to assist in stabilizing a mobile unit, such as
by an external force such as a spring or gravity. an outrigger, torsion bar or spring lockout.
single elevator — an elevator lift with one load carrying arm. The stake — to slightly deform the threads of a fastener or material at the
single elevator system includes a lower pedestal, arm, arm cylinder(s), joint between two components by placing the blade of punch or chisel
parallel links, and upper pedestal. on the threads or joint and tapping on the handle with a hammer. The
single handle control — a control, with an interlock trigger incorpo- deformed material serves to prevent loosening of the components.
rated in the handle, which allows the operator to simultaneously control stall torque — the torque produced by a rotating device such as a motor
multiple functions of the booms and turntable from the platform. or gearbox at zero rotational speed.
single-pole, double-throw (SPDT) switch — a three-terminal electri- standard option — an option which can be ordered from a standard
cal switch or relay that connects one terminal to either of two other order form and can be supplied without additional engineering work.
terminals.
start/stop control module — an electrical device that relays signals
single-pole, single-throw (SPST) switch — a two-terminal electrical from the unit’s remote start/stop system to the component(s) or system(s)
switch or relay that opens or closes one circuit. being controlled, such as the secondary stowage DC pump and/or
slave control panel — a secondary derrick lower control panel that is vehicle ignition system.
configured as a remote terminal of the master panel. The slave panel stationary frame — the structure attached to the subbase of a pressure
is used in conjunction with a master panel to provide dual station lower digger that supports the outriggers and rotate frame.
controls.
stationary platform — a platform which can not be rotated about a
slave cylinder — a cylinder in which motion of the piston is produced vertical axis to change its position in relationship to the boom tip.
by the transfer of hydraulic fluid from a master cylinder, resulting in
corresponding motion. stow — to place a component such as a boom or digger derrick auger
in its rest position.
slide frame — the structure on a pressure digger used to support the
auxiliary engine, hydraulic reservoir, control station, and pivot weld- strainer — a coarse filter.
ment. The slide frame can be extended horizontally from its stowed strainer basket — a coarse, basket shaped filter which is mounted in
position to adjust the distance of the kelly bar from the rotate frame. the fill hole of a reservoir and projects into the reservoir.
slide pad — a rectangular block used as a bearing between extendible strand — 1: one of the groups of individual fibers or wires within a
boom or outrigger sections, usually composed of a non-metallic mate- synthetic winch line or wire rope. 2: see suspension strand.
rial.
strand carrier — a device used to support and transport strand reels
slip ring — an assembly of one or more conductive, rotating rings and on a vehicle.
stationary brushes used to provide a continuous electrical connection
between rotating and stationary conductors. Commonly used at the strand reel — a reel or spool used for carrying suspension stand.
centerline of rotation of units equipped with continuous rotation. street side — the side of a vehicle toward oncoming traffic when the
slug face — the extreme end of the cable slug which is secured to the vehicle is traveling forward in the normal direction in a lane of traffic.
cylinder rod or adjusting stud. stroke — 1: total linear movement in either direction of a piston or
snatch block — a device which has a means of attachment to connect plunger. 2: to change the displacement of a variable displacement
it to a boom or load, and which can be opened to receive a winch line pump or motor.
around an internal sheave. subbase — a structural mounting interface between the pedestal and
snubber valve — a two-port valve with a manually adjustable orifice the vehicle frame. It provides torsional stiffness and strength in addition
that restricts the flow of fluid through the valve. to that which would be provided from the vehicle frame alone.
socket head — a cylindrical cap screw head design containing a subweldment — a smaller welded subassembly used within a more
hexagonal (six-sided) female socket into which an Allen wrench can be complex welded structure.
inserted to turn the cap screw. suction filter — a filter located in a hydraulic system suction line or at
solenoid — a coil of insulated wire that produces a magnetic field within the outlet of a hydraulic reservoir which cleans fluid flowing from the
the coil when electrically energized. When attached to a hydraulic reservoir to the pump inlet.
valve, the magnetic field acts upon the valve to move internal valve suction line — the hydraulic line connecting the pump inlet port to the
parts. reservoir outlet.
solenoid valve — a valve which is actuated by a solenoid to controlling surge — a momentary rise of pressure in a circuit.
the flow of hydraulic fluid. suspension strand — a type of wire rope which is used to support the
speed reducer — see gearbox. weight of an attached communication cable suspended between poles
spherical bearing — a bearing with a spherically shaped inner race or other overhead support structures.
that is allowed to move freely inside a stationary outer race to accom- swage — to taper or reduce the diameter of a rod, tube or fastener by
modate misalignment. forging, squeezing or hammering.
splicer platform — a fiberglass platform equipped with a door and synthetic winch line — a winch line made from nonmetallic synthetic
latch. fibers which are formed into strands that are then braided together to
make a complete rope.

