•••••

WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING
1874
Suggestions regarding the survey organization ••••
Summary of results ............................ ..
Page.
39
4 ~
Scheme for publication of results .............. 0 ••
Explanation of the skeleton·map ................ .
APPENDIX A.
Page.
42
43
Page.
Pre.liminary astronomical report, by Astronomical A88istant J. H. Clark. ...... ..... .... .... ...... ...... .... .... 44
APPENDIX B.
Preliminary astronomical report, by Astrono1!lical Assistant William W. Maryatt... .... ...... ...... ...... •. • ••• 45
APPENDIX C.
Report of Lieut. W. J,. Marshall, Corps of Engineers, upon sextant astronomical observations. .••• . .••••• . ...... 41
of the season.
Second Lieut. Wallace Mott, Eighth United States Infantry, was in charge of the infantry
troops, forming part of the escort, in addition to which duties he, in several cases, assisted in
astronomical and meteorological observations.
At many times during the season each of these officers was placed ill executive charge of a
field· party.
The Medical Department provided for the wants of the parties, one surgeon and one hospital·
steward; the former, Dr. H. C. Yarrow, has acted both as surgeon and naturalist, taking charge
of the operations in both spheres of duty. llospital·Steward T. V. Brown, a member of the expe·
dition of 1871, performed, in addition to his accustomed military labors, those of an observer with
meteorological instruments.
.1 l1CSIrC to state that thanks are due to lihe several omcers ana ClVUlan al:lSistanUi engaged
upon the work, without whose individual sympathy with their duties the operations of the 8C88On
could not have been brought to 80 successful a termination.
In this department, labors were successfully carried on by five topographers in as many distinct
parties. Their efforts for the season in the measuremeut of bases at the main stations, in the occu-
pation of a great number of secondary triangulation stations, and, in burn, the subsidiary points
along a large number of mountain ranges, have a.ggregated a mass of material more than suffi-
ciently elaborate for the construction of the topographical sheets on a scale of one inch to eight
miles as proposed. Their labors, one a:d all, are worthy of commendation. In special cases, for
the expression of certain geological and allied features, more details have been gathered, and
the results can be expressed upon a larger scale. llowever, the scale above mentioned, which
will also be adopted for the larger portion of the geological atlas, will be ample for the delineation
in color of the surface' exposure of the different geological formations noted. Details obtained with
2w
horary changes, oolliiJiDed 'nth monthly and other means, wiii ue embraced in

oitlRle iii of tho
published quarto series of the survey.
GEOLOGICAL.
The f o l l o w i n ~ assistants have carried on their labors in this department during the season:
Messrs. G. K. Gilbert and E. E. Howell. The progress report from the former is herewith, and
marked Appendix D.
It is proposed from year to year to so combine the personnel of the several field-parties
as to be able to make as soon as possible a connected geological surTey as well as a topographi-
cal one.
The time heretofore allowed to the geologists has not been sufficient for such a purpose.
I
- ~
Exploral.!ons and Surveys Wesl of the
Exped Ii lOti of 187Z
· P t\Jf-,.
I·"?/.,
',1-
,;.

,:':
11 ,v

CAMP AT BEAVER, BELKNAP PEAK AND VICINITY. UTAH.
l' ,. 2·:
Report PI,li.(: 11.
Lleul.Geo M Wheeler. Corps of Eng(s , (, OIlldg.
.,
1
t

of
RAj N SCU LPTU RE -SALT CREEK CANON- UTAH
It has been considered that the prof(.'s:'IlonaI uses of photography, as au udj U I I \ : ; ~ I.u ii ~ U l H"Y
of this character, are few, 80 far comparat.ively littlo good beyond that which isor general intermIt
HS expressive of the scenic foatllrtlS of specified areas. T'he material data gathered from its use
apply only to the departments of geology and natural history.
In these departments, where, as is well ontier8tood, we are obliged to leave the field of exact
science, tho special value that comes from -a geological serics of photographs results in the deter-
mination of a relative comprehension of the size and contour of tho rock-beds and of the general
features of tho topograpllY of the country.
Should we, by the application of skilled labor and the refinement of instrumonts, be able to
give a valne to the horizontal and vertical measnrements npon a photographic picture, at once the
subject changes and an addition to positive data is gained. I have faith that this matter may be 80
far advanced from its present stage as to secure these features. Should this pro.e so or not, I
· '-
CANON OF KANAB WASH-COLORADO RIVER-LOOKINC SOUTH.
Star, Ophir, Long Valley, and Hualapais districts, that bid fair to become permanent camps. In
many other where the surface-exposures found seemed to promise largely, little mining-
camps have either been deserted or a limited amount of work is kept up by the hardy pioneers,
only to be suspended upon the exhaustion of their supplies.
In this way a scratching only of the surface is made; and, although it t.akes long to overcome
the lost reputation of an abandoned district, still in most of these cases nothing has been done
aU toward determining the problem whether or not a compensating amount of precious metals can
be roum1 after the requisite preliminary exploration. Where work has been carried to a consider-
able extent and mines opened along several levels, it may prove that the ores are so meager, and,
because of the large cost of the transportation of supplies and material to and from the districts,
and the high price of labor, it is not a profitable investment to continue mining farther.
In many cases, after the time necessary to push forward interior communioation, and more
.... __ , ani!
started with the intention of working from that point, and has been run 220 feet. If successful,
it is expected that a railroad will be carried there. The Miller mine-ledge lies along a prominent
spur between American Fork proper and a creek coming in from the north and westward. Near the
top of the ridge, from ravines of the ridge to tho westward, even to the summit, prospects are found;
11ide Silver Glance, Live Yankee, &c. Pittsburgh is at the north end of the American Fork. The
district bas not been sufficiently developed to determine the general direction of lodes, deposits,
and stratifications, nor the relations existing between the richness of the veins and the local char-
acter of the country-rock. There is a series of deposits running at various angles. The ores are
smelting, though some milling ores have been found near the summit and opposite the Mil-
ler. Gold occurs, reaching as high as $:!5 to the ton of base bullion; seldom less than $20. The
Miller Mining and Smelting Oompany have the only reduction works yet erected, consisting of
tho Emma Hill. Still farther westward, we come to Frederick Hill and Davenport Ilill, north anll
east from Grizzly Flat. In Vallejo the harder the rock the richer the ore, and vice 'Versa. The
metamorphosed monntain·limestone has no regular dip; the strike is to the eastward, the entire
bed resting on quartzite. The ores are worked by the smelting process so far. In certain mines
there are indications of a change towards milling ore. Galena ore averages to yield (according to
}Ir. McDonald) between $90 and '100. The ore in the Windsor mine is the most likely to change
into milling ore. Assays show the presence of gold in the silver·bearing ores. In Superior Gnlch
certain silver· bearing ores near the surface bave given as high as $40 per ton. The principal
mines pow worked are the Emma, Flagstaff, Davenport, South Star, Savage, Montezuma, Grizzly,
Hiawatha, Last Chance No.2, Highland Ohief, Ohio, Frederick, Titus, 'Wellington, Pocahontas,
Enterprise, Peruvian, Ida Brown, Lapham, and Lexington. The first sixteen are well developed
This district was discovered in 1864, and located, as the Big Cottonwood mining-district, March
17, 1870. It has been worked continuously ever since. The area CQvered by mineral croppings is
about forty square miles. The ores found are smelting. Assays show the presence of small per-
centages of gold in the silVE'lr-bearing ores. The principal mines now worked are the Reed and
Benson, Comet and Robert Emmet, (near the Reed and Benson,) Marine, Pannacca, and Kingsberg,
(Mineral Fork,) Sailor's Jack, Provo, McDougall, aud Homeward Bound, (Kesler's Peak,) Richmond,
Theresa, Congress, Davenport, Wellington, Highland Chief, Prince of Wales, and Wandering Boy,
(Silver Fork,) Beckwith, Casper, and Wahsatch, (Honeycomb,) Ontario, Mullen Zook, Evergreen,
(South Fork of Mineral Fork,) Mountain Lake, Brighton, Day, Bemoth, and Mastodon, (Silver
Lake,) Elgin, Eclipse, Scott, and Golden Era, (Scott Hill,) and Maxfield. There is one smelting-
furnace, the Hawk-Eye, not running at present.
nearly the same, including transportation and expense of construction.. The average cost for mining
tbe ore is from .4 to .6 per ton; mining labor averages .3.50 to .4 per diem. One man can extract
about 2 tons of ore per day. Tbe average cost of running a drift on a main vein is .10 per foot;
grain costs 3 to 4 cents per pound; hay, .25 per ton; no facilities for ra.isin g farm-produce. There
is a good stock range. The sources of supply are the Mormon settlements in Juab and Utab, Utah Ter-
ritory. Tbere is plenty of wood for fuel, but no good timber on the mountains and foot-hilltl. Timber
is hauled moretban thirty miles from the Wahsatchat a cost of 4icents per foot. Water is limited;
about Eureka and Homansville are several good springs; elsewhere in the district water can be
found by sinking wells iu the canous from 30 to 95 foot. Tbe district contains 600 inhabitants.
Tbere is one stage-line, (Wells, Fargo & Co.,) but no regular freight-lines. At present, it is fifty'
miles to the terminus of the Utah Southern Railroad, which will eventually run within twenty-four
3w
.Boy, ]!'anny Fern, Galena, Spanish, Saturn, Crresus, and Last Chance.
The Winamuck mine, Winamuck County, (on the ground of Messrs. Daggett & Bristol,) is
described as follows: Strike southeast; dip 33
0
northeast; foot-wall quartzite; hanging wall an
altered sandstone impregnated with metalliferous minerals; ,-ein-matter quartzose un oxidized
ore, argentiferolls galena, pyrite present as au impurity, slight copper-stains; thickness of vein 18
feet; average5 to 6 feet; fissure-walls good, iu places couspicuous. Principal body of ore reached
is oxidized, the lead being in the form of au o x i d e ~ and the silver (supposed to be) in that of chlo-
ride. There are two tunnels on the vein, 450 and 500 feet; incline, 260 feet. Little Stocking, located
on the south side of calion, one mile below Monument. Mine was bonded by present owners, and
after exploration, purchased of original locators (eighteen months ago) for t13,000; since which, it
bas been put in the English market. Twenty-five men are employed.
stroke, 42 inches. The ore is drie<l before crushing; screens, 00 to the inch; 8
4i feet in diameter; 4 settlers, 7 feet in diameter. The mill was made by H. G. Booth & Co., fnrnished
on contract by White & Allen, for $65,500. An Aikin furnace was also built, for $12,000, but
proves nnnecessary; the mill saves 88 per cent. of pulp-assay. Fuel costs $5 per cord; cedar,
pine, and mahogany being used. The average cost of mining labor is from $3 to $4 per day. There
is timber and a saw-mill in East Canon. Water is brought 14,000 feet in asphalt pipes, at a cost of
$5,000. The district contains 300 inhabitants. The country-roads are high-grade toll-roads.
OPHIR DISTRICT, UTAH.
[From notes furnished by Mt. G. K. Gilbert.]
This district was formerly included in the Uush district, which was discovered in 1864; Ophir
district set off August 6, 1870, and has been worked continuously since that time. It is about
are a few small springs. The district contains but two inhabitants. The country·roads are good.
NORTH STAR DISTRICT, UTAH.
[From DOtes famished by Mr. G. K. Gilbert.]
This district was discovered March 8, 1871, and organized November 9,1871, and worked con·
tinuously since that time. Nearest railroad·communication is via Fillmore to the Utah Southern
Railroad, a distance of one hundred and ninety miles. The area covered by miueral croppings is
about three miles east and west by six miles north and east. The mining.ledges lie aloug the
summit and along both slopes. Trend is north and south. The general direction of lodes, &c., is
northeast and southwest. The veins cross the country·rock at all angles. The richest veins are
country·roaus are good. No Indians.
LINCOLN DISTRICT, UTAH.
[From notes furnished by Mr. G. K. Gilbert.]
The mines in this district were discovered in 1859, and included (with Granite district) in the
Pioneer district in 1860; re·organized January 16, 1871, and worked until November, 1871. The
developments are in an arc one mile by one·half mile, trending northwest, and including Grnndy
Spring. The mining·ledges are on the south face of Mineral Granite range, which trends north
and south. General strike of strata and veins is west and south. Dip of both is easterly. The ores
are chiefly of smelting grade; assays show the presence of gold in the silver.bearing ores; gold
has also been found by panning. There are no miues worked at the present time. No mill. The
Blue Olaud, on the southern side of the canon, about three-fourths of a mile from Webster
and Homestead to the west, 250 feet above the valley. Vein 4 feet, running north and south. Tun-
nel 31 feet long; little denloped. Assays $250.
Springtown, one-fourth mile west of the former and on about the same level. Tunnel 82 feet
long; ledge running north and south; 4 feet wide; picked ores assay from '600 to $800. Work,
as a general rule, never less than '125; considerable copper and silver blend occurring; gold 25
per cent.
Belcher, about 100 yards west and 80 feet above Springtown; narrow vein in quartzite; tunnel
40 feet 101lg; assays from $160 to $190; not much developed; direction of vein northeast and
southwest.
Niagara, about one-fourth mile to the southwest of Belcher, and about 120 feet below; in the
'this district was organized in August, 1871, but not yet worked. It is located eight miles west
of Cedar City. The area covered by mineral croppings is about 190 square acres. There are no
developments, except dam to reservoir, and a few roads. Trend of longer axis is north and south,
Mining-ledges run northwest and southeast; main range running east and west. The claims are
situated in a gap opening sontheast and northwest, in the northern portion of the Iron Mountains.
Foot-hills and spurs trend north and south and northeast and southwest. The general direction of
the ledges is northwest and southeast i the lodes dip and strike the country-rock perpendicular,
and no relation is found to exist between the country-rock and the veins, except a slight iron color-
ing of the former. The ores are hematite and magnetic. The ores in this district have a much
finer grain than those at Iron City, and seem to be richer by 10 to 15 per cent. The average yield
is 75 per cent. Some of the ores have been worked by the Mormons about sixteen years ago, at
Cedar City, with .tolerably good success, considering the imperfect furnace erected there-at that
,
cipal miues are sliver. The East Ledge, shalt pei'pendiCUlai', l ~ feet; l\lonswr, shaft perpendicu-
lar, 60 feet; Putnam, shaft perpendicular, 25 feet; Little Brig, shaft perpendicular, 6 feet; Mam-
moth, Washingtou, Humboldt, North Oarolina, and others. Very little work has been done 011
the four last named. Iron mines are the Duncan Ledge, on southern slope j very large deposit of
about three-fourths of a mile in diameter in a blue limestone formation; hematite-ores, with 311
excellent road from Iron City; distance about four miles northeast; ore contains 74 per cent. pure
iron j about three-fourths of a mile northeast of this ledge a lode containing conglomerate ore of
silver, iron, copper, and lead was discovered, (runniug east snd west.) Assays show $30 silver
per ton. This lode is not considered worth working for either of the metals contained therein.
Abont 300 yards north from this ledge a small arsenic vein, three-fourths of an inch, has been founel.
2, 'CHlm::',"="
Agnes, Saint Patrick, and Lily. The Olive Branch tunnel runs through four lodes-Hague,
Revolution, Atlantic, and Olive Branch. The mines in this distriot are only in the first stage of
development. Capital is sadly wanted, and consequently further developments can only take place
iu ('.ourse of due time. The veins and ores look very promising. Mill-site and woodlands have
not yet been located. There is very little water in the immediate vicinity of the mines, and wood
can only be procured at a distanee of about five to seven miles, from the high foot-hills of Mount
Nebo. The average C O l ~ t for mining the ore is '9 per ton. The average cost of mining labor is '3
per diem, and one lUan can extract one-third of a ton of ore per day. It costs $6 (average) per
foot to run a drift on a main vein. There are no chances for a decrease in mining expenses.
Grain is $1 per bushel; hay, $10 per ton. Salt amI Willow Creeks (24 and 18 inches respectively)
4W
\"iL.u ieutl jjUlio have Deeii lliiHetl. "l."I.,ie dUSLi"lct has .lu LO iHiia,tlilc"j,ijl,s, who ha,"o
n.o regular means of communication with other points.
PIERMONT DISTRICT , NEVADA.
[From notes furnished by Mr. G. K. Gilbert.]
Discovered and organized in July, 1869. The area coV"ered by mineral croppings is not grl".at.
The mining-ledges are in a canon of the east slope of the Schell Creek range. General strike of
the lodes, deposits, and stratifications is north and south. The ores arc free, and assays show the
presence of gold in the silver-bearing ores Ii per cent. of value ill bulli(,lI. The principal mine is the
Piermont. This lode is said to be folded or to occupy a fold, and its two parts dill east and west
at 450 ; extreme depth, 150 fep,t; total shaft and illcline, 5;")0 feet,; tUlIlleftl, 1,0"" fl'ct. One thou-
are very good. There are about 100 men, women, and children of the Goshute tribe of Indians in
the vicinity.
SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT.
rFrom notes fnrnished by Mr. Francis Klett.]
Discovered May 23 and organized June 1, 1872, and has been worked continuously since organi.
zation. The nearest railroad·communication is one bundred and seventy miles. The area covered
by mineral croppings is supposed to be 30,000 acres; the mining·ledges run parallel with the
monntain.range situated on divides between canons. The general direction of lodes, deposits, and
stratifications is north and south; dip to the west. 'rho ores are sulphurets and bromides, and
IUIsays show the proscnce of gold ill small quantities. The principal mines are Secnrity ledge, Mc-
basins.
In turn, the amount of rain-fall per sqnare mile in the great interior basin is very much less than
that over the Colorado basin, aud bears but a small ratio to that known to exist in the basin of the
Columbia.
It is unfortunate that we have so little systematic data at typical points thronghout these
areas upon which to base a numerical calculation as to either relative or positive amounts of' pre-
cipitation. A physical distinction of the most marked character is found in tracing the course of
any stream in the interior basin f r o ~ its monntain source or sources to its valley-sink. Most fre-
quently, until the stream emerges from t h ~ mountains, the cnrrent is swift, and the average fall, the
erosive agents of nature that are constantly acting upon the sedimentary strata and other rock-
--
case admit of the practical elucidation of the problem.
From the large amount of humidity gathered along the crests of the Rocky Mountains and
otber parts of tbe dividing ridge of the continent, from the thirty-fifth to the forty-ninth parallel,
there seems to be but little doubt that a comprehensive canal-system would direct such a volume
of water to accessible points now arid upon tbe plains, along the eastern flanks of these ridges, as
to make it a matter of sufficient interest to have, in connection with the general topographical sur·
vey of that region, a series of special contours marked out, intersecting the axial lines of the
basins at altitudes somewhat greater than the generql contour of the conn try lying to the eastward.
Large tracts in these sections would then, if irrigation ensue, become agricultural. Farther east·
ward, the sinking of the artesian wells ought to be 8uccessrul if points are carefully selected, and
vast grazing-fields become habitable for stock. I will here state that the objects to be gained by
----------_.
lDate and subject to much modification, still that the probabilities are in favor of assigning at least
200,000,000 acres to this class.
In this entire portion to which an application of the system may be made, it needs but a single
glance to determine that this question becomes a natiollal one.
The objects to be gn,ined by irrigation are m,my, and will from year to year be better under-
stood. It is plain that the Government can afford to IDflke large temporary sacrifices of parcels of
this land, as it would in return reap the remUlleriLtion to enSU6 froID the enhanced value of territory
now entirely add.
Should the gl1ueral of irriga.tion in all or l>art of the dOlllJoin west of the Mississil>pi be
determined upon, the Rubject will naturally receive full and earnest consideration at the hands of
CongreRs whell represented by the difl'erent Stntes and Territories.
.. ..,"n''''6 the area OI tile many
valleys among the interior basins, and eliminating from it the area of sand·exposure, and that of
a few half-mesa gravelly beds that protrude into them from the base of the foot-hills, we have a
pretty general view of the amount of lund araule, or that may be made such, in the State of
Nevada, portions of Utah, California, and Arizona, so far as my experience reaches. Take from
that tlte very small amount which is apparently arable, nuder rude method!!! of irrigation, and we
have left that amount which, if artificially irrigated, might be made productive, thereby largely
enhancmg the value of onr public domain. It is believed that in certain localities where underly-
ing clay and marl beds more neady approach the surface, by deep planting most of. the grains
and vegetables can be raised without artificial irrigation at the 8urfa(!c. This has been prm·ell
in Parahnagat Valley, Nevada. Indeed, the Moqnis anl1 Zuni Pueblo Indians of Arizona aud
tribute would, at least as much as those lauds known as double-miuimum lands, afford an iucreased
revenne from their sale.
ROUTES OF COMMUNICATION.
The examinations of the present year give data from which certain conclusions may be drawn
regarding the locus of prominent lines of interior communication. This refers more especiaUy to
those lines that depart but little from a northern and southern direction.
The constantly accumulating series of profiles along lines of various azimuths create a record
from which much may be drawn at such time in the future as the growing wants of interior com-
munication call for t.he opening of new rontes. West of the dividing ridge of the contineut, between
the parallels of 49
0
aud 32
0
north latitude: most of the routes of interior commuuication must for-
5w
ernment bas boon made to comanue the construction or tnese roads. Here and there, in the vicinity
of military posts, the troops have been called npon for some little labor in local constructions. It
wonld, in my opinion, be wise economy on tile part of the Government to inaugurate anew the sur·
veys and estimates for the construction of more accessible routes between the several military
establishments of the interior, govemed by necessities for their supply, possibility of the movement
of troops in the change of stations or in operations against the Indians, or in placiug of the mili·
tary force with celerity at points where they may be called upon to sustain the civil law. If, for
instance, it costs 2 cents per pound per hundred miles fro:n, we will RAY, Santa F ~ , to transport
supplies by contract south or westward 011 existiug roads for this ye'ar, and during this year a road
shall have been improved 25 per cent. on a new route discovered and opened, impro###BOT_TEXT###quot;ing travel by
this amount; then, in subsequent years, if the contract were not Ii cents per pound per hundred
miles, it certainly would be less than 2 cents per pound per hundred miles. With very Htt.le trouble,
liualapais LLUlU lIUdll l'VIUIJ,
persons who have reached the summit of the low divide joining Hualapais Valley with the wash
that leads to the river from the south, about three-fourths of a mile below the mouth of the Grand
Wash. Reaching the head of the Hualapais Valley, one road might diverge to the mines in the
Cerbat range, an.d another to those in the Hualapais range, as branches from the main route.
The total distance of the shortest of these routes from Salt Lake to Prescott is five hundred
and eighty-five miles. The most direct from Salt Lake City to the south, until latitude 37
0
30' is reached, is the present traveletI stage-route to Nephi; thence entering the vaUey of the
Sevier, Gunnison is reached, anti following it to its whence by a low valley divide the Kanab
Creek can be gained. At this point a series of flank movements to the east will be necessary, in
order to reach the first practicable crossing of the Colorado at the mouth of Paria Creek. The
profiles from whence the information might be derived as to the route from the head of Kanab
the limit of vegt"wtioii.
Our land-surveys have not reached many of the areas covered by the forests, hence the
adventurous squatter has full possession, and consumes the property which he temporariJy enjoys
at will. The result very naturally appears as an improvident wastage of forest-products, with no
return to the Government, and with the danger, at an early day, of the most damaging decimation
of the forests containing trees of t.he kinds above mentione9. It would Reem wise that the Govern-
ment, through some of its branches, should take cognizance of this matter, and, by legal enactment
or otherwise, stay the fearful cutting of timber, which, in connection with the many mining-towns,
agricnltural settlements, and military posts, will fast bring about the disappearance of forest-
products that in time must have an effect upon the local climates.
UnfortunateJy the small areas that are under cultivation bring about no opposite to this state
of affairs by the creation of other areas of increased exportation.
Lake and in the San Rafael, that have not yet accepted the offers of the Government,'and have
thus far been on no reservation. The settlers on the Upper Sevier, until as late as 1868, have had
frequent difficulties with these Indians, and it was necessary at one time for the former to with·
draw. Of later years, there has beeu a better feeling existing, and these Indians could, doubtless, be
consolidated with the Uintah and White River Utes, on a reservation iu that vicinity. The Seovietz
are a small nomadic tribe, who live by hunting, upon roots, mice, &c., along parts of the valley of
the Colorado, in the Grand Wash, and numerous canons and narrow valleys that lead into it. Here
and there they plant small fields of corn, wheat, squashes, and melons, but the amouut raised fur·
nishes only a small share of their subsistence. South of the Colorado, about New Creek and Dia·
mond Creek, they are quite successful in hunting, but to thE\ north they live a squalid and miserable
existence. At the date of our crossing the Colorado, a party of volunteers and Pah-Utes, about
seventy in number, bad just been collected to go on a scout with General Crook against the Apaches.
continue to recede bef<m, "ggn,s .. ivl'l .. ud expanding enterprise .. , which iu turn bring wealth to tue
nation, and correspondingly enhance the prospects of peaceful relations.
OOLORADO OANoNS.
Two parties during the season have visited at special points the lower of the main grand
canons of the Oolorado River.
These points command all the crossings of the river known to exist from the foot of the canon
as Elmdo de los Padres. The results, affording some of the most striking topographical details that
are known in the world, can be but partially delineated upon a map, no matter what its scale may be.
Photography assists us somewhat in gat.hering ideas of local forms, but fails entirely to impress
one with the. grandeur of the sbapes and details of coloring expressed in nature.
Plates 4 and 5 are characteristic sections across the canon.
L 1 \! ;'1! I,!!
Lleul Geo M'Wheeler, Corps of E n g r ' ~ , Com. ,',::
CRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO-MOUTH OF KANAB WASH, LOOKINC EAST.
I
_ 5

