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GRADE 1

Benchmark
Assessment
PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS
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A

Published by Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, of McGraw-Hill Education, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.,
Two Penn Plaza, New York, New York 10121.

Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. The contents, or parts thereof, may be reproduced
in print form for non-profit educational use with Treasures, provided such reproductions bear copyright notice, but may
not be reproduced in any form for any other purpose without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies,
Inc., including, but not limited to, network storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning.

Printed in the United States of America

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 HES 13 12 11 10 09
Contents
Introduction to the Benchmark Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
How to Use the Benchmark Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Administering the Benchmark Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Scoring the Benchmark Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Scoring Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Treasures Teaching/Practice Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii

Reading Test, Form A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Revising and Editing Test, Form A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Written Composition, Form A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Reading Test, Form B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Revising and Editing Test, Form B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Written Composition, Form B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Reading Answer Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Revising and Editing Answer Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Answer Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Writing Rubrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Anchor Papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 iii
Introduction to the
Benchmark Assessments
The Benchmark Assessments in this book Each Reading test includes:
are designed to measure how well your
■ 36 multiple-choice items similar to
children acquire the reading and language
those that children will encounter on
arts knowledge and skills assessed on
standardized Reading tests.
standardized tests, and to provide you with
information about which children may
benefit from further instruction in a Each Revising and Editing
particular topic area. test includes:
Each Benchmark Assessment is formatted ■ 24 multiple-choice items similar to
to familiarize children with the types of those that children will encounter on
passages and items they may encounter on standardized reading tests.
standardized tests. There are two Reading
tests, two Revising and Editing tests, and
two Written Composition tests included in
Each Written Composition
this book. test includes:
■ A writing prompt, prewriting pages, and
an answer document on which children
may draft their composition.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

iv Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
How to Use the Benchmark Assessments
The Benchmark Assessments can be used to Using the Results to Inform
measure children’s progress throughout the Instruction
year. They can be used to measure a child’s
knowledge of the general domains of The scores on the Benchmark Assessments
reading and language arts independent of should improve over time. Scores are likely
the Treasures reading program. There are to be low on the Benchmark Assessment
two parallel forms of the test covering the administered in the fall, as the items
same skills, and they are of equal difficulty. represent skills that may not yet have been
Administer Form A at the beginning of the taught. Scores on the assessment
year and at the end of the year. Administer administered mid-year should show an
Form B in the middle of the year. increase, and the scores at the end of the
year should be the highest. If you compare
Sample Questions are included in each
or graph the results, scores should show an
Reading test and each Revising and Editing
increase for each child. Children who do not
test for children to practice test items. These
show an improvement in scores should be
pages will help children prepare for this
further evaluated for additional support.
assessment, as well as for standardized tests,
as they are similar to items that students will
encounter on these tests.
The instructional design of the Treasures
program reinforces the knowledge and skills
assessed on these Benchmark Assessments.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 v
Administering the
Benchmark Assessments
The Benchmark Assessments will help you Be sure to choose only one answer for each
identify the skills for which your children question and make your marks dark and neat.
may need more instruction and additional Reading: Distribute copies of the Reading
practice. test. Then say: Now we will answer the sample
The tests are untimed, and children should question together. Look at the directions.
be given as much time as they need to Follow along as I read them aloud: “Read ’Will
respond to each test item. You may It Rain?’ Then read each question.” You may
administer one test per day, or you may now answer the sample question. When
divide each test over several days if you children have finished, review the correct
prefer. Use your knowledge of your children answer: S-1 is B. Answer any questions
to determine the best stopping point in children may have. Then say: You may begin.
each test. Every set of questions is followed Revising and Editing: After distributing
by a stop sign, indicating that the test may copies of the Revising and Editing test,
be stopped and picked back up again in the repeat the general directions. Then say: We
next session. will now answer the sample question together.
You may wish to read the test questions Look at the directions below the words
and answer choices out loud as you feel “Revising and Editing Sample.” Follow along as
necessary to help the children. I read them aloud: “This is a story that Nat
wrote. The story has mistakes. Read the story.
Testing Procedures Then answer the questions.” You may now
Before the test: Distribute copies of the answer the sample question. When children
Benchmark Assessment. Optional Answer have finished, review the correct answer: S-1
Sheets can be found on pages 117–119. If is A. Answer any questions children may
you choose to use one, distribute it now. have. Then say: You may begin.
General Directions: These directions apply Written Composition: Distribute copies
to the Reading and Revising and Editing of the Written Composition test. Say: Write
Benchmark Assessments. Test-specific your name and the date on the cover of your
directions are noted below. Say: Write your test booklet. In this test, you will write a
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

name and the date on the cover of your test. composition on a topic given to you. Open your
(If you are using the separate answer sheet, test to the writing prompt on page 2. You will
say: Write your name and the date at the top see the prompt, three prewriting pages, and
of your answer sheet.) When all children are two lined pages. Be sure to write your
finished, say: Open the test to page 2. We will composition on the lined pages. You do not
take the practice test before we begin. To have to fill both pages, but your composition
answer a question, mark the oval next to the may not be longer than two pages. Read the
answer you choose. (If you are using the prompt on page 2 aloud. Ask: Does anyone
separate answer sheet, remind children to have any questions? Address any questions.
fill in the answer on their answer sheet.) When children are ready, say: You may begin.

vi Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Scoring the Benchmark Assessments
Scoring the Reading and Scoring the Written
Revising and Editing tests Composition
Use the Scoring Charts provided on Children’s writing is assessed in five
pages viii–xi and the Answer Key provided domains: Focus and Coherence,
on pages120–127 to record the number of Organization, Development of Ideas, Voice,
correct items for each child. Use the results and Conventions. Teachers should use the
to identify those tested skills for which scoring criteria contained in the Writing
children need additional instruction and Rubrics on pages 128–131 to determine
practice throughout the year. The Treasures the overall performance level of the child’s
Teaching/Practice Opportunities chart on writing and assign it one of four score
pages xii–xiii identifies where instruction points.
for specific tested skills is provided in the Anchor Papers to help you score the
Treasures reading program. writing assessments can be found on
You can save the Scoring Charts for each pages 132–139. These writing samples
child as you progress through the year. illustrate the kinds of responses children are
Compare the results recorded across charts likely to write, as well as the most common
to see where progress has been made and kinds of errors found in children’s writing at
determine where a child still may need this grade level.
additional help.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 vii
Student Name

Reading Test Form A
Total Number Number
Reading Objectives Total
of Items Correct
Objective 1: Basic Understanding 15 /15
Objective 2: Literary Elements 6 /6
Objective 3: Analysis Using
12 /12
Reading Strategies
Objective 4: Analysis Using
3 /3
Critical-Thinking

/36

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

viii Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

Revising and Editing Test Form A
Total Number Number
Writing Objectives Total
of Items Correct
Objective 3: Organization 3 /3
Objective 4: Sentence Structure 7 /7
Objective 5: Standard Usage/Word
7 /7
Choice
Objective 6: Punctuation,
7 /7
Capitalization, Spelling

/24

Written Composition Form A
Writing Objectives Total

Objective 1:
Effective Composition
/4
Objective 2:
Command of Conventions
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 ix
Student Name

Reading Test Form B
Total Number Number
Reading Objectives Total
of Items Correct
Objective 1: Basic Understanding 15 /15
Objective 2: Literary Elements 7 /7
Objective 3: Analysis Using
10 /10
Reading Strategies
Objective 4: Analysis Using
4 /4
Critical-Thinking

/36

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

x Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

Revising and Editing Test Form B
Total Number Number
Writing Objectives Total
of Items Correct
Objective 3: Organization 3 /3
Objective 4: Sentence Structure 7 /7
Objective 5: Standard Usage/Word
8 /8
Choice
Objective 6: Punctuation,
6 /6
Capitalization, Spelling

