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A World of Sustainable Ideas

LeNS project funded by the Asia-Link Programme, EuropeAid, European Commission

This Work is Licensed under Creative Commons


Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
For full details on the license, go to:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

E UROPE A ID
Edited by Cindy Kohtala and Carlo Vezzoli CO-OPERATION OFFICE
The catalogue is also available at
www.lens.polimi.it

The LeNS Award was organized Jury members:


and managed by:
Danupop Chaisiri, King Mongkut’s Institute
 
Cindy Kohtala, Tatu Marttila, Aalto University, of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, Thailand
School of Art and Design, Department of Design,
Helsinki, Finland Jan Carel Diehl, Delft University of Technology,
 
Delft, The Netherlands
Carlo Vezzoli, Fabrizio Ceschin, Politecnico
di Milano, INDACO Department, Milan, Italy Wang Guosheng, Academy of Arts and
 
Design, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Zuo Hengfeng, Academy of Arts and Design,
 
Other LeNS partners cooperating with the Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
organization are:
Kirsi Niinimäki, Aalto University, School of Art
 
Jan Carel Diehl, Duygu Keskin, Marcel Crul,
and Design, Department of Design, Helsinki,
Delft University of Technology, Delft, The
Finland
Netherlands
Ravi Mokashi Punekar, Faculty of Design, IIT
 
Amrit Srinivasan, Indian Institute of Technology
Guwahati, India
Delhi, India
Mary Jacob, Deepta Sateesh, Srishti School Yashas Shetty, Srishti School of Art, Design
 

of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore, India and Technology, Bangalore, India

Sompit Moi Fusakul, Praoranuj Ann Siridej, Amitoj Singh, Samsung, Delhi, India
 
Pwinn Rujikietkhumjron, King Mongkut’s Rustam Vania, Srishti School of Art, Design
 
Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Faculty of and Technology, Bangalore, India
Architecture, Department of Design, Bangkok,
Thailand Carlo Vezzoli, Politecnico di Milano University,
 
Milan, Italy
Cai Jun, Liu Xin, Liu Guanzhong, Academy of
Arts and Design, Tsinghua University, Beijing,
China This catalogue is published under the Creative
Commons License:
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike.

The paper in this publication is FSC Mixed Sources product group from well-managed forests and other controlled sources. Produced at a mill that is
certified with the ISO14001 environmental management standard, and certified to the EMAS environmental management standard (No FIN-000021).
A World of Sustainable Ideas
CONTENTS

Foreword and LeNS Student Design Competition 2

LeNS Competition Themes: 4


Sustainable Food Systems, Sustainable Mobility Systems and Sustainable Health/Well-being Systems

Index of Projects 11

The Winners 12

Honourable Mentions 18

Promising Concepts 38

Images of the Pilot Courses 52

the Learning Network on Sustainability


the Learning Network on Sustainability

CONTENTS
FOREWORD

The sustainable system concepts presented in A network can generate a new LeNS-based web plat-
WORLD OF SUSTAINABLE IDEAS are the winners form; any new generated web platform uploads learn-
and promising concepts of the LeNS Student Design ing resources independently; and all LeNS-based web
Competition 2010. The student competition and platforms are interlinked. LeNS Africa was launched
Award is promoted and organized as part of the LeNS on 7 September 2009, in Cape Town, South Africa;
project, funded by the European Commission under LeNS South America was launched on 6 November
the Asia-Link Programme, which aims at the develop- 2009, São Paulo, Brazil; LeNS Central America, 3 June
ment and diffusion of design for sustainability in de- 2010 in Mexico City; LeNS Oceania, 1 July 2010 in Syd-
sign institutions. ney, Australia; and LeNS North America is currently “in
press”.

THE LENS PROJECT


LENS STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION
LeNS, the Learning Network on Sustainability, is an
Asian-European multi-polar network for curricula de- Background: sustainable ideas and transcultural
velopment on design for sustainability focused on design creativity
Product-Service System innovations. It is a three-year
project (Dec 2007–Dec 2010) funded by the European To promote a positive transition towards sustainability
Commission (Asia-Link Programme, EuropeAid), in- (and the related systemic discontinuity) we must be
volving seven design schools in Europe and Asia. The able to find the modality to shift to new life scenarios
project scope is to promote a new generation of Asian (consumption and production patterns) that are radi-
and European designers capable of designing for sus- cally different from the current ones.
tainable Product-Service System innovation, through
a new generation of design educators. The main out- There are several strategies to follow and levels on
put is the so-called Open Learning E-Package (OLEP) which to intervene. However, we need an outstand-
on Design for Sustainability (DfS). It is a web platform ing amount of creativity to produce radical sustain-
allowing interested teachers to download open source able innovations. However much we have to change is
and copyleft learning resources (slideshows, texts, however much we have to be able to create. We need
audio-videos, etc.) that could be modified/remixed to imagine in order to innovate.
and reused, i.e. adapted according to each teacher’s
specific didactic needs, institutional requirements and This catalogue presents a set of sustainable system
local context peculiarities. The same LeNS web plat- concepts from young designers from and for different
form is downloadable as open source and copyleft. It parts of the world: a “world” of sustainable ideas.
is thus a “regenerative” platform: namely, any educa- These projects illustrate that there are some “good
tional institution, teacher, or sustainability-focused ideas” that may emerge in very different locations and

2
migrate to various places throughout the world. These Catalogue structure
good cosmopolitan ideas are the positive side of our
globalized world and clearly highlight that we would An introduction to the three competition themes pre-
need to build transcultural design thinking: a design cedes the presentation of the twenty system concepts.
thinking able to move between different ideas, able to Each concept is illustrated by:
recognize the differences, and find the concrete pos-
sibility of integration – or able to create/re-elaborate A descriptive text;


starting from differences and connections. We need a A system map that displays the interaction between


migrant creativity, as a way to be in a design process and among stakeholders in the system, including
that builds up its own ability by passing from one form flows of money, material, and information;
of thought to another, by opening the mind to codes An interaction storyboard that illustrates how the


of structures and to different meaning systems. What target user interacts within the system and its ele-
is sought is a design attitude able to decentralize from ments in order to have needs satisfied;
its own cognitive references and values, to direct itself Concept details and components;


towards those of other cultures, and able to return to Socio-ethical, environmental, and economic bene-


its own culture enriched by the confrontation experi- fits.
ence – and able to disseminate itself into other cul-
tures.
Sustainable ideas sharing and diffusion
Within this attitude what is needed is the capability
to operate in a complex context with a twofold de- The catalogue and the system concepts (sustainable
sign capability: the capability to elaborate visions of ideas) are licensed under the Creative Commons Li-
possible socio-technical discontinuity starting from cense, Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike and
intersection, connections and differences, and the ca- are available at www.lens.polimi.it. This facilitates and
pability to put into action the strategies to transform promotes the philosophy that good ideas should be
those visions into real solutions. shared and diffused.

These are fairly new dimensions for the designer, Alongside the catalogue a travelling exhibition has
connected with the so-called discipline of Product- been launched during the Bangalore conference “Sus-
Service Systems Design for Sustainability. tainability in Design: NOW!” aiming at further support-
ing the diffusion and sharing of good ideas.

Finally this same exhibition is designed in such a way to


render it easily reproducible in other locations, to em-
power the potential of seeding and cross-fertilization.

3
the Learning Network on Sustainability

LeNS COMPETITION THEMES

to be adopted to understand the mindset and envi-


ronment of a faraway stakeholder in a (probably) un-
familiar context. Participatory co-design tools and
methods that are so helpful in this kind of situation
were less useful here, but input from guest teachers
and old-fashioned research fed the process as an ex-
perimental platform. All competition entries had to
address problem choice, deciding what problems
were key strategic sustainability issues where one
would have the most positive impact. Moreover, PSS
design tools such as those found in the LeNS online
database served the students in analyzing the current
situation, in ideation and brainstorming, as well as
subsequent idea evaluation and filtering. Importantly,
new tools were also developed or adapted and tested
as a necessary outcome of each context’s cultural
uniqueness, such that the goal of “sustainability” could
be given its own local and appropriate definition.

In design schools, product design obviously has a long


tradition, while service design is now gaining in popu-
Entries to the LeNS Competition came from near larity in many locations. There are nevertheless few
and far, from LeNS pilot courses as well as schools instances and opportunities to design true Product-
within the international LeNS network. They all ad- Service Systems, especially those that address both
dressed issues within one of three key themes, Food, eco-efficiency as well as social-efficiency, i.e. taking
Mobility and Health/Well-being, sectors that LeNS into account environmental and socio-ethical impacts
considers highly important in building a sustainable and improvements. In sustainable Product-Service
society. More on these themes can be found on Systems there is thus a need to design (or re-design)
these pages. behaviour as well as touchpoints. This in its turn may
even entail a “re-design” of attitudes, a semiotic and
On the one hand, the pilot courses were a medium of conceptual reframing of solutions, in order to effect a
cross-cultural exchange, where students were faced positive lifestyle shift and a new consciousness of sus-
with the challenge of designing for university cam- tainability values and principles within individuals.
puses and users in other cultures and where a truly Herein lies both the challenge and a true opportunity
empathic, culturally sensitive approach thus needed for design learners and educators.

4
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS come contexts often have too little food and unbal-
anced diets while people from industrialized contexts
The food domain represents a complex production are increasingly contracting diseases related to over-
and consumption system because it involves a wide consumption of calories. A system generally charac-
and articulated network of stakeholders. It is a net- terized by consumers’ decreasing knowledge about
work in which farmers, cattlemen, and final consum- nutrition, food, and local traditions.
ers are joined by processing companies, packaging
companies, wholesale dealers, retailers and catering Within the complex articulation of the food domain,
actors, hotels and restaurants as key stakeholders. what are the key sustainability issues? One key con-
sideration both environmentally and socio-ethically is
But it is complex also because it is associated to sev- related to food security and having good food for all.
eral important aspects: economic ones, because agri- Under current production and consumption struc-
culture and the food industry are still very important tures, there will not be enough land to feed the world’s
sectors for most countries; environmental ones, be- population. In fact, it is expected that in 2050 nine bil-
cause the food domain is responsible for a large share lion people will require between 1.8 and 2.2 Earth-
of environmental impacts (in Europe, 30% of all envi- sized planets in order to sustain their consumption of
ronmental impacts can be linked to the agri-food sec- crops, meat, and fish. This pressure will easily lead to
tor); and socio-ethical ones, because food is related to even more environmentally damaging agricultural
individual health, well-being and pleasure – but also practices and loss of biodiversity. It also magnifies the
to the valorization and strengthening of local tradi- need for increased transparency to consumers. The
tions and resources. Sustainable Consumption debate must begin with an
understanding of “why people buy” and not merely
Food production has become an industry: conven- act as one of the many stakeholders in sustainable
tional agriculture worldwide is increasingly intensified production in advanced nations – an information
and characterized by greater use of synthetic fertiliz- service to make the public aware about their right to
ers, pesticides, and technical devices, and growing av- choice, labelling, regulation of products, and the like1.
erage farm size. Moreover, it is a system that has be-
come more and more globalized, with food products The concept of sustainable food thus requires a much
transported over large distances (produced in one broader systemic approach where each of the various
country, processed in another and sold in yet anoth- stages in the chain and the interactions between
er), resulting in a loss of any direct connection be- stakeholders can be analyzed both in terms of the im-
tween producers and consumers. It is a system in pact on the environment and on human health2, but
which more and more farmers are suffering from eco- moreover, where the interfaces between humans and
nomic pressure and little or no control over prices. A their need for food can be understood and redesigned
system in which people from emerging and low-in- towards sustainability with sensitivity and delicacy.

