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Issue #748 Harrisburg, PA Oct.

29, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​​ ​Twitter Feed​​ ​PaEnviroDigest Google+

Northeast PA Environmental Partners Honor Winners Of 2018 Environmental Leadership


Awards

The Northeast PA Environmental Partners


Thursday recognized the winners of their 2018
Environmental Leadership Awards, the
Emerging Environmental Leader Award and
the Thomas P. Shelburne Award at a special
dinner in Wilkes-Barre. Environmental
Leadership Awards
This year's winner of the Environmental
Leadership Awards are-
-- Don Baylor, Monroe County​​, for his
leading role in various conservation efforts
throughout Monroe County.
Mr. Baylor partnered with numerous organizations to protect the streams of Monroe
County and in turn those of the Delaware River Watershed. He collected biological data,
conducted studies for environmental projects, acted as a liaison and facilitator between private
groups, environmental organizations and government entities.
His service to numerous nonprofit organizations has led to collaboration among many
groups allowing for cross pollination of environmental efforts and greater successes than any of
these groups could have achieved individually.
--​​Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor​​, Northampton County, for their ability to
form strong partnerships with local entities to not only complete the 165-mile ​D&L Trail​, but
also to create a regional network of interconnected multi-use trails in the Lehigh Valley.
Their ability to form and maintain unique partnerships is what allows for increased
support for complicated projects.
The D&L has built relationships with organizations in 5 counties and over 50
municipalities to connect the D&L Trail and preserve the heritage of the region. They are a
leader in conservation, recreation, and historic preservation in Northeast Pennsylvania.
-- ​Leggett and Platt, Incorporated​​ – Branch 0383 Luzerne County, for the development of an

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environmental management system to implement environmental sustainability practices,
encourage employee involvement, and establish partnerships with the community to achieve
their sustainability goals.
Instead of simply meeting industry-specific environmental standards, they go well above
and beyond to significantly improve resource management and lesson their impact on the
environment.
The success of this program is attributed to the many partnerships the branch has and
continues to develop with employees, other Leggett & Platt branches, suppliers, government
agencies, and the community.
-- ​Patriots Cove, Wyoming County​​, is a wild native brook trout sanctuary specifically designed
to provide optimal habitat features to restore, preserve, and protect a threatened fish species.
Patriots Cove partnered with the Wyoming County Conservation District and local
volunteers to install log structures for trout habitat, remove log jams and trash in the waterways,
and conduct water quality sampling.
More importantly, Patriots Cove is a place for veterans and first responders injured in the
line of duty to fish and reconnect with nature.
Emerging Environmental Leader Award
The Emerging Environmental Leader Award will be presented to ​Dinah DiMeolo​​,
Wyoming County, for demonstrating leadership, initiative, and dedication to protecting and
promoting a healthy environment.
Ms. DiMeolo is currently a student at the Tunkhannock Area School District and is an
avid hunter and outdoors person who has actively sought out both real world and academic
experiences that support her passion for the environment.
She has not only pursued academic opportunities to learn more about wildlife and
wildlife management but has volunteered and partnered with the USDA, Game Commission,
hunters, teachers, other youth, and biologists to study wildlife and improve their habitat in
northeastern Pennsylvania.
Ms. DiMeolo has volunteered and learned from many different organizations to pursue
her career goals in wildlife management and conservation.
Thomas P. Shelburne Award
The 24th Annual Thomas P. Shelburne Environmental Leadership Award will be
presented to ​Craig Todd​​, Monroe County. Mr. Todd is being honored for his more than 35 years
of dedication and commitment to the environment.
Mr. Todd has spent his entire career working toward protecting the natural resources of
Monroe County and northeastern Pennsylvania. His work ethic and drive allowed the ​Monroe
County Conservation District​ to cooperate with numerous local and state agencies as well as the
business community.
Throughout his tenure he partnered with organizations to work on protecting the local
environment while utilizing smart growth initiatives.
Mr. Todd has never wavered in his commitment to soil and water conservation protection
while working hand-in-hand with land preservation organizations and government agencies to
make the system work better for everyone.
Mr. Todd understood that a clean environment would not only benefit the fauna and flora
of the region but also the homeowners and businesses that call Monroe County home. His work
while at the Conservation District has served as a model for other Conservation Districts within

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the state as well as for state and federal conservation partners.
He has been instrumental in preserving the sensitive resources in Monroe County while
advocating for economic growth in compliance with environmental regulations.
Mr. Todd initiated conservation partnerships, worked cooperatively with conservation
partners at all levels, and was instrumental in protecting the resources of Monroe County, the
Delaware River Basin, and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
He led projects and initiatives that changed the way conservation practices are carried out
on all levels.
Under his tenure he worked locally with other agencies in Monroe County on planning,
agricultural land and open space preservation, stormwater management, water quality studies,
litter control and beautification, and worked with businesses and economic development
organizations to promote smart growth and development while maintaining a strong and
compliant resource conservation program.
The Northeast Environmental Partners include Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance,
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Department of Environmental Protection,
PA Environmental Council, PPL Corporation, Procter & Gamble Paper Products Company, and
Wilkes University.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on
Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click Here​ to receive regular
updates from PEC.
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Op-Ed: Power Of Collaboration For Clean Water In Delaware River Watershed

By: Andrew Johnson, ​William Penn Foundation

The ​Delaware River Basin​ supplies drinking water to over 15


million people throughout the mid-Atlantic, and is the lifeblood of
the region’s cities, suburbs, forests, and farms.
Today, in spite of an impressive recovery over the past four decades
(thanks largely to the Clean Water Act) the watershed is at risk of
“death by a thousand cuts” due to severe fragmentation of local land
use decisions, farming practices and stormwater management.
These thousand cuts, in the long term, jeopardize clean water for
five percent of the US population.
These challenges are not headline-grabbing crises. Rather they are
incremental, cumulative and deeply embedded in local land use
policies.
How can a regional funder effectively catalyze change in such a
complex system? No doubt many TFN [The Funding Network] members grapple with this
question in your work for livable and healthy communities.
This question is rich for us, especially today as the federal government is increasingly
less likely to take the lead on driving change at the regional scale, even as a rapidly changing
climate hits our communities harder every year.