/24

Written Composition Form B
Writing Objectives Total

Objective 1:
Effective Composition
/4
Objective 2:
Command of Conventions
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 xi
Treasures Teaching/Practice Opportunities
Teacher’s Edition TFK Magazine TM
Locate Facts and Details: Unit 1: 7A; Unit 2: 57A;
Unit 3: 77N-78/79, 117A, 147G, 147X–Z; 85K–93A,
97I, 97T–V, 97Z– BB; Unit 5: 85A
Nouns and Verbs: Unit 2: 11A, 27B, 33B, 35H, 35V,
37G, 41A, 57B, 63B, 65V,67G, 69A, 77B, 81A, 81J, 81X,
83G, 87A, 105B, 109B, 111H, 111V, 113G, 117A, 135B,
135C, Unit 3: 7G, 11A, 29B, 33B, 37G, 41A, 59B, 63B,
65H, 67G, 69A, 77B, 81A, 81J, 81X, 115V, 116L, 151A,
Unit 4: 6K, 9C, 29B, 29O, 33B, 35H, 39C, 59B, 59O,
63B, 65H, 66L, 69C,77B, 77P, 85C, 101B, 101O, 107B,
109H,133K; Unit 6: 9C, 35B, 35O, 39B, 41H, 163C
Compound Words: Unit 2: 117F, 141D, Unit 4: 59K,
141A; Unit 5: 160C; Unit 6: 163G, 163U, 167D
Context Clues: Unit 1: 33CC, 33GG, 61GG; Context Clues: 2, 12, 22, 32,
Unit 4:14/15, 29K, 133K; Unit 5: 155K, Unit 6: 75K 42, 52, 62, 72, 82, 92, 102,
112, 122, 132, 142
Word Study: Conceptual Categories: Unit 1: 33GG,
61GG, 105A, 105GG, 131GG, 135A, Unit 2: 81II, 111A,
Unit 4: 106/107; Unit 5: 85C, 93B, 93P, 97A, 97J
Dictionary Alphabetical Order: Unit 1: 111F, 131D,
Unit 2: 77L, 77M; Unit 4: 77O; Unit 6: 93H, 93K, 129H,
163H
Plot: Unit 1: 79A, 79J, 86/87, 90-97, 99, 105G,
105R–T; Unit 2: 83A, 87I, 111G 111R–T, 111X–Z,
41I–57A; Unit 4: 85A–B, 85L–101A, 109G, 109R–T,
109X–Z
Topic: Unit 1: , 111I, 127A, 128/129, 131R, 131S,
131Y; Unit 2: 26, 58/59; Unit 4: 100, 132; Unit 5:
118/119, 155A
Main Idea: Unit 2: 6K, 7A, 7J, 11I –27A, 35G, 35R–T, Main Idea: 11, 41, 61, 71,
35X–Z, 67A, 69I–77A, 81I, 81T–V, 81Z–BB, Unit 3: 81, 91, 141
67A, 69I–77A, 81I, 81T–V, 81Z–BB, 149A; Unit 4:
133N
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

xii Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Teacher’s Edition TFK Magazine TM
Rhythm, Rhyme, and Alliteration in Poetry: Poetry: 19, 29, 49, 69, 79,
Unit 1: S11, S23, S41, S53, S71, S83, 127J, 128/129, 89, 139, 149
129A, 136/137, Unit 2: 11C, 27J, 28/29, 32/33, 33A,
69C, Unit 3: 6K, 20/21, 28, 29E, 29F, 65K, 141K,
144/145, 145A, 152/153, Unit 4: 28, 35K, 65W,
133Y, 134/135,135A; Unit 5: 155Y, 156/157, 157A;
Unit 6: 41W, 163Y, 164/165, 165A
Fable: Unit 2: 57A, Unit 4: 7A, 29N, 77R, 133R,
Unit 5: 164/165
Character: Unit 1: 7A, 11I–25A, 33G, 33R–T,
33X–Z, 46/47; Unit 2: 100/101; Unit 4: 39A, 39B,
39L–59A,65G, 65R–T, 65X–Z; Unit 6: 35N, 139A, 139B,
139L–163A, 167G, 167R–T, 67X–Z
Sensory Language: Unit 3: 141K, 142/143, 145A,
Unit 4: 94/95, Unit 5: 155Y, 156/157, 157A

Sequence: Unit 1: 65I, 68/69, 70/71, 77I, 77T–V, Sequence: 1, 3, 111
77Z–BB, 83I–99A; Unit 2: 61R–T, 61X-Z, 113A; Unit 5:
129A–B, 129K–155A, 159G, 159R–T, 159X–Z
Text Features: Unit 1: 25K, 26/27, 28/29, 30/31, 53K, Text Features: 2, 10, 22, 32,
54/55, 56/57, 58/59, 73L, 73M, 99K, 102/103; Unit 39, 42, 52, 59, 62, 82, 99,
2:57J, 60/61, 63A, 105L, 106/107, 108/109, 138/139, 102, 109, 112, 119, 129, 142
146/147, Unit 3: 29L, 30/31, 32/33, 59L, 77L, 108/109,
110/111, 150/151; Unit 4: 29X, 32/33, 59X, 60/61,
62/63, 77O, 101Y, 104/105, 106/107, 139A, 140/141,
Unit 5: 43Y, 46/47, 75X, 76/77, 78/79, 117Y, 122/123,
161A; Unit NIT 6: 38/39, 75X, 76/77, 129X, 130/131,
132/133, 169A, 170/171
Directions: Unit 2: 135K, 138/139, 139A, 144/145,
Unit 3: 66L, 76/77, 77A, 152/153, Unit 6: 171A
Graphic Features of Text: Unit 6: 35X, 38/39, 39A, Graphic Features of Text:
171A 12, 72, 92, 132
Author’s Purpose: Unit 1: 100/101, 107A, 107 J, Author’s Purpose: 31, 51,
111I–127A, 131G, 131R–T, 131X–ZL; Unit 2: 16/17, 101,
24/25; Unit 3: 74/75–77A
Fantasy and Reality: Unit 6: 9A, 9B, 9K-35A, 41G,
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

41R-T, 41X-Z, 129N
Sequence of events: Unit1: 35A, 39I–51, 53, 61G,
61X–Z, 63A; Unit 2: 117I–135A; Unit 5: 101A–B,
101L–117A, 125G, 125R–T, 125X–Z
Retell: Unit 2: 37A, 37J, 41I–57A, 65G,
117I–135A, 141G, 141R–T, 141X–Z; Unit 3: 7A, 7J,
11I–29A,

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 xiii
Teacher’s Edition TFK Magazine TM
Confirm Predictions: Unit 3: 37A, 37J, 41I-59A, 65G,
65R-T, 65X-Z; Unit 4: 9A, 9B, 9L-29A, 35G, 35R-T, 35X-Z;
Unit 5:72/73, 92/93, 101L, 114/115, Unit 6: 56/57,
72/73, 101A, 101B, 101F, 101L,104/105, 110/111,
116/117, 118/119, 124/125, 126/127, 129D, 135G,
135R, 135S, 135T, 135U,135Y
Purposes of Media: Unit 1: 137J, Unit 2: 147J;
Unit 3: 77L, 77M, 153J; Unit 4: 143I, Unit 5:165J, Unit
6: 93O
Techniques in Media: Unit 1: 137J, 153 Unit 3: 153J,
Unit 4: 143I, 143J, Unit 5: 165I, 165J, Unit 6: 173J

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

xiv Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Grade 1

Student Name

Date

Reading Test
Form A
Reading Sample
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the question.

Will It Rain?

Pat has her boots. She has her hat. She thinks it will rain.
But the sun is out.

S-1 Why does Pat have her hat and her boots?

A It is hot.