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the Learning Network on Sustainability

Food and eating belong as much to pleasure and in- sustainability. They are projects that rethink the cur-
dulgence as mere survival. Activities relating to food, rent and dominant food domain of the agri-food in-
such as growing, harvesting, cooking, dining, gather- dustry, and propose alternative eating satisfaction
ing, conversing, and buying or selling food are all the systems. They represent a panorama of new and in-
elements that help render eating more enjoyable and novative food networks characterized by: the valori-
meaningful. Designers – as experts in the human/ zation of small local producers and typical and or-
non-human interface – can benevolently propose a ganic food products; the valorization of sustainable
system of solutions and offers that are celebratory and culinary traditions and knowledge; the protection of
pleasant to stakeholders in the food chain, helping to biodiversity; the promotion of fair trade and the inte-
transform people’s lives in a positive and sustainable gration of marginalized and weak social strata; and
way. There is of course no one single winning solution, the safeguarding of transparency in relation to con-
but different sustainable food alternatives for differ- sumers. They place sustainability at the core of all ef-
ent regions and cultures, different production systems forts: understanding the need for human security
and consumers/citizens. and concentrating on building people’s capabilities
to develop their full potential with safeguards
The projects collected in this catalogue represent a against external challenges. Many of the concepts
set of promising sustainable ideas that, through a sys- introduce the Sufficiency Economy Philosophy (SEP)
temic approach, propose solutions tackling the envi- as an alternative way of thinking alongside the main-
ronmental, socio-ethical, and economic dimensions of stream Sustainable Design approach. The projects
with SEP’s principle in mind place humanity at the
centre and focus on food as part of well-being. Eat-
ing well is not merely about eating good nutritious
food. It implies well-being that transcends people’s
contentment.

6
SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY SYSTEMS during their journey and as a consequence must deal
with the waiting times in between, while peak hours
While food is central to our survival, mobility plays an in major cities around the world mean crushing con-
increasingly important role in our modern, urbanized gestion.
life. Every day billions of billions of people commute
up and down from home to their office, university, or A car offers the user flexibility and independence; they
other places in their daily activities. Moreover, mobili- can go wherever they want to go and have their own
ty and modes of transport are implicated in many private space. The drawbacks are the inefficient use of
other activities, such as shopping, leisure, travelling, (fossil) fuel and related emissions, the need for space
and visiting family members and friends. Consequent- for infrastructure and parking lots, as well as an in-
ly, mobility has a large impact in terms of sustainabili- crease in traffic congestion, not to mention the related
ty – not only because of its environmental impact (fuel health impacts. Last but not least bicycles offer an en-
consumption and emissions), but also social aspects vironmentally sound alternative with the freedom of
(many people spend at least two hours in traffic), as choice to go where the user wants. However the use
well as the corresponding costs for fuel, infrastructure, of bicycles is limited to short distances, and its con-
and vehicles. According to a DEFRA study, for instance, venience depends very much on the weather condi-
the consumer behaviours and actions in the UK with tions. In short, none of the current mobility options
the highest environmental impact but the lowest rate offered can provide the user a perfect match between
of positive change (i.e. low take-up of alternative, low- planet aspects (i.e. low energy consumption and emis-
er-impact behaviours) involved personal transport3. sions), people aspects (i.e. convenience and safety),
and profit aspects (i.e. acceptable costs for infrastruc-
Citizens can choose from a wide range of mobility al- ture, vehicles, and service).
ternatives to reach their destination. In daily mobility
an individual has roughly three options: using collec- Taking this as a starting point, student teams from all
tive systems such as public transport, individual fuel- over the world investigated in more depth the current
powered modes of transport like cars, or individual people/planet/profit aspects of mobility systems and
human-powered modes of transport like bicycles or developed new alternative and challenging product-
walking. Each of these offers a range of positive and service systems. All entries did have one aspect in com-
negative aspects in transporting a person from A to B. mon: to take the bicycle as a starting point for the de-
Public transport is characterized by energy efficiency, velopment of a new SPSS. Bicycles use no fossil fuels
low initial investments for the user and – in the best and create no toxic emissions, need less space for rid-
circumstances – providing the opportunity to work or ing as well as parking (planet), are healthy (people) as
relax during travelling. The disadvantages are the well as are affordable for all target groups (profit). A
fixed routes and stops. Public transport users have to wide range of solutions was presented by the student
change their mode of transport often several times teams to overcome the current drawbacks, the barriers

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the Learning Network on Sustainability

to more widespread use of bicycles, and to identify SUSTAINABLE HEALTH/WELL-BEING


and exploit any key leverage points. Several issues SYSTEMS
were addressed by the solutions presented here:
Despite a wealth of ancient inherited folk wisdom in
Better

 connection and interaction between public cultures worldwide telling us otherwise, we are still in-
transport and bicycles; clined to believe that money can indeed buy us happi-
Providing services for maintenance and repair;

 ness, as we use monetary indicators to tell us about the
Including ICT technologies for identifying and un-

 health of our economies and therefore – in a logical
locking, finding directions, and protection against fallacy – the health and wellness of our societies. This
theft and vandalism; fallacy locks us into systems of unequal access: unequal
Public-use bicycle systems;

 access to money and capital also means unequal ac-
Increased infrastructure for bicycle lanes and tar-

 cess to basic healthcare as well as education, political
geted public lighting; decision-making, clean and safe environments, digni-
(Renewable) electric support in addition to the hu-

 fied living standards, and even community building.
man power. Vast inequalities do not support the stability of a soci-
ety; a robust, resilient community is made up of indi-
According to the United Nations Population Fund, the viduals and social networks that have the capability to
urban population in Africa and Asia will double be- build meaningful, healthy lives. And it is important to
tween 2000 and 20304, while in industrialized econo- recognize that capability and empowerment can be
mies the dominance of the private car has usually led designed into systems: designers have the ethical and
to urban sprawl and car-oriented lifestyles and infra- moral responsibility to ensure their work does not de-
structures. In all these contexts low-income and mar- grade the integrity of a strong community nor indi-
ginalized groups face the ever-increasing danger of viduals, and moreover to deliberately factor in elements
social exclusion on the basis of their mobility options. of non-materialistic well-being when considering how
At the same time those with more options tend to to satisfy “user needs”.
choose the path of least resistance, which usually en-
tails the greatest carbon emissions. The projects in Indicators and indices of well-being include the New
this volume show us a more promising future, where Economic Foundation’s Happy Planet Index and Na-
more sustainable choices become the most satisfying, tional Accounts of Well-being, the United Nations Hu-
to all stakeholders. man Development Index, the Calvert-Henderson
Quality of Life Indicators, and Gross National Happi-
ness as used in Bhutan. These indices are largely
based on qualitative, descriptive frameworks of hu-
man needs and capability such as Sen and Nuss-
baum’s Capability Approach, Erik Allardt’s Indicators

8
of Well-Being, Max-Neef’s list of Fundamental Human dealt with in a more direct service offering, but even
Needs, and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. These frame- there it has been acknowledged by many experts that
works generally acknowledge that both objective co-production of services is more desirable. Accord-
and subjective factors make up any assessment pro- ing to the NEF, for instance, co-production – sharing
cedure, as one individual can subjectively “feel happy” the delivery of public services between professionals
in conditions of abject poverty due to strong social and users – embraces into the system the very users
connections and family ties, while another suffers or stakeholders that are the target of the service, ex-
from social exclusion even as material conditions sup- ploiting their skills and facilitating their valued contri-
port an otherwise healthy lifestyle. Moreover, in larg- bution as opposed to regarding them as needy but
er societal contexts and comparisons, indicators such passive actors. When it comes to well-being, moreover,
as the NEF’s National Accounts of Well-being take what is needed is an enabling platform solution that
both personal well-being and social well-being into allows the stakeholders to build their own conditions
account. of wellness, according to their individual and collec-
tive competencies, know-how, and values – and sup-
The collection of projects on health and well-being in ported by a designerly approach to processes and
this volume displays the strengths and challenges in analysis. Only in this way can the solution become a
the task of designing a well-being-oriented Product- sustaining, regenerative, self-organizing ecosystem,
Service System. The lessons learned in each case are where aspirations and concepts of personal growth
not so easily generalizable and certainly not always are decoupled from materialistic, consumerist sym-
scalable: each local focus will have different problems bols.
to address and different socio-cultural patterns and
values that can serve as either opportunities or obsta-
cles. Generally speaking health-oriented issues can be

NOTES

1 Soumitri, G.V. and Srinivasan, A. (2003) “Sustainable Development: The Indian Perspective on PSS”. Proceedings, the IInd International Workshop on
Sustainable Consumption, the Society of Non Traditional Technology (SNIT) and National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
(AIST), Japan, Tokyo, pp. 66–71.
2 Tischner, U., and Kjaernes, U. (2007) “Sustainable consumption and production in the agriculture and food domain”, in Lahlou. S. and Emmert, S. (eds.)
Proceedings: SCP cases in the field of food, mobility and housing, Proceedings of the Sustainable Consumption Research Exchange, Paris, June 2007,
pp. 201-237. http://www.score-network.org/files//9594_Proceedings_worshop.07.pdf.
3 DEFRA (2008) A Framework for Pro-Environmental Behaviours (Report), London: Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. http://www.
score-network.org/files//22299_Framework_Report.pdf.
4 UNFPA – United Nations Population Fund (2007) State of World Population 2007: Unleashing the Potential of Urban Growth, United Nations Population
Fund, online: http://www.unfpa.org/swp/2007/presskit/pdf/sowp2007_eng.pdf.