i
I
- - - - - - - - - . - - . - - ~
vne c.l:uei: topographer;
One assistant topograpber and meteorologist;
One geologist;
One: collector;
One odometer-recorder; and
Eigbt engineer-soldiers.
MAIN FIELD-PARTY No.3.
One officer of engineers, executive and astronomical duty;
One officer of tbe line, assisting;
One cbief topographer;
1
It has been fonnd that, where an executive Omoor is caiied upon to carry ou field astronomical
observations, the duties of his position become too arduous; hence he should have assistance,
80 that the executive aud astronomical duties may be divided up between the two persons.
For assisting astronomical parties and to protect the public property and animals of the work-
ing field-force, I have thought it wise to suggest that a special detail, to consist of two sergeants,
three corporals, and twenty-five enlisted men of the engineer-battalion, be stationed near the obser-
vatory-site at Ogden, Utah; said station to be ill charge of an engineer-officer selected for that
purpose.
At this point could be established an interior depot of supplies, which is quite necessary for
the economic interests of the service, and as a matter of convenience to the survey.
One naturalist; and
Three collectors.
One photographer; and
One artist.
Three draugbtsmen.
Twenty-four engineer-soldiers.
6w
NATURAL HISTORY.
GENERAL.
OFFICE.
ESCORT.
- - ~ - - - - - --_. - --- -- .... ~ - - - - -
iornia; a final report of tbat year goes forward to the present Oongress, in answer to call of tbat
body of January 9, 1873. A preliminary report and map of the of 1871 appeared in,be
spring of 1872. Tbe progress-report for the year 1872 is herewith.
A variety of office-publications bave been necessary as aids to the compilation of the immense
mass of topographical and other material gathered by the survey.
SCHEME FOR PUBLIOATION OF RESULT8.
The annual report submitted to the Chief ,of Engineers, .June 30,1873, presents the scheme
proposed for tbe pUblications pertaining to the survey tbus far, as follows:
It is proposed to group the material at disposal into tbe following form:
1st. Six 'luarto volumes.
--
- -----. ............. - - - - - - ~
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS "WEST 0'1' mE ONE-HUNDREDTH ME
-=-------
r
- - - --- - - - - - - " - ~ - -
I
I
, 1
I
' I
has been KlnQly furntsueu trom the records of theI!Jogilleer uepartment. Although its compilation
was exceedingly hasty, most of the information which it contains has been accurately transferred.
The rontes laid down are only those resulting from the expeditions where maps have been
rendered to the Burean of Engineers for pnblication or for use in the compilation of their general
topographical maps, and cannot be expected to embrace tbe large number of military expeditions
of various characters that have been directed from the headquarters of the several geographical
and military departments of the interior.
This map has been extremely valuable for a variety of office· uses in connection with the com·
pilation of our finished maps, and will form the basis of a series of topographical and other maps
of this scale, proposed for publication from time to time.
of Oambridge, Mass. The chronograph was also used to record the observations for time. These
automatic signa.ls were excha.nged six evenings; besides, there was one evening of ordinary signals.
For latitude there was a list from the British Association Oatalogue of about 40 pairs, most of
which were measured from six to eight times, and will give some 175 results. The apllroximate
latitude is 41
0
07l' ; longitude, 28
m
20- east of Salt Lake observatory.
FORT FRED STEELE.
For the determinations at Fort Steele, as also at the subsequent station, Laramie Oity, the
instruments used were the same as those employed at Oheyenue, and they were mounted in the
same manner. The observatory here was very favorably situated in respect to the jar and smoke
of the trains; there was a deep ravine between it and the track, and, being on the west side, it was
to the windwarrl.
APPENDIX B.
PRELIMINARY AS'fRONOMIOAL REPORT, BY WILLIAM W. MARYATT, A ~ T R O N O M
ICAL ASSISTANT.
UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE,
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS WEST OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH MERIDIAN,
Washington, D. G., February 18, 1873.
Sm: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to su1)mit the following brief pre·
liminary report of my observations for latitudes and longitudes during the field-season of 1812:
Observations were condncted by me at the following-
On evenings when exchanges of signals were effected, observations for two independent deter·
minations were made, one series preceding and the other im mediately following the exchange.
TELEGRAPHIO SIGNALS.
Telegraphic signals for difference in longitude were exchanged with President Brigham
Young's observatory in Temple Square, Salt Lake Oity, with which the requisite connections
were made at the first two stations by the Deseret Telegraph-Line, (A. M. Musser, superintendent,)
and at the last by a wire of the Atlantic and Pacific line, (J. J. Dicky, superiutendent.)
The Salt Lake observatory was in charge of Mr. Edward P. Austin, principal astronomical
observer to the expedition.
The exchanges consisted, first, in receiving, during an interval of five minutes, in addition to
and circum-meridiau altitudes of the same body and altitudes of Polaris.for latitude.
When the camps were for a single night, east and west stars were observed for time, and Polaris
and, when practicable, south stars for lat·itude.
At all rendezvous-camps, and partioularly at main astronomical stations, t.he observations were
multiplied.
By comparing the results at the latter points with those obtained by the use of more perfect
instruments, the limit of probable error at the sextant-stations may be found.
LONGITUDE.
Throughout the season, M. S. box-chronometer No. 1501 by Myers, and pocket-chronometer
No. 1497 by Frodsham, were carried by Lieutenant Hoxie, and M. S. No. 1521
chiefly composed of crushed and altered Paleozoic strata, alternate with somewhat broader valleys,
half filled with the waste of the mountains; in the southeastern, which belongs to the plateau
region of the Upper Colorado, the rock·s.vstem, ranging from the Tertiary to the Devonian, is com-
paratively undisturbed, and denudation has left its harder beds in a succession of steps. A set
of parallel faults across these steps cuts them into a system of limited tables, which are so
thoroughly drained by tributaries of the Colorado and Sevier Rivers that the valley-deposits inter-
fere little with geological examinations, while deep canons afford frequent natnral sections. In the
fOrmer province rocks are of frequf'nt occurrence, and in both are considerable areas
occupied by lavas. Metalliferous vei ns are almost entirely confined to the former; but the latter
contains coal inexhaustible in quantity and widely distributed.
From the great diversity of material aftorded by this field, I have selected for brief mention
here a few facts of semewhat general interest.
slight antiquity. The majority of them were covered by the lake; but a few have been formed since
the subsidence, and these are so fresh as to be absolutely devoid of vegetation.
These features of the Hooding of Great Salt La.ke Valley, namely, that it a temporary
climatal extreme, and that its occurrence was, geologicaUy speaking, very recent, lead me to regard
it as contemporary with the general glaciation of the northern portion of the continent, Rnd with
the formation of the numerous local glaciers of western mountain-systems, and to consider it, in
common with them, a phenomenon of the Glacial epoch. While the general climatal change that
caused or accompanied that epoch (depression of' temperature, carrying with it decrease of evap-
oration, if not increase of precipitation) may be adduced as the cause of the inundation of Utah,
there is no reason to suppose that the relath'e humidities of the portions of the continent
were greatly changed; and this consideration will aid in accounting for the fact that tbe;,
7w
and are intimately associated with ridges of upheaval. The regular alternations of curved anti-
clinals and syncliuals of the Appalachians demand the assumption of great horizontal diminution
of the space covered by the disturbed strata, and suggest lateral pressure as the immediate force
concerned; while in the Cordilleras, the displacement of comparatively rigid bodies of stmta by
vertical or nearly vertical faults involves little horizontal diminution, and suggests the application
of vertical pressure from below. For theRe reasous, and others that will be adduced in the final
report, I regard the forces that have npheaved the Cordilleras as distinctively deep-seated, pro-
ducing, in a portion of the earth's crust below the immediate surface, inequalities, perhaps nndula-
tions, in adjusting to whicb, under gravity, tbe upper portion of the crust bas assumed the forms
we see.
,
• The po88ibility of the formation of glaciers and their magnitude at au;v point depend on precipitation no 1_ than
temperature.
FIG. 2. Ideal aootiou of valley between moontain ridges, m "1 i II, imperviolls bed i w, well.
this is not likely to be fulfilled in a narrow valley among the Oordilleras, but may in a broad onl'.
I can think of no place where I should be more confident of artesian water than on the Great Salt
Lake Desert-say on the jornada between Granite Rock and Redding Spring-but pure watl'r
could not be expected from the bottom of a basin so perfectly land-locked. Some point on the
Amargosa Desert, or in Ralston's Valley or Big Smoky Valley, Nevada, would be more likely to
afford it.
To pierce the indurated rocks, a locality should be selected where those of the adjacent range
dip toward the valley with such inclination and uniformity HS to promise continuity below the
• Identified by a comparison of fossils by Mr. F. B. Meek.
52
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS
vaJIey-deposits, and where, too, the rocks comprise a. proper successiou of permeable and imper-
meable strata.
FIG. 3. Ideal monntain-section: 4, impervions strata j b, water-bearing strata j w, well.
Such localities are very numerous, but are usually so well watered that there is uo demand for
artesiau wells. Exception may be made of the western base of the Fish Oreek range, Utah, near
its northern extremity; of the eastern base of the same range, near Sevier Lake; of the eastern
base of the Beaver Oreek range, Utah; of the western base of the Oedar range, Utah; and of
the western base of the Pahranagat range, under Quartz Mountain, Nevada. The most favorable
of these st.ations are the two last mentioned, but none of them give nnequivocal promise of snccess