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Delaware Watershed Initiative
Six years ago, we reworked our environmental grantmaking to focus on the protection
and restoration of clean water in the Delaware River watershed. As part of that shift, we
developed the ​Delaware River Watershed Initiative​ (DRWI).
Today, five years and more than $100 million in DRWI investments later, we have
learnings, both inspiring and humbling, to share as the next three-year phase of this program
begins.
When we got started, there were dozens of nonprofit organizations working across the
basin to reduce stormwater pollution, protect forests, bring back native plants, and support
river-friendly farms.
But, absent a shared plan of action and with little coordination, as a community we were
missing opportunities to leverage and build upon each other’s successes to meaningfully improve
water quality.
And, because of this fragmentation, it was nearly impossible to standardize water quality
metrics—key to understanding progress over time.
We began by tapping the expertise of the ​Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel
University​ and the ​Open Space Institute​ to use data to identify the most promising places where,
with our funding, we could tip the scale in favor of clean water.
Next, we engaged more than 40 conservation nonprofits who work on the ground and
provided them with support to develop shared action plans, in teams, to focus their efforts in
those places and on a list of four key threats to clean water.
Finally, we set up measurement sites in the same places so we could assess impact
effectively.
Our goal was to focus and amplify the excellent land protection and restoration work
already underway across the basin, by using our grantmaking and convening powers to
encourage collaboration and alignment.
Key Components
Five key components of the initiative are worth sharing, because they seem to be working
well as we launch the second phase of this work:
1. Grantee Collaboration:​​ The Initiative was conceived and is run as a collaborative among
more than 40 grantees working in teams in eight parts of the watershed. This is both challenging
and rewarding, and we’re achieving aligned impact in carefully selected places that serve as
laboratories for change and models for expansion.
2. The Power of Intermediaries:​​ Facilitating collaboration across more than 40 nonprofit
partners is a huge job and requires significant expertise and ongoing attention. We have invested
in the very skilled Institute for Conservation Leadership to develop, nurture and steward the
DRWI network.
3. Embedding Science:​​ We are using active monitoring and modeling to ensure that scarce
dollars are spent in the most efficient and effective ways. This is often a culture-shift for small
organizations that don’t have science-based capacity or culture. We partner with the Academy of
Natural Sciences at Drexel University as the science lead for DRWI, and also engaged Stroud
Water Research Center—both of which provide essential technical assistance.
4. Funder Coordination:​​ Our collaborative approach has helped unlock other funding streams
from local, state and federal sources for core project work on the ground, as we have been able to
demonstrate “transformative” partnerships that go beyond “transactional” partnerships.

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Partnering with the Open Space Institute and ​National Fish and Wildlife Foundation​ to
manage re-grant programs focused on land protection and restoration, respectively, enables us to
leverage the expertise of these key partners to direct funds to projects that will produce the
greatest return on investment.
5. Storytelling:​​ Communications is a key pillar of this Initiative. It’s important to leverage
grantees’ ability to tell nuanced, local, powerful stories about the positive impact of land use
decisions on water quality. Strong storytelling grows support, which will allow us to scale up this
approach across the watershed.
2nd Phase
As the second phase of the work begins, we face three key challenges that are also worth
sharing--
-- Social equity considerations were not baked into the formation of the DRWI, despite our
recognition that clean water is particularly important to vulnerable downstream communities
who pay the price for upstream pollution. As we focus in on the equity dimensions of our work,
we face challenges connecting these dots.
-- An external evaluation of the DRWI reinforced the need for clear, measurable goals. While we
can’t reasonably claim that our funding will protect water quality in the entire basin, we are now
refocused on demonstrating impact within our key focus areas. This change-- from the rhetorical
to the achievable-- is making a difference as the initiative evolves.
-- While science-based decision-making is critical, it is not always enough. Grantees need the
freedom to work on policy change that shifts the rules in favor of clean water actions at the local
and state levels. This is particularly true as the Trump administration rolls back clean water
protections, and local ordinances and state regulations become ever more important.
We are already thinking about where we want the Initiative to be at the end of 2021, and
how over the next two years we can meaningfully evolve DRWI from a William Penn
Foundation funding strategy to a sustainable regional initiative.
For more on accomplishments and projects, visit the ​Delaware River Watershed Initiative
website.

Andrew Johnson​ is the ​Watershed Protection Program​ Director for the William Penn
Foundation in Philadelphia. He can be contacted by sending email to:
ajohnson@williampennfoundation.org​.
NewsClips:
Delaware RiverKeeper Files Lawsuit To Protect Tinicum Creek In Bucks County
DRBC Participates In Announcement Of Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Grants
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct 26 RiverWatch Video Report

(Reprinted from the ​The Funders’ Network​ website.)


[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Now Online: WITF Documentary Generations Yet To Come: Environmental Rights In


Pennsylvania

A new documentary by WITF-TV-- ​Generations


Yet To Come: Environmental Rights In

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Pennsylvania​-- traces the history of a Pennsylvania constitutional amendment that guarantees
citizens the right to clean air and pure water.
The documentary was produced by Marie Cusick and ​StateImpact Pennsylvania​.
Pennsylvania is one of only a few states to recognize environmental quality as a basic
civil right-- much like the U.S. Constitution protects the right to free speech and freedom of
religion.
Article 1, Section 27, which was added to Pennsylvania’s constitution in 1971, says--
“The people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic,
historic and esthetic values of the environment. Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the
common property of all the people, including generations yet to come. As trustee of these
resources, the Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them for the benefit of all the people”
But its powerful language was ignored for decades. That’s starting to change.
In recent years, state Supreme Court decisions are giving it renewed life. People who
once felt bulldozed by energy companies now have a powerful new way to fight back, according
to WITF.
This has sparked fresh interest, among environmental advocates, in the concept of
“environmental constitutionalism”-- the idea that getting similar provisions amended into other
state constitutions, or the federal constitution, could be the key to reshaping not only policy, but
public opinion about how humans relate to the natural world.
The documentary will features former Sen. Franklin Kury, the author of the
Environmental Rights Amendment, and others involved in this issue.
Click Here​ to watch the program online.
Visit the ​PA Conservation Heritage​ website for other conservation heritage
documentaries by WITF.
NewsClips:
Cusick: Watch Now: The Story Of Environmental Rights In Pennsylvania
Energy, Explained Podcast: Environmental Rights In PA, New Life For A Forgotten Amendment
PA Supreme Court Environmental Rights Amendment Ruling Wild Card For Energy Developers
Related Stories:
PA Supreme Court Rules Act 13 Drilling Law Municipal Preemption Unconstitutional
PA Supreme Court Declares Law Diverting Oil & Gas Lease Funds To General Fund
Unconstitutional
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Gov. Wolf Signs Recreation Liability, Lead Service Line, Leaf Waste Bills, Ag Advisory
Board Bills