Appendix — Glossary 12 3-05


T-stand — a “T” shaped weldment for mounting lower controls to the turnbuckle — a link with screw threads at both ends that is turned to
vehicle. bring the ends closer together for tightening purposes.
tachometer — an instrument used for displaying the speed of rotation turns from finger tight (T.F.F.T.) — a method of counting the number
of an engine output shaft. of turns of a hydraulic adapter to establish a torque value.
tailshelf — the rear portion of the mobile unit above and behind the rear turntable — the structure located above the rotation bearing which
axle. supports the lower boom or articulating arm, and rotates about the
tailshelf tools — see lower tool circuit. centerline of rotation.
tank — the hydraulic reservoir. turntable winch — a winch located on the turntable.
telescopic — having sections that slide within or over one another to turret — see turntable.
change overall length. two-man platform — a platform designed to carry two people. It is
terminal block — an insulating mounting used for making electrical usually 24″ wide x 48″ wide.
terminal connections. two-part line — a multiple-part line on a digger derrick in which the
test block — a manifold with ports for connecting a hydraulic pressure winch line is routed from the boom tip sheave down to a snatch block
source, pressure gauge and a cartridge valve such as a counterbalance at the load and then back up to a stationary attachment point on the
valve or relief valve used for testing and adjusting the relief setting of the boom.
valve. two-position valve — a valve having two positions for direction of fluid
thimble — a metal ring around which a rope is passed and spliced to flow, such as open and closed.
make a loop or eye. two-speed motor — a motor which has two operating speed and
thread locking adhesive — an anaerobic adhesive that is applied to torque modes (a low-speed, high-torque mode, and a high-speed, low-
fastener threads to prevent loosening due to vibration or repeated torque mode) that can be selected by the operator.
loading. two-way valve — a valve having two ports for direction of fluid flow, with
three-phase — a system for transmitting high voltage, alternating one internal flow path which can be open or blocked.
current, electrical power along three separate conductors, with 120 UNC — Unified National Coarse, a thread description.
degrees between the voltage waveform cycles of any two conductors. underframe — an outrigger weldment mounting position located
three-position valve — a valve having three positions for direction of beneath the unit subbase or vehicle chassis frame.
fluid flow, such as neutral, flow in one direction, and flow in the opposite undertighten — to torque a threaded fastener below the recom-
direction. mended value.
three-way valve — a valve having three ports for direction of fluid flow. UNF — Unified National Fine, a thread description.
throttle control — a manual, hydraulic, or electrical device used to unfold — to move a pivoting structure such as an articulating upper
regulate vehicle or auxiliary engine speed. boom away from its stowed position.
toggle switch — an electrical switch operated by a short projecting unit — the Altec device(s), subbase, outriggers, body and associated
lever combined with a spring to quickly open or close a circuit when the interface items mounted on a chassis, but not including the chassis
lever is pushed through a small arc. itself.
topping cylinder — see lift cylinder. unload — to release hydraulic flow, usually directly to the reservoir, to
torque — 1: a rotational twisting force. 2: to preload a threaded fastener prevent pressure buildup.
by application of a rotational twisting force. unloaded vehicle weight — the total weight of the completed mobile
torque converter — a rotary device for transmitting and amplifying unit without payload.
torque, especially by hydraulic means. unloading valve — a valve that bypasses flow to the reservoir when a
torsion bar — a rod-like spring which is flexed by being twisted about set pressure is maintained on its pilot port.
its axis, used to assist in stabilizing a mobile unit. upper arm — the primary load-carrying structure of a double elevator
tow line winch — a winch located on a cable placer which is used for which is located between the riser and the upper pedestal.
tensioning suspension strand or self-supporting cable or towing a cable upper arm cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the upper arm
lasher. of a double elevator up and down.
trace element analysis — analysis of a small sample of hydraulic fluid upper boom (UPR BOOM) — the boom section in a boom assembly
to determine contamination level and condition of additives. which is farthest from the turntable when the boom assembly is fully
tracking — a current leakage path created across the surface of extended or unfolded, and which supports the boom tip sheave and/or
insulating material when a high-voltage current forms a carbonized platform(s).
path within a foreign material on the surface. upper boom cylinder — the hydraulic cylinder that moves the upper
transducer — a device that converts input energy of one form into boom about its pivot point on an articulating-boom aerial device.
output energy of another, such as hydraulic pressure into an electrical upper boom drive mechanism — the components used to produce
signal. upper boom movement on an articulating boom-aerial device, such as
transferable boom flares — boom flares, on which a pole guide may linkage, cables, sheaves and/or gears.
be mounted, that can be pinned to either the intermediate boom tip or upper boom rest — the structural member that supports the upper
the upper boom tip of a digger derrick. boom in the rest or travel position.
transferable upper controls — an upper control panel on a digger upper boom tip — the boom tip of an upper boom.
derrick that can be attached to either the upper boom tip or the
transferable boom flares by the use of a detent pin. upper control valve — the hydraulic valve on or beside the platform
of an aerial device used for operating some or all of the functions of the
transmitter — a device used to generate and emit a radio frequency aerial device.
carrier signal. The signal is sent to a receiver which translates the signal
into usable information. upper controls — the controls located on or beside the platform used
for operating some or all of the functions of the unit.
trim pot — a potentiometer which is used to make fine adjustments in
a circuit during manufacture or calibration, typically by turning a slotted upper pedestal — the structure within an elevator lift that connects the
adjusting screw. elevator lift to the aerial device rotation bearing.
troubleshoot — to locate and diagnose problems in a system or a upper tool circuit — a tool hydraulic circuit with quick disconnect
component. couplings located at the upper boom tip.
trunnion — a mounting device consisting of a pair of opposite, vacuum — the absence of pressure. A perfect vacuum is the total
projecting cylindrical pivots on which something can be rotated or tilted. absence of pressure; a partial vacuum is some condition less than
atmospheric pressure. Vacuum is measured in inches of mercury (in.
trunnion bearing — a bearing that a trunnion pin pivots in. Hg.).
trunnion pin — a cylindrical pivot pin that is a part of a trunnion.

3-05 13 Appendix — Glossary


valve — a device that controls fluid flow direction, pressure or flow rate. water removal filter cartridge — a special filter cartridge designed to
vane pump — a type of pump with a rotor and several sliding vanes in absorb and remove water from hydraulic fluid. It is not intended for use
an elliptical chamber. Hydraulic fluid enters the expanding area and is during normal operation, but is for use when water removal is required.
forced out as the fluid is moved to the decreasing chamber area. way — a term which describes how many ports are in a valve or valve
variable displacement pump — a pump in which the size of the section.
pumping chamber(s) can be changed, so that the output flow can be weldment — a structural unit formed by welding together an assembly
changed by moving the displacement control or varying the drive speed of pieces.
or both. wheel chock — a wedge or block placed on the ground in front of or
vehicle — a carrier for a unit. behind the wheel of a vehicle to block the movement of the wheel.
velocity — the speed of linear motion in a given direction. winch — a mechanism consisting of a gearbox with a cylindrical
velocity fuse — a hydraulic valve that is used to stop fluid flow through rotating drum on which to coil a line for load hoisting or line tensioning.
it when the flow rate reaches a predetermined cut-off value. winch capacity — the maximum load, specified by the manufacturer,
vent — an air breathing device on a fluid reservoir or hydraulic line. that can be pulled on the first layer of line on the winch drum at rated
system pressure.
VI — see viscosity index.
winch line — a load hoisting line consisting of a synthetic or wire rope.
viscosity — a measure of the internal friction or resistance to flow of a
fluid. winch line rated working load — the average breaking strength of a
winch line (as specified by the line manufacturer) divided by the
viscosity index (VI) — a measure of the resistance to change in appropriate design factor as specified by ANSI.
viscosity of a fluid with change in temperature. The higher the number,
the less the viscosity will change as the temperature changes. wire rope — a rope made from steel wires which are formed into
strands that are then twisted about each other in a spiral configuration.
voltmeter — an instrument used to measure the potential difference in
volts between two points in an electrical circuit. work — the exertion of a force moving through a definite distance. Work
is measured in units of force multiplied by distance; for example, pound-
volume — 1: the size of a space or chamber in cubic units. 2: loosely feet.
applied to the output flow of a pump in gallons per minute (gpm).
worm gearbox — a gearbox that utilizes a gear which has a continuous
vortex — a whirlpool of liquid. helix tooth or teeth similar to a large screw thread along shaft (worm),
waist harness — a belt device worn by the operator of a radio remote that drives a gear which has teeth cut at an angle along a its outside
control system to which the transmitter is attached. diameter (worm gear). The rotational axis of the worm is perpendicular
to the rotational axis of the worm gear.
walking beam outrigger — an extendible outrigger which has a pivot
point at the top of the nonextending leg and a linkage attached to the wrap — a single coil of winch line on a winch drum.
extending leg, so that the leg assembly rotates about the pivot point to Y-cable — an electrical cable assembly which contains three branches
increase the outrigger spread as it is extended. joined at a common point, similar to a “Y.”
warning — an instruction that indicates a potentially hazardous situa- zerk — see grease fitting.
tion which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
water monitor — an articulating mechanism that is used to direct the
flow of a high pressure water stream.