B It may rain.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C She wants to get wet.

Page 2

2 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
Read the poem. Then answer the questions.

Little Gray Kitten

1 Little gray kitten, where can you be?
2 I have looked in the house.
3 I have climbed the big tree.
4 Little gray kitten, where can you be?
5 I have looked in your bed.
6 Are you hiding from me?
7 Little gray kitten, where can you be?
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

8 Oh Kitty, there you are!
9 Now, you are safe with me.

Page 3

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 3
Student Name

1 Which words from the poem rhyme?
A be and tree

B house and bed

C kitten and Kitty

2 The speaker first looks for the kitten —
A under the bed

B by the window

C in the house

3 Which word from line 6 is an action word?
A hiding

B from
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C me

Page 4

4 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

4 What do the bed, the house, and the tree all have in common?
A They are places the kitten could be.

B They are all colors of kittens.

C They are different kinds of kittens.

5 Which word from the poem comes before looked in
the dictionary?
A now

B gray

C safe
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 5

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 5
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Window Box Garden

Planting a window box is fun. Window boxes
are small. The boxes are put outside a window.
They go on the windowsill. Flowers can add color
and life to a home. Choose the colors you like
best. Plants that do not grow tall are best for a
window box.
Follow the steps on the next page to make a
window box garden.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 6

6 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
1. Cover the bottom of a window box with small
round stones. Add dirt.

2. Add water so the dirt is a little wet.

3. Add seeds or small plants.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

You have to keep your plants healthy. Water them
when the dirt gets dry. Then watch your garden grow!

Page 7

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 7
Student Name

6 What should you do before you add dirt to the box?
A Add water to wet the dirt.

B Put seeds or plants in the dirt.

C Cover the bottom with stones.

7 Add seeds or small plants after —
A the dirt gets dry

B the dirt is a little wet

C the plants grow

8 What is the topic of this article?
A How to plant a window box garden

B How to grow flowers in your house
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C How to keep busy in the summer

Page 8

8 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

9 What kinds of plants are best for a window box?
A Plants that do not grow tall

B Plants that do not need water

C Plants that smell nice

10 Which sentence from the article tells you what will happen
to the plants?
A Add seeds or small plants.

B Window boxes are small.

C Then watch them grow!
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 9

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 9
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Sick Day
“Are you all right, Nancy?” asked her teacher,
Mr. Brown. “Your face is red. You look very warm.”
Nancy looked up from reading her book. “I want to
go home,” she said.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

“All right. Go to the nurse. She will call your
father. He will be here soon. He will take you home,”
Mr. Brown said.

Page 10

10 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
After Nancy’s dad took her home, Nancy climbed
into her bed. Her cat, Melba, jumped up beside her.
“My head hurts,” she said sadly. “It feels like a
drummer is pounding away on my head. Boom!
Boom! Boom!”
Melba looked at Nancy. She rubbed against Nancy’s
arm. She seemed to say, “Everything will be all right.”
Melba’s soft purring made Nancy feel better. Soon
it felt like the drum was beating more and more softly,
until Nancy was able to fall asleep.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 11

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 11
Student Name

11 Look at this chart of events from the story.

Mr. Brown asks if Nancy feels all right.

Nancy says she wants to go home.

What belongs in the empty box?
A Nancy reads her book.

B Nancy’s teacher asks if she is okay.

C Nancy’s dad picks her up from school.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 12

12 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

12 What is Nancy’s problem in the story?
A She does not feel well.

B Her book is too hard to read.

C She does not want to leave school.

13 Which sentence from the story helps you know that Nancy
will begin to get well?
A Soon it felt like the drum was beating more softly.

B Nancy looked up from reading her book.

C Nancy climbed into her bed.

14 What helps Nancy begin to feel better?
A Having the nurse call her father

B The book she is reading
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C Her cat’s soft purring

Page 13

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 13
Student Name

15 Why does Mr. Brown ask Nancy if she is okay?
A She is crying.

B Her face is red.

C She misses her cat.

16 Which words help you feel how Nancy’s head hurts?
A “Boom! Boom! Boom!”

B “Are you all right, Nancy?”

C “I want to go home,” she said.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 14

14 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Fireflies
In the summer, look in the yard at night. Do
you see lights that go on and off? You are seeing
fireflies. Many kids and grown ups like to watch
fireflies.

Firefly Fun Facts
FOOD: earthworms, snails, slugs, plant
nectar, pollen
AVERAGE 2 months
LIFE:
SIZE: up to 1 inch

Fireflies are beetles with wings. There are many
kinds of fireflies. They live all over the world in
warm, wet places.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 15

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 15
Fireflies have cells that help them make light.
Light from fireflies is mostly green or yellow, but
there are some fireflies that make blue light. The
light shows that fireflies are talking to each other.
Different kinds of fireflies make different patterns
with their lights.

Fireflies get nectar and pollen from plants.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 16

16 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

17 Use the chart on page 15 to answer the question.

Earthworms Plant Nectar Snails

What topic goes in the center oval?
A Size

B Average Life

C Food
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 17

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 17
Student Name

18 What helps fireflies make light?
A Cells

B Patterns

C Beetles

19 Look at the chart on page 15.
What size are most fireflies?
A 2 inches

B 1 foot

C 1 inch

20 The author wrote this article to —
A give information about fireflies

B tell a funny story about fireflies
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C get the reader to keep fireflies as pets

Page 18

18 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

21 Which word from page 16 tells what fireflies do?
A some

B make

C each

22 Which word from the article means “insects that light up”?
A earthworms

B fireflies

C different

23 What is this article mainly about?
A Things fireflies do

B Where fireflies live
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C Insects in your yard

Page 19

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 19
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Turtle and Rabbit

Rabbit ran fast. He talked and talked about how fast
he could run. One day at lunchtime, he told the other
animals, “I am very swift. I will win every race I run.
I will race any animal.”
Turtle said, “I will race you.” Rabbit thought that
was very funny.
“You can laugh after you win the race,” said Turtle.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

“Will you race me?”

Page 20

20 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Rabbit agreed to race with Turtle. All the other
animals came to watch the race.
When the race started, Rabbit ran as fast as he
could. Turtle started walking. Turtle was slow, but he
never stopped.
Rabbit laughed at Turtle. Rabbit ran and ran. When
he could not see Turtle, Rabbit stopped to rest. He was
tired. He went to sleep.
Rabbit opened his eyes. “What a nice nap,” he
thought. He looked down the road. He laughed loudly
because Turtle was nowhere in sight. “I knew I would
win the race!”
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 21

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 21
Rabbit started walking up the road happily to the
finish line. Suddenly, he stopped.
Rabbit rubbed his eyes. “Oh no! Turtle is near the
end of the race!” Rabbit jumped up. He ran as fast as
he could. But he could not catch Turtle. Turtle won
the race.
Rabbit was unhappy. He thought Turtle had played
a trick on him. But Turtle did not play a trick on
Rabbit. Turtle just walked and walked when Rabbit
was asleep. Turtle knew the best way to win was to
keep going.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 22

22 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

24 You can tell that this fable is make-believe because —
A Turtle is slower than Rabbit

B Turtle and Rabbit are talking

C Turtle keeps on walking

25 Rabbit laughs when Turtle says he will race him
because Rabbit —
A is tired and needs a nap

B is afraid that Turtle is too fast

C thinks he is better than Turtle

26 Which sentence from the fable helps you know that Rabbit
might not win the race?
A “I knew I would win the race!”
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

B “What a nice nap!”

C “Oh, no! Turtle is at the end of the race!”

Page 23

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 23
Student Name

27 Why is Rabbit unhappy at the end of the race?
A He thinks Turtle tricked him.

B Turtle is laughing at him.

C He knows he is slower than Turtle.

28 What can you learn from this fable?
A You should keep going during a race.

B You should take a nap during a race.