Gov. Tom Wolf Wednesday signed into law bills limiting landowner liability for recreation, lead
service line replacement, leaf waste composting exemption, expanding the responsibilities of
DEP Agricultural Advisory Board and a one-stop business permitting center. The bills include--
-- Recreation Liability:​​ ​House Bill 544​ (Moul-R-Adams) further providing for liability
protection for landowners opening their land for public recreation (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and
summary). Signed into law as Act 98.
“Adams County has a lot of farmland, trails and open spaces that could be available for
public use, but landowners who permit such use – at no cost – should not be held liable if

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someone gets hurt on their land through no fault of the landowner,” said Rep. Dan Moul. ​Click
Here for more.​
-- ​Leaf Waste Recycling:​​ ​House Bill 927​ ​(Rader-R-Monroe) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste
Planning and Recycling Act to eliminate the mandate on smaller municipalities to have a leaf
waste collection program (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary). Signed into law as Act 101.
-- ​Lead Service Lines:​​ ​House Bill 2075​ (Charlton-R-Delaware) authorizing rate recovery for
customer-owned lead water service lines (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary). Signed into law as
Act 120.
In an effort to curb this problem, a bipartisan group of legislators wrote language into this
year’s Fiscal Code allowing municipal authorities and municipal governments to replace
homeowner’s water and sewer laterals when there is a public health concern such as lead.
“Unfortunately, left out of that was Pennsylvania’s regulated water and wastewater
utilities that serve much of my district,” said Rep. Alex Charlton. This legislations corrects that.
Click Here​ for more.
-- ​DEP Agricultural Advisory Board:​​ ​Senate Bill 1171​ (Brooks-R-Crawford) provides detailed
procedures for DEP to consult with the existing Agricultural Advisory Board on the adoption of
technical guidance, changes to permits affecting agriculture and regulations (​House Fiscal Note
and summary). Signed into law as Act 162.
-- ​One-Stop-Business Center:​​ ​House Bill 1284​ (Peifer-R-Pike) directs DCED to develop a
one-stop-shop online business formation and permitting portal for business (​Senate Fiscal Note
and summary). Signed into law as Act 107.
“As a former business owner, I know that for too long the processes and procedures for
starting and running a business were a barrier to entry for so many entrepreneurs across the
commonwealth,” Gov. Tom Wolf said. “I’m proud that my PA Business One-Stop Shop has
successfully eased that burden on entrepreneurs. I applaud the legislature for recognizing that
success and cementing the one-stop shop into statute.” ​Click Here for more.​
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

Bloomberg Philanthropies Names Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, 2 Other Cities Winners In


American Cities Climate Challenge

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for


Climate Action and former New York City
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Pittsburgh
Mayor William Peduto in West End Overlook
Park Sunday to announce Pittsburgh,
Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington D.C. as
the next round of winning cities for the
Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge​.
These four cities join six other cities – Atlanta,
Los Angeles, Portland, San Diego, San Jose and
Seattle – as the first half of the total twenty cities
that will be named winners of the Climate Challenge.
The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge is a $70 million-dollar program that
will accelerate these 20 cities’ efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future

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for residents.
Through the Climate Challenge – which is part of Bloomberg’s American Cities Initiative
– Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington D.C. are accepted into a two-year
acceleration program that will provide cities powerful new resources and access to cutting-edge
support to help meet or beat their near-term carbon reduction goals.
Bloomberg highlighted the cities’ innovative and ambitious climate action plans for the
Challenge, all aimed to reduce air pollution and city-wide emissions with specific projects to
reform their respective transit and buildings sectors – two areas traditionally responsible for 80
percent total of all citywide emissions and over which mayors have significant authority.
Bloomberg recognized Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto, Philadelphia Mayor Jim
Kenney, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, and Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser for their
commitment to ambitious climate action and securing a cleaner, safer, and healthier environment
and economy for their residents.
“When Bloomberg Philanthropies announced the Climate Challenge, cities all across the
country, with both Republican and Democratic mayors, put forward thoughtful and innovative
proposals,” said Bloomberg. “Selecting the ones with the boldest goals — and the most realistic
plans for reaching them — was not easy. But Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Boston, and D.C. all stood
out, and we’re glad to include them in the group of winners. With our federal government asleep
at the wheel, cities are more important than ever in the fight against climate change — and these
cities are stepping up to the challenge. Congratulations to them all.”
Documentary Paris To Pittsburgh
Standing with Mayor Peduto, who plays a key role in Bloomberg Philanthropies’
upcoming ​National Geographic documentary Paris to Pittsburgh​, Mike also announced that
mayors in select U.S. cities will join the conversation on local climate action by hosting
screenings of the film on December 3rd and convening community discussions on climate
change. ​Click Here​ to view trailer.
The screenings, which will be held in Charleston, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, New York
City, Orlando, and Pittsburgh, will emphasize the need for the bottom-up climate action
strategies being taken by winners of the Climate Challenge.
“Pittsburgh is a city built on innovation. We’re so proud that we’ve done our part to
uphold the Paris Agreement, and we’re ready to do even more.” said Pittsburgh Mayor Bill
Peduto. “With the American Cities Climate Challenge, we can expand our clean energy program
not just in Pittsburgh, but statewide, and we’re ready to get to work.”
$2.5 Million Grant
Winners of the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge will be provided robust
technical assistance and a support package valued at up to $2.5 million per city.
These resources include a philanthropy-funded team member to facilitate the
development and passage of high impact policies, training for senior leadership to assist with
implementation of their proposed climate plans, and citizen engagement support to maximize
community buy-in.
Pittsburgh​​ plans to use support from the Climate Challenge to create and implement a
benchmarking policy for buildings. Additionally, Pittsburgh will work with Bloomberg partners
to develop and roll out a statewide clean energy financing program, scale renewable power
through community solar programs, and expand bike and pedestrian infrastructure throughout the
city. ​Click Here​ for more.