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the Learning Network on Sustainability

INDEX OF PROJECTS

The Winners

1st prize: 2Gen Cooking Club 12


2nd prize: Windmee 14
3rd prize: POLImensa 16

Honourable Mentions

Carnot Restaurant 18
Local Integration Project for Srishti (LIPS) 20
Minimo 22
MumMyCare: Self Prenatal Care Kit 24
Pronto: the Collective Mobile Vendor 26
Self Producer 28
Sparks: Solar Bicycle Parking 30
Sydney Cycle Hub 32
Ufarm 34
Wormun-It: Rooftop Vermicomposting System 36

Promising Concepts

Be My Guest 38
B-SAFE Urban Bicycle Helmet Sharing System 40
Felice Cibo Club 42
GreenHigh 44
i-CO 46
La Mela Della Concordia 48
Replenish – Responsible Bottled Water Usage 50

11
Theme: Food on campus in Italy
1st PRIZE
2Gen Cooking Club
Junapon Klongklaw, Kittipat Rakbongkotkul, Piyanut Choongoen, Wipawee Angsuwatcharakorn, Wandee Wattanawisitsiri
KING MONGKUT’S INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LADKRABANG / THAILAND

New Organic restaurants in the Polimi Campus area (Milan, Italy) are difficult to
Existing
system
Sufficiency find and mostly offer more expensive food. We are proposing a cooking club
PSS
Average people 4.0
that offers students the facilities to learn cooking at school. Student representa-
Average planet 3.7 tives run the club, while Polimi provides cooking facilities based on a pay-per-
Average profit 3.3 use system (via a smart refrigerator system).
Average technology 3.0
  By inviting older local residents to teach students traditional and regional
food, we can establish a good relationship among students, the elderly, local
Balance
markets, and local organic farmers. Making arrangements by phone between
student and elderly club members also ensures that the older ones are fine and
Average people
in good health. This system helps Polimi students living away from home
Average planet (coming from different regions in Italy), who are yearning for traditional/
Average profit regional food currently difficult to find in Milan, to have the opportunity to
Average technology eat traditional, home-cooked food on a limited budget.
  Both students and elderly are living alone; thus they feel lonely, disconnected
Existing system New Sufficiency PSS
and isolated from society. We believe that cooking FOOD together can create
GOOD relationships and alleviate the loneliness of the two generations.
When comparing the overall balancing score between the existing and
the new SEP-PSS systems, the “Overall Balance” chart shows that the new
system has improved in People, Planet and Profit dimensions, even though
the Technology dimension is slightly lowered. As a whole, all four
dimensions are more balanced than the existing system.
KITCHEN  Kitchen for cooking club.

COMPONENTS The students and the elderly cook traditional


food together.

REFRIGERATOR  Each block of the


refrigerator can contain a raw material
plastic box per each member, who has
his/her own code to use and pay sepa-
rately. Any materials or food can be
kept cold for seven days, after which
any leftovers will be disposed of. If the
food has not yet expired, it will be
moved to the public refrigerator.

PACKAGING  This packaging is used


to contain food sold every Friday as
take-away.

12
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Service action 1 Service action 2 Service action 3 Service action 4 Service action 5 Service action 6
Association Contact company Contact farmer Contact elder Make order Bring the elder
for pay-per-use with farmer to university

LINE OF
INTERACTION

The students join The electric The students invite the The elderly members The orders are The older member is
together to apply to appliance company farmer to participate for are contacted about collected from contacted and
CAPTION be members of the is contacted about everyone’s advantage. menus and teaching members and the arrangements are
club. They contact the pay-per-use days and times. farmer is contacted made for someone to
the university. machine. by telephone. bring her to the club.
Service action 7 Service action 8 Service action 9 Service action 10 Service action 11 Service action 12
Deposit and check Teaching and Eating together Cleaning Elderly member back Notify and
your account activity to nursing home selling food

LINE OF
INTERACTION

The money is Learning about and The students and The tools are put away The student brings Traditional food is
CAPTION deposited in the teaching cooking the older teacher and the club is cleaned. the older member sold every Friday
bank before the traditional food. eat together at the back home along afternoon.
machine is used. table. with the leftovers.

SYSTEM MAP BENEFITS


FOR PEOPLE:
A"#B/&6+./5#,+/#/8,+/2+-#/8#,+/#
!"#$%&'#()*+#),-++(+./#01/2#3)-(+-45#%+)6+-"! ?"#@)-(+-45# • Improve social cohesion.
=+-(15518.#8.#5+C.,#&=#)#
:88*1.,#:%&'#).6#:88*1.,# !"#$"!
7"#$%&'#8-6+-5#()/+-1)%5#3-8(#3)-(+-45#%+)6+-"! Farmer
%+)6+-#
:8((&.1:)/+# • Empower/enhance local resources.
[leader]!
3):1%1D+5#3-8(#E.1;+-51/>"! 01/2#8/2+-##
3)-(+-5#1.#8-6+-##
• Enable responsible/sustainable consumption.
9"#$%&'#-+:+1;+5#3886#'8<+5#).6#=)>##(8.+>#/8#
3)-(+-45#%+)6+-"! /8#,)/2+-#).6#
38-(#/2+1-#80.#
• Integrate weak and marginalized such as the
Association! ,-8&="! elderly.
University!
Kitchen [University]!
AF"#B/&6+./#,8+5#/8#/2+# FOR THE PLANET:
.&-51.,#28(+#/8#=1:*#&=#+%6+-#
/8#:8(+#/2+#:%&'#*1/:2+."!
Farmer A!
N"#@)-(+-45#
• Toxicity reduction: organic agriculture.
%+)6+-#8-6+-5# • Transportation reduction: by combining orders,
-)0#()/+-1)%5#
3-8(#1.61;16&)%# raw materials can be collected and transported
A!"#H%6+-#/)*+#3886#
3)-(+-5"!
together.
'):*#/8#.&-51.,#
28(+#)M+-#:%)55"! • Waste reduction: no packaging disposal.
F"#$%&'#:8./):/5#+%+:/-1:)%#
)==%1).:+#:8(=).>##/8#1.5/)%%#
*1/:2+.#)==%1).:+5#&51.,#=)># Nursing Home!
Farmer B!
FOR PROFIT:
=+-#&5+#5>5/+("!
J"#$%&'#1.38-(5#+%6+-5#
G"#H):2#3)-(+-#
5+.65#-)0#
• Partnership/cooperation: local farmers form a
)'8&/#/2+#8'K+:D;+#).6#
(+/2868%8,>#83#/2+#
()/+-1)%5#/8# network of collaboration.
:%&'L#/2+.#1.;1/+#/2+(#/8#
'+:8(+#(+('+-5"!
3)-(+-45#%+)6+-"!
• Profitability/partnership: collaboration with
electrical appliance company brings them income
Electronic Company! in pay-per-use system.
AA"#B/&6+./5#'&>#5+)58.1.,#38-# AI"#@)-(+-45#%+)6+-#
:88*1.,#)/##%8:)%#5&=+-()-*+/"! Farmer C! 61;16+5#1.:8(+#=-8=+-%># FOR TECHNOLOGY:
• Appropriate technology: adopting the pay-per-
/8#1.61;16&)%#3)-(+-5"!

use system that already exists in Italian culture.


• Introducing EM (Effective Micro-Organism) which
Supermarket!
is suitable for local farms.

13
Theme: Mobility on campus in The Netherlands
2nd PRIZE
Windmee
Pei Xue, Wang Xinwei, Long Cunxin, Lin Musen, Wilco Prinsen
Academy of Arts & Design, Tsinghua University / China

Our mission: how to encourage staff members that live ten


or more kilometres away from TU Delft University (Delft,
Network System The Netherlands) to travel by bike to the campus.
  Our solution: supplying electric bikes alongside
conventional bikes in the university bike allowance (for the
target group only). Extra support for the electric bikes are a
fingerprint-secured parking space inside the campus
More Parking Space
including free charging, free ‘on-the-road’ and campus
Wind Energy support service for electric bikes during working days and
I AM HERE  .  .  .
an information system including a website, a smartphone
application and/or SMS service for the latest weather
forecast, energy charging/saving advice and improving
your carbon footprint statistics (which can be added as
a gadget to your online profiles).
Space for Charge
and Parking on
Campus

Mobility Repair Service

PROBLEM 2 STEP 1 STEP 3

PROBLEM 3

PROBLEM 1 STEP 2

Traffic jam. Waste time No parking space for the Worry about the weather Buy a bike on the Take it easy. Put an Park the bike on
on the road cars on the campus website, available for umbrella “on” the bike campus, not off campus
people of TU Delft

PROBLEM 5 PROBLEM 6 STEP 5

STEP 4 STEP 6
PROBLEM 4

Wait for a train/bus for Bike breaks down on the Can’t deal with heavy goods Use fingerprint to check in; Use your cellphone to Check how many points
quite a long time road, can’t get it repaired on campus the information will be sent log in to the website to you have earned, compare
right now to the website get your bike fixed with others, and connect
to your Facebook page to
share with friends
14
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Record details Transportation of Bring repair service Share and record
USER ROLE Standard parking space people and goods to your bike on the net
Service action 1 Service action 2 Service action 3 Service action 4

LINE OF INTERACTION

Scan fingerprint to log in. Short-distance travel and Get in touch with the Contact friends and get
Connect the battery to transport. maintenance contractors more information.
your own charging through the network
equipment. platform.

SYSTEM MAP
BENEFITS
Socio-ethical:
• Responsible and sustainable consumption:
the system makes choosing a bicycle easier.
• Empower/valorize local resources: the system
cooperates with local companies (such as the
electric bike manufacturer and the maintenance
service).
• Improve working conditions: increasing the
health of the staff members through more
exercise and improving access to offices.
Environmental:
• Transport reduction: the mode of personal
transport is preferable to a car.
• Resource reduction: a bike entails less material
and waste than a car and the maintenance
service will extend the products’ lifespan.
• Bio-compatibility: the electricity source is
wind- and solar-generated, and less campus
space is used for parking.
Economic:
• Added value for customers: cheaper to buy an
electric bike than a car. No petrol costs. Free
charging during working days and free
maintenance service.
• Added value for companies: more electric bicycles
are sold, and the energy company can improve
the balance between supply and demand.

15
Theme: Food on campus in Italy
3nd PRIZE
POLImensa
Gabriele Tempesta, YingYing Sheng, Andrea Valenti
Politecnico di Milano / Italy

POLImensa is a new campus canteen concept for the


Polytechnic of Milan that offers low-impact nutrition to
GENUINE INGREDIENTS
A POLITECNICO-BASED “ETHICAL students on a systemic level, with food supplied directly by
PURCHASE GROUP” SUPPLIES THE local organic farmers through a university-based ethical
CANTEEN WITH LOCAL FOODS FROM
ORGANIC FARMERS ON AVAILABILITY purchase group (EPG). The network includes appliance
AND SEASONAL BASIS manufacturers, energy companies, and solar panel manu-
facturers with the goal of saving electricity and encourag-
ing the use of renewable energy sources. Focus is also
“GRANNY COOKING”
THE EPG ASKS STUDENTS’ placed on waste reduction and “valorization”.
“GRANNIES” TO HELP TO CREATE   The concept operates through a fixed price payment
MENUS BY PROPOSING RECIPES
AND SHARING THEIR CULINARY system based on two weight ranges aimed at reducing the
EXPERTISE WITH CANTEEN amount of leftovers. Each recipe is labelled with a “sustain-
COOKS
ability score”, and higher scores are rewarded with
bonuses, thus encouraging more sustainable diets. Elderly
and retired people are invited to participate by proposing
RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION
MEALS ARE SERVED IN A BUFFET, traditional recipes based on the use of local ingredients,
WITH A FIXED PRICE FOR TWO in order to offer more authentic and healthy cooking.
WEIGHT “RANGES”. “MORE
SUSTAINABLE” CHOICES ARE
REWARDED WITH BONUSES

Canteen entrance and Blackboard showing menu Labels showing names and
“Polimi-style” logo and sustainability sources scores for each recipe

Posters about nutrition Receipt showing scores


and EPG activities awarded and total amount

16
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Agreements with equipment manufacturers and canteen managers POLI EPG launch and setup

1. The Politecnico pays a 2. The appliance manufac- 3. The solar panel 4. The canteen is operated 5. The university recruits 6. The EPG carefully selects
rental fee for appliances turer offers free manufacturer replaces by a private company that volunteers for the EPG from the suppliers and purchases
and solar panels according maintenance and pays only the panels for free when pays an “entry fee” and among students and their goods on a seasonal
to agreement with for grid electricity new technologies buys supplies only from teachers. and availability basis.
producers. consumption. become available. the EPG.