My own work bas been flopplemented throughout the season by tbat of tbe assistaut geologist
Mr. E. E. Howell, and tbe data presented above are in part from bis notes. I am specially
indebted.to Messrs. Gilbert Thompson and Francis Klett, of the Topogropbical Corps, for valuable
notes and collections from points not visited by the geologists, and I gratefully acknowledge the
cheerful co·operation and assistance of all the officers and other gentlemen of the party •
. Our tbanks are tendered to Prof. J. E. Olayton, of Schellbourne, Nev., and to Mr. Jobn
Harris, of Glendale, Utah, for valuable fossils.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEORGE M. WHEELER,
First Lielttenant United States Engineers, in charge.
APPENDIX E.
G. K. GILBERT,
OMej Otological Assistant.
REPORT UPON NATURAL-HISTORY OOLLEOTIONS, BY ACTING ASSISTANT SUR-
GEON H. O. YARROW: SURGEON AND NATURALIST.
UNITED STATES ENGIlI.'EER OFFICE,
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS WEs'r OF ONE HUNDREDTH MERIDIAN,
Washington, D.O., January 8, 1873.
Sm: In accordance with verbal instructions received from you, I have the honor to submit
the following preliminary report of the work and collections made in natural history during the
months of Jnly,August, September, October,November, and December, 1872, in Utah, Nevada, and
Arizona., by the expeditIon under your command. Our labors in natural history may be said to have
commenced from the time of our arrival at Salt Lake City, Utah; for, during tbe unavoida.ble delay
incident upon organizing so large an expedition, nearly every moment was occupied in studying
and co])ecting specimens in the vicinity of Salt Lake Oity and Provo, Utah, and I am glad to be
able to state that our researches were richly rewarded. The Great Salt Lake was viRited, and its
waters carefully examined for forms of animal life; but with the exception of Artemia jerlilis, a
crustacean, (lescribed by Prof. A. E. Verrill, of Yale Gollege, some time since, nothing was
found. From certain newspaper and popular reports, we had been led to believe there existed in
the lake a representative of the Anguilla, (eels;) but after a close and careful e:xaminat\on of
the bottom of the lake for upward of sixty miles, no Boch fish could be seen; in short, uo fish
lucuS WCla also secured, and ,Viil ptuuauiy i)imuye valuable IU iu(3,gasiug \luI"' knOWledge uf tha SOllio"
what limited flora of Utah. It is an interesting fact, and worthy of mention, that in Provo is the
only locality in all Utah in which the common garden or angle worm is fonnd. They are not native,
but were introdnced by Doctor Roberts, of tbis city, and have increased to snch an extent as to
completely boney-comb the soil of an the gardens of the vicinity, and in this way greatly assist in
irrigation. To the same pnblic-spirited gentleman, the settlers are indebted for the introdnctionof
the common eastern quail, (Ortyx. VirgianUB., Bonap.,) which is constantly increasing to snch a degree
as to bid fair in a tew years to o###BOT_TEXT###quot;'errun the entire western conntry. After leaving Provo and pro-
• At this place onr attention Willi called to a fish numerons in winter, called by the Mormons" mountain-herring j"
UPOIl iuvestigation, much to onr surprise, this Willi found to be a species of whitefish, (CortgOJlIUI WilliarRllOlli,) a native
of the fauna of Puget Sound. From t.he bll8in of the Great Salt Lake it hllll never been chronicled before, and this
i n t e r e s t i n ~ fact is mentioned l1li showing oue of the many valuable items of geographical distribntion established by
the expedItion. It was also found in the Sevier, near Panquitch.
swamp-sparrow, (JfiloBpiza palust1'is, Baird,) whose previous geographical range was from the
Atlantic Eastern States to the Missouri, aud Abert's Towhee, (Pipeto Abertii, Baird,) an individnal
heretofore found only in New Mexico, Arizona, and California. We secured this bird also at Saint
George, and about ten miles northward from that city we were fortunate enongh t.o capture a fine
cactus-wren, (Oampy torh!lnchwJ brunneicapillus, Gray,) a species found in California, New llexico,
and Arizona, but never before in Utah. Passing np the valley of the Santa Clara River, we were
overtaken by a severe hail-storm, which effectually drove away all the migratory birds, and for
days no specimens were seen except a few jays and ravens. At Beaver we had a few days pleas-
ant weather; but after this, during the entire trip to Provo, we had sach severe cold, that had
specimens beeu abundant, we should have failed to collect them. At this latter point, oar work
again commenced, and we made a fine collection of birds and fish. We here procured a valuable
accomplished during the season of 1872, in accordance with verba.l instructions issued by yourself
in the field.
The extent of the work in the department of ethnology was necessarily abridged to a consider-
able degree by the rapidity of the marches consequent on the traversing of largo area.s of country,
and the small amount of time that could be devoted in anyone place to the consideration of a spe-
ciallocal topic. Another element hostile to much work in this line was the unfrieO(lly attitude in
which the Ute and other tribes of the Territory of Utah stood to the General Government during
the months in which the expedition held its line of march tbrough their country; which naturally
rendered intimate intercourse not only profitless but dangerous, and shut the door upon a source
of information concerning a tribe of comparative obscurity and interesting history. An endeavor
was made, however, as far as possible, to overcome these obstacles; and the collection of data.
relating to the present and past inhabitants of the country passed over will be found to be not
inconsiderable.
geon and naturalist., I am indebted for valuable aid in prosecuting the work briefly mentioned in
tbe above skelewn-report.
I am, sil', your very obedient servant,
MAax SiBLEY SEVERANCE.
Lieut. GEORGE M. WHEELER,
Corps of Engine«s, in ch.arge.
o

Related Interests

oitlRle iii of tho
published quarto series of the survey.
GEOLOGICAL.
The f o l l o w i n ~ assistants have carried on their labors in this department during the season:
Messrs. G. K. Gilbert and E. E. Howell. The progress report from the former is herewith, and
marked Appendix D.
It is proposed from year to year to so combine the personnel of the several field-parties
as to be able to make as soon as possible a connected geological surTey as well as a topographi-
cal one.
The time heretofore allowed to the geologists has not been sufficient for such a purpose.
I
- ~
Exploral.!ons and Surveys Wesl of the
Exped Ii lOti of 187Z
· P t\Jf-,.
I·"?/.,
',1-
,;.

,:':
11 ,v

CAMP AT BEAVER, BELKNAP PEAK AND VICINITY. UTAH.
l' ,. 2·:
Report PI,li.(: 11.
Lleul.Geo M Wheeler. Corps of Eng(s , (, OIlldg.
.,
1
t

