You are on page 1of 3

Baader to Costanzo, [Munich,] 1 June, 17801 

I. Chard. 1150 

Iʹve received your last letter from Manheim and the two from Frankfurt. The Sublime Chapter is 
very pleased with your diligence and assiduousness. My dear brother, what travel and 
adventure awaits! But rest assured your task will not be a thankless one; expect to settle with 
real brothers in Elysium,2 and after hardships, knowledge of yourself and your brothers will 
increase.  

For the cause of Elysium, already three letters have been sent: one to Philadelphia, and two to 
Paris, addressed to Franklin3 and Adams.4 My daughter5 is steadfast, and does not wish to have 
an inactive, nor at the same time, troubled life, but to live with great simplicity, friendship, and 
freedom. Our motto is Libertas, veritas, amicitia [Liberty, Truth, Friendship]. 

As satisfied as I am of the accommodations made at Manheim, it is still a pity that it wasnʹt 
possible to establish something in Heidelberg. Young people are the trees for the ground of a 
new colony. 

I believe that you will not be so happy at Frankfurt.6 Their Masonic knowledge should not be 
too advanced if, without further explanation or other things more enlightening, illuminating and 
instructive, they are confined to the first three degrees.7 As an expert on the ceremonies of the 

                                                      
1 Secret State Archive Berlin, FM 5.1.5, Nr, 2910, Bl. 107t/v 
2 A term for an American colony to be established in the southern states, compare Baader to Costanzo, 

7/5/1780, p.154, as well as Weishaupt to Merz 3/13/1778, p. 41; in Greek mythology the Lethe flowed 
around the Elysian fields in the underworld. 
3 Benjamin Franklin (1706‐1790), writer and naturalist, co‐author of the American Declaration of 

Independence, 1776‐85 American envoy in Paris, then Governor of Pennsylvania; Freemason since 1731, 
Provincial Grand Master in 1749 in Boston, in Philadelphia in 1760, 1779‐82 master of the Parisian Lodge 
“The Nine Sisters”. Cf. Louis Amiable: Une loge maçonnique dʹavant 1789: la R. L. Les neuf sœurs, Paris 1897. 
4 John Adams (1735‐1826), 1778‐88 American envoys to Paris and London, 1797‐1801 second President of 

the USA. 
5 Baaderʹs step daughter, the painter and copperplate engraver Amalia Schweinhammer (married to 

Schattenhofer, 1763‐circa 1840). 
6 “Already on the 4th of March 1780 arranged […] Costanzo […]a letter to the Provincial Grand Master, in 

which he commissioned of the chapter of the Lodge Theodore of good council […] connection to a 
transparent correspondence and representation has been solicited for, and except that on that proposal, 
that the members could enter both lodges mutually without affiliation […].” (Georg Kloss, Kloss, Annalen 
der Loge zur Einigkeit, der Englischen Provincial‐Loge, 1858, p.134) 
7 Founded in 1742, the Lodge “Zur Einigkeit” had no higher system of grades, and still worked with only 

three degrees. 
reformed degrees, try to win the confidence of Mr. Gogel.8 Give him a thousand compliments 
and salutations, on my behalf, as known members, and tell him that brother Kesler9 has assured 
us that he encountered Illuminati in Frankfurt and ask why he has determined to refuse union 
with the Strict Observance. As My Very Respectable Brother Gogel has passed through the 
reformed degrees,10 he will be capable of enlightening you better than any other. Without a 
doubt heʹll recognize the symbols on their rings11 and neck collar. (As he only knows the first 
three grades of our Masonry, he will not be capable of showing us the parallels between our 
Lodge and the higher reformed degrees. But if you have carefully studied the four grades 
constituted by Brother Le Bauld‐de‐Nans, you yourself will be in a position to judge. I have my 
reasons to doubt what Brother Le Bauld‐de‐Nans has proposed, and have thought all along that 
the Perfect Master of the English12 should be one of the Scottish grades of the reformists.) Due to 
a bad memory, Brother Gogel wonʹt be able to explain the particularities of the grades, yet he is 
knowledgeable and friendly enough to disclose the aim of the Masonic Reformers. Also try to 
gain knowledge from the other Brothers initiated in the Reform. Perhaps you can uncover 
something yet about the grand idea of the Reformers, and if they are of the opinion to form a 
union. 

How shall we go about forming one or more Lodges in France? Could they not be subordinate 
to our Chapter established by the Provincial Lodge of Frankfurt [?]13 For our system it would be 
necessary. Maybe we could gain the right to establish [a foothold] in France for a small sum of 
money, for example by saying “We give you such and such a small sum” for each Lodge we 
establish in France; we could give the amount such as they usually require, provided that after 
their constitution, the Lodges are under our control. Probe the thoughts of Mr. Gogel a little 
more. 

There are Brothers who have come to visit so I have to bid you farewell Very Dear and Very 
Respectable Brother, I am always and with all my heart Yours 

                                                      
8 Johann Peter Gogel (1728‐82), Frankfurt wine wholesaler; in 1755, became a member of the Lodge “Zur 
Einigkeit,” the grand master since 1761, also Provincial Grand Master since 1766. 
9 Joseph Kessler, yard master of the young Baron von Castel in Frankfurt, then Assessor to the Secret 

Chancellery in Munich, 1793 Privy Secretary; visitor to the Lodge “St. Theodor vom guten Rat“ in March 
1781, Illuminatus (“Aulus Gellius”) 
10 On 10/02/1778 Gogel was “himself the person, who introduced Prince Carl into the interior of the 

higher Order” (Georg Kloss, Kloss, Annalen der Loge zur Einigkeit, der Englischen Provincial‐Loge, 1858, 
p.120). 
11 Rings with Masonic symbols. 

12 Around 1740 the first documented French higher degrees. 

13 The Lodge “Zur Einigkeit” was constituted in 1761 and had a Nuremberg sister lodge, but in 1766 it 

passed over to the Strict Observance (cf. Georg Kloss, Annalen der Loge zur Einigkeit, der Englischen 
Provincial‐Loge, 1858, pp. 28‐46). 
Celsus‐ 

Proxima plura.14 

Pericles asks you to always remember him15 

 

                                                      
14 Latin. More soon 
15 Le Bauld‐de‐Nans’ Note: These words are from another hand and without doubt the one named Pericles ‐ 
I thought I should copy this letter in its entirety. It offers insight into the fanaticism of the mind of Celsus, 
of Diomedes and of those whom he called Americans. Youʹll see later what this means, especially in my 
notes on these letters. In the meantime persuade yourself of the lack of faith on the part of the Lodge St. 
Theodore. What vacuous inquisitiveness! Iʹm afraid it is but nonsense! Continue to learn more before its 
ratification.