Appendix — Glossary 14 3-05


Material Handling Capacity Charts

AM50 – Single 1-Man Platform

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-40 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,935 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,800 1,500 1,000 750
-25 1,695 1,500 1,000 750
-20 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
-15 1,550 1,500 1,000 750
-10 1,505 1,455 1,000 750
-5 1,475 1,420 1,000 750
0 1,465 1,410 1,000 750
5 1,465 1,415 1,000 750
10 1,485 1,440 1,000 750
15 1,525 1,475 1,000 750
20 1,580 1,500 1,000 750
25 1,655 1,500 1,000 750
30 1,750 1,500 1,000 750
35 1,870 1,500 1,000 750
40 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,735 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,510 1,460 1,000 750
120 1,325 1,280 1,000 750
125 1,170 1,135 1,000 750
130 1,040 1,005 980 750
135 930 900 875 750
140 835 810 790 750
145 755 735 715 700
150 690 670 655 640
155 635 620 605 590
160 595 580 565 555
165 565 550 535 525
170 540 525 515 500
175 525 515 500 490
180 520 510 495 485
185 520 510 495 485
190 520 510 495 485
195 520 510 495 485
200 520 510 495 485
205 520 510 495 485
210 520 510 495 485

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 670-02639.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50 – Dual 1-Man Platform

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,925 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,685 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,485 1,430 1,000 750
-35 1,320 1,275 1,000 750
-30 1,190 1,150 1,000 750
-25 1,080 1,045 1,000 750
-20 995 965 935 750
-15 935 905 875 750
-10 890 860 835 750
-5 860 830 800 750
0 850 815 785 750
5 850 820 790 750
10 870 845 815 750
15 910 880 855 750
20 965 935 905 750
25 1,040 1,005 975 750
30 1,135 1,095 1,000 750
35 1,255 1,210 1,000 750
40 1,405 1,355 1,000 750
45 1,510 1,455 1,000 750
50 1,695 1,500 1,000 750
55 1,920 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,735 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,410 1,350 1,000 750
110 1,140 1,095 1,000 750
115 915 885 855 750
120 730 705 680 660
125 570 555 535 520
130 440 425 410 400
135 325 315 305 300
140 230 225 220 210
145 150 145 145 140
150 85 85 80 80
155 30 30 30 30
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0
205 0 0 0 0
210 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 670-02641.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50 – Dual 1-Man Platform, Dual Upper Controls

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,895 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,655 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,455 1,400 1,000 750
-35 1,290 1,245 1,000 750
-30 1,160 1,120 1,000 750
-25 1,050 1,015 985 750
-20 965 935 910 750
-15 905 875 850 750
-10 860 830 805 750
-5 830 805 770 745
0 820 790 760 730
5 820 795 765 735
10 840 815 785 750
15 880 850 825 750
20 935 905 880 750
25 1,010 975 945 750
30 1,105 1,070 1,000 750
35 1,225 1,185 1,000 750
40 1,375 1,325 1,000 750
45 1,480 1,425 1,000 750
50 1,665 1,500 1,000 750
55 1,890 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,705 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,380 1,320 1,000 750
110 1,110 1,070 1,000 750
115 885 855 825 750
120 700 675 655 635
125 540 525 510 495
130 410 395 385 375
135 295 285 280 270
140 200 195 190 185
145 120 120 115 110
150 55 55 50 50
155 0 0 0 0
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0
205 0 0 0 0
210 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 670-02644 and 670-02645.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50 – Single 2-Man Platform

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,885 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,685 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,520 1,470 1,000 750
-30 1,390 1,340 1,000 750
-25 1,280 1,240 1,000 750
-20 1,200 1,160 1,000 750
-15 1,135 1,100 1,000 750
-10 1,090 1,055 1,000 750
-5 1,060 1,025 985 750
0 1,050 1,010 970 750
5 1,050 1,015 975 750
10 1,070 1,040 1,000 750
15 1,110 1,075 1,000 750
20 1,165 1,130 1,000 750
25 1,240 1,200 1,000 750
30 1,335 1,290 1,000 750
35 1,455 1,405 1,000 750
40 1,605 1,500 1,000 750
45 1,715 1,500 1,000 750
50 1,895 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,910 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,585 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,320 1,270 1,000 750
115 1,095 1,055 1,000 750
120 910 880 850 750
125 750 725 705 685
130 620 600 580 565
135 505 490 480 465
140 410 400 390 380
145 335 325 315 310
150 270 260 255 250
155 215 210 205 200
160 170 165 165 160
165 140 135 135 130
170 115 115 110 110
175 100 100 95 95
180 95 95 90 90
185 95 95 90 90
190 95 95 90 90
195 95 95 90 90
200 95 95 90 90
205 95 95 90 90
210 95 95 90 90

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 670-02647.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55 – Single 1-Man Platform

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,895 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,715 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,570 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,450 1,405 1,000 750
-25 1,355 1,310 1,000 750
-20 1,275 1,240 1,000 750
-15 1,220 1,180 1,000 750
-10 1,180 1,130 1,000 750
-5 1,155 1,100 1,000 750
0 1,145 1,090 1,000 750
5 1,145 1,095 1,000 750
10 1,165 1,120 1,000 750
15 1,200 1,160 1,000 750
20 1,250 1,215 1,000 750
25 1,315 1,280 1,000 750
30 1,405 1,360 1,000 750
35 1,515 1,465 1,000 750
40 1,650 1,500 1,000 750
45 1,750 1,500 1,000 750
50 1,915 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 1,945 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,630 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,370 1,320 1,000 750
110 1,155 1,115 1,000 750
115 975 945 915 750
120 825 800 780 750
125 700 680 660 645
130 590 575 560 545
135 500 490 475 465
140 425 415 405 395
145 360 350 345 335
150 305 300 295 285
155 265 260 250 245
160 230 225 220 215
165 205 200 195 190
170 185 180 175 175
175 175 170 165 160
180 170 165 160 160
185 170 165 160 160
190 170 165 160 160
195 170 165 160 160
200 170 165 160 160
205 170 165 160 160
210 170 165 160 160

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 670-02615.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55 – Dual 1-Man Platform