of
RAj N SCU LPTU RE -SALT CREEK CANON- UTAH
It has been considered that the prof(.'s:'IlonaI uses of photography, as au udj U I I \ : ; ~ I.u ii ~ U l H"Y
of this character, are few, 80 far comparat.ively littlo good beyond that which isor general intermIt
HS expressive of the scenic foatllrtlS of specified areas. T'he material data gathered from its use
apply only to the departments of geology and natural history.
In these departments, where, as is well ontier8tood, we are obliged to leave the field of exact
science, tho special value that comes from -a geological serics of photographs results in the deter-
mination of a relative comprehension of the size and contour of tho rock-beds and of the general
features of tho topograpllY of the country.
Should we, by the application of skilled labor and the refinement of instrumonts, be able to
give a valne to the horizontal and vertical measnrements npon a photographic picture, at once the
subject changes and an addition to positive data is gained. I have faith that this matter may be 80
far advanced from its present stage as to secure these features. Should this pro.e so or not, I
· '-
CANON OF KANAB WASH-COLORADO RIVER-LOOKINC SOUTH.
Star, Ophir, Long Valley, and Hualapais districts, that bid fair to become permanent camps. In
many other where the surface-exposures found seemed to promise largely, little mining-
camps have either been deserted or a limited amount of work is kept up by the hardy pioneers,
only to be suspended upon the exhaustion of their supplies.
In this way a scratching only of the surface is made; and, although it t.akes long to overcome
the lost reputation of an abandoned district, still in most of these cases nothing has been done
aU toward determining the problem whether or not a compensating amount of precious metals can
be roum1 after the requisite preliminary exploration. Where work has been carried to a consider-
able extent and mines opened along several levels, it may prove that the ores are so meager, and,
because of the large cost of the transportation of supplies and material to and from the districts,
and the high price of labor, it is not a profitable investment to continue mining farther.
In many cases, after the time necessary to push forward interior communioation, and more
.... __ , ani!
started with the intention of working from that point, and has been run 220 feet. If successful,
it is expected that a railroad will be carried there. The Miller mine-ledge lies along a prominent
spur between American Fork proper and a creek coming in from the north and westward. Near the
top of the ridge, from ravines of the ridge to tho westward, even to the summit, prospects are found;
11ide Silver Glance, Live Yankee, &c. Pittsburgh is at the north end of the American Fork. The
district bas not been sufficiently developed to determine the general direction of lodes, deposits,
and stratifications, nor the relations existing between the richness of the veins and the local char-
acter of the country-rock. There is a series of deposits running at various angles. The ores are
smelting, though some milling ores have been found near the summit and opposite the Mil-
ler. Gold occurs, reaching as high as $:!5 to the ton of base bullion; seldom less than $20. The
Miller Mining and Smelting Oompany have the only reduction works yet erected, consisting of
tho Emma Hill. Still farther westward, we come to Frederick Hill and Davenport Ilill, north anll
east from Grizzly Flat. In Vallejo the harder the rock the richer the ore, and vice 'Versa. The
metamorphosed monntain·limestone has no regular dip; the strike is to the eastward, the entire
bed resting on quartzite. The ores are worked by the smelting process so far. In certain mines
there are indications of a change towards milling ore. Galena ore averages to yield (according to
}Ir. McDonald) between $90 and '100. The ore in the Windsor mine is the most likely to change
into milling ore. Assays show the presence of gold in the silver·bearing ores. In Superior Gnlch
certain silver· bearing ores near the surface bave given as high as $40 per ton. The principal
mines pow worked are the Emma, Flagstaff, Davenport, South Star, Savage, Montezuma, Grizzly,
Hiawatha, Last Chance No.2, Highland Ohief, Ohio, Frederick, Titus, 'Wellington, Pocahontas,
Enterprise, Peruvian, Ida Brown, Lapham, and Lexington. The first sixteen are well developed
This district was discovered in 1864, and located, as the Big Cottonwood mining-district, March
17, 1870. It has been worked continuously ever since. The area CQvered by mineral croppings is
about forty square miles. The ores found are smelting. Assays show the presence of small per-
centages of gold in the silVE'lr-bearing ores. The principal mines now worked are the Reed and
Benson, Comet and Robert Emmet, (near the Reed and Benson,) Marine, Pannacca, and Kingsberg,
(Mineral Fork,) Sailor's Jack, Provo, McDougall, aud Homeward Bound, (Kesler's Peak,) Richmond,
Theresa, Congress, Davenport, Wellington, Highland Chief, Prince of Wales, and Wandering Boy,
(Silver Fork,) Beckwith, Casper, and Wahsatch, (Honeycomb,) Ontario, Mullen Zook, Evergreen,
(South Fork of Mineral Fork,) Mountain Lake, Brighton, Day, Bemoth, and Mastodon, (Silver
Lake,) Elgin, Eclipse, Scott, and Golden Era, (Scott Hill,) and Maxfield. There is one smelting-
furnace, the Hawk-Eye, not running at present.
nearly the same, including transportation and expense of construction.. The average cost for mining
tbe ore is from .4 to .6 per ton; mining labor averages .3.50 to .4 per diem. One man can extract
about 2 tons of ore per day. Tbe average cost of running a drift on a main vein is .10 per foot;
grain costs 3 to 4 cents per pound; hay, .25 per ton; no facilities for ra.isin g farm-produce. There
is a good stock range. The sources of supply are the Mormon settlements in Juab and Utab, Utah Ter-
ritory. Tbere is plenty of wood for fuel, but no good timber on the mountains and foot-hilltl. Timber
is hauled moretban thirty miles from the Wahsatchat a cost of 4icents per foot. Water is limited;
about Eureka and Homansville are several good springs; elsewhere in the district water can be
found by sinking wells iu the canous from 30 to 95 foot. Tbe district contains 600 inhabitants.
Tbere is one stage-line, (Wells, Fargo & Co.,) but no regular freight-lines. At present, it is fifty'
miles to the terminus of the Utah Southern Railroad, which will eventually run within twenty-four
3w
.Boy, ]!'anny Fern, Galena, Spanish, Saturn, Crresus, and Last Chance.
The Winamuck mine, Winamuck County, (on the ground of Messrs. Daggett & Bristol,) is
described as follows: Strike southeast; dip 33
0
northeast; foot-wall quartzite; hanging wall an
altered sandstone impregnated with metalliferous minerals; ,-ein-matter quartzose un oxidized
ore, argentiferolls galena, pyrite present as au impurity, slight copper-stains; thickness of vein 18
feet; average5 to 6 feet; fissure-walls good, iu places couspicuous. Principal body of ore reached
is oxidized, the lead being in the form of au o x i d e ~ and the silver (supposed to be) in that of chlo-
ride. There are two tunnels on the vein, 450 and 500 feet; incline, 260 feet. Little Stocking, located
on the south side of calion, one mile below Monument. Mine was bonded by present owners, and
after exploration, purchased of original locators (eighteen months ago) for t13,000; since which, it
bas been put in the English market. Twenty-five men are employed.
stroke, 42 inches. The ore is drie<l before crushing; screens, 00 to the inch; 8
4i feet in diameter; 4 settlers, 7 feet in diameter. The mill was made by H. G. Booth & Co., fnrnished
on contract by White & Allen, for $65,500. An Aikin furnace was also built, for $12,000, but
proves nnnecessary; the mill saves 88 per cent. of pulp-assay. Fuel costs $5 per cord; cedar,
pine, and mahogany being used. The average cost of mining labor is from $3 to $4 per day. There
is timber and a saw-mill in East Canon. Water is brought 14,000 feet in asphalt pipes, at a cost of
$5,000. The district contains 300 inhabitants. The country-roads are high-grade toll-roads.
OPHIR DISTRICT, UTAH.
[From notes furnished by Mt. G. K. Gilbert.]
This district was formerly included in the Uush district, which was discovered in 1864; Ophir
district set off August 6, 1870, and has been worked continuously since that time. It is about
are a few small springs. The district contains but two inhabitants. The country·roads are good.
NORTH STAR DISTRICT, UTAH.
[From DOtes famished by Mr. G. K. Gilbert.]
This district was discovered March 8, 1871, and organized November 9,1871, and worked con·
tinuously since that time. Nearest railroad·communication is via Fillmore to the Utah Southern
Railroad, a distance of one hundred and ninety miles. The area covered by miueral croppings is
about three miles east and west by six miles north and east. The mining.ledges lie aloug the
summit and along both slopes. Trend is north and south. The general direction of lodes, &c., is
northeast and southwest. The veins cross the country·rock at all angles. The richest veins are
country·roaus are good. No Indians.
LINCOLN DISTRICT, UTAH.
[From notes furnished by Mr. G. K. Gilbert.]
The mines in this district were discovered in 1859, and included (with Granite district) in the
Pioneer district in 1860; re·organized January 16, 1871, and worked until November, 1871. The
developments are in an arc one mile by one·half mile, trending northwest, and including Grnndy
Spring. The mining·ledges are on the south face of Mineral Granite range, which trends north
and south. General strike of strata and veins is west and south. Dip of both is easterly. The ores
are chiefly of smelting grade; assays show the presence of gold in the silver.bearing ores; gold
has also been found by panning. There are no miues worked at the present time. No mill. The
Blue Olaud, on the southern side of the canon, about three-fourths of a mile from Webster
and Homestead to the west, 250 feet above the valley. Vein 4 feet, running north and south. Tun-
nel 31 feet long; little denloped. Assays $250.
Springtown, one-fourth mile west of the former and on about the same level. Tunnel 82 feet
long; ledge running north and south; 4 feet wide; picked ores assay from '600 to $800. Work,
as a general rule, never less than '125; considerable copper and silver blend occurring; gold 25
per cent.
Belcher, about 100 yards west and 80 feet above Springtown; narrow vein in quartzite; tunnel
40 feet 101lg; assays from $160 to $190; not much developed; direction of vein northeast and
southwest.
Niagara, about one-fourth mile to the southwest of Belcher, and about 120 feet below; in the
'this district was organized in August, 1871, but not yet worked. It is located eight miles west
of Cedar City. The area covered by mineral croppings is about 190 square acres. There are no
developments, except dam to reservoir, and a few roads. Trend of longer axis is north and south,
Mining-ledges run northwest and southeast; main range running east and west. The claims are
situated in a gap opening sontheast and northwest, in the northern portion of the Iron Mountains.
Foot-hills and spurs trend north and south and northeast and southwest. The general direction of
the ledges is northwest and southeast i the lodes dip and strike the country-rock perpendicular,
and no relation is found to exist between the country-rock and the veins, except a slight iron color-
ing of the former. The ores are hematite and magnetic. The ores in this district have a much
finer grain than those at Iron City, and seem to be richer by 10 to 15 per cent. The average yield
is 75 per cent. Some of the ores have been worked by the Mormons about sixteen years ago, at
Cedar City, with .tolerably good success, considering the imperfect furnace erected there-at that
,
cipal miues are sliver. The East Ledge, shalt pei'pendiCUlai', l ~ feet; l\lonswr, shaft perpendicu-
lar, 60 feet; Putnam, shaft perpendicular, 25 feet; Little Brig, shaft perpendicular, 6 feet; Mam-
moth, Washingtou, Humboldt, North Oarolina, and others. Very little work has been done 011
the four last named. Iron mines are the Duncan Ledge, on southern slope j very large deposit of
about three-fourths of a mile in diameter in a blue limestone formation; hematite-ores, with 311
excellent road from Iron City; distance about four miles northeast; ore contains 74 per cent. pure
iron j about three-fourths of a mile northeast of this ledge a lode containing conglomerate ore of
silver, iron, copper, and lead was discovered, (runniug east snd west.) Assays show $30 silver
per ton. This lode is not considered worth working for either of the metals contained therein.
Abont 300 yards north from this ledge a small arsenic vein, three-fourths of an inch, has been founel.
2, 'CHlm::',"="
Agnes, Saint Patrick, and Lily. The Olive Branch tunnel runs through four lodes-Hague,
Revolution, Atlantic, and Olive Branch. The mines in this distriot are only in the first stage of
development. Capital is sadly wanted, and consequently further developments can only take place
iu ('.ourse of due time. The veins and ores look very promising. Mill-site and woodlands have
not yet been located. There is very little water in the immediate vicinity of the mines, and wood
can only be procured at a distanee of about five to seven miles, from the high foot-hills of Mount
Nebo. The average C O l ~ t for mining the ore is '9 per ton. The average cost of mining labor is '3
per diem, and one lUan can extract one-third of a ton of ore per day. It costs $6 (average) per
foot to run a drift on a main vein. There are no chances for a decrease in mining expenses.
Grain is $1 per bushel; hay, $10 per ton. Salt amI Willow Creeks (24 and 18 inches respectively)
4W
\"iL.u ieutl jjUlio have Deeii lliiHetl. "l."I.,ie dUSLi"lct has .lu LO iHiia,tlilc"j,ijl,s, who ha,"o
n.o regular means of communication with other points.
PIERMONT DISTRICT , NEVADA.
[From notes furnished by Mr. G. K. Gilbert.]
Discovered and organized in July, 1869. The area coV"ered by mineral croppings is not grl".at.
The mining-ledges are in a canon of the east slope of the Schell Creek range. General strike of
the lodes, deposits, and stratifications is north and south. The ores arc free, and assays show the
presence of gold in the silver-bearing ores Ii per cent. of value ill bulli(,lI. The principal mine is the
Piermont. This lode is said to be folded or to occupy a fold, and its two parts dill east and west
at 450 ; extreme depth, 150 fep,t; total shaft and illcline, 5;")0 feet,; tUlIlleftl, 1,0"" fl'ct. One thou-
are very good. There are about 100 men, women, and children of the Goshute tribe of Indians in
the vicinity.
SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT.
rFrom notes fnrnished by Mr. Francis Klett.]
Discovered May 23 and organized June 1, 1872, and has been worked continuously since organi.
zation. The nearest railroad·communication is one bundred and seventy miles. The area covered
by mineral croppings is supposed to be 30,000 acres; the mining·ledges run parallel with the
monntain.range situated on divides between canons. The general direction of lodes, deposits, and
stratifications is north and south; dip to the west. 'rho ores are sulphurets and bromides, and
IUIsays show the proscnce of gold ill small quantities. The principal mines are Secnrity ledge, Mc-
basins.
In turn, the amount of rain-fall per sqnare mile in the great interior basin is very much less than
that over the Colorado basin, aud bears but a small ratio to that known to exist in the basin of the
Columbia.
It is unfortunate that we have so little systematic data at typical points thronghout these
areas upon which to base a numerical calculation as to either relative or positive amounts of' pre-
cipitation. A physical distinction of the most marked character is found in tracing the course of
any stream in the interior basin f r o ~ its monntain source or sources to its valley-sink. Most fre-
quently, until the stream emerges from t h ~ mountains, the cnrrent is swift, and the average fall, the
erosive agents of nature that are constantly acting upon the sedimentary strata and other rock-
--
case admit of the practical elucidation of the problem.
From the large amount of humidity gathered along the crests of the Rocky Mountains and
otber parts of tbe dividing ridge of the continent, from the thirty-fifth to the forty-ninth parallel,
there seems to be but little doubt that a comprehensive canal-system would direct such a volume
of water to accessible points now arid upon tbe plains, along the eastern flanks of these ridges, as
to make it a matter of sufficient interest to have, in connection with the general topographical sur·
vey of that region, a series of special contours marked out, intersecting the axial lines of the
basins at altitudes somewhat greater than the generql contour of the conn try lying to the eastward.
Large tracts in these sections would then, if irrigation ensue, become agricultural. Farther east·
ward, the sinking of the artesian wells ought to be 8uccessrul if points are carefully selected, and
vast grazing-fields become habitable for stock. I will here state that the objects to be gained by
----------_.
lDate and subject to much modification, still that the probabilities are in favor of assigning at least
200,000,000 acres to this class.
In this entire portion to which an application of the system may be made, it needs but a single
glance to determine that this question becomes a natiollal one.
The objects to be gn,ined by irrigation are m,my, and will from year to year be better under-
stood. It is plain that the Government can afford to IDflke large temporary sacrifices of parcels of
this land, as it would in return reap the remUlleriLtion to enSU6 froID the enhanced value of territory
now entirely add.
Should the gl1ueral of irriga.tion in all or l>art of the dOlllJoin west of the Mississil>pi be
determined upon, the Rubject will naturally receive full and earnest consideration at the hands of
CongreRs whell represented by the difl'erent Stntes and Territories.
.. ..,"n''''6 the area OI tile many
valleys among the interior basins, and eliminating from it the area of sand·exposure, and that of
a few half-mesa gravelly beds that protrude into them from the base of the foot-hills, we have a
pretty general view of the amount of lund araule, or that may be made such, in the State of
Nevada, portions of Utah, California, and Arizona, so far as my experience reaches. Take from
that tlte very small amount which is apparently arable, nuder rude method!!! of irrigation, and we
have left that amount which, if artificially irrigated, might be made productive, thereby largely
enhancmg the value of onr public domain. It is believed that in certain localities where underly-
ing clay and marl beds more neady approach the surface, by deep planting most of. the grains
and vegetables can be raised without artificial irrigation at the 8urfa(!c. This has been prm·ell
in Parahnagat Valley, Nevada. Indeed, the Moqnis anl1 Zuni Pueblo Indians of Arizona aud
tribute would, at least as much as those lauds known as double-miuimum lands, afford an iucreased
revenne from their sale.
ROUTES OF COMMUNICATION.
The examinations of the present year give data from which certain conclusions may be drawn
regarding the locus of prominent lines of interior communication. This refers more especiaUy to
those lines that depart but little from a northern and southern direction.
The constantly accumulating series of profiles along lines of various azimuths create a record
from which much may be drawn at such time in the future as the growing wants of interior com-
munication call for t.he opening of new rontes. West of the dividing ridge of the contineut, between
the parallels of 49
0
aud 32
0
north latitude: most of the routes of interior commuuication must for-
5w
ernment bas boon made to comanue the construction or tnese roads. Here and there, in the vicinity
of military posts, the troops have been called npon for some little labor in local constructions. It
wonld, in my opinion, be wise economy on tile part of the Government to inaugurate anew the sur·
veys and estimates for the construction of more accessible routes between the several military
establishments of the interior, govemed by necessities for their supply, possibility of the movement
of troops in the change of stations or in operations against the Indians, or in placiug of the mili·
tary force with celerity at points where they may be called upon to sustain the civil law. If, for
instance, it costs 2 cents per pound per hundred miles fro:n, we will RAY, Santa F ~ , to transport
supplies by contract south or westward 011 existiug roads for this ye'ar, and during this year a road
shall have been improved 25 per cent. on a new route discovered and opened, impro###BOT_TEXT###quot;ing travel by
this amount; then, in subsequent years, if the contract were not Ii cents per pound per hundred
miles, it certainly would be less than 2 cents per pound per hundred miles. With very Htt.le trouble,
liualapais LLUlU lIUdll l'VIUIJ,
persons who have reached the summit of the low divide joining Hualapais Valley with the wash
that leads to the river from the south, about three-fourths of a mile below the mouth of the Grand
Wash. Reaching the head of the Hualapais Valley, one road might diverge to the mines in the
Cerbat range, an.d another to those in the Hualapais range, as branches from the main route.
The total distance of the shortest of these routes from Salt Lake to Prescott is five hundred
and eighty-five miles. The most direct from Salt Lake City to the south, until latitude 37
0
30' is reached, is the present traveletI stage-route to Nephi; thence entering the vaUey of the
Sevier, Gunnison is reached, anti following it to its whence by a low valley divide the Kanab
Creek can be gained. At this point a series of flank movements to the east will be necessary, in
order to reach the first practicable crossing of the Colorado at the mouth of Paria Creek. The
profiles from whence the information might be derived as to the route from the head of Kanab
the limit of vegt"wtioii.
Our land-surveys have not reached many of the areas covered by the forests, hence the
adventurous squatter has full possession, and consumes the property which he temporariJy enjoys
at will. The result very naturally appears as an improvident wastage of forest-products, with no
return to the Government, and with the danger, at an early day, of the most damaging decimation
of the forests containing trees of t.he kinds above mentione9. It would Reem wise that the Govern-
ment, through some of its branches, should take cognizance of this matter, and, by legal enactment
or otherwise, stay the fearful cutting of timber, which, in connection with the many mining-towns,
agricnltural settlements, and military posts, will fast bring about the disappearance of forest-
products that in time must have an effect upon the local climates.
UnfortunateJy the small areas that are under cultivation bring about no opposite to this state
of affairs by the creation of other areas of increased exportation.
Lake and in the San Rafael, that have not yet accepted the offers of the Government,'and have
thus far been on no reservation. The settlers on the Upper Sevier, until as late as 1868, have had
frequent difficulties with these Indians, and it was necessary at one time for the former to with·
draw. Of later years, there has beeu a better feeling existing, and these Indians could, doubtless, be
consolidated with the Uintah and White River Utes, on a reservation iu that vicinity. The Seovietz
are a small nomadic tribe, who live by hunting, upon roots, mice, &c., along parts of the valley of
the Colorado, in the Grand Wash, and numerous canons and narrow valleys that lead into it. Here
and there they plant small fields of corn, wheat, squashes, and melons, but the amouut raised fur·
nishes only a small share of their subsistence. South of the Colorado, about New Creek and Dia·
mond Creek, they are quite successful in hunting, but to thE\ north they live a squalid and miserable
existence. At the date of our crossing the Colorado, a party of volunteers and Pah-Utes, about
seventy in number, bad just been collected to go on a scout with General Crook against the Apaches.
continue to recede bef<m, "ggn,s .. ivl'l .. ud expanding enterprise .. , which iu turn bring wealth to tue
nation, and correspondingly enhance the prospects of peaceful relations.
OOLORADO OANoNS.
Two parties during the season have visited at special points the lower of the main grand
canons of the Oolorado River.
These points command all the crossings of the river known to exist from the foot of the canon
as Elmdo de los Padres. The results, affording some of the most striking topographical details that
are known in the world, can be but partially delineated upon a map, no matter what its scale may be.
Photography assists us somewhat in gat.hering ideas of local forms, but fails entirely to impress
one with the. grandeur of the sbapes and details of coloring expressed in nature.
Plates 4 and 5 are characteristic sections across the canon.
L 1 \! ;'1! I,!!
Lleul Geo M'Wheeler, Corps of E n g r ' ~ , Com. ,',::
CRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO-MOUTH OF KANAB WASH, LOOKINC EAST.
I
_ 5