Elderly people’s involvement in canteen activities How the POLImensa system works

7. The EPG “recruits” elderly 8. The EPG invites students to 9. Recipes with the most 10. Meals are served in a 11. Payment is based on two 12. Each recipe has a
people from among vote for their favourite votes are taught to the buffet: students can weight ranges with fixed “sustainability score” that
students’ relatives, who will recipe online in order to canteen cooks by the choose freely, using a steel prices. Excess food is paid students can collect on
propose local recipes. involve them in the activity. elderly people. tray to carry and eat their separately. their “Poli-cards”, to get
food. rewards.

SYSTEM MAP
start

BENEFITS
Environmental:
• Supplying exclusively from local organic farmers/markets promotes local
economies, reduces transportation impact, and rewards those practising more
sustainable farming methods, thus eliminating impacts from “industrial”
processes.
• The EPG system bypasses the traditional supply chain, thus eliminating
several processes (and their impacts). Being campus-based, it also guarantees
reliability and transparency.
• The agreements create economic interest in designing energy-saving
appliances and more efficient solar panels.
• Support products’ lifespan is extended through the use of durable cutlery and
trays, and the offering of free maintenance/repair/upgrade services by the
manufacturers.
Socio-ethical:
• Students can enjoy healthy meals, are enabled towards more responsible
consumption, and rewarded when they choose more sustainable diets.
• Elderly people are actively involved by sharing their cooking expertise.
• Waste is valorized through the offering of excess food and supplies to charity
associations.

17
Theme: Food in the restaurant industry on university campuses
HONOURABLE MENTION
Carnot Restaurant
Atul Singh, Kiran Gangadharan
IIT Delhi / India

“Any new system to be introduced has to gradually phase


out the old system.”
  Our concept of “Carnot Restaurant” provides a frame-
NGO joins hands work that would gradually incentivize the drive for more
with Institute to Institute provides
start a pilot
Pilot ratings to restaurant sustainable restaurants and to create awareness among
project
Project users regarding food services.
  As the name suggests, this concept promotes the most
efficient restaurant that can be put into practice. Institutes
together with the industry would develop a body to design
Faith in the most sustainable restaurant (virtually) and present its
FOOD SYSTEM “I am a benefits. It would be used as a platform for industry,
contributor”
restaurants and designers to showcase their advances in
the future. It would also be used to create an attractive brand
name that encourages participation in the system.
  “Carnot Restaurant” would thus be positioned as a
Partnership with Partnership between
benchmark for a given time period. The rating system
manufacturer and packaging industry would be similar to the SDO (Sustainability Design-Ori-
restaurant and campus
restaurant enting) toolkit, meaning it would have certain criteria and
points allotted accordingly. By filling in the details of these
criteria, the user and the restaurateur can gain a clear
picture of where they stand and what needs to improve to
achieve the desired rating. The governing body would
award the final rating to the restaurants using the tool.

Carnot Restaurant

1 Star

2 Star

3 Star

4 Star

5 Star

18
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Solution Carnot Restaurant Tie-ups with industries Pilot project Students’ support Upgrading Trend shift

User/
organization
role Enthusiasm among Tie-ups with NGO and College together Students End users give feedback
students for a green industries to back the pilot with NGO forms a supporting the about the pilot project and
restaurant project, e.g. governing body to rated rate restaurants themselves,
supplying greener products design the whole restaurants promoting adoption of
and services rating system sustainable criteria

Line of
interaction The body provides the Thus the chain
knowledge database to of such
The body designs a the firms involved in restaurants
Carnot Restaurant and partnership for would start to
takes up a pilot project continuous improve- build up
for transformation ment in products and
services

SYSTEM MAP
BENEFITS
The system takes a highly holistic approach to the
problem. It does not encourage a specific
application of a product or service; rather it provides
all the players a direction to follow, which enhances
the possibilities of innovative solutions. It thereby
provides a strong framework for the development of
sustainable food services. It also establishes the
benchmark for a restaurant to reach.
  Consumers are well incorporated in the system
and are encouraged to be an active part of it. The
end user interacts directly with the rating system.
The solution also encourages manufacturers to
produce more energy-efficient and greener
products.

19
Theme: Health/well-being on campus in India
HONOURABLE MENTION
Local Integration Project for Srishti (LIPS)
Claudia Garduño, Kavita Gonsalves
Aalto University / Finland

LIPS is a platform that would provide the students with


safety and security they are lacking today. It is a three-year-
round “service” which aims at integrating the Srishtian not
only into the school but also within the local community
through appointed actors and learning projects.
  The students participate in projects to not only learn
from their surroundings but to also “give back” to their
neighbourhood through school initiatives.
  The proposal is to primarily build relationships between
Srishti and its local community. It is sustained by:
zzMaking the interaction part of the curriculum;

zzMaking use of the biggest asset that exists – human

resources;
Time is the capital here.
zz

SYSTEM LIFE OPTIMIZATION


4th year IT IS IMPORTANT TO
In comfort zone
CONSIDER THAT:
TRANSPORTATION/
3rd year TOXICITY DISTRIBUTION IF SRISHTI DOES NOT
REDUCTION REDUCTION
Growing HAVE TO BUILD A NEW
NOT A MAJOR indifferent
ISSUE CAMPUS, THERE WOULD
Self-actualization BE A MAJOR SAVING IN
   - CLASH WITH LOCAL COMMUNITY 1st year RESOURCES.
   WHO IS PERCEIVED TO BE CONSERVATIVE
Needs to create new
Esteem   - ISSUE OF RESPECTABILITY WITHIN LOCALS
social circles. Young IT IS ALSO LIKELY THAT IF
- NEW PLACE, NEW CULTURE! ISOLATION?
and energetic. Unaware THE LIVING CONDITION
Love/belonging of local environment.
RESOURCES
IN YELAH-ANKA IMPROVES,
- INABILITY TO ACCESS APPROPRIATE AUTHORITY FOR HELP CONSERVATION
Safety - THREAT/FEAR OF VIOLENCE OR DEGREE OF ABUSE WITHIN LOCALITY
2nd year REDUCTION MORE SRISHTI STUDENTS
Still learning BIOCOMPATIBILITY
about new area. WILL MOVE TO THE AREA,
NEEDS MET
Physiological Wants to create REDUCING THE NEED
change but does FOR TRANSPORTATION.
not know how. WASTE MINIMIZATION VALORIZATION

20
INTERACTION STORYBOARD

The intro workshop: LIPS I:


• helps the students to build relations. Tutors–assistant pair Introduction to design methodologies
• by having topics related to the neighbourhood, it encourages and Close interaction with the community
guides the new ones in their first exploration Contributing with choices for the neighbours

Meeting wellness team and INTRODUCTION WORKSHOP First exploration to the Welcome party for all students Introducing LIPS I: EXPLORING First weekly meeting with
student guardian •  All teams are formed by four neighbourhood (assisted) YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD retired neighbour (lasts for
students, from each academic year TOPIC: Design activities/ three months)
•  TOPIC: Find a way to throw a party products for retired individuals
without disturbing the neighbours

LIPS I hidden purpose:


Changing mindsets (neighbours about
Srishti)

Feeling homesick Talks to student guardian LIPS I Design process begins LIPS I Implementation LIPS I Final Presentation

BENEFITS Community

year 3: giving back to your neighbourhood

SYSTEM MAP Neighbourhood

Spreading
the word
local medical grocery local street local civic law
home neighbours industry clinic shop hawkers
NGOs school body enforcement
EXCHANGE

F5.PROJECT EXPENDiTURE
i21.SKILL

LiPS

Knowledge exchange
i18.LiPS STUDENT-COMMUNITY PROJECT

Students
F4.LIVING EXPENDITURE

Local Guardian(LG) SRISHTI


F1.DESIGN PROJECT
COLLABORATiON i19.HELPER New 2nd year 3rd year 4th year
i17.LOCAL INFORMATION TRANSFER 1st year
student
Interaction
investors
i20.PEDAGOGICAL SKILLS i19.ASSISTANT Local guardians in LIPS
2nd year
i19. LiPS SKILL EXCHANGE

student
i15.PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

i16.ORIENTATION AND
COMMUNITY SENSITIZATION
WORKSHOP community peace keepers
Members of local Grocery shop
Wellness team community forum owner
Neighbour
Student Guardian(SG)
F2.SCHOOL FEE 3rd year student
F3.ALLOWANCE Faculty
i19.PROJECT LEADER IN LiPS SKILL EXCHANGE
Parents
i18.LiPS STUDENT-COMMUNITY PROJECT

Community

21
Theme: Food on campus in Italy
HONOURABLE MENTION
Minimo
Kokaew Wongpichet, Pongpath Pongsupath, Penthida Ngammanewat, Muthita Torteeka, Sarinya Praserdsun
King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang / Thailand

Limited selections of food are available around the Polimi campus. Most restau-
rants offer low-quality, industrialized and highly processed food without
information on where the raw ingredients come from. Minimo Club offers
students healthy eating options where they pay for exactly the portion amount and
the quality they choose.
  Minimo has three options: students customize the portion and ingredients of
their meal at the Semi-Ready-to-Eat Bar; they choose their preferred ingredi-
ents and enjoy authentic meals freshly cooked on-site by retired chefs (e.g.
Mexican, Chinese, and Thai food); they can also buy a packaged meal made
from yesterday’s leftover ingredients – also healthy but cheaper and faster.
1. Raw materials from providers Variations in ingredients promote a diversity of dishes, and knowledge in cooking
recommended by members
2. Prepared materials skills can be preserved and passed on through the on-site cooking facilities.
3. Pay for as much as you eat   Students become part of Minimo as active ‘Momembers’. They make sugges-
(weighing)
4. On-site cooking tions about raw materials/ingredients at local shops near their Milan residences
and volunteer to pick them up on the way to attending classes at Polimi. This
system allows for a variety of best-quality ingredients directly delivered to
Minimo by the Momember, without additional transportation cost. Momem-
bers even enjoy a dividend if the Minimo club becomes profitable.