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,800 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,525 1,465 1,000 750
-45 1,300 1,255 1,000 750
-40 1,115 1,080 1,000 750
-35 970 935 905 750
-30 845 820 795 750
-25 750 725 705 685
-20 675 655 635 615
-15 615 595 580 565
-10 575 555 540 525
-5 550 535 520 495
0 540 520 510 485
5 540 525 510 490
10 560 545 530 510
15 595 580 560 545
20 645 625 610 590
25 715 695 675 655
30 800 775 755 730
35 910 885 855 750
40 1,050 1,015 980 750
45 1,150 1,110 1,000 750
50 1,320 1,270 1,000 750
55 1,530 1,465 1,000 750
60 1,785 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 1,375 1,315 1,000 750
100 1,055 1,015 975 750
105 790 765 735 710
110 575 555 535 520
115 390 380 365 355
120 235 230 225 215
125 110 105 100 100
130 0 0 0 0
135 0 0 0 0
140 0 0 0 0
145 0 0 0 0
150 0 0 0 0
155 0 0 0 0
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0
205 0 0 0 0
210 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 670-02619.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55 – Dual 1-Man Platform, Dual Upper Controls

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,860 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,585 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,365 1,315 1,000 750
-40 1,180 1,140 1,000 750
-35 1,030 1,000 970 750
-30 910 885 855 750
-25 815 790 765 745
-20 740 715 695 675
-15 680 660 640 620
-10 640 620 605 575
-5 615 595 575 550
0 605 585 565 540
5 605 590 570 545
10 625 610 590 565
15 660 640 625 600
20 710 690 670 650
25 780 755 735 715
30 865 840 815 750
35 975 945 915 750
40 1,110 1,075 1,000 75
45 1,215 1,170 1,000 750
50 1,385 1,330 1,000 750
55 1,590 1,500 1,000 750
60 1,850 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 1,435 1,370 1,000 750
100 1,115 1,070 1,000 750
105 855 820 790 750
110 635 615 595 575
115 455 440 425 410
120 300 290 280 275
125 170 165 160 155
130 60 60 60 55
135 0 0 0 0
140 0 0 0 0
145 0 0 0 0
150 0 0 0 0
155 0 0 0 0
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0
205 0 0 0 0
210 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 670-02622 and 670-02636.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55 – Single 2-Man Platform

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,725 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,500 1,450 1,000 750
-40 1,320 1,275 1,000 750
-35 1,170 1,130 1,000 750
-30 1,050 1,015 985 750
-25 950 920 895 750
-20 875 850 825 750
-15 815 790 760 730
-10 775 750 715 685
-5 750 720 690 660
0 740 710 680 650
5 740 715 685 655
10 760 740 705 675
15 795 770 740 710
20 845 820 800 750
25 915 885 860 750
30 1,005 970 945 750
35 1,115 1,080 1,000 750
40 1,250 1,210 1,000 750
45 1,350 1,305 1,000 750
50 1,520 1,465 1,000 750
55 1,730 1,500 1,000 750
60 1,990 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 1,555 1,490 1,000 750
100 1,235 1,185 1,000 750
105 975 935 905 750
110 755 730 705 680
115 575 555 535 520
120 420 405 395 385
125 290 285 275 265
130 180 175 170 170
135 90 90 85 85
140 15 10 10 10
145 0 0 0 0
150 0 0 0 0
155 0 0 0 0
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0
205 0 0 0 0
210 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 670-02625.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 1-Man Platform, Maximum Jib Rating

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,875 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,750 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,645 1,500 1,000 750
-25 1,565 1,500 1,000 750
-20 1,495 1,460 1,000 750
-15 1,445 1,410 1,000 750
-10 1,410 1,375 1,000 750
-5 1,385 1,340 1,000 750
0 1,380 1,325 1,000 750
5 1,380 1,335 1,000 750
10 1,400 1,360 1,000 750
15 1,430 1,390 1,000 750
20 1,475 1,435 1,000 750
25 1,535 1,495 1,000 750
30 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
35 1,705 1,500 1,000 750
40 1,750 1,500 1,000 750
45 1,860 1,500 1,000 750
50 1,995 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
115 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
120 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
125 1,835 1,500 1,000 750
130 1,680 1,500 1,000 750
135 1,545 1,500 1,000 750
140 1,430 1,380 1,000 750
145 1,310 1,270 1,000 750
150 1,215 1,180 1,000 750
155 1,140 1,105 1,000 750
160 1,075 1,045 1,000 750
165 1,030 1,000 975 750
170 1,000 970 945 750
175 980 950 925 750
180 970 945 920 750
185 970 945 920 750
190 970 945 920 750
195 970 945 920 750
200 970 945 920 750

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025172.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Dual 1-Man Platform, Maximum Jib Rating

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,975 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,720 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,505 1,455 1,000 750
-45 1,325 1,285 1,000 750
-40 1,175 1,140 1,000 750
-35 1,050 1,020 990 750
-30 945 920 895 750
-25 860 835 815 750
-20 795 770 755 735
-15 740 725 705 685
-10 705 685 670 645
-5 680 660 635 615
0 675 645 625 600
5 675 650 630 605
10 695 675 655 630
15 725 705 690 670
20 770 750 730 710
25 830 805 785 750
30 905 880 860 750
35 1,000 975 945 750
40 1,045 1,015 985 750
45 1,160 1,125 1,000 750
50 1,295 1,255 1,000 750
55 1,460 1,410 1,000 750
60 1,655 1,500 1,000 750
65 1,890 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,800 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,540 1,485 1,000 750
120 1,320 1,275 1,000 750
125 1,130 1,095 1,000 750
130 970 945 920 750
135 835 815 795 750
140 725 700 680 660
145 605 590 570 555
150 510 495 480 465
155 430 420 410 395
160 370 360 350 340
165 325 315 305 300
170 290 280 275 270
175 270 265 255 250
180 260 255 250 240
185 260 255 250 240
190 260 255 250 240
195 260 255 250 240
200 260 255 250 240

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 970025173 and 970025174.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 2-Man Platform, Maximum Jib Rating

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,795 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,615 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,465 1,420 1,000 750
-35 1,340 1,300 1,000 750
-30 1,235 1,200 1,000 750
-25 1,150 1,120 1,000 750
-20 1,085 1,055 1,000 750
-15 1,030 1,005 980 750
-10 995 970 940 750
-5 970 945 910 750
0 965 930 895 750
5 965 935 900 750
10 985 960 925 750
15 1,015 990 965 750
20 1,060 1,030 1,000 750
25 1,120 1,090 1,000 750
30 1,195 1,165 1,000 750
35 1,290 1,255 1,000 750
40 1,335 1,295 1,000 750
45 1,450 1,405 1,000 750
50 1,585 1,500 1,000 750
55 1,745 1,500 1,000 750
60 1,940 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,835 1,500 1,000 750
120 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
125 1,425 1,385 1,000 750
130 1,265 1,230 1,000 750
135 1,130 1,100 1,000 750
140 1,020 985 955 750
145 900 875 850 750
150 805 780 760 735
155 725 705 685 670
160 665 645 630 610
165 620 600 585 570
170 585 570 555 540
175 565 550 535 520
180 555 540 530 515
185 555 540 530 515
190 555 540 530 515
195 555 540 530 515
200 555 540 530 515