i
I
- - - - - - - - - . - - . - - ~
vne c.l:uei: topographer;
One assistant topograpber and meteorologist;
One geologist;
One: collector;
One odometer-recorder; and
Eigbt engineer-soldiers.
MAIN FIELD-PARTY No.3.
One officer of engineers, executive and astronomical duty;
One officer of tbe line, assisting;
One cbief topographer;
1
It has been fonnd that, where an executive Omoor is caiied upon to carry ou field astronomical
observations, the duties of his position become too arduous; hence he should have assistance,
80 that the executive aud astronomical duties may be divided up between the two persons.
For assisting astronomical parties and to protect the public property and animals of the work-
ing field-force, I have thought it wise to suggest that a special detail, to consist of two sergeants,
three corporals, and twenty-five enlisted men of the engineer-battalion, be stationed near the obser-
vatory-site at Ogden, Utah; said station to be ill charge of an engineer-officer selected for that
purpose.
At this point could be established an interior depot of supplies, which is quite necessary for
the economic interests of the service, and as a matter of convenience to the survey.
One naturalist; and
Three collectors.
One photographer; and
One artist.
Three draugbtsmen.
Twenty-four engineer-soldiers.
6w
NATURAL HISTORY.
GENERAL.
OFFICE.
ESCORT.
- - ~ - - - - - --_. - --- -- .... ~ - - - - -
iornia; a final report of tbat year goes forward to the present Oongress, in answer to call of tbat
body of January 9, 1873. A preliminary report and map of the of 1871 appeared in,be
spring of 1872. Tbe progress-report for the year 1872 is herewith.
A variety of office-publications bave been necessary as aids to the compilation of the immense
mass of topographical and other material gathered by the survey.
SCHEME FOR PUBLIOATION OF RESULT8.
The annual report submitted to the Chief ,of Engineers, .June 30,1873, presents the scheme
proposed for tbe pUblications pertaining to the survey tbus far, as follows:
It is proposed to group the material at disposal into tbe following form:
1st. Six 'luarto volumes.
--
- -----. ............. - - - - - - ~
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS "WEST 0'1' mE ONE-HUNDREDTH ME
-=-------
r
- - - --- - - - - - - " - ~ - -
I
I
, 1
I
' I
has been KlnQly furntsueu trom the records of theI!Jogilleer uepartment. Although its compilation
was exceedingly hasty, most of the information which it contains has been accurately transferred.
The rontes laid down are only those resulting from the expeditions where maps have been
rendered to the Burean of Engineers for pnblication or for use in the compilation of their general
topographical maps, and cannot be expected to embrace tbe large number of military expeditions
of various characters that have been directed from the headquarters of the several geographical
and military departments of the interior.
This map has been extremely valuable for a variety of office· uses in connection with the com·
pilation of our finished maps, and will form the basis of a series of topographical and other maps
of this scale, proposed for publication from time to time.
of Oambridge, Mass. The chronograph was also used to record the observations for time. These
automatic signa.ls were excha.nged six evenings; besides, there was one evening of ordinary signals.
For latitude there was a list from the British Association Oatalogue of about 40 pairs, most of
which were measured from six to eight times, and will give some 175 results. The apllroximate
latitude is 41
0
07l' ; longitude, 28
m
20- east of Salt Lake observatory.
FORT FRED STEELE.
For the determinations at Fort Steele, as also at the subsequent station, Laramie Oity, the
instruments used were the same as those employed at Oheyenue, and they were mounted in the
same manner. The observatory here was very favorably situated in respect to the jar and smoke
of the trains; there was a deep ravine between it and the track, and, being on the west side, it was
to the windwarrl.
APPENDIX B.
PRELIMINARY AS'fRONOMIOAL REPORT, BY WILLIAM W. MARYATT, A ~ T R O N O M
ICAL ASSISTANT.
UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE,
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS WEST OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH MERIDIAN,
Washington, D. G., February 18, 1873.
Sm: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to su1)mit the following brief pre·
liminary report of my observations for latitudes and longitudes during the field-season of 1812:
Observations were condncted by me at the following-
On evenings when exchanges of signals were effected, observations for two independent deter·
minations were made, one series preceding and the other im mediately following the exchange.
TELEGRAPHIO SIGNALS.
Telegraphic signals for difference in longitude were exchanged with President Brigham
Young's observatory in Temple Square, Salt Lake Oity, with which the requisite connections
were made at the first two stations by the Deseret Telegraph-Line, (A. M. Musser, superintendent,)
and at the last by a wire of the Atlantic and Pacific line, (J. J. Dicky, superiutendent.)
The Salt Lake observatory was in charge of Mr. Edward P. Austin, principal astronomical
observer to the expedition.
The exchanges consisted, first, in receiving, during an interval of five minutes, in addition to
and circum-meridiau altitudes of the same body and altitudes of Polaris.for latitude.
When the camps were for a single night, east and west stars were observed for time, and Polaris
and, when practicable, south stars for lat·itude.
At all rendezvous-camps, and partioularly at main astronomical stations, t.he observations were
multiplied.
By comparing the results at the latter points with those obtained by the use of more perfect
instruments, the limit of probable error at the sextant-stations may be found.
LONGITUDE.
Throughout the season, M. S. box-chronometer No. 1501 by Myers, and pocket-chronometer
No. 1497 by Frodsham, were carried by Lieutenant Hoxie, and M. S. No. 1521
chiefly composed of crushed and altered Paleozoic strata, alternate with somewhat broader valleys,
half filled with the waste of the mountains; in the southeastern, which belongs to the plateau
region of the Upper Colorado, the rock·s.vstem, ranging from the Tertiary to the Devonian, is com-
paratively undisturbed, and denudation has left its harder beds in a succession of steps. A set
of parallel faults across these steps cuts them into a system of limited tables, which are so
thoroughly drained by tributaries of the Colorado and Sevier Rivers that the valley-deposits inter-
fere little with geological examinations, while deep canons afford frequent natnral sections. In the
fOrmer province rocks are of frequf'nt occurrence, and in both are considerable areas
occupied by lavas. Metalliferous vei ns are almost entirely confined to the former; but the latter
contains coal inexhaustible in quantity and widely distributed.
From the great diversity of material aftorded by this field, I have selected for brief mention
here a few facts of semewhat general interest.
slight antiquity. The majority of them were covered by the lake; but a few have been formed since
the subsidence, and these are so fresh as to be absolutely devoid of vegetation.
These features of the Hooding of Great Salt La.ke Valley, namely, that it a temporary
climatal extreme, and that its occurrence was, geologicaUy speaking, very recent, lead me to regard
it as contemporary with the general glaciation of the northern portion of the continent, Rnd with
the formation of the numerous local glaciers of western mountain-systems, and to consider it, in
common with them, a phenomenon of the Glacial epoch. While the general climatal change that
caused or accompanied that epoch (depression of' temperature, carrying with it decrease of evap-
oration, if not increase of precipitation) may be adduced as the cause of the inundation of Utah,
there is no reason to suppose that the relath'e humidities of the portions of the continent
were greatly changed; and this consideration will aid in accounting for the fact that tbe;,
7w
and are intimately associated with ridges of upheaval. The regular alternations of curved anti-
clinals and syncliuals of the Appalachians demand the assumption of great horizontal diminution
of the space covered by the disturbed strata, and suggest lateral pressure as the immediate force
concerned; while in the Cordilleras, the displacement of comparatively rigid bodies of stmta by
vertical or nearly vertical faults involves little horizontal diminution, and suggests the application
of vertical pressure from below. For theRe reasous, and others that will be adduced in the final
report, I regard the forces that have npheaved the Cordilleras as distinctively deep-seated, pro-
ducing, in a portion of the earth's crust below the immediate surface, inequalities, perhaps nndula-
tions, in adjusting to whicb, under gravity, tbe upper portion of the crust bas assumed the forms
we see.
,
• The po88ibility of the formation of glaciers and their magnitude at au;v point depend on precipitation no 1_ than
temperature.
FIG. 2. Ideal aootiou of valley between moontain ridges, m "1 i II, imperviolls bed i w, well.
this is not likely to be fulfilled in a narrow valley among the Oordilleras, but may in a broad onl'.
I can think of no place where I should be more confident of artesian water than on the Great Salt
Lake Desert-say on the jornada between Granite Rock and Redding Spring-but pure watl'r
could not be expected from the bottom of a basin so perfectly land-locked. Some point on the
Amargosa Desert, or in Ralston's Valley or Big Smoky Valley, Nevada, would be more likely to
afford it.
To pierce the indurated rocks, a locality should be selected where those of the adjacent range
dip toward the valley with such inclination and uniformity HS to promise continuity below the
• Identified by a comparison of fossils by Mr. F. B. Meek.
52
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS
vaJIey-deposits, and where, too, the rocks comprise a. proper successiou of permeable and imper-
meable strata.
FIG. 3. Ideal monntain-section: 4, impervions strata j b, water-bearing strata j w, well.
Such localities are very numerous, but are usually so well watered that there is uo demand for
artesiau wells. Exception may be made of the western base of the Fish Oreek range, Utah, near
its northern extremity; of the eastern base of the same range, near Sevier Lake; of the eastern
base of the Beaver Oreek range, Utah; of the western base of the Oedar range, Utah; and of
the western base of the Pahranagat range, under Quartz Mountain, Nevada. The most favorable
of these st.ations are the two last mentioned, but none of them give nnequivocal promise of snccess

My own work bas been flopplemented throughout the season by tbat of tbe assistaut geologist
Mr. E. E. Howell, and tbe data presented above are in part from bis notes. I am specially
indebted.to Messrs. Gilbert Thompson and Francis Klett, of the Topogropbical Corps, for valuable
notes and collections from points not visited by the geologists, and I gratefully acknowledge the
cheerful co·operation and assistance of all the officers and other gentlemen of the party •
. Our tbanks are tendered to Prof. J. E. Olayton, of Schellbourne, Nev., and to Mr. Jobn
Harris, of Glendale, Utah, for valuable fossils.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEORGE M. WHEELER,
First Lielttenant United States Engineers, in charge.
APPENDIX E.
G. K. GILBERT,
OMej Otological Assistant.
REPORT UPON NATURAL-HISTORY OOLLEOTIONS, BY ACTING ASSISTANT SUR-
GEON H. O. YARROW: SURGEON AND NATURALIST.
UNITED STATES ENGIlI.'EER OFFICE,
EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS WEs'r OF ONE HUNDREDTH MERIDIAN,
Washington, D.O., January 8, 1873.
Sm: In accordance with verbal instructions received from you, I have the honor to submit
the following preliminary report of the work and collections made in natural history during the
months of Jnly,August, September, October,November, and December, 1872, in Utah, Nevada, and
Arizona., by the expeditIon under your command. Our labors in natural history may be said to have
commenced from the time of our arrival at Salt Lake City, Utah; for, during tbe unavoida.ble delay
incident upon organizing so large an expedition, nearly every moment was occupied in studying
and co])ecting specimens in the vicinity of Salt Lake Oity and Provo, Utah, and I am glad to be
able to state that our researches were richly rewarded. The Great Salt Lake was viRited, and its
waters carefully examined for forms of animal life; but with the exception of Artemia jerlilis, a
crustacean, (lescribed by Prof. A. E. Verrill, of Yale Gollege, some time since, nothing was
found. From certain newspaper and popular reports, we had been led to believe there existed in
the lake a representative of the Anguilla, (eels;) but after a close and careful e:xaminat\on of
the bottom of the lake for upward of sixty miles, no Boch fish could be seen; in short, uo fish
lucuS WCla also secured, and ,Viil ptuuauiy i)imuye valuable IU iu(3,gasiug \luI"' knOWledge uf tha SOllio"
what limited flora of Utah. It is an interesting fact, and worthy of mention, that in Provo is the
only locality in all Utah in which the common garden or angle worm is fonnd. They are not native,
but were introdnced by Doctor Roberts, of tbis city, and have increased to snch an extent as to
completely boney-comb the soil of an the gardens of the vicinity, and in this way greatly assist in
irrigation. To the same pnblic-spirited gentleman, the settlers are indebted for the introdnctionof
the common eastern quail, (Ortyx. VirgianUB., Bonap.,) which is constantly increasing to snch a degree
as to bid fair in a tew years to o###BOT_TEXT###quot;'errun the entire western conntry. After leaving Provo and pro-
• At this place onr attention Willi called to a fish numerons in winter, called by the Mormons" mountain-herring j"
UPOIl iuvestigation, much to onr surprise, this Willi found to be a species of whitefish, (CortgOJlIUI WilliarRllOlli,) a native
of the fauna of Puget Sound. From t.he bll8in of the Great Salt Lake it hllll never been chronicled before, and this
i n t e r e s t i n ~ fact is mentioned l1li showing oue of the many valuable items of geographical distribntion established by
the expedItion. It was also found in the Sevier, near Panquitch.
swamp-sparrow, (JfiloBpiza palust1'is, Baird,) whose previous geographical range was from the
Atlantic Eastern States to the Missouri, aud Abert's Towhee, (Pipeto Abertii, Baird,) an individnal
heretofore found only in New Mexico, Arizona, and California. We secured this bird also at Saint
George, and about ten miles northward from that city we were fortunate enongh t.o capture a fine
cactus-wren, (Oampy torh!lnchwJ brunneicapillus, Gray,) a species found in California, New llexico,
and Arizona, but never before in Utah. Passing np the valley of the Santa Clara River, we were
overtaken by a severe hail-storm, which effectually drove away all the migratory birds, and for
days no specimens were seen except a few jays and ravens. At Beaver we had a few days pleas-
ant weather; but after this, during the entire trip to Provo, we had sach severe cold, that had
specimens beeu abundant, we should have failed to collect them. At this latter point, oar work
again commenced, and we made a fine collection of birds and fish. We here procured a valuable
accomplished during the season of 1872, in accordance with verba.l instructions issued by yourself
in the field.
The extent of the work in the department of ethnology was necessarily abridged to a consider-
able degree by the rapidity of the marches consequent on the traversing of largo area.s of country,
and the small amount of time that could be devoted in anyone place to the consideration of a spe-
ciallocal topic. Another element hostile to much work in this line was the unfrieO(lly attitude in
which the Ute and other tribes of the Territory of Utah stood to the General Government during
the months in which the expedition held its line of march tbrough their country; which naturally
rendered intimate intercourse not only profitless but dangerous, and shut the door upon a source
of information concerning a tribe of comparative obscurity and interesting history. An endeavor
was made, however, as far as possible, to overcome these obstacles; and the collection of data.
relating to the present and past inhabitants of the country passed over will be found to be not
inconsiderable.
geon and naturalist., I am indebted for valuable aid in prosecuting the work briefly mentioned in
tbe above skelewn-report.
I am, sil', your very obedient servant,
MAax SiBLEY SEVERANCE.
Lieut. GEORGE M. WHEELER,
Corps of Engine«s, in ch.arge.
o