Easy to Food packaging Containers help


understand for carries a message customer to
all users about the evaluate the
concept right portion

22
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Minimo Café: materials delivery Minimo Café: scenario (stock-checking)

Students apply for Manager chooses Momembers deliver Momembers bring Momembers put materials Stock-keeper checks the
Momember position. material providers the materials. materials to Minimo Café. in boxes according to material boxes in the
and Momembers. colour codes. freezer.

Minimo Café: scenario (Semi-Ready-to-Eat) Minimo Café: scenario (Ready-to-Eat) Minimo Café: scenario (on-site cooking)

Customers choose Chefs reheat the food. Customers choose the meals and pay. Customers choose Chefs cook on-site.
the ingredients. the ingredients.

BENEFITS
FOR PEOPLE:
Possible to try various kinds of food. Possible to
SYSTEM MAP 31/8/10!
choose the appropriate portion size. Can get to
know sources of raw materials/ingredients. Better
health and gaining knowledge of nutrition.
@"#A+&6#0.+&*1-.*#'(&-=#0(#9(5+9#/.(:%;-.*##
-:-.=#B-;&-*;+=#+&;#C.%;+="! FOR PLANET:
1!
Preserving national dishes. Creating jobs for
!"#$! unemployed people. New learning centre for food
J"#$('-'3-.*#3F=# "%%&'#("#() management. Disseminating traditional food to
K&,.-;%-&0*#1.('#9(5+9#
/.(:%;-.*#+&;#-L57+&,-## "%%&'#("#() community. Encouraging support among the
%&1(#(&#/.%5%&,#+&;# G"#$('-'3-.*#,-0#;%:%;-&;*#1.('#'%&%'("!
H"#I55(F&0+&0#
0.+&*1-.*#'(&-=#
community. Reducing food waste.
*-+*(&+9#1((;!
MO-MEMBER!
0(#9(5+9#/.(:%;-.*)##
3+&6#+55(F&0*"!
FOR PROFIT:
>"#?0(56#6--/-.#.-'%&;*##
$('-'3-.*#0(#5(99-50##
Increase revenue and provide a more stable income.
START! !"#$%&%'()*#'+&+,-.#/(*0*#%&1(# %&,.-;%-&0*#1.('#9(5+9## Promoting the store through connection with Minimo.
(&#2-3*%0-#+4-.#*0(56#6--/-.*# /.(:%;-.*#:%+#*'*"!
8"#$%&%'()*#'+&+,-.# ! #57-56#'%&%'()*#*0(56"!
57((*-*#9(5+9#/.(:%;-.*"!
))))))))))))))%&&$*) Balance

D"#E((6*#F*-#%&,.-;%-&0*# Average people


LOCAL PROVIDER! 01213456)0"#"7+-*) *(&%$)$++,+-! 1(.#5((6%&,#! $.(%/+#)
Average planet

MOMEMBER! Average profit


<"#$('-'3-.*#3.%&,#%&,.-;%-&0*#
2%07#07-'#(&#07-#2+=#0(#*57((9"! Average technology

Existing system New Sufficiency PSS


0!

Contributor: K.Wongpichet, P.Pongsupath, P.Ngammanewat, M.Torteeka, S.Praserdsun!


Bangkok Pilot: Design for Su"ciency Economy/ S.Fusakul, P. Siridej, P. Rujikietkumjorn, D. Chaisiri!
King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang / THAILAND 23
Theme: Health/well-being in remote Australia
HONOURABLE MENTION
MumMyCare: Self Prenatal Care Kit
Ronald Turinuddin, Raymond Vuong, Joseph Louis Tan, Phillip Serna, Joshua Cope-Summerfield
University of New South Wales / Australia

Pregnancy in remote Australia is a difficult situation, where many are forced


to leave their families or require long travelling times to receive medical aid.
Moreover, these situations are worsened when the purpose of their prenatal
care visit is just for a few quick tests.
  The design of the MumMyCare loan system is to minimize travelling times
and the risks of complications for pregnant mothers while visiting the doctor.
By incorporating products already available in the market, MumMyCare gives
pregnant mothers a sense of security and convenience during their pregnancy
period through regular interaction with their doctors and self-testing on their
medical health. Test results are sent via the products’ Bluetooth capabilities to
the patient’s computer, and through a government-funded broadband scheme
to their doctors.
  The products in the kit are a scale, thermometer, portable ultrasound, blood
pressure, blood glucose and a urine test. These are the prenatal tests that allow
patients to do it themselves with the guidance of doctors through an online
video conference. This system reduces product waste through its product
attachment with its users.

24
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Rural expectant mother
notifies authorities about her
pregnancy and provides
information required to
receive MumMyCare kit. Travels to the closest
town with a general
practitioner.

Government Health Division


allocates and responds to
customers living in rural Australia.

Expectant mother
arrives at local general
practitioner for the first From the comfort of home, After baby is born,
required doctor’s visit. she will use the supplied MumMyCare kit is
She is able to pick up equipment to monitor sent back to the
MumMyCare kit. her baby’s progress and government body,
gather data and samples where it is sterilized
to be sent to the doctor and can be reused by a
General practitioner via Internet and video new rural expectant
trains expectant conferencing. mother.
mother on how to use
supplied equipment.

SYSTEM MAP BENEFITS


Environmental
• The usage of MumMyCare reduces transportation
by minimizing travel rates of medical visits which
leads to a reduction in carbon emissions.
• The use of resources is heavily reduced, because
the product is reused so fewer products are
manufactured.
• Product waste is minimized because of reduction
of purchase and also wastes from the hospital are
reduced.
Socio-ethical
• MumMyCare will help to reduce overcrowding in
hospital, staff workload and increase the
efficiency of Occupational Health and Safety.
• It will provide greater equality to the remote
Australian public by breaking the barrier of time
and distance in receiving medical treatment.
Economic
• There are opportunities for partnership,
sponsorship and cooperation between
businesses, which in turn will provide a strong
market position.
• Human reproduction will never cease and people
will continue to live on rural properties, meaning
our product will always have a purpose. The product
maintains and funds itself through constant use.

25
Theme: Food on campus in Italy
HONOURABLE MENTION
Pronto: the Collective Mobile Vendor
Napawan Deewajee, Piyapat Sakdaprayoon, Sarawut Junnoi, Orapan Watjanasathienkul, Itsaraporn Suvachart
King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang / Thailand

Most restaurants are located far from Polimi classes resulting in students
developing a bad habit of eating while walking in order to get to lectures on
time. In addition, due to limited time and budget, students do not have many
food options.
  This concept offers students the opportunity to consume healthier foods
from Pronto, a collective Mobile Vendor that delivers food from local favourite
Pronto is the collective Mobile Vendor shops and installs them in the Mobile Vendor modules. It lessens the distance
that truly delivers higher quality of life and walking time to the restaurants, but provides healthier options and the
to Polimi students
amount students want to eat.
  The Pronto car arrives at several locations and releases trailer modules that sell
food to students at each location. Students use an ID card as payment at the
Mobile Vendor.
  Pronto offers part-time jobs for students who join the project, giving them a
chance to generate some income while studying on campus. Food shops that
join Pronto agree to use fresh produce from certified organic farms selected by
Pronto. With this new system, good healthy food is on the move; gradually,
students will change their eating habits – eating healthier food slowly without
haste.

MENU WITH IMAGES AND PRICE

HEATING SHELF
DIGITAL MENU
KETCHUP BOTTLE
CASHIER
STORYTELLER
GRAPHIC

FOODS DISPLAY
BACK DOOR

26
INTERACTION STORYBOARD

Pronto members consult with The members give information to The members give information to The design of the Mobile Vendor is Mobile Vendor gets the food from
professor about the Mobile Vendor the shop owners about the Mobile the local farmers about the Pronto a collaboration between 3 faculties the shops
project. Vendor project. project (the use of organic produce). in Politecnico Bovisa Campus.

Mobile Vendor’s staff take the food Staff arrange the food in the mobile Students standing in line in front When selling, Employee A takes order from With the existing ID card
into the car before selling time. vender then bring them to sell in the of the Mobile Vendor. Menu student and checks bill. Employee B prepares you can check balance
campus. contain 4 options per day. the food and gives it to the student. and refill cash value at the
refill machine.

SYSTEM MAP

BENEFITS
Environmental:
The electric Mobile Vendor creates no pollution.
It can be recharged. It has two modules but one is
used to transport.
Health and convenience:
Food shops make cheap but good-quality food with
fresh produce from local farmers. They have an
expanded marketing channel by being able to sell
on campus through the Mobile Vendor.
  Students have more eating options and they do
not have to rush or eat while walking.
Social:
Pronto helps strengthen the local farmer commu-
nity. Local farmers have a better supporting market
and a chance to generate more income.
Knowledge and Technology:
The system provides a collaboration project
between three faculties (Architecture, Design and
Engineering), sharing knowledge about working
space and ergonomics, car structure and technology.

27
Theme: Food on campus in India
HONOURABLE MENTION
Self Producer
Maria Rodilla, Eloy Martinez
Politecnico di Milano / Italy

The main idea is to achieve self-sufficiency with the


self-production of vegetables using “workers’ self-manage-
ment”. Nonetheless, we retain the initial relationships with
local farmers to buy rice and wheat, preserving their jobs.
  Workers’ self-management is a form of workplace
decision-making in which the employees themselves agree
on choices instead of the traditional supervisor telling
workers what to do, how to do it and where to do it.
  Cultivation would be established in free zones around
the different residential areas. The fields would be for local
farmers’ use, thus creating jobs for the local population.
  Organic wastes would form the raw materials for pro-
cesses creating biogas and fertilizer. The gas is sold as an
entire service not just a product.
  The system enables neighbourhood social integration,
creating relationships between students and the world of
agriculture through apprenticeships, practical classes, etc.
  As an interesting initiative to improve relations, an
outdoor canteen is proposed as a meeting point for students,
respecting and encouraging cultural identities and diversi-
ties, and the establishment of a weekly market where
Canteens are open
External canteen as a social
meeting point
students will be able to buy products from local farmers
continuously
Students democratically and others from the city.
decide on menus

Learn how to grow Students can buy products


Create a new relationship with from local farmers and city
farmers

28
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Students Students eat
and farmers in the hostel
working canteen
together
HARVEST CANTEEN WASTE

Fertilizer made Delivering Farmers’


from biogas vegetables waste
process to the
kitchens
ORGANIC FERTILIZER HARVEST DELIVERY WASTE

The food is
cooked in
the hostel
GAS DELIVERY COOK DELIVERY
kitchen COOK ORGANIC WASTE

Biogas The IOC Organic


made from delivers waste
organic gas to the collection
waste kitchen
BIOGAS INDIAN OIL COMPANY GAS DELIVERY ORGANIC WASTE

SYSTEM MAP
BENEFITS
Biogas:
A gas produced by the biological breakdown of
organic matter in the absence of oxygen. Biogas
originates from biogenic material and is a type of
biofuel.
Collaborative learning:
With the students’ participation in apprenticeships,
practical classes, volunteer work, etc. in a close
relation with the farmers. The pedagogic methodol-
ogy used is called “Collaborative Learning”.
Collaborative Learning is a situation in which two or
more people attempt to learn something together.
External Canteen:
To improve social cohesion, though in a traditional
way, respecting and encouraging cultural identities
and diversities. Using natural, local, and traditional
materials for building.
Weekly Market:
Where students and citizens can find quality organic
products; at the same time the farmers and local
vendors can sell their products.