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Philadelphia​​ plans to scale up energy efficiency projects across homes and the city’s
largest commercial buildings through policies, programs, job training and other resources, as
well as dramatically increase the generation and use of renewable energy by leading and
supporting institutional clean energy procurement programs.
In working with Bloomberg partners, Philadelphia will also work increase trips by
bicycle, walking, and transit by 5 percent by 2025 or sooner through the implementation of
Connect: Philadelphia’s Strategic Transportation Plan​ and accelerate transition of 6,000
municipal vehicles to electric, and work with SEPTA to electrify its fleet
NewsClips:
AP: Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 2 Other Cities Win Bloomberg Support For Plans To Curb Climate
Change
Bloomberg, Pittsburgh Mayor Talk Climate Change Fight In Pittsburgh
Bloomberg Announces $2.5 Million Award To Help Pittsburgh’s Environment
Kummer: Philly Wins $2M From Bloomberg For Climate Efforts
Philadelphia Wins Major Bloomberg Grant For Environmental Work
Sisk: Bloomberg Announces $2.5M Gifts To Tackle Climate Change In Pittsburgh, Philly
Bloomberg Visiting Pittsburgh To Spotlight Climate Program
Editorial: Pittsburgh Shows Leadership In Climate Change
Cusick: Climate Change: A Crisis For Humanity, Not A Big Deal In Governor’s Race
Related Stories:
Canadian, Colorado Companies Enter Into Agreement To Reduce Methane Emissions From
Closed Cambria 33 Mine
Sustainable Pittsburgh Names Joylette Portlock New Executive Director
New National Wildlife Federation Unnatural Disaster Interactive Map On Growing Climate
Impacts
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Straight Talk: Do Your Duty And Fear No One

By John A. Arway, Executive Director, ​Fish & Boat Commission

I thought that the title of this column was fitting since it will be the last
one I write as Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat
Commission (PFBC).
In case you have not heard, ​I will be retiring on November 2, 2018​,
after a 38-year career to spend time enjoying Penns waters, woods and
beyond with family and friends. I have had an amazing career and the
personal privilege to work with some incredible people.
I began my career in 1980 as a semi-skilled laborer doing habitat
improvement projects on waters across Pennsylvania.
I still have my first time and activity report, which I framed and have
on my bookshelf in my office.
My first day was spent working 9 hours “laying out” a habitat project
on Bobs Creek, Bedford County, at Blue Knob State Park. I earned an
hourly wage of $4.62.

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I was promoted to a fisheries biologist a few years later, hired Dave Spotts and Steve
Kepler and was empowered by PFBC Executive Director Ralph W. Abele to do what was
necessary to protect our aquatic resources.
That was all the direction some rookie biologists needed to change the world.
I spent most of my career reviewing permit applications for a variety of industries to
assure protection, conservation and enhancement of our Commonwealth’s aquatic resources.
I partnered with many other scientists, lawyers and conservationists along the way who
were interested in the same thing— protecting the Commonwealth’s natural resources,
improving them for use by future generations and punishing the polluters who took advantage of
them for personal profit.
I am proud to be part of a generation that can rightfully say that we have more waters to
fish today than when we were children.
I have learned many lessons throughout the years from those much wiser than me or from
personal experience by winning or losing battles. Looking back, I would not change one
second of time and hope that my children and grandchildren feel the same way about their
accomplishments when they retire from their careers.
I would like to thank everyone who I have had the honor to work with over the years.
Thanks to those who voted for me to lead charges as President of the Pennsylvania
Chapter and Northeast Division of the American Fisheries Society, President of the Northeastern
Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Chairman of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agency’s
Executive Committee and member of various technical committees, and Board member of the
American Sportfishing Association and the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council.
Also, a personal thanks to Paul Swanson who was the motivation for me to rise to the
challenge as PFBC Executive Director.
Additionally, thanks go out to past and present Commissioners Huhn, Keir, Martin,
Moore, Stidd, Shetterly, Sabatose, Worobec, Bachman, Hussar, Gavlick, Lichvar, Small, Lewis
and Kauffman for their support through calm waters and heavy seas.
And, a special thanks to everyone who helped ​fight back Senate Bill 935​. Your
confidence in me instilled confidence in myself. Thank you all.
I have crossed paths with many people over the years with a common interest in
conservation. Many of the people I have met have become personal friends. Some temporary
acquaintances and others more permanent.
I truly value those lasting friendships immeasurably and look forward to spending time
enjoying the fruits of our collective labor in retirement.
As the old saying goes, things happen for a reason, so my career ends with the passing of
the torch to a new generation of PFBC staff and Pennsylvania anglers.
I am strongly encouraged by the great work being done by the ​Wildlife Leadership
Academy​, ​Governor’s Youth Council for Hunting, Fishing and Conservation​, Pennsylvania
Council of Trout Unlimited’s ​Rivers Conservation & Fly Fishing Youth Camp​, PFBC’s
partnership with the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Gaun First Catch Centers,
and many other youth initiatives.
These combined with the addition of a new generation of PFBC staff should give us all
hope for the future.
Best of luck Mike and Mike, Julie, Chad, Amidea and Bob along with all the other new
PFBC employees and Executive Director.

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Chart a course for the destination set by the Board and stick to your plan for there will be
many obstacles along the way.
But dare to have the courage and resolve to do the right things for the right reasons for
not only the current generation of Pennsylvania anglers and boaters but for generations yet to
come.
Just remember time passes in the blink of an eye, so start making a difference today.
I did my best to ​get a revenue plan across the finish line​. I used every play in my
playbook and got us to the ​goal line several times​.
But, now it is time for me to turn the team over to a new coach and a competent Board
with new ideas and a vision to move the agency forward into the future.
I remain confident that the agency is poised to cross the funding goal line and get back on
the track of Resource First—conservation science and recreation.
I designed my email signature line many years ago using a favorite saying adopted by
former PFBC Executive Director Ralph W. Abele from his favorite book Life with Father by
Clarence Day.
I felt that it also accurately reflected my philosophy of leadership.
I also did my duty by stepping up and leading one of the finest conservation agencies in
the nation.
Although the second part of the saying—fear no one—is somewhat daunting, I finally
realized the true meaning when I had the opportunity to hear Commander Kirk S. Lippold of the
USS Cole speak about his experiences on October 12, 2000 when his ship was attacked and
bombed by Al-Qaeda terrorists during a refueling stop in the Yemeni port of Aden, killing
17 United States sailors.
He was in a time of crisis and everyone around him was advising him about what to do.
He quickly concluded that he was in the best position to make decisions because of his training
and position as Commanding Officer.
He made his decisions without fear of the consequences of his actions. So, my final
advice for those who follow me is to Do Your Duty—gather the facts, trust your judgment, check
in with your advisors from time to time and Fear No One.
Don’t be afraid of the consequences of your decisions, and never look back.
Hope to see you on the water!

-- John Arway
Do Your Duty And Fear No One… R. W. Abele

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles,
or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is
actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives
valiantly...who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy
cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst,
if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and
timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” Theodore Roosevelt, (1910).