C You should play a trick to win a race.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 24

24 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

29 Which word from the fable is made of two shorter words
that tell when to eat a meal?
A animals

B lunchtime

C finish

30 What does the word swift mean on page 20?
A Smart

B Strong

C Fast
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 25

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 25
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

The Mountain Man

Long ago, there lived a man named John Muir.
He liked many things. He loved nature most of all.
John Muir was born in Scotland. He grew up
with his mother and father and many brothers and
sisters. John’s family moved to this country when he
was a child.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 26

26 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
John loved the outdoors. He wanted to learn
more about it. So he went on a hike. He hiked
across the United States.
John hiked in the woods. He hiked over
mountains. One time he even got stuck in a
snowstorm! He made a cave to stay safe and warm.
He ate crackers, cheese, and beans to stay alive.

John Muir loved spending time outdoors.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

John walked across a lot of the country. He hiked
one thousand miles!

Page 27

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 27
Later, John hiked in many more places and wrote
books about his travels. He told people what he
learned about nature. He helped to set up parks to
protect it.
Today, John Muir has part of a trail in California
named after him. This shows that his work was
important. It shows that people should remember
his lessons.

Yosemite
National Key
CA

Park
Park set up
LI

by John Miur
F
O

Ocean
N
R

IA

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 28

28 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

31 How far did John Muir walk?
A Over three mountains

B One thousand miles

C Ten meters

32 After John Muir hiked across California, he —
A moved to Wisconsin

B made a cave

C set up parks

33 What happened right before John Muir built a cave?
A He got stuck in a snowstorm.

B He hiked across California.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C He ate crackers and beans.

Page 29

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form A 29
Student Name

34 The author wrote this biography to —
A name good places for readers to hike

B tell readers about the life of John Muir

C help readers get in shape and stay healthy

35 Look at the map on page 28.
What is the name of a park John Muir set up?
A California

B Yosemite National Park

C U.S.A. Park

36 What does the word protect mean on page 28?
A Keep safe

B Hide from
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C Sell to

Page 30

30 Grade 1 • Reading • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Grade 1

Student Name

Date

Revising and
Editing
Form A
Revising and Editing Sample
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Nat wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the question.

I Am Nat
(1) my name is Nat. (2) I am six years old. (3) I ride the
bus to school.

S-1 Which sentence needs a capital letter?

A Sentence 1

B Sentence 2

C Sentence 3

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 2

32 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Ben wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Dan Had Fun
(1) dan had fun. (2) He play all day. (3) He took a bath.
(4) Now Dan can go bed. (5) His dad will tuck him in?
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 3

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 33
Student Name

1 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A dan had Fun.

B Dan had fun.

C Dan Had Fun.

2 What is the BEST way to write sentence 2?
A He will play all day.

B He playing all day.

C He played all day.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 4

34 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

3 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Now Dan can go to bed.

B Now Dan can go for bed.

C Now Dan can go at bed.

4 What is the BEST way to write sentence 5?
A His dad tuck him in will?

B His dad tuck him in?

C Will his dad tuck him in?
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 5

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 35
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Jill wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Mars
(1) Mars is not like Earth? (2) it has two moons. (3) It is
hottest on Mars. (4) I like to swim.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 6

36 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

5 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A Mars is not like Earth.

B Mars is not like Earth!

C Mars is not like Earth

6 Which sentence needs a capital letter?
A Sentence 1

B Sentence 2

C Sentence 3
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 7

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 37
Student Name

7 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A It is hot on Mars.

B It is hots on Mars.

C It is more hotter on Mars.

8 Which sentence does not belong in the story?
A Sentence 1

B Sentence 3

C Sentence 4

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 8

38 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Tara wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Grandma Saves the Day
(1) My cat is on a tree. (2) “Please help her,” my said.
(3) Grandma can help? (4) Grandma helping my cat get down.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 9

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 39
Student Name

9 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A My cat is of a tree.

B My cat is in a tree.

C My cat is at a tree.

10 What is the BEST way to write sentence 2?
A “Please help her,” I said.

B “Please help her,” me said.

C “Please help her,” she said.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 10

40 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

11 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A Help can Grandma?

B Help Grandma can?

C Can Grandma help?

12 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Grandma help my cat get down.

B Grandma helps my cat get down.

C Grandma is help my cat get down.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 11

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 41
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Juan wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Seashells
(1) Seashells are of the beach. (2) It are big and small.
(3) Some animals living in seashells. (4) i like to look
for seashells.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 12

42 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

13 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A Seashells are under the beach.

B Seashells are in the beach.

C Seashells are on the beach.

14 What is the BEST way to write sentence 2?
A They are big and small.

B Them are big and small.

C He is big and small.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 13

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 43
Student Name

15 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A Some animals lives in seashells.

B Some animals live in seashells.

C Some animals is living in seashells.

16 Which sentence needs a capital letter?
A Sentence 1

B Sentence 3

C Sentence 4

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 14

44 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Julie wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

A Real Team
(1) Sam and Jack are friends. (2) Jack likes to cook.
(3) Sam and Jack plays ball. (4) Jack is by the team.
(5) Sam helps the team?
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 15

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 45
Student Name

17 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A Sam and Jack play ball.

B Sam and Jack playing ball.

C Sam and Jack is play ball.

18 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Jack is at the team.

B Jack is on the team.

C Jack is of the team.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 16

46 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

19 Which sentence does not belong in the story?
A Sentence 1

B Sentence 2

C Sentence 4

20 What is the BEST way to write sentence 5?
A Does Sam help the team?

B Sam the team help?

C Does help Sam the team?
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 17

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 47
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Maria wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Grow a Snack
(1) You can grow a best snack. (2) First plant some bean
seeds. (3) Last, water them. (4) wait a short time. (5) Soon
you will have beans to eat?

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 18

48 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

21 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A You can grow a better snack.

B You can grow a good snack.

C You can grow a gooder snack.

22 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A Last water them.

B First water them.

C Then water them.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 19

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A 49
Student Name

23 Which sentence needs a capital letter?
A Sentence 2

B Sentence 4

C Sentence 5

24 What is the BEST way to write sentence 5?
A Soon you will have beans to eat.

B Soon beans you will have to eat.

C Soon you will have beans to eat,

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 20

50 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Grade 1

Student Name

Date

Written
Composition
Form A
Write a composition about a craft you made at
home or school.

REMEMBER TO—
❏ write about a craft you made

❏ make sure that every sentence you write helps
the reader understand your composition

❏ include enough details to help the reader clearly
understand what you are saying
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

❏ use correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation,
grammar, and sentences

Page 2

52 Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

USE THIS PREWRITING PAGE TO
PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

MAKE SURE THAT YOU WRITE YOUR COMPOSITION ON
Page 3 THE LINES ON PAGES 6–7.

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form A 53
Student Name

USE THIS PREWRITING PAGE TO
PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

MAKE SURE THAT YOU WRITE YOUR COMPOSITION ON
Page 4 THE LINES ON PAGES 6–7.

54 Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

USE THIS PREWRITING PAGE TO
PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

MAKE SURE THAT YOU WRITE YOUR COMPOSITION ON
Page 5 THE LINES ON PAGES 6–7.

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form A 55
Student Name

Answer Document

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 6

56 Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form A Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

Answer Document
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 7

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form A 57
Grade 1

Student Name

Date

Reading Test
Form B
Reading Sample
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the question.

Will It Rain?
Pat has her boots. She has her hat. She thinks it will rain. But
the sun is out.

S-1 Why does Pat have her hat and her boots?
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

A It is hot.

B It may rain.

C She wants to get wet.

Page 2

60 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
Read the poem. Then answer the questions.