29
Theme: Mobility on campus in China
HONOURABLE MENTION
Sparks: Solar Bicycle Parking
Heleen Buijs, Julie Louwman, Nelliene Molenaar, Minyou Rek
Delft University of Technology / The Netherlands

USING SOLAR ENERGY Using the big empty spaces used for
Approximately 30,000 students use a bicycle to get
bicycle storage to generate power
with solar panels and solar energy
around the campus of Tsinghua University in Beijing each
day. However, when they reach their destination, they park
their bike on an open surface in front of the building. This
TWO-STOREY SUSTAINABLE
BICYCLE STORAGE STREET LIGHTING leads to huge, messy areas of bicycles. Bikes are easily
damaged when rows of bikes fall down.
  We propose placing two-storey bicycle racks by busy
buildings. These racks will maximize the use of the
available parking space, give the campus a neater look and
protect the bikes that are parked.
  The protection of the bikes will be increased by a roof-
cover which will shield them from rain and sunshine.
Providing students at
Tsinghua University
These roofs will be covered with solar panels to generate
with good bike
storage facilities Using the
energy to power the street lighting on the campus. To
Increasing the
amount of space by
generated power
for street lighting
help the financing of this plan and increase awareness the
using multi-storey
bicycle storage
on campus
empty sides of the racks will be used for advertising.
  All in all value is created through a combination of
product quality + service quality + image.
AN EFFICIENT WAY TO STORE YOUR BIKE zzHigh product quality: use of lightweight, recycled

aluminium;
zzHigh service quality for students: easy bike parking,

easy bike finding, extended bike lifetime (sheltered


from weather);
zzGood image for the campus: sustainable, orderly

appearance, towards a self-sustaining energy system.

30
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
SYSTEM ROLE

1. Students go to the faculty by bike 2. Store the bike easily in the “cell” 3. G
 o back home by bike. The streets are
lit with energy generated by the cell
UNIVERSITY MANAGEMENT

CENTRAL ENERGY
USER ROLE

RESOURCE

Management is happy with the space Solar energy from the sun is converted into electricity
and neat look of the campus by the cell and used by the university

SYSTEM MAP

BENEFITS
Environmental benefits:
• Conservation and resource reduction is achieved.
Energy is needed to build the system, but once
running only sustainable energy is generated.
Socio-ethical benefits:
• Improved equity and justice in relation to
stakeholders is addressed.
The university is interested in making bike parking
areas more orderly. The image of the university will
also improve because of the sustainable system.
Economic benefits:
• Added value for users and a long-term business
development reducing risk.
The solar bike parking provides great value for the
users and the university, and with time energy is
generated and money saved.

31
Theme: Mobility in urban Australia
HONOURABLE MENTION
Sydney Cycle Hub
Hollie Baigent, Jeff Hunt, Tom Wilson, James Turnbull
University of New South Wales / Australia

A proposed initiative for Sydney councils, Sydney Cycle Hub is a product-serv-


ice system designed to make cycling a safer, more appealing and accepted form
of transport. EQUIPPED

  The system features a network of “hubs” powered by solar and green power SAFETY. COMFORT. CONVENIENCE TRAFFIC
UPDATES
energy. In accordance with an existing government initiative known as “Bike BIKE BUS WEATHER
Bus”, the hubs act as “bus stops”, enabling commuters to meet and travel CBD: HOW TO GET
THERE
AND TIME
together between the city and its outer suburbs. The Sydney Cycle Hub further
breaks down social and physical barriers by providing a free automatic pump
service and puncture gel to assist cyclists, in particular those of lower socio-
economic class or lesser stature.
  The product features include:
zzInterface software MAINTENANCE & REPAIR

zzHow to maintain your bicycle (pump and puncture)


PUNCTURE GEL
zzCycle path maps in CBD and outer suburbs in 5–10 km radius AIR PUMP
zzBike Bus schedule

zzWeather and time

zzCycle traffic updates

zzAir pump with adjustable PSI settings

zzPuncture sealant gel (inserted into the tyre)

PROPOSED LOCATIONS LEGEND


THE SYSTEM INCORPORATES
SYDNEY CYCLE HUB
SOLAR POWER AS ONE OF ITS SERVICE POINTS
ENERGY SOURCES, REDUCING SYDNEY CENTRAL
ENHANCING USER INTERACTION RELIANCE ON FOSSIL FUELS. BUSINESS DISTRICT
AND ABILITY TO NAVIGATE SYSTEM
MENUS, THE CAPACITIVE TOUCH
SCREEN IS ALSO VERSATILE AND
WEATHERPROOF.

TWO HOSES EQUIPPED WITH BICYCLE


TYRE VALVES PROVIDE THE AIR AND
PUNCTURE SEALANT FOR TYRES. ALL
INTERACTIONS AND PSI SETTINGS ARE
DONE THROUGH THE MAIN SCREEN,
EASING THE FLOW OF USE.

32
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Sydney bicycle
commuters

1. Cyclist registers 2. Sydney initiative sends via mail 3. Cyclist accesses air pump and 4. Cyclist checks updates/CBD 5. Cyclist joins Bike Bus to ride
online. cyclists’ swipe access card to “Hub”. “Slime” puncture gel. cycle maps/next Bike Bus. home/around CBD with commuters.
Sydney councils

Machine and system Sydney council initiative and sponsors


maintenance acknowledge feedbacks from users.

SYSTEM MAP

BENEFITS
Environmental Benefits:
• Utilizes green power energy, assisted by solar
technologies.
• Reduces the need for people to use cars and
hence reduces automotive pollution.
• Extends the life of bicycle tubes that have been
punctured, reducing their effect on landfill.
Socio-ethical Benefits:
• Creates jobs in the field of maintenance and
construction of unit.
• Made available to all cultures and allows
financially disadvantaged an alternative system
of transportation.
• Promotes use of renewable energies and
facilitates sustainable transport options among
community.
• Educates people about repairs and maintenance;
makes people feel more confident riding.
• Promotes riding as a form of exercise.

33
Theme: Food on campus in Thailand
HONOURABLE MENTION
Ufarm
Sérgio Cameira, Yvonne Chua, Elisabetta Stacchiotti, Kim Ong Tan
Politecnico di Milano / Italy

Ufarm is an innovative way to pro­


mote the diffusion of organic food
and to promote healthier, sustainable
lifestyles in the King Mongkut’s
Institute of Technology Ladkrabang.
  The project is a 0 km food system
that involves the Faculty of Agricul-
ture and unemployed farmers.
Together, they foster the culture of
organic plantation on unused campus
land space.
  Crops are grown on campus and
are channelled directly into the
university canteen, cutting costs from
transport and middlemen mark-ups –
and offering tastier and healthier food
WORKING TO BENEFIT
THE ENVIRONMENT
BETTER CANTEEN options to the university.
CONDITIONS
  A personal card supports the
Ufarm initiative by improving the
efficiency and time management of
the university canteen.
  All payments in the canteen are
made electronically using this card.
Students can volunteer to help
cultivate crops and can recharge their
card value using the Ufarm digital
EARNING POINTS EATING HEALTHY, platform. They are rewarded with
THROUGH WORK GOOD FOOD
credit points whenever they help
farming and when they purchase
organic food from the canteen. These
points can be used to redeem more
organic food from the same canteen.
  As an alternative energy source, solar
panels can be set up where possible
on the campus. Sponsorships can come
from public or private organizations
supporting this sustainable cause.

34
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
HOW TO GET THE CARD? HOW TO RECHARGE IT? HOW TO USE IT?
USER ROLE

Collecting the student card Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Using the card to pay at the
from the university offices. Recharge the card with money Work in the Ufarm to earn Buy organic food in the canteen individual stalls with money or
in the machines. points. to earn points. accumulated points.
SYSTEM ROLE

In the university vegetable The school canteen gets The canteen promotes food Food waste is turned into
garden farmers and students products from the university cooked with organic products, organic fertilizer for the Ufarm
cultivate organic vegetables. garden, and the rest from the selling it at the same price. fields.
local market.

SYSTEM MAP BENEFITS


Environmental:
• Ufarm improves the management of the canteen
and consolidates the product life cycle (of food)
into the campus.
• Use of renewable energy, reduction of transport
and packaging.
• Organic farming minimizes the use of pesticides.
• Minimization of the waste, using part of it as an
organic fertilizer.
Socio-ethical:
• Ufarm is in line with the “Sufficiency Economy”
practice.
• Ufarm offers employment opportunities and
provides organic food to students on campus at
affordable prices.
• The user is involved in the production process,
and also informed about a healthier diet and
about organic farming.

35
Theme: Health/well-being for apartment city dwellers
HONOURABLE MENTION
Rooftop Vermicomposting System
Jessica Tong, Jennifer Rondolo, Mina Chung, Lyvia Alam, Josephine Kim
University of New South Wales / Australia

The Wormun-it system is a modular vermicomposting system that can be


implemented in apartment unit buildings of varying sizes. It allows tenants of
apartment buildings to dispose of their food waste responsibly, encouraging
users to recycle their food waste through a collective effort. The more effort the
tenants put into the vermicomposting, the more they would reap the benefits
of the rooftop vegetable garden. This system targets apartment residents (the
highest producers of food waste) with the goal of reducing the amount of food
waste that ends up in landfills. The system includes an ambient lounging or
dining area amongst the plants and gardens where apartment residents can have
an outdoor escape area to relax and mingle with their neighbours. It provides a
simple means for users to reduce their carbon footprint while providing them
with the benefits of an improved lifestyle. Rainwater is used to clean the bins,
which then feeds the vermicomposting beds and its worms. Vermicomposting
is used to process the waste, which consists of composting worms, which travel
between different levels to process the waste, producing compost “tea”, which is
used to fertilize the garden beds.

Open lid Tip food waste Internal jetsprays clean bin


into chute and waste into the Wormun-it

Press to trigger Twist to


cleaning spin chute

36
INTERACTION STORYBOARD

SYSTEM MAP
BENEFITS
Environmental:
The Wormun-it System combats the problem of food
waste accumulation in landfills by offering a
completely natural solution through vermicompost-
ing. The reuse of food means that there is a
closed-loop cycle where food waste enables the
production of food.
Socio-ethical:
Wormun-it promotes the recycling of food waste
while also educating the users about the amount of
food waste they produce in the effort to help them
reduce it. Meanwhile the rooftop garden provides a
place for socialization amongst the residents.
Economic:
There is a long-term threat to the management of
household waste which ends up in landfills.
Currently, there are no systems that deal with this
problem in city apartments, which provides a strong
market opportunity for this system. It provides an
opportunity for residents to save money in the
purchase of fresh vegetables as they are provided by
the system.