P.S. You are invited to join me and PFBC staff at Bobs Creek, Bedford County (near ​Blue Knob
State Park​), from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Friday, November 2, 2018. We will be completing a

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habitat improvement project to bring my 38-year career full circle. Details to follow.
Related Stories:
4 House, Senate Game & Fisheries Committee Chairs Commit To New Funding For Fish & Boat
Commission In 2019
Fish & Boat Commission Names Tim Schaeffer Executive Director

(Reprinted from the ​Nov/Dec PA Angler & Boater Magazine.​ )


[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

4 House, Senate Game & Fisheries Committee Chairs Commit To New Funding For Fish &
Boat Commission In 2019

On the strength of a commitment by all four Chairs of the House and Senate Game and Fisheries
Committees, the Fish and Boat Commission Board of Commissioners Tuesday [July 10, 2018]
deferred its decision from last fall to reduce spending by $2 million beginning in July 2018.
“I want to thank the chairmen of the House and Senate Game and Fisheries Committees
for their commitment to seek additional funding for the PFBC in 2019. This commitment,
coupled with new internal revenue sources identified by our staff, provides the Board with the
necessary security to defer its’ prior decision from last fall,” said Board President Eric Hussar.
“The closure of hatcheries and potential reductions in trout and other stockings that were slated
to begin this month have been deferred and will be revisited at our spring meeting.”
“The price of a general fishing license was last increased in 2005, while license sales
continue to decline and expenses continue to grow,” added PFBC Executive Director John
Arway. “I am pleased that the General Assembly acknowledges the Commission’s need for
additional revenue to keep our Commonwealth waters protected and managed. The Commission
receives no general funds for operations and management of programs which are all funded by
our customers— PA anglers and boaters who annually spend billions of dollars fueling
Pennsylvania’s economy. This decision will allow the PFBC to move forward in the new fiscal
year and provide our customers the level of goods and services they have come to expect.”
“We certainly understand the fiscal challenges the Fish and Boat Commission faces, both
at present and moving into the future,” said ​Representatives Keith Gillespie (R-York) and
Bryan Barbin (D-Cambria)​​. “We look forward to working with the Commission early next

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session to promote legislation that would provide additional funding to help meet those
challenges. We appreciate and commend the Commission for taking this action to keep
hatcheries open and maintain the current levels of fish production and stocking our anglers
expect.”
“We have long believed that we must address the fiscal security of our wildlife
management agencies and continue to support Senate Bill 30 to achieve those goals,” added
Senators Pat Stefano (R-Fayette) and Jim Brewster (D-Allegheny)​​. “After the Senate passed
this bill by wide, bipartisan majorities in the last two sessions, we worked with our colleagues in
the House to try and make this legislation a reality. We look forward to once again working with
our fellow chairmen in the House to secure our wildlife agencies’ financial future in the next
legislative session.”
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Fish and
Boat Commission​ website.
(​Photos:​ Senators Stefano (R), Brewster (D), Reps. Gillespie (R), Barbin (D).)
Related Stories:
Straight Talk: Do Your Duty And Fear No One - John Arway
Fish & Boat Commission Names Tim Schaeffer Executive Director
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Centralized Grants Management Initiative For DEP, Other Agencies Winner Of National
Information Technology Award

Secretary of Administration Sharon Minnich Wednesday announced the centralized grants


management program, ​including DEP grants,​ is a winner of a ​2018 Outstanding Achievement in
the Field of Information Technology Award​ presented by the National Association of State Chief
Information Officers.
The project was selected from a pool of over 125 nominations submitted by state
governments.
DEP’s electronic permitting system​ was also a finalist for this same award.
Prior to developing this online grants portal, individuals had to search for grant
information across various state agencies and, in many cases, submit an application by mail. The
portal also provides a cost-effective path for agencies that want to modernize their paper-based
review and approval processes or replace their own outdated online grant systems.
The centralized grants management system currently supports over 120 programs
administered by seven agencies, including the PA Council on the Arts and DEP.
Applications that were previously submitted and reviewed on paper are being processed
50 percent faster in the electronic system, resulting in increased productivity of $18 million since
2017.
Savings will continue to grow as more grants are processed through the system.
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million

The Department of
Environmental Protection

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Friday announced the award of over $37.2 million in recycling implementation grants to ​195
community recycling programs​ across the state.
The Section 902 grants, awarded under the Act 101 Municipal Waste Planning,
Recycling and Waste Reduction Act, pay 90 percent of the cost of local recycling and
composting implementation projects.
Click Here​ for a list of grants awarded.
Pennsylvania’s curbside/drop-off recycling program celebrates its 30th anniversary this
year and now reaches 94 percent of the state’s population.
In those 30 years recycling in Pennsylvania has turned into a $22.6 billion industry, but
the program now faces challenges in terms of marketing collected materials, an electronics waste
recycling effort that is foundering and a recycling funding model that may be out of date. ​Click
Here​ for more.
To learn more about the recycling program, visit DEP’s ​Recycling In Pennsylvania
webpage.
New Grant Round
DEP is also opening a new Section 902 grant application period with new applications
due March 22. ​Click Here​ for more information.
More information on Section 902 recycling grants will be available on DEP’s ​Recycling
Financial Assistance​ webpage. Read the full ​October 27 PA Bulletin notice​ for more
information.
NewsClips:
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing


Act 101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5

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DEP’s ​Solid Waste Advisory​ and Recycling
Fund Advisory Committees will hold a joint
meeting November 5 to review a final set of draft
recommendations for changing and
strengthening the Act 101 Municipal Waste
Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act.
The Committees have been working with a
variety of stakeholders on the recommendations
since June of 2017. The goal of this meeting is
to see if the Committees can come to a consensus
on the recommendations.
A ​3-page summary of 25 recommendations ​will be reviewed by the Committee. Among
the recommendations are--
-- Require curbside recycling in any community of 5,000 or more (now 10,000 or more);
-- Any municipality of less than 5,000 must have a recycling program feasible for them;
-- All persons must separate, municipalities must collect ALL materials listed in the Act (now
it’s 3 out of 8 materials-- clear glass, colored glass, aluminum, steel and bimetallic cans,
high-grade office paper, newsprint, corrugated paper and plastics);
-- Add mixed paper to the list of items that must be recycled;
-- All state agencies must recycling listed materials;
-- All state agencies must default to purchasing products with recycled content;
-- Ban aluminum, steel/bi-metal cans from being landfilled or going to resource recovery
facilities;
-- Add provisions to facilitate universal access to waste management, recycling services;
-- Authorize counties to adopt fees to support recycling programs;
-- Authorize municipalities to adopt fees to support recycling programs; and
-- Expand/create specific recycling public education requirements.
Click Here​ for a copy of the draft recommendations.
The meeting will be held in Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building starting at 10:00.
For more information and available handouts, visit DEP’s ​Solid Waste Advisory
Committee​/ Recycling Fund Advisory Committee webpage. Questions should be directed to
Laura Henry, 717-772-5713 or send email to: ​lahenry@pa.gov​.
Background
Pennsylvania’s curbside/drop-off recycling program celebrates its 30th anniversary this
year and now reaches 94 percent of the state’s population.
In those 30 years recycling in Pennsylvania has turned into a $22.6 billion industry, but
the program now faces challenges in terms of marketing collected materials, an electronics waste
recycling effort that is foundering and a recycling funding model that may be out of date. ​Click
Here​ for more.
To learn more about the recycling program, visit DEP’s ​Recycling In Pennsylvania
webpage.
NewsClips:
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly

15
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program

The ​PA Parks and Forests Foundation​ is now


accepting nominations for its ​2019 awards
program​ to recognize a state park, forest, or
volunteer that exemplifies the best of the
best. Nominations are due December 17.
Award winners will be announced in January
2019 and honored at PPFF’s awards banquet
in May 2019.
The award categories include:
-- Cliff Jones Keystone Legacy Award:
This top honor is given to a group, individual, or business. It recognizes an outstanding
contribution to the protection and/or enhancement to the park and forest system in Pennsylvania.
-- Joseph Ibberson Government Award:​​ The Ibberson Government Award is given to a person
or department at any level of government to recognize their work in the stewardship of
Pennsylvania’s state park and forest systems.
-- Park of the Year: ​The Park of the Year Award is designed to recognize a park for their
exemplary or innovative work in customer service, education, or recreation; stewardship of
natural, cultural, or historic assets; and/or accommodation of special needs of visitors.
-- Forest of the Year:​​ The Forest of the Year Award is designed to recognize a forest district for
its innovative and exemplary work in both forest management and recreation.
-- Volunteerism Awards:​​ The Volunteerism Award honors organizations or individuals that
have made a lasting, positive impression on a park or forest.
-- Young Volunteer Award: ​The Young Volunteer Award recognizes a significant contribution
to a park or forest by a person under the age of 25, including volunteer hours, a significant

16
project or an innovative idea.
Click Here​ for a list of 2018 Award winners and their stories.
Nominations can be sent to the PPFF office at 1845 Market Street, Suite 202, Camp Hill,
PA 17011 or send by email to: ​mmowery-ppff@pa.net​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA Parks &
Forests Foundation​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Foundation,
Like them on Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to become a member of the
Foundation.
NewsClips:
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Related Story:
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Recognizes 2018 Award Winners
Related Stories This Week:
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary’s Dr. Laurie Goodrich Recognized With Raptor Conservation
& Education Award

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary’s​ Director of Long-term Monitoring


Dr. Laurie Goodrich was nominated and selected as the
recipient of the Jerry Ligouri Conservation and Education
Award at the 2018 ​Hawk Migration Association of North
America​ Conference.
This new HMANA award is presented to individuals who have
made significant contributions to the hawkwatching and raptor
research community, and it honors Jerry Liguori, who is a
famed raptor photographer, educator, and writer, and former
HMANA board member.
Dr. Goodrich was selected as the first recipient of this award
due to her widespread dedication to raptor research and
conservation.
According to the nomination, "She has been a vital part of not only Hawk Mountain for
decades, but has been serving in various capacities in HMANA, in the development of the

17
Raptor Population Index​, and she was a major contributor to ​The State of North America's Birds
of Prey​."
She also founded the ​Veracruz River of Raptor projects​, working closely with ProNatura
in Veracruz, Mexico, and currently, she continues to be a leader in broad-winged hawk research
and conservation and to contribute to ongoing research with northern goshawks and farmland
raptors.
A tribute to Dr. Goodrich from Jerry Liguori was read at the presentation which said in
part: "I am especially honored that Laurie is the first recipient. I have admired you since the 80s
for your dedication, but even more for your humble and professional manner. Nobody deserves
more respect than you in this field, and everyone who knows you knows that to be true.
Congratulations, and thank you for being a role model and inspiration."
To learn more about the projects, visit the ​Broad-Winged Hawk Project​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Hawk
Mountain Sanctuary​ website or call 610-756-6961. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates
from the Sanctuary, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​visit them on Flickr​, be part of
their ​Google+ Circle​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​. ​Click Here ​to support Hawk Mountain.
Related Stories:
Penn State: Fracking Wastewater Accumulation Found In Freshwater Mussel Shells
Game Commission Accepting Public Comment On Proposal To List 3 Bat Species As
Endangered, Make Other Listing Changes
New National Wildlife Federal Unnatural Disaster Interactive Map On Growing Climate Impacts
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas

The Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources Thursday ​Fall Foliage Report​ found Fall
colors continue to progress throughout the state, with
vibrant color in the southern Pocono area extending
toward the middle portion of the Commonwealth
along the Appalachian Mountains.
Peak foliage for oak-dominated communities from
the northcentral tier into southern Pennsylvania is
still developing and expected in the next forecast.
East-central and west-central counties are showing
good color, while expected peak in the southeast is
still roughly more than one week away.
Click Here​ for this week’s map and all the details! Visit DCNR’s ​Fall Foliage Report
webpage for more information.
Visitors can get suggestions about the best spots to view fall foliage on the ​Penn's Woods
Fall Foliage story map​ and on the ​Pennsylvania Tourism Office​ website.
NewsClips:
Leaf Colors Fall Flat
Fiery Fall Foliage Still Missing In Action Across The Mid-Atlantic
6 Gorgeous Philly-Area Hikes Near Breweries

18
Mountain Areas In Westmoreland, Somerset See First Sign Of Winter
Related Stories:
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Bills On Governor's Desk

The following bills were given final approval by the Senate and House and are now on the
Governor's desk for action--

Recreation Liability:​​ ​House Bill 544​ (Moul-R-Adams) further providing for liability protection
for landowners opening their land for public recreation (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary).
Signed into law as Act 98.
“Adams County has a lot of farmland, trails and open spaces that could be available for
public use, but landowners who permit such use – at no cost – should not be held liable if
someone gets hurt on their land through no fault of the landowner,” said Rep. Dan Moul. ​Click
Here for more.​

Leaf Waste Recycling:​​ ​House Bill 927​ ​(Rader-R-Monroe) amends Act 101 Municipal Waste
Planning and Recycling Act to eliminate the mandate on smaller municipalities to have a leaf
waste collection program (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary). Signed into law as Act 101.