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970041671.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 1-Man Platform, Maximum Jib Rating

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,960 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,770 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,475 1,435 1,000 750
-35 1,360 1,325 1,000 750
-30 1,270 1,235 1,000 750
-25 1,195 1,165 1,000 750
-20 1,135 1,105 1,000 750
-15 1,090 1,065 1,000 750
-10 1,055 1,030 1,000 750
-5 1,035 1,010 990 750
0 1,030 1,005 980 750
5 1,030 1,005 985 750
10 1,045 1,020 1,000 750
15 1,075 1,050 1,000 750
20 1,115 1,090 1,000 750
25 1,170 1,140 1,000 750
30 1,235 1,205 1,000 750
35 1,325 1,290 1,000 750
40 1,365 1,330 1,000 750
45 1,465 1,425 1,000 750
50 1,585 1,500 1,000 750
55 1,730 1,500 1,000 750
60 1,910 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,855 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,640 1,500 1,000 750
120 1,455 1,410 1,000 750
125 1,295 1,260 1,000 750
130 1,165 1,135 1,000 750
135 1,050 1,025 1,000 750
140 955 930 910 750
145 875 855 835 750
150 805 790 770 750
155 755 735 720 705
160 710 695 680 665
165 675 660 650 635
170 650 640 625 615
175 640 625 610 600
180 630 620 605 595
185 630 620 605 595
190 630 620 605 595
195 630 620 605 595
200 630 620 605 595

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025176.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Dual 1-Man Platform, Maximum Jib Rating

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,550 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,320 1,275 1,000 750
-50 1,125 1,090 1,000 750
-45 960 935 910 750
-40 825 805 785 750
-35 715 695 680 660
-30 620 605 590 575
-25 545 530 520 505
-20 485 475 460 450
-15 440 430 420 410
-10 405 395 390 380
-5 385 375 370 360
0 380 370 360 350
5 380 370 365 355
10 395 385 380 370
15 425 415 405 395
20 465 455 445 435
25 520 505 495 485
30 590 575 560 545
35 675 655 640 625
40 715 700 680 660
45 820 795 775 750
50 940 915 885 750
55 1,090 1,055 1,000 750
60 1,265 1,225 1,000 750
65 1,480 1,425 1,000 750
70 1,745 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,790 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,475 1,425 1,000 750
110 1,215 1,175 1,000 750
115 995 965 935 750
120 805 785 765 740
125 650 630 615 600
130 515 500 490 475
135 400 390 380 375
140 305 300 290 285
145 225 220 215 210
150 155 155 150 145
155 100 100 95 95
160 60 55 55 55
165 25 25 25 25
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 970025177 and 970025178.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 2-Man Platform, Maximum Jib Rating

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,785 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,555 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,360 1,320 1,000 750
-45 1,200 1,165 1,000 750
-40 1,060 1,035 1,000 750
-35 950 925 900 750
-30 855 835 815 750
-25 780 760 745 725
-20 720 705 685 670
-15 675 660 645 630
-10 640 625 610 600
-5 620 605 595 580
0 615 600 585 570
5 615 600 590 575
10 630 615 605 590
15 660 645 630 615
20 700 685 670 650
25 755 735 720 700
30 825 805 785 750
35 910 885 865 750
40 955 925 905 750
45 1,055 1,025 995 750
50 1,175 1,140 1,000 750
55 1,325 1,280 1,000 750
60 1,500 1,450 1,000 750
65 1,720 1,500 1,000 750
70 1,985 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,710 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,450 1,405 1,000 750
115 1,230 1,190 1,000 750
120 1,040 1,015 985 750
125 885 860 840 750
130 750 730 710 695
135 635 620 605 590
140 540 525 515 505
145 460 450 440 430
150 390 385 375 365
155 335 330 320 315
160 295 285 280 275
165 260 255 250 245
170 235 230 225 220
175 220 215 210 210
180 215 210 205 205
185 215 210 205 205
190 215 210 205 205
195 215 210 205 205
200 215 210 205 205

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025179.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Medium Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,840 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,420 1,375 1,000 750
-45 1,255 1,220 1,000 750
-40 1,120 1,090 1,000 750
-35 1,010 980 955 750
-30 915 890 870 750
-25 840 820 795 750
-20 780 760 740 720
-15 735 715 700 680
-10 700 685 665 650
-5 680 665 650 630
0 675 655 640 625
5 675 660 645 625
10 690 675 655 640
15 720 700 685 665
20 760 740 720 705
25 815 790 770 750
30 880 860 835 750
35 965 940 915 750
40 1,010 980 950 750
45 1,110 1,075 1,000 750
50 1,230 1,190 1,000 750
55 1,375 1,330 1,000 750
60 1,555 1,495 1,000 750
65 1,765 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,755 1,500 1,000 750
120 1,525 1,475 1,000 750
125 1,335 1,295 1,000 750
130 1,170 1,135 1,000 750
135 1,035 1,005 975 750
140 915 890 870 750
145 820 800 780 750
150 740 720 705 685
155 675 655 640 625
160 620 605 590 580
165 580 570 555 540
170 555 540 525 515
175 535 525 510 500
180 530 515 505 495
185 530 515 505 495
190 530 515 505 495
195 530 515 505 495
200 530 515 505 495

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025180.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Medium Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,855 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,615 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,430 1,365 1,000 750
-25 1,285 1,230 1,000 750
-20 1,170 1,120 1,000 750
-15 1,085 1,040 1,000 750
-10 1,025 985 945 750
-5 990 950 915 750
0 975 935 900 750
5 980 940 905 750
10 1,005 965 930 750
15 1,055 1,010 975 750
20 1,125 1,080 1,000 750
25 1,225 1,175 1,000 750
30 1,355 1,295 1,000 750
35 1,525 1,455 1,000 750
40 1,735 1,500 1,000 750
45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,755 1,500 1,000 750
120 1,525 1,475 1,000 750
125 1,335 1,295 1,000 750
130 1,170 1,135 1,000 750
135 1,035 1,005 975 750
140 915 890 870 750
145 820 800 780 750
150 740 720 705 685
155 675 655 640 625
160 620 605 590 580
165 580 570 555 540
170 555 540 525 515
175 535 525 510 500
180 530 515 505 495
185 530 515 505 495
190 530 515 505 495
195 530 515 505 495
200 530 515 505 495