37
Theme: Mobility on campus in China
PROMISING CONCEPT
Be My Guest
Marloes van Driel, Marjolein Hartog, Tine Lavrysen, Rob Boon
Delft University of Technology / The Netherlands

The University of Tsinghua is visited by 7,000 guests a day. These guests arrive at
the main gates and move around the 4,000,000 m2 campus by foot. A bike rental
service could enable them to get around the campus faster, but it should suit the
status of the guests, who are part of the top management of Chinese companies.
That is why Be My Guest is proposed.
  Be My Guest is a rental system with personalized electric mopeds that can be
used with reusable personal cards. The rental centre functions as an informa-
tion centre about the campus and will help guests to choose the fastest route
to their destination. The electric mopeds can be charged with rooftop wind
turbines at every main building on the campus.
  This service could also be offered to the professors of the Tsinghua Univer-
sity. About 1,250 professors travel to the University by car, because the public
transport system is not well connected to the bus that drives around the
campus. Be My Guest could be an incentive for the professors who go by car
to use public transport instead.
Guest destination area
Student living area
Professors’ living area Subway station
Restaurant Wind turbines (rooftops)
Main gate Bike rental centre

Eco-costs/value ratio

Profit
Retail
Emissions Tax
Marketing
Distribution
Labour Convenience
Labour

Assembly Status
Depreciation Depreciation
Components
Energy Service
Energy

Materials Product
Materials

Eco-costs Costs Value

38
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
GUEST

A university staff The guest arrives at 1. The guest 3. The guest receives 4. The moped is While the guest After the meeting 5. The guest pays
member reserves a the subway station supplies personal the personal card charged at has his meetings, the moped is ready for the time of
moped online for a and makes his way information to (which also serves to charging points the moped is to ride to another use of the
guest he has invited. to the rental point rent a moped at (un)lock the moped) on the campus. charged at the place on campus or moped.
outside. the rental point. and a moped. charging point. the rental point.
SERVICE MANAGER

A rental point staff 2. A rental point staff The charging points Maintenance The moped
member prepares member supplies are connected to the employees are receives a small
route information tailored route power grid which available to fix any check-up and will
for reservations information and a receives electricity problems with the be fully charged.
personal card. from wind turbines. moped.

Socio-ethical dimension
BENEFITS Health and safety

Customer benefits Working conditions/employment

Current situation
SYSTEM MAP Cultural diversity/
Stakeholder
benefits/
(walking)
Be My Guest concept
social values participants

Environmental dimension
Resource life
extension

System life optimization

Current situation
(walking)
Conservation Mobility reduction Be My Guest concept

Resource reduction

Economic dimension
Partnership

Competitiveness Long-term business

Current situation
(walking)
Be My Guest concept
Added value Added value
companies customers

39
Theme: Mobility in urban Australia
PROMISING CONCEPT
B-SAFE Urban Bicycle Helmet Sharing System
Sean Ying Kit Lee, Lisa Li, Wendy Tan, Huon Lui
University of New South Wales / Australia

Bicycle-sharing systems provide an affordable and easily accessible commuting


alternative for short-distance trips within the city to reduce the use of automo-
biles. The benefits of bicycle sharing include reduced congestion on public
transport, traffic and roads, lower greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution,
Reduction of Traffic & and reduced road accidents. Furthermore, bicycle-sharing systems enhance the
Congestion well-being of individuals with associated health benefits from cycling.
Less Pollution
  Despite the benefits, the major barrier for the implementation of a bicycle-
sharing system is safety. To enhance the safety of cycling, bicycle helmets are
mandatory in Australia. Therefore, users are discouraged from cycling on roads
shared with cars and congested traffic, limiting travel distances and transport
Provide Protection between destinations. Furthermore, hygiene issues are raised as the system is
Provide Convenience of Commuting
based on sharing.
  The central concept of the B-SAFE system is to provide a safe and hygienic
solution to users and provide a comfortable adoption of a bicycle-sharing
system with the provision of bicycle helmet rental.
Urban Bicycle Helmet Sharing System
Satisfaction Offering Diagram

Integral in-moulding shell


construction:
Polycarbonate on all the
external surfaces of the helmet
to reinforce the helmet and
increase its longevity.
  Revolutionary new genera-
tion of “morpho-gel” pads allow
the head to stay cool, due to
the natural capacity of the gel
to cool when in contact with
the head, to dispel the sweat
and perfectly fit the shape of
the skull.

Adjustable nylon straps:


Ultra-light and resistant
material that guarantees safety,
comfort and breathability.

Adult universal fit sizes


Universal = 54–61 cm
Universal Women’s = 50–57 cm

40
INTERACTION STORYBOARD

Register online to be a Scan membership card for existing Proceed to the back of the station to Enjoy your ride without Return your bicycle and helmet
member of B-SAFE to member and credit card for collected rented items and clean helmet having to worry about at any B-SAFE station.
receive membership card non-members. Select a bicycle and with disposable sanitized wipes. Yellow light helmet mandatory
and discount benefits. Make helmet from the screen and collect a on number display indicates selection and requirements for cycling.
payments via credit card. packet of disposable sanitized wipes red light indicates prebooked by other user.
from the slot.

SYSTEM MAP
An employee is responsible for the maintenance
of the bicycles, helmets, machine interface, and
replenishing of disposable sanitized wipes to
ensure safety & hygiene for users.

BENEFITS
Environmental:
Lower greenhouse gas emissions in commuting;
reduce the use of automobiles.
Increase energy efficiency in urban transportation as
the product entails lower use of fossil fuels and very
little waste is generated over the product’s life cycle;
hence, reduction in the use of natural resources.
Socio-ethical:
The product breaks the barrier of safe urban
cycling issues converting motorized trips to
non-motorized trips, and counteracts many health
risks associated with sedentary lifestyles, which
includes obesity and cardiovascular diseases, thus
providing a comfortable adoption of the system
and enhances the well-being of the user.
Registration is done online, and members of B-Safe Urban Bicycle Sharing System will receive privileges such as discounts on Economic:
rentals or a rewards programme, to encourage people to adopt the system. Non-members such as tourists may use their The cost of building and maintaining infrastructure
credit card for rentals at the station. A number of bicycles and helmets are made available for shared use to individuals who for the system is minimal compared to an
do not own a bicycle or helmet, complying with mandatory bicycle helmet requirements. A packet of disposable sanitized automobile infrastructure; thus, the system can
wipes will be dispensed from the B-SAFE station upon each helmet rental, and both bicycles and helmets are maintained and
cleaned on a daily basis which will ensure safety and provide hygienic assurance to the user. As the system is designed for obviate large capital investments for new roads or
short trips, long hours’ usage will be slightly expensive. If the rented items are not returned after 24 hours, a mobile SMS and public transit infrastructure and expenditures on
email reminder will be sent to the user. maintenance of existing infrastructures.

41
Theme: Food on campus in Italy
PROMISING CONCEPT
Felice Cibo Club
Wanwisa Sripinij, Tanawat Pongsapas, Pai Piwla-or, Kwanruthai Wongrattanakarn, Nuttaman Dhanesnitaya
King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang / Thailand

Within the Polimi campus, biological food waste is increasing as the food
Merchandise Stationery
Noticeboards portions served are usually more than what students need. Furthermore,
Products
expiring, “ugly looking” or visually unappealing fruits and vegetables are often
ignored by customers and discarded by shops causing more daily food waste.
Fridge At the same time, there is no facility available that manages bio-waste.
  Felice Cibo Club is one solution for reducing biological food waste. We
collect “unwanted” raw materials from participating local supermarkets and
shops and use food preservation processes to turn them into new (added
value) quality products such as preserved fruit, jam, etc. The “real food waste”
goes through a fermentation process and becomes cooking gas and agricultural
fertilizer for domestic farms (e.g. EM, Effective Micro-organism products).
  Felice Cibo instils knowledge and concern about natural resources/consump-
tion and improves the extent of the material usage. Members share knowledge
Ingredients Multipurpose
Stoves Sinks furniture at the workshop and pass it on to family or friends. Though their participation
people gradually become aware of the true value of food while building
community living.

FELICE CIBO CART

You can create your own menu


and sharing recipe.

WE NEED LOW GRADE FRUITS AND


VEGETABLES: PLEASE DONATE.

42
INTERACTION STORYBOARD

Students get together to establish Club contacts University to get Club contacts electrical appliance Club’s secretary contacts Club’s workers collect materials
Felice Cibo Club. permission for setting up the club, company to install kitchen. supermarkets and local shops to from the supermarkets and local
cooking facilities and eating area. supply raw materials for the club. shops.

Member of Felice Cibo can take Other students purchase Food preservation, for example: The “real’ food waste” goes through fermentation process and
preserved food home. preserved food during lunchtime. making jam, preserved fruits, and becomes cooking gas and agricultural fertilizer for domestic
lunch meal. farms (e.g. EM Effective Micro-organism product).

SYSTEM MAP BENEFITS


FOR PLANET:
• System optimization: reduce the process of waste
separation and save energy.
• Waste reduction: encourage people in local area
to separate food waste.
• Resource reduction: use the heat generated by
EM gas.
FOR PEOPLE:
• Enable responsible consumption: offer various
kinds of food to students all year round.
• Human development: encourage students to get
a hands-on experience in preserving food.
• Favour social cohesion: help students realize the
value of food. Tighten connection between
student member and community.
• Knowledge sharing: teach students how to
preserve food.
FOR PROFIT:
• Profitability: make profit for the club.
FOR TECHNOLOGY:
• Knowledge sharing: apply local wisdom in food
preservation.

43
Theme: Health/well-being on campus in Finland
PROMISING CONCEPT
GreenHigh
Bharath Nandan, Coral Hartman, Huda Jaffer, Madhurya Balan, Ragini Ramanathan
Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology / India

In order to improve the health and wellness of TaiK (now Aalto University
School of Art and Design) students, we propose an on-campus greenhouse café.
“GreenHigh”, which will be situated on the terrace of the TaiK building, inte-
grates sustainable systems and wellness factors to provide the students with a
holistic experience. Profits from GreenHigh produce contribute to the mainte-
nance of the café. Organic waste compost is used in the greenhouse and excess
compost sold to local organic farmers. We also propose collaboration with the
agricultural students in Helsinki, for advice and offering them experiment
space.
  Services of the café include bringing the students closer to nature, enhanced
comfortable lighting, providing a warm environment, healthy food and drinks
(which the students themselves may grow and make), and an alternative peace-
ful ideating space. A symbolic natural structure, a rainwater harvesting water
pillow, low-impact infrared heating system, natural lighting, use of natural
materials for furniture and an aquarium bar counter are some of the features
that contribute to the ecological experience. This space will inspire, rejuvenate,
and invigorate the students of TaiK in many ways.

44
INTERACTION STORYBOARD

Oh no! Kipsari is full again! Ah man! What do I do now? Hey, man! You wanna come and check out GreenHigh?
Oh, right! The greenhouse café! Yeah, OK!