Spinning
1 When I spin round
2 Without a stop
3 And keep my balance
4 Like the top,
5 I find that soon
6 The floor will swim
7 Before my eyes.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 3

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 61
8 And then, like it,
9 I lie all dizzy
10 On the floor
11 Until I feel
12 Like spinning more.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 4

62 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

1 Which words rhyme in the poem?
A floor and more

B stop and soon

C dizzy and eyes

2 The girl lies on the floor because —
A the top is broken

B she wants to swim

C she is dizzy

3 Which word from the poem rhymes with stop in line 2?
A find

B top
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C round

Page 5

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 63
Student Name

4 What is the girl doing?
A Jumping

B Spinning

C Swimming

5 What does the word it mean in line 8 of the poem?
A The floor

B The girl

C The top

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 6

64 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Fire Trucks
Fire trucks help people who fight fires. They help
people get to fires. Fire trucks also help people put out
the fires when they get there.
Getting to the Fire
A fire truck has red and yellow lights that flash. It
has a horn that makes loud noises. The lights and horn
tell people on the road to get out of the way. When the
road is clear, the fire truck can race through the streets.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Truck leaving Fire Station Number 7 on Oak Street.

Page 7

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 65
Tools to Fight Fires
The truck holds many important tools. It carries a
long ladder. People can use the ladder to reach high
places. The fire truck also holds other tools. It has
strong tools to help break down walls. It has fans to
blow smoke away. It also has air tanks to help people
breathe when they are in smoky fires. The tools on a
fire truck help people and keep them safe.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 8

66 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

6 Look at the chart below.

Helps people Holds tools to Holds tools to
get to fires put the fire out keep people safe

Which main idea belongs in the bottom box?
A Clothes keep people safe in fires.

B A fire truck helps people fight fires.

C You should learn to escape a fire.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 9

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 67
Student Name

7 The author wrote this article to —
A tell a scary story about a fire

B teach readers about fire trucks

C explain how to drive a fire truck

8 Why does a fire truck have fans?
A To blow the smoke away

B To keep people cool and dry

C To help people reach high places

9 Ladders, fans, and air tanks are all types of —
A trucks

B tools
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C games

Page 10

68 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

10 Look at the picture on page 7.
What street is the fire station on?
A Fire Street

B Station Street

C Oak Street

11 What is the topic of this article?
A Ladders

B Fire trucks

C Air tanks
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 11

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 69
DIRECTIONS
Read the Web page. Then answer the questions.

Tiger SEARCH

Home Sweet Home for Tigers
Most tigers live in the wild.
They are mostly found in Asia.
Their habitat, or home, can be
grassland or swamp. There has
to be a lot of water close by.
Tiger Facts
Tigers can grow to be as long as 13 feet.
The largest tigers can weigh over 600 pounds!
Dinnertime for Tigers
Tigers find everything that they need to
survive right where they live.
Tiger Toys
Tiger products for sale! You will be happy or
your money back!
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 12

70 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

12 How does the Home Sweet Home for Tigers link on the
Web page try to get your attention?
A The sound of tigers roaring

B Bright colors and lights

C A picture of a real tiger

13 The author of the Tiger Toys link most likely created it to —
A make people want to buy tiger toys

B teach people to care for tigers

C give facts about tigers
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 13

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 71
Student Name

14 Which link would be the best to use to find out what kind of
food tigers eat?
A Tiger Toys

B Tiger Facts

C Dinnertime for Tigers

15 About how long can a tiger grow?
A 600 pounds

B 2 inches

C 13 feet

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 14

72 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

16 What does the word products under the Tiger Toys
link mean?
A Things people can buy

B Food tigers like to eat

C Places tigers hide

17 Which word from the Web page is a compound word that
means “a place with tall grass”?
A largest

B habitat

C grassland
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 15

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 73
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Rosie the Cowgirl
The bell rang from the house. It was time for lunch!
Rosie could smell the stew and it made her mouth
water. She was so hungry she could almost taste the
salty beef and feel the soft potatoes in her mouth.
Rosie jumped off her horse.
Just then, her father yelled, “The cows are loose!”
Rosie jumped back on her horse. She rode toward the
cows. Her hat flew back, but she kept riding. Rosie
rode past the cows and blocked their way. She waved
her arm at a mother cow and her calf. The cows turned
back to the barn.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 16

74 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Rosie was starving when she got back home. Her
mother put the bowls of stew on the table. Rosie’s
father put his arm around her. He said, “I am very
proud of you. You worked hard and didn’t give up.
You got the job done.” Rosie felt great as they finally
sat down to eat.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 17

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 75
Student Name

18 Look at the chart.

Rosie jumped off her horse.

Rosie got back on her horse.

Which event belongs in the middle box?
A The cows got loose.

B It was time for lunch.

C The bell rang.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 18

76 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

19 On page 16, which sentence shows that Rosie made
the cows return?
A Rosie jumped off her horse.

B The cows turned back to the barn.

C She rode toward the cows.

20 Rosie shows that she is —
A lazy

B responsible

C cheerful

21 Why doesn’t Rosie stop for lunch?
A She is not very hungry.

B She does not want to eat the stew.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C She has to turn the cows back to the barn.

Page 19

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 77
Student Name

22 Which words from the story help the reader almost taste
the stew?
A salty beef, soft potatoes

B bell rang, time for lunch

C so hungry, sat down

23 Rosie’s father is proud of her because she —
A didn’t give up

B rode a horse

C ate all her stew

24 What is Rosie’s problem in the story?
A Her mouth watered.

B The bell rang.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C The cows were loose.

Page 20

78 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Sally Ride
Sally Ride was the first American woman in space.
First Sally had to go to a special school. Sally learned
a lot about space. She studied math and science. She
exercised to stay strong and healthy. She was ready to
go. But she had to wait.
In 1983, Sally got her chance. She got to go to space.
She went with four people. Sally was the only woman
to go.

Sally studied hard to
learn about space.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 21

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 79
Sally Ride spent six days
in space in 1983.

Sally spent six days in space. When she came back to
Earth, her life had changed. People were very proud of
her. People all over the world knew about Sally Ride.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 22

80 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

25 Before Sally went to space, she —
A was there for six days

B went to a special school

C went with four people

26 How can you tell that this article is a true story?
A It tells about a real person.

B It has a title and an illustration.

C It is fun to read.

27 Which sentence from the article tells how people felt when
Sally went to space?
A In 1983, Sally got her chance.

B Sally learned a lot about space.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

C People very were proud of her.

Page 23

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 81
Student Name

28 How did Sally stay strong and healthy?
A She studied.

B She exercised.

C Her life changed.

29 Which word from the article comes before she
in the dictionary?
A school

B special

C strong

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 24

82 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
Read the selection. Then answer the questions.

Bike Tips
Bikes are fun to ride. You can ride to school. You can
ride to a friend’s house. You can ride to a park.

SCHOOL

treet
S
n
o
gt

Elm Street
hin

STORE
Was

Apple Street
Park

Follow the tips on the next two pages. You will be a
safe bike rider!
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 25

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 83
1. When you first get your bike, check to make sure
it has a light, reflectors, and a bell or horn. These
things help people see and hear you while you are
riding your bike.
2. A helmet is a special hat that protects your head. Put
it on and snap it tight before you get on your bike.
This will keep you safe. Make sure you tell a grown
up where you are going before you leave.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 26

84 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
3. It can be hard for drivers to see you when you are
on your bike. A safe rider will stop at all red lights
and stop signs. When you get to a busy street, look
both ways before you cross. Wait until you see that
it is safe. Then walk your bike across the street.
4. Riding with friends can be a lot of fun. To stay safe,
never carry someone on your bike. Always go the
same way the cars go.
Following these rules will keep you safe. Have fun
riding your bike!