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025180.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Medium Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,470 1,420 1,000 750


-55 1,260 1,220 1,000 750
-50 1,080 1,050 1,000 750
-45 935 905 880 750
-40 810 785 765 745
-35 705 685 670 655
-30 620 605 590 575
-25 550 535 525 510
-20 495 485 470 460
-15 455 445 435 425
-10 425 415 405 395
-5 405 395 385 380
0 400 390 380 370
5 400 390 385 375
10 415 405 395 385
15 440 430 420 410
20 480 465 455 445
25 530 515 505 490
30 590 575 560 550
35 670 655 635 620
40 710 690 670 655
45 800 780 760 735
50 915 885 860 750
55 1,050 1,015 985 750
60 1,210 1,170 1,000 750
65 1,410 1,355 1,000 750
70 1,650 1,500 1,000 750
75 1,955 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,710 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,450 1,400 1,000 750
115 1,230 1,190 1,000 750
120 1,040 1,010 985 750
125 885 860 835 750
130 750 730 710 695
135 635 620 605 590
140 540 525 515 505
145 460 450 440 430
150 390 380 375 365
155 335 330 320 315
160 290 285 280 275
165 260 255 250 245
170 235 230 225 220
175 220 215 210 205
180 215 210 205 200
185 215 210 205 200
190 215 210 205 200
195 215 210 205 200
200 215 210 205 200

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025187.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Medium Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′ + to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,760 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,490 1,405 1,000 750
-35 1,270 1,215 1,000 750
-30 1,100 1,055 1,000 750
-25 965 930 895 750
-20 865 830 800 750
-15 785 760 730 705
-10 735 705 680 660
-5 700 675 650 630
0 685 660 640 620
5 690 665 645 620
10 715 690 665 645
15 760 735 705 685
20 825 795 770 740
25 920 885 850 750
30 1,040 995 960 750
35 1,190 1,140 1,000 750
40 1,385 1,325 1,000 750
45 1,635 1,500 1,000 750
50 1,955 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,710 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,450 1,400 1,000 750
115 1,230 1,190 1,000 750
120 1,040 1,010 985 750
125 885 860 835 750
130 750 730 710 695
135 635 620 605 590
140 540 525 515 505
145 460 450 440 430
150 390 380 375 365
155 335 330 320 315
160 290 285 280 275
165 260 255 250 245
170 235 230 225 220
175 220 215 210 205
180 215 210 205 200
185 215 210 205 200
190 215 210 205 200
195 215 210 205 200
200 215 210 205 200

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025187.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,755 1,500 1,000 750


-55 1,555 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,390 1,345 1,000 750
-45 1,250 1,210 1,000 750
-40 1,135 1,100 1,000 750
-35 1,040 1,010 980 750
-30 960 930 905 750
-25 890 870 845 750
-20 840 820 800 750
-15 800 780 760 740
-10 770 755 735 715
-5 755 735 720 700
0 750 730 710 695
5 750 730 715 695
10 765 745 725 710
15 785 765 750 730
20 820 800 780 750
25 870 845 825 750
30 930 905 880 750
35 1,000 975 945 750
40 1,035 1,005 975 750
45 1,120 1,090 1,000 750
50 1,225 1,185 1,000 750
55 1,350 1,305 1,000 750
60 1,505 1,450 1,000 750
65 1,685 1,500 1,000 750
70 1,910 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,925 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,685 1,500 1,000 750
120 1,490 1,440 1,000 750
125 1,320 1,280 1,000 750
130 1,180 1,145 1,000 750
135 1,065 1,035 1,000 750
140 965 935 910 750
145 880 855 835 750
150 810 790 770 750
155 755 735 715 700
160 710 690 675 660
165 675 655 640 625
170 650 635 620 605
175 635 620 605 590
180 630 615 600 585
185 630 615 600 585
190 630 615 600 585
195 630 615 600 585
200 630 615 600 585

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025181.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′ + to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-40 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-35 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,840 1,500 1,000 750
-25 1,695 1,500 1,000 750
-20 1,580 1,500 1,000 750
-15 1,495 1,435 1,000 750
-10 1,435 1,380 1,000 750
-5 1,400 1,345 1,000 750
0 1,385 1,330 1,000 750
5 1,390 1,335 1,000 750
10 1,420 1,360 1,000 750
15 1,465 1,410 1,000 750
20 1,540 1,475 1,000 750
25 1,635 1,500 1,000 750
30 1,765 1,500 1,000 750
35 1,935 1,500 1,000 750
40 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,925 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,685 1,500 1,000 750
120 1,490 1,440 1,000 750
125 1,320 1,280 1,000 750
130 1,180 1,145 1,000 750
135 1,065 1,035 1,000 750
140 965 935 910 750
145 880 855 835 750
150 810 790 770 750
155 755 735 715 700
160 710 690 675 660
165 675 655 640 625
170 650 635 620 605
175 635 620 605 590
180 630 615 600 585
185 630 615 600 585
190 630 615 600 585
195 630 615 600 585
200 630 615 600 585

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025181.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Dual 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,430 1,380 1,000 750


-55 1,205 1,165 1,000 750
-50 1,020 990 955 750
-45 865 840 815 750
-40 735 710 690 675
-35 625 605 590 575
-30 535 520 505 495
-25 460 450 435 425
-20 400 390 380 370
-15 360 350 340 330
-10 325 315 310 300
-5 305 300 290 285
0 300 290 285 275
5 300 295 285 280
10 315 310 300 295
15 340 335 325 315
20 380 370 360 355
25 435 420 410 400
30 500 485 475 460
35 585 565 550 535
40 625 605 585 570
45 720 700 680 660
50 840 810 785 750
55 980 945 915 750
60 1,150 1,110 1,000 750
65 1,360 1,305 1,000 750
70 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
75 1,925 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,965 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,645 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,375 1,330 1,000 750
120 1,155 1,115 1,000 750
125 965 935 905 750
130 805 780 760 735
135 670 650 635 615
140 555 540 530 515
145 460 450 440 430
150 385 375 365 355
155 320 310 305 295
160 270 260 255 250
165 230 225 220 215
170 200 195 190 190
175 185 180 175 170
180 180 175 170 165
185 180 175 170 165
190 180 175 170 165
195 180 175 170 165
200 180 175 170 165