Lead Service Lines:​​ ​House Bill 2075​ (Charlton-R-Delaware) authorizing rate recovery for
customer-owned lead water service lines (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary). Signed into law as
Act 120.
In an effort to curb this problem, a bipartisan group of legislators wrote language into this
year’s Fiscal Code allowing municipal authorities and municipal governments to replace
homeowner’s water and sewer laterals when there is a public health concern such as lead.
“Unfortunately, left out of that was Pennsylvania’s regulated water and wastewater
utilities that serve much of my district,” said Rep. Alex Charlton. This legislations corrects that.
Click Here​ for more.

One-Stop-Business Center:​​ ​House Bill 1284​ (Peifer-R-Pike) directs DCED to develop a


one-stop-shop online business formation and permitting portal for business (​Senate Fiscal Note
and summary). Signed into law as Act 107.
“As a former business owner, I know that for too long the processes and procedures for
starting and running a business were a barrier to entry for so many entrepreneurs across the
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commonwealth,” Gov. Tom Wolf said. “I’m proud that my PA Business One-Stop Shop has
successfully eased that burden on entrepreneurs. I applaud the legislature for recognizing that
success and cementing the one-stop shop into statute.” ​Click Here for more.​

DEP Agricultural Advisory Board:​​ ​Senate Bill 1171​ (Brooks-R-Crawford) provides detailed
procedures for DEP to consult with the existing Agricultural Advisory Board on the adoption of
technical guidance, changes to permits affecting agriculture and regulations (​House Fiscal Note
and summary). Signed into law as Act 162.

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars

House (Nov. 13):​​ ​House Bill 1401​ (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) which amends Title 58 to impose a
sliding scale natural gas severance tax, in addition to the Act 13 drilling impact fee, on natural
gas production (NO money for environmental programs) and includes provisions related to
minimum landowner oil and gas royalties; ​House Bill 1446​ (Quinn-R- Bucks) encouraging
infrastructure for electric and natural gas fueled vehicles; ​House Bill 2105​ (Fritz-R-
Susquehanna) abolishing certain “obsolete” boards and commissions; ​House Bill 2638
(Stephens-R-Montgomery) which would authorize new local authorities to cleanup former
military installations or land having water, sewer or stormwater pollution identified by the
Department of Environmental Protection or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency financed
by tax refunds by businesses and individuals working in the remediation area was amended to
eliminate its application to all properties with pollution to just those involving former military
installations (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary) ​ ​House Resolution 284​ (Moul-R-Adams) urging
Congress to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s MS4 Stormwater Pollution
Prevention Program (​sponsor summary​)​; ​House Resolution 943​ (Tallman-R-Adams) urging the
federal Food And Drug Administration to promptly consider candidates for Lyme disease
vaccinations; ​House Resolution 1112​ (Barrar-R-Delaware) calling on federal government to
recognize the importance of durable, flood-resilient infrastructure (​sponsor summary​). ​<> ​Click
Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (Nov. 14): ​Senate Bill 820 ​(Aument-R- Lancaster) providing liability protection for
owners and operators of on-farm agritourism activities (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 930
(Dinniman-D- Chester) sets notification requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor
summary​); ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requires the installation of automatic or
remote controlled safety values in natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas; ​Senate Bill
1199​ (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) providing for a landowners’ bill of rights in cases of eminent
domain, including by private entities like pipeline companies (​sponsor summary​); ​ ​Senate Bill
1270​ (Yudichak-D-Luzerne), (Baker-R-Luzerne) requiring universal lead testing for children
(​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 214​ (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) urging Pennsylvania
natural gas producers to export gas to European countries in an effort to curtail the monopoly
20
that Russia has on supply to that region (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-
Montgomery) is a concurrent Senate-House resolution to ​establish a Senate-House legislative
Commission to Study Pipeline Construction and Operations and to recommend improvements
for the safe transport of oil, natural gas and other hazardous liquids through pipelines; ​House Bill
86​ (Lawrence-R-Chester) eliminating tailpipe emissions testing for 1992-1995 vehicles in
Pittsburgh and Philadelphia areas (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary); ​House Bill 2154
(Causer-R-Cameron) which would weaken environmental standards for conventional (not Shale)
oil and gas drilling (​Senate Fiscal Note​, ​House Fiscal Note​ and summaries)​. <> ​Click Here​ for
full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House:​​ <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate ​(Recessed to the Call of the President Pro Tempore)


November 14 (leadership elections)

House​​ ​(On A 12-Hour Call)


November 13 (​Now Voting Day​) (leadership elections)

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Joint State Government Commission: Removing PA Counties From Vehicle Emissions


Testing Program Not Authorized By Federal Law

The ​Joint State Government Commission​ Wednesday


released a report on Pennsylvania’s Vehicle Emissions
Testing Program​ that concluded removing individual or
21
groups of counties from the testing requirement was not authorized under the federal Clean Air
Act.
Senate Resolution 168​ (Langerholc-R-Bedford) asked the Joint Commission to establish
an advisory committee to review the potential impact of removing one or more counties from the
vehicle emissions testing program.
The Resolution also asked the Commission for recommendations on how the loss of any
emissions benefits from removing counties could be made up by requiring reductions from other
sources of air pollution.
“The overwhelming consensus of the advisory committee was that revisions to the SIP
[State Air Quality Implementation Plan] suggested by Senate Resolution 168 that would remove
certain counties from the vehicle emissions testing program are not authorized under the CAA
[federal Clean Air Act].
“The driving factor in this conclusion is the fact that Congress included Pennsylvania in
the Northeast Ozone Transport Region (OTR) under the CAA, and the CAA imposes expanded
geographical coverage for vehicle inspection and maintenance programs in OTR states.
“Additionally, a majority of the advisory committee was also of the opinion that
removing any counties from the SIP was inadvisable for adverse public health and environmental
reasons.
“Because the Advisory Committee has determined that no counties should be removed,
there is no environmental or other financial impact to be considered.
“Given that there are 20 counties in the group under consideration in this report, and that
the resolution discussed removing these counties both individually and collectively, an attempt to
calculate the potential impact of the thousands possible combinations of those counties was
unrealistic.”
At various times bills have been introduced in the House and Senate to exempt certain
counties from the state’s vehicle emissions inspection program.
Click Here​ for a summary of the report. ​Click Here​ for a copy of the full report.
For more information on the vehicle emissions inspection program, visit ​PennDOT’s
Emissions Inspection Program​ webpage.
Related Stories:
PennDOT Announces Opening Of 13th CNG Transit Fueling Station In Adams County
AG Shapiro, 20 Other Attorneys General File Comments Asking EPA To Withdraw Proposal To
Roll Back Clean Car Rules
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Video Available Of Joint Conservation Committee Environmental Forum On BioGas