Always ride in one line with friends.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 27

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 85
Student Name

30 Look at the map on page 25.
Apple Street is where you can find the —
A park

B school

C store

31 Look at the picture on page 26.
What goes on the front of your bike?
A Helmet

B Horn

C Reflectors

32 You can ride your bike to the —
A park
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

B light

C reflectors

Page 28

86 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

33 What should you do before you leave?
A Ride to the school

B Put your bike away

C Tell where you are going

34 What does the word busy mean on page 27?
A Full of activity

B Has a lot of color

C Very dirty
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 29

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Reading • Form B 87
Student Name

35 Look at the picture on page 27.
How do you ride with friends?
A In the street

B Very fast

C In one line

36 Which word from the article names an action?
A fun

B street

C walk

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 30

88 Grade 1 • Reading • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Grade 1

Student Name

Date

Revising and
Editing
Form B
Revising and Editing Sample
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Nat wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the question.

I Am Nat
(1) my name is Nat. (2) I am six years old. (3) I ride the
bus to school.

S-1 Which sentence needs a capital letter?

A Sentence 1

B Sentence 2

C Sentence 3

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 2

90 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Fran wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Ben Has a Plan
(1) Ben and sally want a new ball. (2) They has a plan.
(3) They can sell drink. (4) First they can get a new ball.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 3

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 91
Student Name

1 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A ben and sally want a new ball.

B Ben and Sally want a new ball.

C ben and Sally want a new ball.

2 What is the BEST way to write sentence 2?
A They have a plan.

B They are having a plan.

C They will have a plan.

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Page 4

92 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

3 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A They can sell Drink.

B They can sell a drinks.

C They can sell drinks.

4 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Then they can get a new ball.

B Before they can get a new ball.

C They can first get a new ball.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 5

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 93
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Leo wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Don and the Doghouse
(1) Don has a bigger dog. (2) Him dog needs a nap.
(3) A duck is on the way. (4) “Go away,” said Don.
(5) The dog take a nap.

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Page 6

94 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

5 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A Don has a bigger dogs.

B Don has a big dog.

C Don has a biggest dog.

6 What is the BEST way to write sentence 2?
A His dog needs a nap.

B He dog needs a nap.

C Her dog needs a nap.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 7

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 95
Student Name

7 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A A duck is at the way.

B A duck is of the way.

C A duck is in the way.

8 What is the BEST way to write sentence 5?
A The dog taking a nap.

B The dog can take a nap.

C The dog does take a nap.

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Page 8

96 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Sasha wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

My Cat
(1) Puff is me cat. (2) She is black and white. (3) puff likes
to play. (4) I like to play tag. (5) Puff is a good cat?
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Page 9

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 97
Student Name

9 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A Puff is my cat.

B Puff is mine cat.

C Puff is I cat.

10 Which sentence needs a capital letter?
A Sentence 1

B Sentence 3

C Sentence 4

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Page 10

98 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

11 Which sentence does not belong in the story?
A Sentence 2

B Sentence 3

C Sentence 4

12 What is the BEST way to write sentence 5?
A Puff is a good cat

B Puff is a good cat.

C Puff is a good cat,
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 11

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 99
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Beth wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

A Family Trip
(1) We went to a trip. (2) First we got into our car. (3) We
drove for a long time. (4) Then we got to my grandmother’s
house (5) she was glad to see us.

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Page 12

100 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

13 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A We went on a trip.

B We went of a trip.

C We went by a trip.

14 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A Last we drove for a long time.

B We drove for a long time then.

C Next we drove for a long time.
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Page 13

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 101
Student Name

15 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Then we got to my grandmother’s house?

B Then we got to my grandmother’s house.

C Then to my grandmother’s house we got!

16 Which sentence needs a capital letter?
A Sentence 2

B Sentence 4

C Sentence 5

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Page 14

102 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Jim wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Starfish
(1) Starfish have five arm. (2) They looks like stars.
(3) I like to look at stars in the sky. (4) Starfish live in
the ocean? (5) Yes, they do!
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 15

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 103
Student Name

17 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A Starfish have five arms.

B Starfish have fives arm.

C Starfishs have five arm.

18 What is the BEST way to write sentence 2?
A They looked like stars.

B They looking like stars.

C They look like stars.

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Page 16

104 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

19 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Do starfish live in the ocean?

B Starfish do live in the ocean?

C Starfish do in the ocean live?

20 Which sentence does not belong in the story?
A Sentence 1

B Sentence 3

C Sentence 5
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Page 17

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 105
DIRECTIONS
This is a story that Donna wrote. The story has mistakes.
Read the story. Then answer the questions.

Snowy Days
(1) I love when it snows? (2) First I put on my coat.
(3) My mom helps with my boots. (4) Then she help me
put on my hat. (5) You like to play in the snow?

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Page 18

106 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

21 What is the BEST way to write sentence 1?
A I love when it snows,

B I love when it snows

C I love when it snows!

22 What is the BEST way to write sentence 3?
A Next my mom helps with my boots.

B But my mom helps with my boots.

C First my mom helps with my boots.
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Page 19

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B 107
Student Name

23 What is the BEST way to write sentence 4?
A Then she was help me put on my hat.

B Then she helps me put on my hat.

C Then she helping me put on my hat.

24 What is the BEST way to write sentence 5?
A You do like to play in the snow?

B Like to play in the snow, do you?

C Do you like to play in the snow?

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Page 20

108 Grade 1 • Revising and Editing • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Grade 1

Student Name

Date

Written
Composition
Form B
Write a composition about your favorite toy.

REMEMBER TO—
❏ write about your favorite toy

❏ make sure that every sentence you write helps
the reader understand your composition

❏ include enough details to help the reader clearly
understand what you are saying
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

❏ use correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation,
grammar, and sentences

Page 2

110 Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

USE THIS PREWRITING PAGE TO
PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

MAKE SURE THAT YOU WRITE YOUR COMPOSITION ON
Page 3 THE LINES ON PAGES 6–7.

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form B 111
Student Name

USE THIS PREWRITING PAGE TO
PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

MAKE SURE THAT YOU WRITE YOUR COMPOSITION ON
Page 4 THE LINES ON PAGES 6–7.

112 Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

USE THIS PREWRITING PAGE TO
PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

MAKE SURE THAT YOU WRITE YOUR COMPOSITION ON
Page 5 THE LINES ON PAGES 6–7.

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form B 113
Student Name

Answer Document

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Page 6

114 Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form B Benchmark Assessment
Student Name

Answer Document
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Page 7

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 • Written Composition • Form B 115
Student Name

STUDENT ANSWER SHEET

READING

S-1 abc

1 abc 13 abc 25 abc
2 abc 14 abc 26 abc
3 abc 15 abc 27 abc
4 abc 16 abc 28 abc
5 abc 17 abc 29 abc
6 abc 18 abc 30 abc
7 abc 19 abc 31 abc
8 abc 20 abc 32 abc
9 abc 21 abc 33 abc
10 abc 22 abc 34 abc
11 abc 23 abc 35 abc
12 abc 24 abc 36 abc
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 117
Student Name

STUDENT ANSWER SHEET

REVISING AND EDITING

S-1 abc

1 abc 9 abc 17 abc
2 abc 10 abc 18 abc
3 abc 11 abc 19 abc
4 abc 12 abc 20 abc
5 abc 13 abc 21 abc
6 abc 14 abc 22 abc
7 abc 15 abc 23 abc
8 abc 16 abc 24 abc
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 119
Form A Answer Key: Reading
Question Answer Content Focus

1 A Rhyme
2 C Retell
3 A Verbs
4 A Classify and Categorize
5 B Alphabetical Order
6 C Follow Directions
7 B Follow Directions
8 A Topic
9 A Details
10 C Confirm Predictions
11 C Retell
12 A Problem and Solution
13 A Confirm Predictions
14 C Problem and Solution
15 B Character
16 A Sensory Language
17 C Text Features: Charts
18 A Details
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120 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Question Answer Content Focus