"},"eligible_for_exclusive_trial_roadblock":false,"eligible_for_seo_roadblock":false,"exclusive_free_trial_roadblock_props_path":"/doc-page/exclusive-free-trial-props/3915460","flashes":[],"footer_props":{"urls":{"about":"/about","press":"/press","blog":"http://literally.scribd.com/","careers":"/careers","contact":"/contact","plans_landing":"/subscribe","referrals":"/referrals?source=footer","giftcards":"/giftcards","faq":"/faq","accessibility":"/accessibility-policy","faq_paths":{"accounts":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246346","announcements":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246066","copyright":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246086","downloading":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/articles/210135046","publishing":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246366","reading":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246406","selling":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246326","store":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246306","status":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/en-us/articles/360001202872","terms":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246126","writing":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246366","adchoices":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/articles/210129366","paid_features":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/sections/202246306","failed_uploads":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/en-us/articles/210134586-Troubleshooting-uploads-and-conversions","copyright_infringement":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/en-us/articles/210128946-DMCA-copyright-infringement-takedown-notification-policy","end_user_license":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/en-us/articles/210129486","terms_of_use":"https://support.scribd.com/hc/en-us/articles/210129326-General-Terms-of-Use"},"publishers":"/publishers","static_terms":"/terms","static_privacy":"/privacy","copyright":"/copyright","ios_app":"https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/scribd-worlds-largest-online/id542557212?mt=8&uo=4&at=11lGEE","android_app":"https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.scribd.app.reader0&hl=en","books":"/books","sitemap":"/directory"}},"global_nav_props":{"header_props":{"logo_src":"/images/landing/home2_landing/scribd_logo_horiz_small.svg","root_url":"https://www.scribd.com/","search_term":"","small_logo_src":"/images/logos/scribd_s_logo.png","uploads_url":"/upload-document","search_props":{"redirect_to_app":true,"search_url":"/search","search_test":"control","query":"","search_page":false}},"user_menu_props":null,"sidebar_props":{"urls":{"bestsellers":"https://www.scribd.com/bestsellers","home":"https://www.scribd.com/","saved":"/saved","subscribe":"/archive/pmp_checkout?doc=3915460&metadata=%7B%22context%22%3A%22pmp%22%2C%22action%22%3A%22start_trial%22%2C%22logged_in%22%3Afalse%2C%22platform%22%3A%22web%22%7D","top_charts":"/bestsellers","upload":"https://www.scribd.com/upload-document"},"categories":{"book":{"icon":"icon-ic_book","icon_filled":"icon-ic_book_fill","url":"https://www.scribd.com/books","name":"Books","type":"book"},"news":{"icon":"icon-ic_articles","icon_filled":"icon-ic_articles_fill","url":"https://www.scribd.com/news","name":"News","type":"news"},"audiobook":{"icon":"icon-ic_audiobook","icon_filled":"icon-ic_audiobook_fill","url":"https://www.scribd.com/audiobooks","name":"Audiobooks","type":"audiobook"},"magazine":{"icon":"icon-ic_magazine","icon_filled":"icon-ic_magazine_fill","url":"https://www.scribd.com/magazines","name":"Magazines","type":"magazine"},"document":{"icon":"icon-ic_document","icon_filled":"icon-ic_document_fill","url":"https://www.scribd.com/docs","name":"Documents","type":"document"},"sheet_music":{"icon":"icon-ic_songbook","icon_filled":"icon-ic_songbook_fill","url":"https://www.scribd.com/sheetmusic","name":"Sheet Music","type":"sheet_music"}},"categories_array":["mixed","book","audiobook","magazine","news","document","sheet_music"],"selected_content_type":"mixed","username":"","search_overlay_props":{"search_input_props":{"focused":false,"keep_suggestions_on_blur":false}}}},"recommenders":{"related_titles_recommender":{"item_props":[{"type":"document","id":327823913,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/327823913/108x144/45ab174e3d/1476671997?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/327823913/216x288/b583f2a580/1476671997?v=1","title":"BCRA 15-3-1988","short_title":"BCRA 15-3-1988","author":"Caegeo","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":327823913,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"ot2Y8xRY03MO7FVSe7nypXX55bo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/327823913/BCRA-15-3-1988"},{"type":"document","id":238598447,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/238598447/108x144/c5781afbc6/1486556412?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/238598447/216x288/f5225ca77e/1486556412?v=1","title":"architectural thesis coda 4","short_title":"architectural thesis coda 4","author":"api-263097572","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":238598447,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"UXbDjB6EFhFW5v2tT2ImQhldQns="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/238598447/architectural-thesis-coda-4"},{"type":"document","id":376091340,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/376091340/108x144/92c6c245f9/1523448854?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/376091340/216x288/27943fec71/1523448854?v=1","title":"The Effects of Global Warming","short_title":"The Effects of Global Warming","author":"Anonymous 6yTIVqnOu","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":376091340,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"91tNanV9UbWLvJoHkxDQBAV0mOM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/376091340/The-Effects-of-Global-Warming"},{"type":"document","id":282693545,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/282693545/108x144/cb00fe33a2/1443193650?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/282693545/216x288/2e891cbaea/1443193650?v=1","title":"SMLJJU001 YGE 2014 - TSLs","short_title":"SMLJJU001 YGE 2014 - TSLs","author":"Jjuuko Samuel","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":282693545,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"S5XGQCnJi+bN/6iv529OaqPPTZk="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/282693545/SMLJJU001-YGE-2014-TSLs"},{"type":"document","id":365657196,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/365657196/108x144/8b182be56a/1511829648?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/365657196/216x288/950d3acdd8/1511829648?v=1","title":"Selection (1)","short_title":"Selection (1)","author":"Muhammad Sarif","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":365657196,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"HXgLcBm4rGJ4fVsw7Gf4RRTQgdM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/365657196/Selection-1"},{"type":"document","id":378757982,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/378757982/108x144/4ec5899661/1525912819?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/378757982/216x288/32f3833606/1525912819?v=1","title":"Mapping the World's Topography Using Radar","short_title":"Mapping the World's Topography Using Radar","author":"anon_109082185","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":378757982,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"9xnG/ivZITc59RwP9bskKYTlSzw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/378757982/Mapping-the-World-s-Topography-Using-Radar"},{"type":"document","id":291295914,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/291295914/108x144/1b3a1ab059/1448601088?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/291295914/216x288/7d089649f3/1448601088?v=1","title":"Forme relief","short_title":"Forme relief","author":"enickym","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":291295914,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"LdVosZv8Psf9ap6G0DvossuSLPQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/291295914/Forme-relief"},{"type":"document","id":382343939,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/382343939/108x144/9516c4d218/1529681174?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/382343939/216x288/4ee5d74f8b/1529681174?v=1","title":"Petrology Yy","short_title":"Petrology Yy","author":"Ford","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":382343939,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"V/ft8WiujE87+d25ynRTtS2UHRo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/382343939/Petrology-Yy"},{"type":"document","id":126877475,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/126877475/108x144/b87b42879a/1366351450?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/126877475/216x288/351515beb3/1366351450?v=1","title":"GIS Introduction","short_title":"GIS Introduction","author":"suwash","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":126877475,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"paqu8gLDgBbAMCMAOiykDYCs2P8="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/126877475/GIS-Introduction"},{"type":"document","id":3886359,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/3886359/108x144/0015580f04/1399609123?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/3886359/216x288/471cccaf3f/1399609123?v=1","title":"Utah section from Mineral Yearbooks 1968-2007","short_title":"Utah section from Mineral Yearbooks 1968-2007","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":3886359,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"hjK0UAompnNdvyoLVkbpt7rGIBw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/3886359/Utah-section-from-Mineral-Yearbooks-1968-2007"},{"type":"document","id":339768097,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/339768097/108x144/6a38ebc9d5/1520231591?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/339768097/216x288/9d87219a00/1520231591?v=1","title":"Leapfrog Geo Tutorials","short_title":"Leapfrog Geo Tutorials","author":"Ruben Di Ruggiero Mario","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":339768097,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"wAnDs8P48U7C47udUA+B2RAEqGw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/339768097/Leapfrog-Geo-Tutorials"},{"type":"document","id":129455402,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/129455402/108x144/fb7d623c45/1442087970?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/129455402/216x288/4c47d55196/1442087970?v=1","title":"Shaping Earth","short_title":"Shaping Earth","author":"Renata Alves","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":129455402,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"1kYFy6jhLXfro8RvlGOuel73W6o="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/129455402/Shaping-Earth"},{"type":"document","id":37498111,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/37498111/108x144/3676c749cb/1284552076?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/37498111/216x288/99b1fc96c2/1284552076?v=1","title":"Maps%20_%20Structural%20Geology","short_title":"Maps%20_%20Structural%20Geology","author":"overachiever12","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":37498111,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"7hdrQsUiahC9JqUPpZ8PbPIBF7E="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/37498111/Maps-20-20Structural-20Geology"},{"type":"document","id":35802714,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/35802714/108x144/8af6df73f5/1351175764?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/35802714/216x288/d8d9a7fcb9/1351175764?v=1","title":"2007 Fall-Winter Current News, Clackamas River Basin Council","short_title":"2007 Fall-Winter Current News, Clackamas River Basin Council","author":"Friends of the Clackamas River Basin Council ","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":35802714,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"nIfJ/QJQT2AJXtIeclwxPL0pgTw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/35802714/2007-Fall-Winter-Current-News-Clackamas-River-Basin-Council"},{"type":"document","id":218575934,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/218575934/108x144/53382bf868/1397644670?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/218575934/216x288/ec53571ba9/1397644670?v=1","title":"Glaciers Presentation","short_title":"Glaciers Presentation","author":"Miguel Montero Alonso","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":218575934,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"KxRRrk2JFZ3QHI5yp+AGnpV60eE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/218575934/Glaciers-Presentation"},{"type":"document","id":319002915,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/319002915/108x144/9edba26aba/1469188822?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/319002915/216x288/71220eb620/1469188822?v=1","title":"Me","short_title":"Me","author":"Shuvabrata01","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":319002915,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"aqMvK36L0PdAWysLFQbbbEP0H9A="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/319002915/Me"},{"type":"document","id":250801316,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/250801316/108x144/b620f68214/1486572958?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/250801316/216x288/34f598e58e/1486572958?v=1","title":"final grade 3 social studies thematic unit","short_title":"final grade 3 social studies thematic unit","author":"api-270078599","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":250801316,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"siMsSY8xz0z6+0R7zacaW7IvR/M="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/250801316/final-grade-3-social-studies-thematic-unit"},{"type":"document","id":134476444,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/134476444/108x144/32230208f1/1365334154?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/134476444/216x288/0f0f9e4186/1365334154?v=1","title":"Plouff","short_title":"Plouff","author":"enrilei","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":134476444,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"F9U0dPCZ7xJ1/XY5hAlxdI79FJA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/134476444/Plouff"},{"type":"document","id":246029650,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/246029650/108x144/a2d3e8b37f/1440384102?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/246029650/216x288/6c44f28382/1440384102?v=1","title":"Haile Mine SC Dept of Commerce","short_title":"Haile Mine SC Dept of Commerce","author":"Ken Storey","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":246029650,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"vbGVPaHiMsWvHjRH/N/gT8lGFdA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/246029650/Haile-Mine-SC-Dept-of-Commerce"},{"type":"document","id":64687447,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/64687447/108x144/560529fc98/1511333510?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/64687447/216x288/0cdab45c69/1511333510?v=1","title":"Slope Processes Landslides","short_title":"Slope Processes Landslides","author":"dinesh_vishwakarma_9","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":64687447,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"ENamzCVl0R4rpCaB+pJWzIX+JeY="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/64687447/Slope-Processes-Landslides"},{"type":"document","id":344569902,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/344569902/108x144/dd777d89d1/1491743783?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/344569902/216x288/706f05fd8d/1491743783?v=1","title":"A GARDER (1).pdf","short_title":"A GARDER (1).pdf","author":"AntoineSoixanteQuatre","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":344569902,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"ImVaBfKyflSIsbVGDTOpT+LxDZg="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/344569902/A-GARDER-1-pdf"},{"type":"document","id":53729095,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/53729095/108x144/760168746a/1405717367?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/53729095/216x288/dc427770bb/1405717367?v=1","title":"Cronograma y Presentación DAC Ejercicio 2013 - Declaración Anual Consolidada Julio 2014","short_title":"Cronograma y Presentación DAC Ejercicio 2013 - Declaración Anual Consolidada Julio 2014","author":"Ricardo Carrasco-Francia","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":53729095,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"UC23+1JFIB7aANGo+j2sGiDdC1Q="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/53729095/Cronograma-y-Presentacion-DAC-Ejercicio-2013-Declaracion-Anual-Consolidada-Julio-2014"},{"type":"document","id":345016365,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/345016365/108x144/af4345119e/1492038990?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/345016365/216x288/179f0d35bb/1492038990?v=1","title":"jharris updated 4 12 17","short_title":"jharris updated 4 12 17","author":"api-314837384","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":345016365,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"/zlmbeYSrSvv1SuQwFqdrRss4P0="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/345016365/jharris-updated-4-12-17"},{"type":"document","id":220293708,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/220293708/108x144/eec5104c2d/1398444151?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/220293708/216x288/5cebacd525/1398444151?v=1","title":"KEFI Minerals Apr 2014 Shareholder Update","short_title":"KEFI Minerals Apr 2014 Shareholder Update","author":"Denise Cruz","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":220293708,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"NXmN34RwR1x+T3+Pr7rpkDOpWQA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/220293708/KEFI-Minerals-Apr-2014-Shareholder-Update"},{"type":"document","id":131193526,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/131193526/108x144/5898e80ebd/1363684713?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/131193526/216x288/2d58ddeabb/1363684713?v=1","title":"An Attractive and Economical Alternative to Owner","short_title":"An Attractive and Economical Alternative to Owner","author":"rannscribd","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":131193526,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"ecapqZz/fO4NXUeUgqNlsAYzYNo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/131193526/An-Attractive-and-Economical-Alternative-to-Owner"},{"type":"document","id":346369708,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/346369708/108x144/83ad3eaa20/1493155899?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/346369708/216x288/2eae6d471d/1493155899?v=1","title":"Dialnet-ElModeloDeSolowAnalisisTeoricoInterpretacionEconom-3361925","short_title":"Dialnet-ElModeloDeSolowAnalisisTeoricoInterpretacionEconom-3361925","author":"Frank","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":346369708,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"A7liKEOGgsCAy5JvDPKbViM3Itw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/346369708/Dialnet-ElModeloDeSolowAnalisisTeoricoInterpretacionEconom-3361925"},{"type":"document","id":234783762,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/234783762/108x144/9c3f0db804/1406049423?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/234783762/216x288/9170391c43/1406049423?v=1","title":"PLJ Volume 16 Number 4-5-01- Jorge Bocobo-The Regalian Doctrine","short_title":"PLJ Volume 16 Number 4-5-01- Jorge Bocobo-The Regalian Doctrine","author":"Krissa Jennesca Tullo","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":234783762,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"1aDTcdUiVWv0EZixmk0gRxLjzJQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/234783762/PLJ-Volume-16-Number-4-5-01-Jorge-Bocobo-The-Regalian-Doctrine"},{"type":"document","id":293695948,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/293695948/108x144/5202ff1989/1486431433?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/293695948/216x288/a307dcb184/1486431433?v=1","title":"finalexamessay","short_title":"finalexamessay","author":"api-302157516","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":293695948,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"GFh83uCOpFMzKJBtQCogXPCDwXM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/293695948/finalexamessay"},{"type":"document","id":333719741,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/333719741/108x144/5bc65dc255/1481285196?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/333719741/216x288/a8c8b6d4f1/1481285196?v=1","title":"9789073368224 - Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 39 - ebook","short_title":"9789073368224 - Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 39 - ebook","author":"Sidestone Press","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":333719741,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Vu9O5FRVsVDc3AphuJyMdZO7RiY="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/333719741/9789073368224-Analecta-Praehistorica-Leidensia-39-ebook"},{"type":"document","id":19262317,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/19262317/108x144/a8cad1eebe/1399827190?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/19262317/216x288/9cf73298cd/1399827190?v=1","title":"Minnesota DOT Survey Manual_Manual2007","short_title":"Minnesota DOT Survey Manual_Manual2007","author":"ludwik43","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":19262317,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"e4oqm/agDvQM3dx/qK+70/Y1z30="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/19262317/Minnesota-DOT-Survey-Manual-Manual2007"},{"type":"document","id":33375653,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375653/108x144/414027d71b/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375653/216x288/7d5a46455b/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1921 april 30 construction begins","short_title":"slmr 1921 april 30 construction begins","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375653,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"UqHv6/43jo9doFia+Jey0HP5NXk="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375653/slmr-1921-april-30-construction-begins"},{"type":"document","id":113964115,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/113964115/108x144/819938fb5e/1369955401?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/113964115/216x288/36cf39aa3f/1369955401?v=1","title":"Fort Irwin Mines","short_title":"Fort Irwin Mines","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":113964115,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"ePRno2ZjGt5UWWQNxsZWQiJLMDQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/113964115/Fort-Irwin-Mines"},{"type":"document","id":33375654,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375654/108x144/b6c73572c5/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375654/216x288/0dac907da3/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1929 march 15 silver king mill photo","short_title":"slmr 1929 march 15 silver king mill photo","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375654,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"yy++mpDLQDmdVttMrBVKpb17e9I="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375654/slmr-1929-march-15-silver-king-mill-photo"},{"type":"document","id":33375632,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375632/108x144/16900178e9/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375632/216x288/7c13935d2c/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1917 jan 15 silver king","short_title":"slmr 1917 jan 15 silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375632,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"E8G8tao1BVSSgTnUQlCNIEfvAtM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375632/slmr-1917-jan-15-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":33375661,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375661/108x144/0e15f643b1/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375661/216x288/4dab49bb77/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr silver king takes over cal comstock","short_title":"slmr silver king takes over cal comstock","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375661,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Xd2SIzYLnipeS2557TJaZVEasWU="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375661/slmr-silver-king-takes-over-cal-comstock"},{"type":"document","id":33375668,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375668/108x144/1ed574ed4e/1368017483?