Hey, this is a nice place! It’s so warm Cheers!


and green!

SYSTEM MAP
I like the tree. Hey, let’s sit at the bar!

BENEFITS
- Terrace greenhouse; ample greenery
Nature - Overlooks parks and bay around university

• Glass structure allows natural lighting


• Traps heat and humidity during winter

Healthy • Serves fresh organic fruits and vegetables


food • Nutritious salads, sandwiches, juices

Wellness
factors Ideating • Students can take a break from work here
space • Refresh ideas or brainstorm in the space

Nurture • Students grow and nourish plants


• Instils feeling of responsibility and emotional attachment

Rejuvenate
• We hope to achieve in this space the feeling of rejuvenation,
freshness and well-being

45
Theme: Mobility on campus in The Netherlands
PROMISING CONCEPT
i-CO
Yue Wei, Zhou Shusan, Wang Xiaohan, Kang Ran, Yang Qiuyue
Academy of Arts & Design, Tsinghua University / China

This PSS is designed for the academic staff of TU Delft who live outside Delft
town. The product in the PSS is named “i-CO”, which is a new type of vehicle.
The “i” stands for individual, as the vehicle serves one person at a time,
guaranteeing the private space and flexible schedule needed by our target user.
The vehicle consists of the removable “C-part”, which allows a higher turnover
rate of usage in a rent system, and the flexible “O-part”, which addresses
mobility in non-car areas as cars will be forbidden in the TU Delft campus in
the future. All these elements make up the product name “i-CO”.
  This vehicle can drive automatically on the highway, which allows the academ-
ic staff to work during their travelling time. People can conveniently rent this
vehicle from service nodes all over the country. The rental system makes mainte-
nance and recycling easier and improves the efficiency of the material use.
It also helps to reduce the total amount of private cars in the long term. To be
even more sustainable, clean energy, electricity produced by wind and solar
power, is used in the system.

46
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
BEFORE  .  .  .

AFTER  .  .  .

SYSTEM MAP BENEFITS


System life
Environmental benefits optimization

Transport
Toxicity reduction reduction

Conservation/ Resource
biocompatibility reduction

Waste minimization/valorization

Market position and


Economic benefits competitiveness

Profitability/
Macro-economic effect added value for
companies

Partnership/cooperation Added value for


customers

Long-term business development/risk

47
Theme: Food on campus in Italy
PROMISING CONCEPT
La Mela Della Concordia
Flavia Brambilla, Silvia Montalto, Francesco Pulvirenti, Silvia Torretta
Politecnico di Milano / Italy

The area adjacent to Milan’s Bovisa station is in a situation of degradation and


represents a serious danger both for the environment and public health as it is
ORCHARD LIVING UNITS
contaminated by heavy metals. The Municipality of Milan needs to clean it up
and furthermore assign a social function to an area such as this, which can be
considered a societal investment.
  This concept proposes revitalizing the area previously occupied by the Roma,
turning it to an organic orchard. The aim is to reinstate the ethnic Roma
Opportunity to population of the district, involving both the students of the Politecnico and
see where fruit students of the faculty of Agriculture in the cultivation. The latter will provide
comes from and
work in the area the know-how on organic cultivation methods. In the area temporary lodges
will be assigned to the Roma and to foreign students, in exchange for active and
continuous cooperation in the maintenance of the area. Scholarships and
incentives can also be granted. The products grown here will be transported to
the campus by an employee who will on a daily basis stock a vending machine
Organic fruit on Milkshake made
the campus with organic fruit placed inside the campus. In order to minimize waste, second-grade fruit will
be used to prepare milkshakes that will be sold on the campus.

48
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
The former ethnic Roma area needs reclaiming. Santa
Giulia S.p.a. will perform the operation.
People in need in the area can offer their help in
exchange for temporary houses in the field itself.
Politecnico students will offer work in exchange for
vouchers or for “150 hours” of tutoring.
Agriculture students will teach and furthermore use
the orchard to gain true work experience.

The vending machines will be in every common room


of the campus. Every student will have an opportu-
nity to buy this fruit.
Every day an operator will monitor the machine’s
supply and at lunchtime prepare milkshakes made
with the second-grade fruit.

BENEFITS
Socio-ethical benefits
Concept

SYSTEM MAP
GOOD JOB CONDITIONS AND JOB OPPORTUNITIES FOR
THOSE WHO HAVE DIFFICULTY IN FINDING ONE

Improve employment and working conditions


Empower/valorize local
resources Improve equity and
justice in relation to
ENRICHES THE CULTURAL VARIETY OF stakeholders
THE DISTRICT THANKS TO THE
KNOWLEDGE AND THE RESPECT OF THE FAIR INVOLVEMENT OF
ROMA CULTURE. THE ACTORS. WIN-WIN
RELATIONSHIPS.

Improve social cohesion


Enable responsible and
NO DISCRIMINATION. INTEGRATION OF sustainable consumption
THE ROMA POPULATION IN THE
DISTRICT. RESOLUTION OF CONFLICTS CONSUMER KNOWS HOW
(RETALIATIONS AND DEMONSTRATIONS PRODUCTION IS DONE.
AGAINST THE ROMA POPULATION). SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOUR.

Favour/integrate weaker and marginalized strata

POINT OF STRENGTH IN THE SYSTEM IS THE INTEGRATION OF THE ROMA POPULATION


FORCED TO LEAVE THE AREA. INTEGRATION OF THE WEAK AND OUTCASTS.

Environmental benefits
SECOND-CHOICE FRUIT IS USED FOR MILKSHAKES. ETHICAL Current situation
WORKING CONDITIONS THAT ENCOURAGE SOCIAL INTEGRATION.
Concept
System life optimization

Toxicity reduction
Transport reduction
REHABILITATION OF A HIGHLY
POLLUTED AREA. ORGANIC AND ZERO-MILE TRANSPORT.
BIODYNAMIC PRODUCTION LOCAL PRODUCTION
(BIODIVERSITY – YES; (FORMER ROMA FIELDS).
PESTICIDES – NO). SLOW IMPACT PACKING,
LOCAL AVAILABILITY.

Conservation/ Resource reduction


biocompatibility
THE ONLY REMARKABLE
CONSUMPTION IS DUE TO
EXTENSIVE USE OF RENEWABLE
THE VENDING MACHINE.
MATERIALS (E.G. MATER-BI). LESS
THE PACKAGING IS
USE OF FOSSIL FUELS (MANUAL
REDUCED TO A MINIMUM.
CULTIVATION).

Waste minimization/valorization

FOOD WASTE AND PACKAGING TO COMPOST. VENDING MACHINES


& MIXERS HAVE NEW SHAPES AND MATERIALS FOR A NEW LIFE.

49
Theme: Food in Australia
PROMISING CONCEPT
Replenish – Responsible Bottled Water Usage
Chris Bull, Raymond Cyril, Mary Harrington
University of New South Wales / Australia

KIOSK LAYOUT
& INTERFACE Easy-to-use
touch-screen
interface
AVAILABILITY
OF KIOSK
Sydney Pure is a sustainable water service. Allowing custom-
Bottle carries ers to purchase a unique flat-pack water bottle, each bottle
standard
amount of entitles the user to a lifetime of free Sydney water. When
600 ml empty, the bottle is flat for ease of storage, making it easier
to keep and carry, and ideal to reuse and refill.
Screw-top   With high-quality drinking water in most of urban
cap
Australia there is no need to waste energy transporting
Kiosks can drinking water from one place to another while increasing
be found
in various our carbon footprint. Our system brings the water collec-
public spaces tion and filtration plant to the consumer.
  Help break the cycle of bottled water!

50
INTERACTION STORYBOARD
Kiosks are located in public and
accessible places.

People interact with kiosk as they


usually would; for a small cost the water
bladder is dispensed.

After purchase, bottle is filled by the customer at kiosk point.

Once finished the bottle can be rolled up and stored until


refill is required. Refills are provided at no charge to the
customer.

SYSTEM MAP BENEFITS


Our Sydney Pure bottle takes up less space and
eliminates the transport of bulky water – meaning
all down the line we are making things cheaper,
easier and more environmentally responsible. Our
bottles have a direct connection to their contents –
they feel liquid rather than rigid. At present it takes
1.3–2 litres of water to produce one litre of bottled
water, not to mention the plastic manufacture and
transport, as well as landfill waste.
  In Australia with our unpredictable rainfall we
cannot afford to waste water like that.
  About 80% of drinking bottles go directly to
landfill. Our water does not require energy or
pumping and it is pure and clean.
  Our water is filtered, cold, and provided where
you are. It cuts out the middleman and helps the
environment at the same time. We offer all the
advantages of pre-bottled water with the safety,
price benefits, and convenience of Sydney tap water.

51
J. Klongklaw K. Rakbongkotkul P. Choongoen W. Angsuwatcharakorn W. Wattanawisitsiri
the Learning Network on Sustainability

LeNS, the Learning Network on Sustainability, is an For more info please contact LeNS partners:
Asian-European multi-polar network for curricula
development on design for sustainability focused on Coordinator
Product-Service System innovations. It is a three-year  Politecnico di Milano University, INDACO Department, Italy


project (Dec 2007–Dec 2010) funded by the European Carlo Vezzoli (project head), carlo.vezzoli@polimi.it
Fabrizio Ceschin (project manager), fabrizio.ceschin@polimi.it
Commission (Asia-Link Programme, EuropeAid), involv-
ing seven design schools in Europe and Asia. Delft University of Technology, Industrial Design


Engineering, The Netherlands
The project’s scope is to promote a new generation of Jan Carel Diehl, j.c.diehl@tudelft.nl
Asian and European designers capable of designing for Aalto University, School of Art and Design, Helsinki, Finland


sustainable Product-Service System innovation, through Aila Laakso, aila.laakso@aalto.fi
a new generation of design educators.
Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi, Department of


Humanities and Social Sciences, India
The main output is the so-called Open Learning E-Pack- Amrit Srinivasan, amritsn@hss.iitd.ernet.in
age (OLEP) on Design for Sustainability (DfS). It is a web
platform allowing interested teachers to download open Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology,


source and copyleft learning resources (slideshows, texts, Bangalore, India
Mary Jacob, maryjacob@srishti.ac.in
audio-videos, etc.) that could be modified/remixed and
reused, i.e. adapted according to each teacher’s specific Academy of Arts and Design, Tsinghua University,


didactic needs, institutional requirements and local Beijing, China
context peculiarities. Liu Xin, xinl@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn
King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang,


The same LeNS web platform is downloadable as open Faculty of Architecture, Department of Design, Bangkok,
source and copyleft. It is thus a “regenerative” platform: Thailand
namely, any educational institution, teacher, or sustaina- Sompit Moi Fusakul, moi.sfusakul@gmail.com
bility-focused network can generate a new LeNS-based
web platform; any new generated web platform uploads
learning resources independently; and all LeNS-based To register for the LeNS mailing list please send a request
web platforms are interlinked. email to lens@polimi.it www.lens.polimi.it

ISBN 978-1-906093-56-3