19 C Text Features: Charts
20 A Author’s Purpose
21 B Verbs
22 B Compound Words
23 A Main Idea
24 B Fantasy or Reality
25 C Character
26 C Confirm Predictions
27 A Character
28 A Fables
29 B Compound Words
30 C Words in Context
31 B Details
32 C Sequence
33 A Sequence
34 B Author’s Purpose
35 B Map features
36 A Words in Context
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 121
Form A Answer Key:
Revising and Editing
Question Answer Content Focus

1 B Capitalize names
2 C Verbs
3 A Revise: Addition
Questions:
4 C
Subject/verb
5 A Punctuation
6 B Capitalize sentences
7 A Adjectives: Descriptive
8 C Revise: Deletion
9 B Prepositional phrases
10 A Pronouns
Questions:
11 C
Subject/verb

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122 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Question Answer Content Focus

12 B Verbs
13 C Prepositional phrases
14 A Pronouns
15 B Verbs
16 C Capitalize pronoun I
17 A Verbs
18 B Prepositional phrases
19 B Revise: Deletion
Questions:
20 A
Subject/verb
21 B Adjectives: Descriptive

22 C Time-order transitions

23 B Capitalize sentences
24 A Punctuation
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 123
Form B Answer Key: Reading
Question Answer Content Focus

1 A Rhyme
2 C Character
3 B Rhyme
4 B Details
5 C Context Clues
6 B Main Idea
7 B Author’s Purpose
8 A Details
9 B Classify and Categorize
Text Features:
10 C
Illustrations
11 B Topic
12 C Media Techniques
13 A Purpose of Media
Text Features:
14 C
Headings

15 C Details

16 A Words in Context
17 C Compound Words
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18 A Retell

124 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Question Answer Content Focus

19 B Confirm Predictions
20 B Character
21 C Character
22 A Sensory Language
23 A Character
24 C Problem and Solution
25 B Sequence
26 A Fantasy and Reality
27 C Confirm Predictions
28 B Details
29 A Alphabetical Order
30 C Map Features
31 B Text Features: Diagram
32 A Details
33 C Follow Directions
34 A Words in Context
Text Features:
35 C
Illustraions
36 C Verbs
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 125
Form B Answer Key:
Revising and Editing
Question Answer Content Focus

1 B Capitalize names
2 A Verbs
3 C Nouns
4 A Time-order transitions
5 B Adjectives: Descriptive
6 A Pronouns
7 C Prepositional phrases
8 B Revise: Addition
9 A Pronouns
10 B Capitalize sentences
11 C Revise: Deletion
12 B Punctuation

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

126 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Question Answer Content Focus

13 A Prepositional phrases
14 C Time-order transitions
15 B Punctuation
16 C Capitalize sentences
17 A Nouns
18 C Verbs
Questions:
19 A
Subject/verb
20 B Revise: Deletion
21 C Punctuation
22 A Time-order transitions
23 B Verbs
Questions:
24 C
Subject/verb
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 127
WRITING RUBRICS
SCORE POINT 1
EACH COMPOSITION AT THIS SCORE POINT IS AN INEFFECTIVE PRESENTATION OF THE WRITER’S IDEAS.

Focus and Coherence
● Individual paragraphs and/or the entire composition are not focused. The writer may shift
abruptly from idea to idea, making it difficult for the reader to understand how the ideas in
the composition are related.
● The entire composition has little sense of completeness. The introduction and
conclusion, if present, may be perfunctory.
● A large amount of writing may be unrelated and may not contribute to the development
or quality of the entire composition. At times, the composition may be only weakly
connected to the prompt.

Organization
● The writer’s progression of thought between sentences and/or paragraphs is not logical.
Occasionally weak progression results from a lack of transitions or from the use of
transitions that do not make sense. At other times, the progression of thought is not
evident, even if appropriate transitions are present.
● An organizational strategy is not evident. The writer may present ideas randomly, making
the composition difficult to follow.
● Wordiness and/or repetition may inhibit the progression of ideas.

Development of Ideas
● The writer presents one or more ideas but provides little development of those ideas.
● The writer presents one or more ideas and makes an attempt to develop them. However,
the development is general or vague, making it difficult for the reader to understand the
writer’s ideas.
● The writer presents only a plot summary of a published piece of writing, movie, or
television show.
● The writer leaves out important information, which creates gaps between ideas. These
gaps inhibit the reader’s understanding of the ideas.
Voice
● The writer does not use language that engages the reader and therefore fails to establish
a connection.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

● There may be no evidence of the writer’s individual voice. The composition does not sound
authentic or original. The writer does not express his/her individuality or unique perspective.
Conventions
● There is little evidence in the composition that the writer can correctly apply the
English language conventions. Severe and/or frequent errors in spelling, capitalization,
punctuation, grammar, usage, and sentence structure may cause the writing to be
difficult to read. These errors weaken the composition by causing a lack of fluency.
● The writer may misuse or omit words and phrases, and may frequently include awkward
sentences. These weaknesses inhibit the effective communication of ideas.

128 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
SCORE POINT 2
EACH COMPOSITION AT THIS SCORE POINT IS A SOMEWHAT EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION OF THE WRITER’S IDEAS.

Focus and Coherence
● Individual paragraphs and/or the entire composition are somewhat focused. The writer
may shift quickly from idea to idea, but the reader can easily understand how the ideas in
the composition are related.
● The entire composition has some sense of completeness. The writer includes an
introduction and conclusion, but they may be superficial.
● Some of the writing may be unrelated and may not contribute to the development or
quality of the entire composition.
Organization
● The writer’s progression of thought between sentences and/or paragraphs may not
always be smooth or logical. Occasionally, the writer should strengthen the progression
by including more meaningful transitions; at other times the writer needs to establish
stronger links between ideas.
● The organizational strategies the writer chooses do not allow the writer to present
ideas effectively.
● Some wordiness and/or repetition may be present, but these weaknesses do not
completely inhibit the progression of ideas.
Development of Ideas
● The writer attempts to develop the composition by listing or briefly explaining the ideas.
The development remains superficial, preventing the reader’s full understanding of the
writer’s ideas.
● The writer presents one or more ideas and attempts to develop them. There is little evidence
of depth of thinking. The development may be mostly general, inconsistent, or contrived.
● The writer may leave out small pieces of information that create minor gaps between
ideas. These gaps do not inhibit the reader’s understanding of the ideas.
Voice
● There may be moments when the writer uses language that engages the reader, but the
writer fails to sustain the connection.
● Individual paragraphs or sections of the composition sound authentic or original, but the
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

writer does not generally express his/her individuality or unique perspective.
Conventions
● Errors in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, usage, and sentence structure
throughout the composition may indicate a limited control of English language
conventions. These errors may not cause the writing to be unclear, however they may
weaken the overall fluency of the composition.
● The writer may employ simple or inaccurate words and phrases, and may write
some awkward sentences. These weaknesses inhibit the overall effectiveness of the
communication of ideas.

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 129
SCORE POINT 3
EACH COMPOSITION AT THIS SCORE POINT IS A GENERALLY EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION OF THE WRITER’S IDEAS.

Focus and Coherence
● Individual paragraphs and the composition are, for the most part, focused. The writer
generally shows the distinct relationship between ideas, rarely making sudden shifts from
one idea to the next.
● The composition has a sense of completeness. The introduction and conclusion add
depth to the composition.
● Most of the writing contributes to the development or quality of the entire composition.