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375668/216x288/cbba193dc9/1368017483?v=1","title":"sltelegram 1931 dec 31 silver king","short_title":"sltelegram 1931 dec 31 silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375668,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"SM6JnTjA/P8yDJR0M0OLjPEn7y4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375668/sltelegram-1931-dec-31-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":33375651,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375651/108x144/231a3df91b/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375651/216x288/f0078615f2/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1918 jan 15","short_title":"slmr 1918 jan 15","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375651,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"8+Gr7N9t/3tu88yXIKwDLhQyz8I="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375651/slmr-1918-jan-15"},{"type":"document","id":33375625,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375625/108x144/32a417afc3/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375625/216x288/7143acef65/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","short_title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375625,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"nlyrZGIzC1FMARa0iFf1N19H1kE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375625/slmr-1913-nov-30-milling-at-the-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":114842064,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/114842064/108x144/009f45f31b/1439990434?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/114842064/216x288/06dd210235/1439990434?v=1","title":"Fort Irwin Mines","short_title":"Fort Irwin Mines","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":114842064,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"nLC/YcZwN7WGnU3UdrCGNuXtbx4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/114842064/Fort-Irwin-Mines"},{"type":"document","id":95056511,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/95056511/108x144/c3fe68def6/1365910491?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/95056511/216x288/f2d94bd2b4/1365910491?v=1","title":"Freeman 1973","short_title":"Freeman 1973","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":95056511,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"X9BNmM3e2oCfU/2KJel40tMHnf0="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/95056511/Freeman-1973"},{"type":"document","id":133027426,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/133027426/108x144/63475b5cca/1378565404?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/133027426/216x288/79fa2e0a12/1378565404?v=1","title":"Citizen Guide to Enviromental Impact Statements","short_title":"Citizen Guide to Enviromental Impact Statements","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":133027426,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"fr/zdIlZaQE38Ne2SCzNeosLC7k="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/133027426/Citizen-Guide-to-Enviromental-Impact-Statements"},{"type":"document","id":33375627,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375627/108x144/3eac1e940d/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375627/216x288/81078358f2/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1916 dec 30 spiro on silver king is gen mgr","short_title":"slmr 1916 dec 30 spiro on silver king is gen mgr","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375627,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"s27Pqm9b1kj8VJiIt0hE2ja0eQo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375627/slmr-1916-dec-30-spiro-on-silver-king-is-gen-mgr"},{"type":"document","id":36070997,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/36070997/108x144/c772d29f8a/1369955456?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/36070997/216x288/bcc1060050/1369955456?v=1","title":"hidden treasure mine map","short_title":"hidden treasure mine map","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":36070997,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"qxIOYL3mxv/EQRFUgEah+TTfsXI="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/36070997/hidden-treasure-mine-map"},{"type":"document","id":89741157,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/89741157/108x144/fc16d198a2/1352145768?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/89741157/216x288/c8be083648/1352145768?v=1","title":"Army Corp of Engineers Contracts","short_title":"Army Corp of Engineers Contracts","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":89741157,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"llB8IDN6zQ5qejutoJi4m408pVQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/89741157/Army-Corp-of-Engineers-Contracts"},{"type":"document","id":33375659,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375659/108x144/4124a5dd46/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375659/216x288/ba61e6fa31/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr park city prospered in 1917","short_title":"slmr park city prospered in 1917","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375659,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Pl3Dgd8p4PreEp+g91+2Hu8haEg="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375659/slmr-park-city-prospered-in-1917"},{"type":"document","id":17205337,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205337/108x144/63582c5cd8/1247056332?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205337/216x288/cc5e3e19c3/1247056332?v=1","title":"BLM Response to Lakeside Claimants","short_title":"BLM Response to Lakeside Claimants","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":17205337,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"mqIUL6bxLJIgEdG9sesF5MOfDoU="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/17205337/BLM-Response-to-Lakeside-Claimants"},{"type":"document","id":33373713,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373713/108x144/8ba3589100/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373713/216x288/11acf62c24/1359748291?v=1","title":"Silver King Coalition Mill flowsheet","short_title":"Silver King Coalition Mill flowsheet","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33373713,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"fdCT5DDCBDsCTceaRxuX7vldJU8="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33373713/Silver-King-Coalition-Mill-flowsheet"},{"type":"document","id":33375614,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375614/108x144/5c53e7db78/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375614/216x288/9363dd07bd/1359748291?v=1","title":"silver king mill slmr 1900","short_title":"silver king mill slmr 1900","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375614,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Mfk130uLxur1rWjOJ8OuCxJOgm4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375614/silver-king-mill-slmr-1900"},{"type":"document","id":15816261,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816261/108x144/0817e47b22/1399793589?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816261/216x288/d5597ca7ca/1399793589?v=1","title":"Lakeside BLM Mine closures ","short_title":"Lakeside BLM Mine closures ","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":15816261,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"k0UoZ8alroXRRif2n7VsFXQTjlc="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/15816261/Lakeside-BLM-Mine-closures"},{"type":"document","id":33375586,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375586/108x144/b4b72578d9/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375586/216x288/6cdb3e8553/1359748291?v=1","title":"sl telegram 1916 nov 26","short_title":"sl telegram 1916 nov 26","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375586,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"2j+Jf2XSS5g3EbDznveo2af9w0o="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375586/sl-telegram-1916-nov-26"},{"type":"document","id":33373730,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373730/108x144/95b7f3e9c7/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373730/216x288/38ef902792/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","short_title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33373730,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"qp2l5VhTJ1xENOs/6nAC7YtKTaA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33373730/slmr-1913-nov-30-milling-at-the-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":17205339,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205339/108x144/319730bb92/1247056141?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205339/216x288/6b31d7e34f/1247056141?v=1","title":"Letter to BLM in re backfilling Lakeside claims","short_title":"Letter to BLM in re backfilling Lakeside claims","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":17205339,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"0vswPk5BRJ8HsrSI0Ld9as0/iSI="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/17205339/Letter-to-BLM-in-re-backfilling-Lakeside-claims"},{"type":"document","id":15816275,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816275/108x144/e0098e512e/1359747758?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816275/216x288/5124b09b04/1359747758?v=1","title":"Lakeside BLM Utah mine closures QandA","short_title":"Lakeside BLM Utah mine closures QandA","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":15816275,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Wps5j5gDwI5OEyFVxMxkGviGeeE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/15816275/Lakeside-BLM-Utah-mine-closures-QandA"},{"type":"document","id":33375609,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375609/108x144/e93d084382/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375609/216x288/526347df32/1359748291?v=1","title":"pr 1916 may 5","short_title":"pr 1916 may 5","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375609,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Qr8O5ShfVzQPS7Cdgln7alGErQs="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375609/pr-1916-may-5"},{"type":"document","id":33375594,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375594/108x144/9719d800fc/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375594/216x288/f857bd81a0/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1905 oct 30 silver king consolidated","short_title":"slmr 1905 oct 30 silver king consolidated","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375594,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"Ugb2+skixPKMPeVtPoMxVtGygnQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375594/slmr-1905-oct-30-silver-king-consolidated"},{"type":"document","id":15816274,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816274/108x144/664deb4efd/1359747758?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816274/216x288/ab36e9381c/1359747758?v=1","title":"Lakeside BLM Mine Closures Update","short_title":"Lakeside BLM Mine Closures Update","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":15816274,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"eyc34e04WGxMjEhY40RIq2v5WGM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/15816274/Lakeside-BLM-Mine-Closures-Update"},{"type":"document","id":33375589,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375589/108x144/bd1cc244ab/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375589/216x288/bfb9a72a24/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1901 dec 15","short_title":"slmr 1901 dec 15","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375589,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"bt/IxymN7IJxQaBn6Li2JKjESA4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375589/slmr-1901-dec-15"},{"type":"document","id":33373719,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373719/108x144/02095b3aa6/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373719/216x288/0f4fbd2a67/1359748291?v=1","title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","short_title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33373719,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"tddD96LCtLwD34U4VcPg8hOr/mI="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33373719/park-record-1921-dec-23-flowsheet-silver-king-coalition"},{"type":"document","id":17205343,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205343/108x144/e49fe06647/1247056958?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205343/216x288/a8597ba396/1247056958?v=1","title":"BLM letter in re backfilling Lakeside claims","short_title":"BLM letter in re backfilling Lakeside claims","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":17205343,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"BGPvNDPaCaubSLVT1Juv5K4bjok="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/17205343/BLM-letter-in-re-backfilling-Lakeside-claims"},{"type":"document","id":33375606,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375606/108x144/4878382f07/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375606/216x288/06442349de/1359748291?v=1","title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","short_title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375606,"track":"flattened_recommender","doc_uuid":"aBCxVx7bDwAjJqFJ0BtTQzy9HTE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375606/park-record-1921-dec-23-flowsheet-silver-king-coalition"}],"title_link":null,"title":null,"track_opts":{"compilation_id":"1d5LwQR7IQlFpQVlwZGGrPdyBmI=","module_id":"YEsFS/Xr7/MDSUswdPE7T3teGu4=","widget_name":"right sidebar","track_id":"flattened_recommender"}},"footer_recommenders":{"recommenders":[{"item_props":[{"type":"document","id":327823913,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/327823913/108x144/45ab174e3d/1476671997?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/327823913/216x288/b583f2a580/1476671997?v=1","title":"BCRA 15-3-1988","short_title":"BCRA 15-3-1988","author":"Caegeo","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":327823913,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"ot2Y8xRY03MO7FVSe7nypXX55bo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/327823913/BCRA-15-3-1988"},{"type":"document","id":238598447,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/238598447/108x144/c5781afbc6/1486556412?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/238598447/216x288/f5225ca77e/1486556412?v=1","title":"architectural thesis coda 4","short_title":"architectural thesis coda 4","author":"api-263097572","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":238598447,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"UXbDjB6EFhFW5v2tT2ImQhldQns="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/238598447/architectural-thesis-coda-4"},{"type":"document","id":376091340,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/376091340/108x144/92c6c245f9/1523448854?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/376091340/216x288/27943fec71/1523448854?v=1","title":"The Effects of Global Warming","short_title":"The Effects of Global Warming","author":"Anonymous 6yTIVqnOu","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":376091340,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"91tNanV9UbWLvJoHkxDQBAV0mOM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/376091340/The-Effects-of-Global-Warming"},{"type":"document","id":282693545,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/282693545/108x144/cb00fe33a2/1443193650?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/282693545/216x288/2e891cbaea/1443193650?v=1","title":"SMLJJU001 YGE 2014 - TSLs","short_title":"SMLJJU001 YGE 2014 - TSLs","author":"Jjuuko Samuel","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":282693545,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"S5XGQCnJi+bN/6iv529OaqPPTZk="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/282693545/SMLJJU001-YGE-2014-TSLs"},{"type":"document","id":365657196,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/365657196/108x144/8b182be56a/1511829648?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/365657196/216x288/950d3acdd8/1511829648?v=1","title":"Selection (1)","short_title":"Selection (1)","author":"Muhammad Sarif","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":365657196,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"HXgLcBm4rGJ4fVsw7Gf4RRTQgdM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/365657196/Selection-1"},{"type":"document","id":378757982,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/378757982/108x144/4ec5899661/1525912819?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/378757982/216x288/32f3833606/1525912819?v=1","title":"Mapping the World's Topography Using Radar","short_title":"Mapping the World's Topography Using Radar","author":"anon_109082185","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":378757982,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"9xnG/ivZITc59RwP9bskKYTlSzw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/378757982/Mapping-the-World-s-Topography-Using-Radar"},{"type":"document","id":291295914,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/291295914/108x144/1b3a1ab059/1448601088?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/291295914/216x288/7d089649f3/1448601088?v=1","title":"Forme relief","short_title":"Forme relief","author":"enickym","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":291295914,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"LdVosZv8Psf9ap6G0DvossuSLPQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/291295914/Forme-relief"},{"type":"document","id":382343939,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/382343939/108x144/9516c4d218/1529681174?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/382343939/216x288/4ee5d74f8b/1529681174?v=1","title":"Petrology Yy","short_title":"Petrology Yy","author":"Ford","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":382343939,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"V/ft8WiujE87+d25ynRTtS2UHRo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/382343939/Petrology-Yy"},{"type":"document","id":126877475,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/126877475/108x144/b87b42879a/1366351450?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/126877475/216x288/351515beb3/1366351450?v=1","title":"GIS Introduction","short_title":"GIS Introduction","author":"suwash","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":126877475,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"paqu8gLDgBbAMCMAOiykDYCs2P8="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/126877475/GIS-Introduction"},{"type":"document","id":3886359,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/3886359/108x144/0015580f04/1399609123?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/3886359/216x288/471cccaf3f/1399609123?v=1","title":"Utah section from Mineral Yearbooks 1968-2007","short_title":"Utah section from Mineral Yearbooks 1968-2007","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":3886359,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"hjK0UAompnNdvyoLVkbpt7rGIBw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/3886359/Utah-section-from-Mineral-Yearbooks-1968-2007"},{"type":"document","id":339768097,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/339768097/108x144/6a38ebc9d5/1520231591?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/339768097/216x288/9d87219a00/1520231591?v=1","title":"Leapfrog Geo Tutorials","short_title":"Leapfrog Geo Tutorials","author":"Ruben Di Ruggiero Mario","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":339768097,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"wAnDs8P48U7C47udUA+B2RAEqGw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/339768097/Leapfrog-Geo-Tutorials"},{"type":"document","id":129455402,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/129455402/108x144/fb7d623c45/1442087970?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/129455402/216x288/4c47d55196/1442087970?v=1","title":"Shaping Earth","short_title":"Shaping Earth","author":"Renata Alves","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":129455402,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"1kYFy6jhLXfro8RvlGOuel73W6o="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/129455402/Shaping-Earth"},{"type":"document","id":37498111,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/37498111/108x144/3676c749cb/1284552076?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/37498111/216x288/99b1fc96c2/1284552076?v=1","title":"Maps%20_%20Structural%20Geology","short_title":"Maps%20_%20Structural%20Geology","author":"overachiever12","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":37498111,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"7hdrQsUiahC9JqUPpZ8PbPIBF7E="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/37498111/Maps-20-20Structural-20Geology"},{"type":"document","id":35802714,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/35802714/108x144/8af6df73f5/1351175764?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/35802714/216x288/d8d9a7fcb9/1351175764?v=1","title":"2007 Fall-Winter Current News, Clackamas River Basin Council","short_title":"2007 Fall-Winter Current News, Clackamas River Basin Council","author":"Friends of the Clackamas River Basin Council ","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":35802714,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"nIfJ/QJQT2AJXtIeclwxPL0pgTw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/35802714/2007-Fall-Winter-Current-News-Clackamas-River-Basin-Council"},{"type":"document","id":218575934,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/218575934/108x144/53382bf868/1397644670?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/218575934/216x288/ec53571ba9/1397644670?v=1","title":"Glaciers Presentation","short_title":"Glaciers Presentation","author":"Miguel Montero Alonso","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":218575934,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"KxRRrk2JFZ3QHI5yp+AGnpV60eE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/218575934/Glaciers-Presentation"},{"type":"document","id":319002915,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/319002915/108x144/9edba26aba/1469188822?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/319002915/216x288/71220eb620/1469188822?v=1","title":"Me","short_title":"Me","author":"Shuvabrata01","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":319002915,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"aqMvK36L0PdAWysLFQbbbEP0H9A="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/319002915/Me"},{"type":"document","id":250801316,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/250801316/108x144/b620f68214/1486572958?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/250801316/216x288/34f598e58e/1486572958?v=1","title":"final grade 3 social studies thematic unit","short_title":"final grade 3 social studies thematic unit","author":"api-270078599","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":250801316,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"siMsSY8xz0z6+0R7zacaW7IvR/M="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/250801316/final-grade-3-social-studies-thematic-unit"},{"type":"document","id":134476444,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/134476444/108x144/32230208f1/1365334154?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/134476444/216x288/0f0f9e4186/1365334154?v=1","title":"Plouff","short_title":"Plouff","author":"enrilei","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":134476444,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"F9U0dPCZ7xJ1/XY5hAlxdI79FJA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/134476444/Plouff"},{"type":"document","id":246029650,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/246029650/108x144/a2d3e8b37f/1440384102?