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 970025183 and 970025184.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Dual 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,870 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,560 1,485 1,000 750
-35 1,320 1,260 1,000 750
-30 1,135 1,085 1,000 750
-25 985 945 905 750
-20 875 835 805 750
-15 790 755 730 700
-10 730 700 675 650
-5 690 665 640 615
0 675 650 625 605
5 680 655 630 610
10 710 680 655 630
15 760 730 700 675
20 830 795 765 735
25 930 890 855 750
30 1,060 1,015 970 750
35 1,230 1,170 1,000 750
40 1,440 1,370 1,000 750
45 1,715 1,500 1,000 750
50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,965 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,645 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,375 1,330 1,000 750
120 1,155 1,115 1,000 750
125 965 935 905 750
130 805 780 760 735
135 670 650 635 615
140 555 540 530 515
145 460 450 440 430
150 385 375 365 355
155 320 310 305 295
160 270 260 255 250
165 230 225 220 215
170 200 195 190 190
175 185 180 175 170
180 180 175 170 165
185 180 175 170 165
190 180 175 170 165
195 180 175 170 165
200 180 175 170 165

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 970025183 and 970025184.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,440 1,390 1,000 750


-55 1,235 1,195 1,000 750
-50 1,065 1,030 1,000 750
-45 920 890 865 750
-40 800 775 755 735
-35 700 680 660 640
-30 615 600 585 565
-25 550 535 520 505
-20 495 480 470 455
-15 455 440 430 420
-10 425 415 400 395
-5 405 395 385 375
0 400 385 380 370
5 400 390 380 370
10 415 405 395 385
15 440 430 415 405
20 475 465 450 440
25 525 510 495 485
30 585 570 555 540
35 660 645 625 610
40 700 675 660 640
45 790 765 740 720
50 895 865 840 750
55 1,025 990 960 750
60 1,185 1,140 1,000 750
65 1,375 1,320 1,000 750
70 1,605 1,500 1,000 750
75 1,895 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,900 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,365 1,315 1,000 750
120 1,160 1,120 1,000 750
125 985 955 925 750
130 840 815 790 750
135 715 695 680 660
140 615 595 580 565
145 525 515 500 490
150 455 445 435 420
155 395 385 375 370
160 350 340 335 325
165 315 305 300 295
170 290 280 275 270
175 275 265 260 255
180 270 260 255 250
185 270 260 255 250
190 270 260 255 250
195 270 260 255 250
200 270 260 255 250

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025186.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM50E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,855 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,615 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,430 1,365 1,000 750
-25 1,285 1,230 1,000 750
-20 1,170 1,120 1,000 750
-15 1,085 1,040 1,000 750
-10 1,025 985 945 750
-5 990 950 915 750
0 975 935 900 750
5 980 940 905 750
10 1,005 965 930 750
15 1,055 1,010 975 750
20 1,125 1,080 1,000 750
25 1,225 1,175 1,000 750
30 1,355 1,295 1,000 750
35 1,525 1,455 1,000 750
40 1,735 1,500 1,000 750
45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,900 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,610 1,500 1,000 750
115 1,365 1,315 1,000 750
120 1,160 1,120 1,000 750
125 985 955 925 750
130 840 815 790 750
135 715 695 680 660
140 615 595 580 565
145 525 515 500 490
150 455 445 435 420
155 395 385 375 370
160 350 340 335 325
165 315 305 300 295
170 290 280 275 270
175 275 265 260 255
180 270 260 255 250
185 270 260 255 250
190 270 260 255 250
195 270 260 255 250
200 270 260 255 250

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025186.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,415 1,370 1,000 750


-55 1,235 1,195 1,000 750
-50 1,085 1,050 1,000 750
-45 955 930 905 750
-40 850 825 805 750
-35 760 740 725 705
-30 690 670 655 640
-25 630 615 600 585
-20 580 570 555 540
-15 545 535 520 510
-10 520 510 495 485
-5 505 490 480 470
0 500 485 475 465
5 500 490 480 465
10 515 500 490 480
15 535 520 510 500
20 565 555 540 530
25 610 595 580 565
30 665 645 630 615
35 730 710 695 675
40 765 745 725 705
45 845 820 795 750
50 940 910 885 750
55 1,055 1,020 990 750
60 1,195 1,155 1,000 750
65 1,360 1,310 1,000 750
70 1,570 1,500 1,000 750
75 1,825 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,720 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,470 1,420 1,000 750
115 1,265 1,225 1,000 750
120 1,095 1,060 1,000 750
125 950 920 895 750
130 825 805 785 750
135 725 705 685 670
140 635 620 605 590
145 565 550 535 525
150 500 490 480 470
155 455 445 435 425
160 415 405 395 385
165 385 375 365 360
170 360 355 345 340
175 350 340 335 330
180 345 335 330 325
185 345 335 330 325
190 345 335 330 325
195 345 335 330 325
200 345 335 330 325

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025188.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,880 1,500 1,000 750
-35 1,675 1,500 1,000 750
-30 1,510 1,430 1,000 750
-25 1,380 1,315 1,000 750
-20 1,275 1,225 1,000 750
-15 1,200 1,155 1,000 750
-10 1,145 1,105 1,000 750
-5 1,115 1,075 1,000 750
0 1,100 1,060 1,000 750
5 1,105 1,065 1,000 750
10 1,130 1,090 1,000 750
15 1,175 1,130 1,000 750
20 1,240 1,195 1,000 750
25 1,330 1,280 1,000 750
30 1,450 1,385 1,000 750
35 1,605 1,500 1,000 750
40 1,795 1,500 1,000 750
45 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,720 1,500 1,000 750
110 1,470 1,420 1,000 750
115 1,265 1,225 1,000 750
120 1,095 1,060 1,000 750
125 950 920 895 750
130 825 805 785 750
135 725 705 685 670
140 635 620 605 590
145 565 550 535 525
150 500 490 480 470
155 455 445 435 425
160 415 405 395 385
165 385 375 365 360
170 360 355 345 340
175 350 340 335 330
180 345 335 330 325
185 345 335 330 325
190 345 335 330 325
195 345 335 330 325
200 345 335 330 325

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025188.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Dual 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 995 960 930 750


-55 795 770 750 725
-50 635 615 595 580
-45 495 480 465 455
-40 380 370 360 350
-35 285 275 270 260
-30 205 200 195 190
-25 140 135 135 130
-20 90 85 85 85
-15 50 50 45 45
-10 20 20 20 20
-5 5 5 5 5
0 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0
10 15 15 15 15
15 35 35 35 35
20 70 70 70 65
25 120 115 110 110
30 175 175 170 165
35 250 245 235 230
40 285 280 270 265
45 370 360 350 340
50 475 460 450 435
55 600 585 565 550
60 755 730 705 680
65 935 900 870 750
70 1,160 1,115 1,000 750
75 1,440 1,375 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,675 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,350 1,300 1,000 750
110 1,080 1,040 1,000 750
115 855 825 800 750
120 665 645 630 610
125 510 495 480 465
130 375 365 355 345
135 260 255 250 240
140 165 160 160 155
145 85 85 80 80
150 20 20 20 20
155 0 0 0 0
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 970025189 and 970025190.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Dual 1-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.

Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)


Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 1,885 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,535 1,440 1,000 750
-40 1,255 1,195 1,000 750
-35 1,035 990 950 750
-30 865 830 795 750
-25 730 700 675 650
-20 630 605 580 560
-15 550 530 510 495
-10 495 480 460 445
-5 465 445 430 415
0 450 435 420 405
5 455 440 425 410
10 480 465 445 430
15 525 505 490 470
20 590 570 550 530
25 685 655 630 610
30 800 770 740 715
35 955 915 880 750
40 1,150 1,100 1,000 750
45 1,400 1,335 1,000 750
50 1,720 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,675 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,350 1,300 1,000 750
110 1,080 1,040 1,000 750
115 855 825 800 750
120 665 645 630 610
125 510 495 480 465
130 375 365 355 345
135 260 255 250 240
140 165 160 160 155
145 85 85 80 80
150 20 20 20 20
155 0 0 0 0
160 0 0 0 0
165 0 0 0 0
170 0 0 0 0
175 0 0 0 0
180 0 0 0 0
185 0 0 0 0
190 0 0 0 0
195 0 0 0 0
200 0 0 0 0

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placards 970025189 and 970025190.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Greater

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′+ to 4′′

-60 1,180 1,140 1,000 750


-55 985 955 925 750
-50 825 800 775 750
-45 685 665 650 630
-40 575 560 545 530
-35 480 465 455 445
-30 400 390 380 370
-25 340 330 320 315
-20 285 280 275 265
-15 250 245 235 230
-10 220 215 210 205
-5 205 200 195 190
0 200 195 190 185
5 200 195 190 185
10 215 210 205 200
15 235 230 225 220
20 270 265 260 250
25 315 310 300 295
30 375 365 355 350
35 445 435 425 415
40 480 470 455 445
45 565 550 535 520
50 670 650 630 615
55 795 770 745 720
60 940 910 880 750
65 1,120 1,080 1,000 750
70 1,345 1,290 1,000 750
75 1,620 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,815 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,495 1,440 1,000 750
110 1,235 1,190 1,000 750
115 1,015 980 950 750
120 830 805 780 750
125 675 655 640 620
130 545 530 515 505
135 435 425 415 405
140 340 335 325 320
145 265 260 250 245
150 200 195 190 185
155 145 145 140 140
160 105 105 100 100
165 75 70 70 70
170 50 50 50 50
175 35 35 35 35
180 30 30 30 30
185 30 30 30 30
190 30 30 30 30
195 30 30 30 30
200 30 30 30 30

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025191.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


AM55E – Single 2-Man Platform,
Minimum Jib Rating, Lower Boom 100 Degrees or Less

Jib capacities are net load carried by the load line at the end of the jib. Jib capacities assume that the platform is loaded
to rated capacity.
Upper Boom Jib Capacity (in Pounds)
Angle Jib Extension From Platform Shaft
(wrt grnd) 0 to 1′′ 1′′ + to 2′′ 2′′ + to 3′′ 3′′ + to 4′′

-60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750


-55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-50 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
-45 1,760 1,500 1,000 750
-40 1,490 1,405 1,000 750
-35 1,270 1,215 1,000 750
-30 1,100 1,055 1,000 750
-25 965 930 895 750
-20 865 830 800 750
-15 785 760 730 705
-10 735 705 680 660
-5 700 675 650 630
0 685 660 640 620
5 690 665 645 620
10 715 690 665 645
15 760 735 705 685
20 825 795 770 740
25 920 885 850 750
30 1,040 995 960 750
35 1,190 1,140 1,000 750
40 1,385 1,325 1,000 750
45 1,635 1,500 1,000 750
50 1,955 1,500 1,000 750
55 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
60 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
65 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
70 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
75 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
80 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
85 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
90 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
95 2,000 1,500 1,000 750
100 1,815 1,500 1,000 750
105 1,495 1,440 1,000 750
110 1,235 1,190 1,000 750
115 1,015 980 950 750
120 830 805 780 750
125 675 655 640 620
130 545 530 515 505
135 435 425 415 405
140 340 335 325 320
145 265 260 250 245
150 200 195 190 185
155 145 145 140 140
160 105 105 100 100
165 75 70 70 70
170 50 50 50 50
175 35 35 35 35
180 30 30 30 30
185 30 30 30 30
190 30 30 30 30
195 30 30 30 30
200 30 30 30 30

Liners, tools, and material are considered part of the platform capacity. Jib capacities shown are capped off at maximum
jib structural capacity. If the platform is not fully loaded, 80 percent of the unused capacity may be added to the jib load
capacity indicated. Note: Additional non-standard options will reduce capacity. This capacity chart is referenced on
capacity placard 970025191.

Appendix — Material Handling Capacity Charts


Troubleshooting Chart

Symptom Possible Cause Test Procedure/Corrective Action

All functions stop Low fluid level in reservoir. Check fluid level. Add proper fluid type.
working.
Engine, PTO, or pump failure. Use auxiliary power source, DC pump, or manually stow the
unit.

Excessive heat High pressure oil return to Remove the twist or kink from the hose.
buildup. reservoir caused by twisted or
kinked hydraulic hose.

Severe hydraulic leak. Failure of hose, tube, fitting, seal, Stow without hydraulic power.
etc.

Upper controls do Controls selector in the Lower Position the controls selector in the Upper position.
not work. position.

Machine/outriggers selector in Position the selector in the Machine position.


Outriggers position.

PTO is not engaged. Engage the PTO.

Emergency stop is engaged. Pull up on emergency stop control.

Lower controls do Controls selector in the Upper Position the controls selector in the Lower position.
not work. position.

Machine/outriggers selector in Position the selector in the Machine position.


Outriggers position.

PTO is not engaged. Engage the PTO.

Emergency stop is engaged. Position control selector to Lower Controls.

Engine and pump Tools valve on. Turn tools valve off.
remain loaded at
all times. Pump signal not bleeding off. Open signal drain line needle valves (located in the pedestal
and the turntable) and adjust 11/2 turns open.

Defective engine pressure Replace pressure switch.


switch.

Tools operate slowly. Defective tool. Try another tool or install flowmeter at tool quick disconnect.
Replace defective tool. Check for proper flow.

Quick disconnect. Install flowmeter as above. Replace defective quick discon-


nect.

Tool flow control valve. Install flowmeter as above. Adjust flow control on valve or
replace defective flow control valve.

No pump signal. Install flowmeter as above. Create a load with flowmeter


needle valve. Check for proper flow. Replace tool signal
pressure reducing valve in pump control valve.

Appendix — Troubleshooting Chart


Appendix — Troubleshooting Chart