Organization
● The writer’s progression of thought between sentences and/or paragraphs is, for the
most part, smooth and controlled. Usually, transitions are meaningful, and the links
between ideas are logical.
● The organizational strategies the writer chooses are usually effective.
● Wordiness and repetition, if present, are minor problems that do not inhibit the
progression of ideas.
Development of Ideas
● The writer attempts to develop all the ideas in the composition. Some ideas may be
developed more thoroughly and specifically than others, but the development reflects
some depth of thought, allowing the reader to generally understand and appreciate the
writer’s ideas.
● The writer’s presentation of some ideas may be thoughtful. Little evidence exists that the
writer has been willing to take compositional risks when developing the topic.
Voice
● The writer uses language that engages the reader and sustains that connection
throughout most of the composition.
● In general, the composition sounds authentic and original. The writer usually expresses
his/her individuality or unique perspective.
Conventions
● There is evidence that the writer generally demonstrates a good command of spelling,
capitalization, punctuation, grammar, usage, and sentence structure. Although there may
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

be minor errors, they create few disruptions in the fluency of the composition.
● The words, phrases, and sentence structures the writer employs are generally
appropriate and contribute to the overall effectiveness of the communication of ideas.

130 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
SCORE POINT 4
EACH COMPOSITION AT THIS SCORE POINT IS A HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION OF THE WRITER’S IDEAS.

Focus and Coherence
● Individual paragraphs and the entire composition are focused. This sustained focus
allows the reader to understand how the ideas included in the composition are related.
● The entire composition has a sense of completeness. The introduction and conclusion
add meaningful depth to the composition.
● Most, if not all, of the writing contributes to the development or quality of the
entire composition.
Organization
● The writer’s progression of thought between sentences and/or paragraphs is smooth and
controlled. The writer’s use of meaningful transitions and the logical movement from idea
to idea strengthen this progression.
● The organizational strategies the writer chooses allow the writer to present ideas clearly
and effectively.
Development of Ideas
● The writer’s thorough and specific development of each idea creates depth of thought in
the composition, allowing the reader to fully understand and appreciate the writer’s ideas.
● The writer’s presentation of ideas is thoughtful or insightful. The writer may approach
the topic from an unusual perspective, use his/her unique experiences or view of the
world as a basis for writing, or make interesting connections between ideas. In all
these cases, the writer’s willingness to take compositional risks improves the quality of
the composition.
Voice
● The writer uses language that engages the reader and sustains this connection
throughout the composition.
● The composition sounds authentic and original. The writer expresses his/her individuality
or unique perspective.
Conventions
● The strength of the conventions contributes to the effectiveness of the composition.
The writer demonstrates a consistent command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation,
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

grammar, usage, and sentence structure. When the writer communicates complex
ideas through advanced forms of expression, he/she may make minor errors as a result
of these compositional risks. These types of errors do not take away from the overall
fluency of the composition.
● The words, phrases, and sentence structures the writer uses enhance the effectiveness
of the communication of ideas.

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 131
Anchor Papers: Student Writing Samples

Form A
Score Point 1

Picter

Onse I make a picter. I draw it it was fun.

Focus and Coherence—Gives little information about the topic.
Organization—Minimal sense of organization and no transitions between thoughts.
Development of Ideas—Provides little or no development of ideas.
Voice—Does not express a personal voice.
Conventions—Frequent errors in grammar, spelling, mechanics, and usage.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

132 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Score Point 2

My clay model
I made a craft out of clay. It was a model of a airplane. It
looked like the plane I flyed wen I went on a trip. The trip was
to florda.

Focus and Coherence—Gives information about a craft but strays from the topic.
Organization—Some attempt at organization; no transitions.
Development of Ideas—Attempts to develop ideas with generic supporting details; presents
ideas in a basically logical order.
Voice—Has difficulty expressing an inviting, unique tone.
Conventions—Errors in spelling do not interfere with understanding; sentences are
somewhat awkward.
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 133
Score Point 3

Happy Birthday Card!
I made a great craft. For my moms birthday I made her a card.
I used blue paper. Blue is her favrit color. I put glitter on it and
write HAPPY BIRTHDAY. She liked it lots. I’m glad I made it.

Focus and Coherence—Gives information about a central topic and the focus is consistent.
Organization—Includes a topic sentence and demonstrates a logical organization pattern.
Development of Ideas—Presents a main idea and supports it with details (“blue paper,” “I put
glitter on it and write HAPPY BIRTHDAY.”);
Voice—Uses a personal voice that generally expresses an inviting, unique tone.
Conventions—Spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage are mostly correct; sentences
lead naturally to those that follow.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

134 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Score Point 4

Pretty Necklaces
I like to make necklaces. I use beads of different colors. I start
with a peace of string and put the beads on it. I put the beads on
in a pattern. I have to be carefull not to let the beads fall off so
I put tape on one end of the string. It can take a long time but
when I finish I have a pretty necklace!

Focus and Coherence—Gives interesting and detailed information about the topic; the focus of
the composition is clear.
Organization—Presents a main idea that is logically developed by supporting details.
Development of Ideas—Thoroughly develops main idea; uses precise words (“in a pattern,”
“tape on one end of the string”).
Voice—Uses a personal voice that expresses an inviting, unique tone.
Conventionsy—Writing is almost entirely free of mechanical, grammatical, and spelling errors;
sentences flow from one to the other.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 135
Form B
Score Point 1

Toys
I lik to play toys. I go to my frends i lik to play with a yo yo.
It is fun.

Focus and Coherence—Gives little specific information and strays from the topic.
Organization—Little evidence of an organizational pattern.
Development of Ideas—Provides little development of ideas; does not use transitions or
supporting details.
Voice—Does not express a personal voice.
Conventions—Frequent errors in grammar, spelling, mechanics, and usage; sentences are
choppy and unvaried.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

136 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Score Point 2

Basketball
I like to playe with mi basketball. I am really good at makking
baskets Sometimes I can even win my big brother. he is ten. He
likes baseball to.

Focus and Coherence—Gives basic information about the topic but focus strays.
Organization—Some evidence of an attempt at organization.
Development of Ideas—Attempts to develop ideas (“good at makking baskets,” “Sometimes
I can even win my big brother.”) but offers few specific details.
Voice—Has difficulty expressing an inviting, unique tone.
Conventions—Mistakes may interfere with the reader’s understanding of the writing; sentences
flow in a somewhat fluid manner.
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 137
Score Point 3

Greatest Doll
My best toy is my doll. She can drink water. She can also
blink her eyes. There is a computer inside her so when you put
her down or don’t feed her she starts to cry. I play with her all
the time.

Focus and Coherence—Gives detailed information about a central topic.
Organization—Includes a topic sentence (“My best toy is my doll.”) and supports it with
specific details in a logical order.
Development of Ideas—Develops ideas logically; chooses precise words to suit the purpose.
Voice—Uses a personal voice that generally expresses an inviting, unique tone.
Conventions—Spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage are mostly correct; sentences
lead naturally to those that follow.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

138 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Score Point 4

Video Game
My favorite toy is my video game. I play it everyday. My high
score is over 10,000. You can choose the color hair and eyes and
skin you have. Your job is to save the gold from the monster.
You can have special powers like flying and freezing time. My
favorite part is making it to a new level. I didn’t win yet, but I
know I will soon.

Focus and Coherence—Gives interesting and detailed information about the topic.
Organization—Presents a main idea that is supported by clear, factual details, which are
presented in a logical order.
Development of Ideas—Thoroughly develops ideas, uses precise descriptive language
(“special powers like flying and freezing time”).
Voice—Uses a personal voice that adds an inviting, unique tone to the writing.
Conventions—Almost entirely free of mechanical, grammatical, and spelling errors; sentences
are varied and flow from one to the other.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 139
Teacher Notes

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140 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Teacher Notes
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 141
Teacher Notes

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142 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Teacher Notes
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 143
Teacher Notes

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144 Grade 1 Benchmark Assessment
Teacher Notes
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Benchmark Assessment Grade 1 145