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/246029650/216x288/6c44f28382/1440384102?v=1","title":"Haile Mine SC Dept of Commerce","short_title":"Haile Mine SC Dept of Commerce","author":"Ken Storey","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":246029650,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"vbGVPaHiMsWvHjRH/N/gT8lGFdA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/246029650/Haile-Mine-SC-Dept-of-Commerce"},{"type":"document","id":64687447,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/64687447/108x144/560529fc98/1511333510?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/64687447/216x288/0cdab45c69/1511333510?v=1","title":"Slope Processes Landslides","short_title":"Slope Processes Landslides","author":"dinesh_vishwakarma_9","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":64687447,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"ENamzCVl0R4rpCaB+pJWzIX+JeY="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/presentation/64687447/Slope-Processes-Landslides"},{"type":"document","id":344569902,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/344569902/108x144/dd777d89d1/1491743783?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/344569902/216x288/706f05fd8d/1491743783?v=1","title":"A GARDER (1).pdf","short_title":"A GARDER (1).pdf","author":"AntoineSoixanteQuatre","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":344569902,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"ImVaBfKyflSIsbVGDTOpT+LxDZg="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/344569902/A-GARDER-1-pdf"},{"type":"document","id":53729095,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/53729095/108x144/760168746a/1405717367?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/53729095/216x288/dc427770bb/1405717367?v=1","title":"Cronograma y Presentación DAC Ejercicio 2013 - Declaración Anual Consolidada Julio 2014","short_title":"Cronograma y Presentación DAC Ejercicio 2013 - Declaración Anual Consolidada Julio 2014","author":"Ricardo Carrasco-Francia","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":53729095,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"UC23+1JFIB7aANGo+j2sGiDdC1Q="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/53729095/Cronograma-y-Presentacion-DAC-Ejercicio-2013-Declaracion-Anual-Consolidada-Julio-2014"},{"type":"document","id":345016365,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/345016365/108x144/af4345119e/1492038990?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/345016365/216x288/179f0d35bb/1492038990?v=1","title":"jharris updated 4 12 17","short_title":"jharris updated 4 12 17","author":"api-314837384","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":345016365,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"/zlmbeYSrSvv1SuQwFqdrRss4P0="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/345016365/jharris-updated-4-12-17"},{"type":"document","id":220293708,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/220293708/108x144/eec5104c2d/1398444151?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/220293708/216x288/5cebacd525/1398444151?v=1","title":"KEFI Minerals Apr 2014 Shareholder Update","short_title":"KEFI Minerals Apr 2014 Shareholder Update","author":"Denise Cruz","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":220293708,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"NXmN34RwR1x+T3+Pr7rpkDOpWQA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/220293708/KEFI-Minerals-Apr-2014-Shareholder-Update"},{"type":"document","id":131193526,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/131193526/108x144/5898e80ebd/1363684713?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/131193526/216x288/2d58ddeabb/1363684713?v=1","title":"An Attractive and Economical Alternative to Owner","short_title":"An Attractive and Economical Alternative to Owner","author":"rannscribd","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":131193526,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"ecapqZz/fO4NXUeUgqNlsAYzYNo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/131193526/An-Attractive-and-Economical-Alternative-to-Owner"},{"type":"document","id":346369708,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/346369708/108x144/83ad3eaa20/1493155899?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/346369708/216x288/2eae6d471d/1493155899?v=1","title":"Dialnet-ElModeloDeSolowAnalisisTeoricoInterpretacionEconom-3361925","short_title":"Dialnet-ElModeloDeSolowAnalisisTeoricoInterpretacionEconom-3361925","author":"Frank","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":346369708,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"A7liKEOGgsCAy5JvDPKbViM3Itw="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/346369708/Dialnet-ElModeloDeSolowAnalisisTeoricoInterpretacionEconom-3361925"},{"type":"document","id":234783762,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/234783762/108x144/9c3f0db804/1406049423?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/234783762/216x288/9170391c43/1406049423?v=1","title":"PLJ Volume 16 Number 4-5-01- Jorge Bocobo-The Regalian Doctrine","short_title":"PLJ Volume 16 Number 4-5-01- Jorge Bocobo-The Regalian Doctrine","author":"Krissa Jennesca Tullo","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":234783762,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"1aDTcdUiVWv0EZixmk0gRxLjzJQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/234783762/PLJ-Volume-16-Number-4-5-01-Jorge-Bocobo-The-Regalian-Doctrine"},{"type":"document","id":293695948,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/293695948/108x144/5202ff1989/1486431433?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/293695948/216x288/a307dcb184/1486431433?v=1","title":"finalexamessay","short_title":"finalexamessay","author":"api-302157516","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":293695948,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"GFh83uCOpFMzKJBtQCogXPCDwXM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/293695948/finalexamessay"},{"type":"document","id":333719741,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/333719741/108x144/5bc65dc255/1481285196?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/333719741/216x288/a8c8b6d4f1/1481285196?v=1","title":"9789073368224 - Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 39 - ebook","short_title":"9789073368224 - Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 39 - ebook","author":"Sidestone Press","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":333719741,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"Vu9O5FRVsVDc3AphuJyMdZO7RiY="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/333719741/9789073368224-Analecta-Praehistorica-Leidensia-39-ebook"},{"type":"document","id":19262317,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/19262317/108x144/a8cad1eebe/1399827190?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/19262317/216x288/9cf73298cd/1399827190?v=1","title":"Minnesota DOT Survey Manual_Manual2007","short_title":"Minnesota DOT Survey Manual_Manual2007","author":"ludwik43","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":19262317,"track":"similar_to","doc_uuid":"e4oqm/agDvQM3dx/qK+70/Y1z30="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/19262317/Minnesota-DOT-Survey-Manual-Manual2007"}],"title_link":null,"title":"Documents Similar To Wheeler Report on Mining Districts From 1872","track_opts":{"compilation_id":"1d5LwQR7IQlFpQVlwZGGrPdyBmI=","module_id":"8Bcq4DUe6or0BxdVduIXIViNGO0=","widget_name":"document_carousel"}},{"item_props":[{"type":"document","id":33375653,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375653/108x144/414027d71b/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375653/216x288/7d5a46455b/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1921 april 30 construction begins","short_title":"slmr 1921 april 30 construction begins","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375653,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"UqHv6/43jo9doFia+Jey0HP5NXk="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375653/slmr-1921-april-30-construction-begins"},{"type":"document","id":113964115,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/113964115/108x144/819938fb5e/1369955401?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/113964115/216x288/36cf39aa3f/1369955401?v=1","title":"Fort Irwin Mines","short_title":"Fort Irwin Mines","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":113964115,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"ePRno2ZjGt5UWWQNxsZWQiJLMDQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/113964115/Fort-Irwin-Mines"},{"type":"document","id":33375654,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375654/108x144/b6c73572c5/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375654/216x288/0dac907da3/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1929 march 15 silver king mill photo","short_title":"slmr 1929 march 15 silver king mill photo","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375654,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"yy++mpDLQDmdVttMrBVKpb17e9I="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375654/slmr-1929-march-15-silver-king-mill-photo"},{"type":"document","id":33375632,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375632/108x144/16900178e9/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375632/216x288/7c13935d2c/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1917 jan 15 silver king","short_title":"slmr 1917 jan 15 silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375632,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"E8G8tao1BVSSgTnUQlCNIEfvAtM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375632/slmr-1917-jan-15-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":33375661,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375661/108x144/0e15f643b1/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375661/216x288/4dab49bb77/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr silver king takes over cal comstock","short_title":"slmr silver king takes over cal comstock","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375661,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"Xd2SIzYLnipeS2557TJaZVEasWU="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375661/slmr-silver-king-takes-over-cal-comstock"},{"type":"document","id":33375668,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375668/108x144/1ed574ed4e/1368017483?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375668/216x288/cbba193dc9/1368017483?v=1","title":"sltelegram 1931 dec 31 silver king","short_title":"sltelegram 1931 dec 31 silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375668,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"SM6JnTjA/P8yDJR0M0OLjPEn7y4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375668/sltelegram-1931-dec-31-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":33375651,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375651/108x144/231a3df91b/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375651/216x288/f0078615f2/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1918 jan 15","short_title":"slmr 1918 jan 15","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375651,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"8+Gr7N9t/3tu88yXIKwDLhQyz8I="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375651/slmr-1918-jan-15"},{"type":"document","id":33375625,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375625/108x144/32a417afc3/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375625/216x288/7143acef65/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","short_title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375625,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"nlyrZGIzC1FMARa0iFf1N19H1kE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375625/slmr-1913-nov-30-milling-at-the-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":114842064,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/114842064/108x144/009f45f31b/1439990434?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/114842064/216x288/06dd210235/1439990434?v=1","title":"Fort Irwin Mines","short_title":"Fort Irwin Mines","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":114842064,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"nLC/YcZwN7WGnU3UdrCGNuXtbx4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/114842064/Fort-Irwin-Mines"},{"type":"document","id":95056511,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/95056511/108x144/c3fe68def6/1365910491?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/95056511/216x288/f2d94bd2b4/1365910491?v=1","title":"Freeman 1973","short_title":"Freeman 1973","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":95056511,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"X9BNmM3e2oCfU/2KJel40tMHnf0="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/95056511/Freeman-1973"},{"type":"document","id":133027426,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/133027426/108x144/63475b5cca/1378565404?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/133027426/216x288/79fa2e0a12/1378565404?v=1","title":"Citizen Guide to Enviromental Impact Statements","short_title":"Citizen Guide to Enviromental Impact Statements","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":133027426,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"fr/zdIlZaQE38Ne2SCzNeosLC7k="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/133027426/Citizen-Guide-to-Enviromental-Impact-Statements"},{"type":"document","id":33375627,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375627/108x144/3eac1e940d/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375627/216x288/81078358f2/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1916 dec 30 spiro on silver king is gen mgr","short_title":"slmr 1916 dec 30 spiro on silver king is gen mgr","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375627,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"s27Pqm9b1kj8VJiIt0hE2ja0eQo="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375627/slmr-1916-dec-30-spiro-on-silver-king-is-gen-mgr"},{"type":"document","id":36070997,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/36070997/108x144/c772d29f8a/1369955456?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/36070997/216x288/bcc1060050/1369955456?v=1","title":"hidden treasure mine map","short_title":"hidden treasure mine map","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":36070997,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"qxIOYL3mxv/EQRFUgEah+TTfsXI="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/36070997/hidden-treasure-mine-map"},{"type":"document","id":89741157,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/89741157/108x144/fc16d198a2/1352145768?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/89741157/216x288/c8be083648/1352145768?v=1","title":"Army Corp of Engineers Contracts","short_title":"Army Corp of Engineers Contracts","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":89741157,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"llB8IDN6zQ5qejutoJi4m408pVQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/89741157/Army-Corp-of-Engineers-Contracts"},{"type":"document","id":33375659,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375659/108x144/4124a5dd46/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375659/216x288/ba61e6fa31/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr park city prospered in 1917","short_title":"slmr park city prospered in 1917","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375659,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"Pl3Dgd8p4PreEp+g91+2Hu8haEg="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375659/slmr-park-city-prospered-in-1917"},{"type":"document","id":17205337,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205337/108x144/63582c5cd8/1247056332?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205337/216x288/cc5e3e19c3/1247056332?v=1","title":"BLM Response to Lakeside Claimants","short_title":"BLM Response to Lakeside Claimants","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":17205337,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"mqIUL6bxLJIgEdG9sesF5MOfDoU="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/17205337/BLM-Response-to-Lakeside-Claimants"},{"type":"document","id":33373713,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373713/108x144/8ba3589100/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373713/216x288/11acf62c24/1359748291?v=1","title":"Silver King Coalition Mill flowsheet","short_title":"Silver King Coalition Mill flowsheet","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33373713,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"fdCT5DDCBDsCTceaRxuX7vldJU8="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33373713/Silver-King-Coalition-Mill-flowsheet"},{"type":"document","id":33375614,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375614/108x144/5c53e7db78/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375614/216x288/9363dd07bd/1359748291?v=1","title":"silver king mill slmr 1900","short_title":"silver king mill slmr 1900","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375614,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"Mfk130uLxur1rWjOJ8OuCxJOgm4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375614/silver-king-mill-slmr-1900"},{"type":"document","id":15816261,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816261/108x144/0817e47b22/1399793589?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816261/216x288/d5597ca7ca/1399793589?v=1","title":"Lakeside BLM Mine closures ","short_title":"Lakeside BLM Mine closures ","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":15816261,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"k0UoZ8alroXRRif2n7VsFXQTjlc="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/15816261/Lakeside-BLM-Mine-closures"},{"type":"document","id":33375586,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375586/108x144/b4b72578d9/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375586/216x288/6cdb3e8553/1359748291?v=1","title":"sl telegram 1916 nov 26","short_title":"sl telegram 1916 nov 26","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375586,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"2j+Jf2XSS5g3EbDznveo2af9w0o="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375586/sl-telegram-1916-nov-26"},{"type":"document","id":33373730,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373730/108x144/95b7f3e9c7/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373730/216x288/38ef902792/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","short_title":"slmr 1913 nov 30 milling at the silver king","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33373730,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"qp2l5VhTJ1xENOs/6nAC7YtKTaA="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33373730/slmr-1913-nov-30-milling-at-the-silver-king"},{"type":"document","id":17205339,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205339/108x144/319730bb92/1247056141?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205339/216x288/6b31d7e34f/1247056141?v=1","title":"Letter to BLM in re backfilling Lakeside claims","short_title":"Letter to BLM in re backfilling Lakeside claims","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":17205339,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"0vswPk5BRJ8HsrSI0Ld9as0/iSI="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/17205339/Letter-to-BLM-in-re-backfilling-Lakeside-claims"},{"type":"document","id":15816275,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816275/108x144/e0098e512e/1359747758?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816275/216x288/5124b09b04/1359747758?v=1","title":"Lakeside BLM Utah mine closures QandA","short_title":"Lakeside BLM Utah mine closures QandA","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":15816275,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"Wps5j5gDwI5OEyFVxMxkGviGeeE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/15816275/Lakeside-BLM-Utah-mine-closures-QandA"},{"type":"document","id":33375609,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375609/108x144/e93d084382/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375609/216x288/526347df32/1359748291?v=1","title":"pr 1916 may 5","short_title":"pr 1916 may 5","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375609,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"Qr8O5ShfVzQPS7Cdgln7alGErQs="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375609/pr-1916-may-5"},{"type":"document","id":33375594,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375594/108x144/9719d800fc/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375594/216x288/f857bd81a0/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1905 oct 30 silver king consolidated","short_title":"slmr 1905 oct 30 silver king consolidated","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375594,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"Ugb2+skixPKMPeVtPoMxVtGygnQ="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33375594/slmr-1905-oct-30-silver-king-consolidated"},{"type":"document","id":15816274,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816274/108x144/664deb4efd/1359747758?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/15816274/216x288/ab36e9381c/1359747758?v=1","title":"Lakeside BLM Mine Closures Update","short_title":"Lakeside BLM Mine Closures Update","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":15816274,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"eyc34e04WGxMjEhY40RIq2v5WGM="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/15816274/Lakeside-BLM-Mine-Closures-Update"},{"type":"document","id":33375589,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375589/108x144/bd1cc244ab/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375589/216x288/bfb9a72a24/1359748291?v=1","title":"slmr 1901 dec 15","short_title":"slmr 1901 dec 15","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375589,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"bt/IxymN7IJxQaBn6Li2JKjESA4="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375589/slmr-1901-dec-15"},{"type":"document","id":33373719,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373719/108x144/02095b3aa6/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33373719/216x288/0f4fbd2a67/1359748291?v=1","title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","short_title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33373719,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"tddD96LCtLwD34U4VcPg8hOr/mI="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/33373719/park-record-1921-dec-23-flowsheet-silver-king-coalition"},{"type":"document","id":17205343,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205343/108x144/e49fe06647/1247056958?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/17205343/216x288/a8597ba396/1247056958?v=1","title":"BLM letter in re backfilling Lakeside claims","short_title":"BLM letter in re backfilling Lakeside claims","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":17205343,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"BGPvNDPaCaubSLVT1Juv5K4bjok="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/document/17205343/BLM-letter-in-re-backfilling-Lakeside-claims"},{"type":"document","id":33375606,"thumb_url":"https://imgv2-1-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375606/108x144/4878382f07/1359748291?v=1","retina_thumb_url":"https://imgv2-2-f.scribdassets.com/img/document/33375606/216x288/06442349de/1359748291?v=1","title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","short_title":"park record 1921 dec 23 flowsheet silver king coalition","author":"Russell Hartill","tracking":{"object_type":"document","object_id":33375606,"track":"from_user","doc_uuid":"aBCxVx7bDwAjJqFJ0BtTQzy9HTE="},"url":"https://www.scribd.com/doc/33375606/park-record-1921-dec-23-flowsheet-silver-king-coalition"}],"title_link":null,"title":"More From Russell Hartill","track_opts":{"compilation_id":"1d5LwQR7IQlFpQVlwZGGrPdyBmI=","module_id":"4qs956TqLzUKls88WcSt26OavCM=","widget_name":"document_carousel"}}]},"seo_new_docs_recommenders":{"recommenders":[]}},"seo_roadblock_props_path":"/doc-page/seo-roadblock-props/3915460","signup_context":null,"toolbar":{"search_path":"/search-4gen?allowed_pages=&auth_token=8CyN6xV%2BGcL4R%2BQ5uU3dEjVXuMM%3D&authenticity_token=RVDw2fkIj55opnUkAhZT3rwb4pSpA5ilf8d5S%2B7WUrNQe%2BsThy9zWDQTCOKz2c6o39cSu9dHej8c7RYjjmy01Q%3D%3D&expires=1537981629&wordDocumentId=3915460&wordUploadId=3938007"},"renewal_nag_props":null}-->