A video of the​ October 15 ​Joint House-Senate Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and
Conservation Committee​ Environmental Issues Forum on biogas and bioenergy from organic
waste is now available.
Janice Kelsey, Vice President of ​Solar CITIES, Inc.​ and Dan Spracklin, CEO of ​SoMax
BioEnergy​ presented information on the technology and process behind biogas and bioenergy.
During the hour-long discussion, Kelsey and Spracklin described the processes and
mechanisms behind converting organic waste materials such as food scraps and septic waste into
byproducts that can then be used for a variety of purposes such as providing electricity, heat and

22
fuel to communities.
The presenters discussed the environmental, health and economic impacts of
transforming organic waste into biogas and bioenergy, as well as the importance of educating the
public about the benefits of biogas initiatives.
“Pennsylvania is privileged to have many resources at its disposal, however, with that,
comes the responsibility of ensuring that we are practicing environmental stewardship and
planning for a sustainable future,” said Rep. Carolyn Comitta (D-Chester), a member of the Joint
Committee. “Solar CITIES and SoMax BioEnergy have paved the way for communities here in
Pennsylvania and across the globe to create energy resources out of accessible materials, while
also reducing carbon emissions and the reliance on landfills.”
Click Here​ to watch the Forum video.
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-Venango) serves as Chair of the Joint Conservation
Committee.
For more information, visit the ​Joint Conservation Committee​ website, ​Like them on
Facebook​ or ​Follow them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Committee.
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

The Feds

AG Shapiro, 20 Other Attorneys General File Comments Asking EPA To Withdraw


Proposal To Roll Back Clean Car Rules

Attorney General Josh Shapiro, with a coalition of 20 other


Attorneys General and four major cities, Friday filed formal
comments demanding the Trump Administration's U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration withdraw their proposal to roll back the
country’s existing Clean Car Standards.
The current Clean Car Standards require significant and
achievable reductions in fuel economy and greenhouse gas
emissions from passenger cars and light trucks.
The current rule is expected to prevent up to 2,000
premature deaths, 50,000 cases of respiratory ailments, and reduce
asthma symptoms for 24 million Americans, including 6.3 million
children.
In Pennsylvania alone, more than 1.7 million adults and 235,000 children have asthma
symptoms.
“The Trump Administration is reversing course on standards that are working
economically and environmentally and I strongly oppose this rollback,” Attorney General Josh
Shapiro said at a news conference Thursday in Pittsburgh, surrounded by Mayor Bill Peduto,
Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald and Pittsburgh City Councilwoman Erika
Strassburger. “Pennsylvanians have a constitutional right to clean air and pure water, and I’ll
stand up to defend those rights and protect Pennsylvania’s environment from anyone who
threatens them.”
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County Executive Fitzgerald submitted written comments himself opposing the rollback
on Clean Car Standards, stating in his formal comments: “This proposal, which would roll back
the emission and fuel economy standards established for light duty vehicles, would be
detrimental to our communities and our county. I strongly oppose the proposed rule and urge the
EPA and NHTSA to reject this proposed rule.”
The proposed rollbacks would also revoke existing authority which California has under
the Clean Air Act to place stronger state limits on automobile-related pollution. This aspect of
the rollback would impact a dozen other states that adopted California’s stricter emissions
standards – including Pennsylvania.
“These Clean Car standards help protect Pennsylvanians, especially our most vulnerable
citizens – our seniors, children and individuals with health challenges,” Attorney General
Shapiro said. According to the EPA’s own data, more than seven million Pennsylvanians are
breathing harmful air.
With gas prices at a four-year high, Attorney General Shapiro noted yesterday that Clean
Car standards also protect family budgets from dramatic price increases at the pump – they help
make sure consumers pay less, because cars are more fuel-efficient.
The current standards have saved Americans more than $50 billion since they were
adopted, and save consumers as much as $5,700 over the life of their car.
Fuel efficiency standards are also expected to spur job growth in the automobile industry.
New technologies could create more than 26,000 jobs in Pennsylvania by 2030.
Unlawful Proposal
In their formal comments, the Attorneys General and mayors from Oakland, Los
Angeles, San Francisco, and New York, called on the EPA and NHTSA to immediately
withdraw the proposal.
The coalition identifies key reasons why the proposal is unlawful:
-- The proposed standards would require little or no progress on greenhouse gas emission
standards or fuel economy for a period of six years, replacing standards requiring significant
reductions in emissions and fuel consumption
-- The proposed rollback ignores overwhelming scientific consensus that immediate and
continual progress toward a near-zero emission economy by mid-century is critical to avoid
irreversible and catastrophic climate change
-- The agencies' rollback process violates numerous important procedural requirements, and is
based on an illegitimate mid-term evaluation based on unsound evidence and data
-- The rollback violates the federal Clean Air Act by increasing greenhouse gas emissions the
EPA is tasked to reduce
Last year, Attorney General Shapiro ​sued the EPA over its rollback​ of smog protections.
EPA backed down the next day and withdrew its action.
NewsClip:
GM Honda Join California In Criticizing EPA Roll Back Of Clean Vehicle Plan
Related Stories:
AG Shapiro Joins Coalition Filing Lawsuit Over EPA Rollback Of Clean Vehicle Rule
DEP, AG, Health & Environmental Groups Oppose EPA Plan To Weaken Car Emission
Standards
Related Stories This Week:
PennDOT Announces Opening Of 13th CNG Transit Fueling Station In Adams County

24
Joint State Government Commission: Removing PA Counties From Vehicle Emissions Testing
Program Not Authorized By Federal Law
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

Bipartisan Federal Water Infrastructure Funding Bill Signed Into Law

On Wednesday, the ​$6 billion America’s Water Infrastructure Act​ was signed into law. The bill
provides federal funding for inland waterways, locks, dams, flood protection, ecosystem
restoration, drinking water systems, promotes hydropower, funds for wastewater projects and
other water infrastructure sending it to the President for his action.
A major provision of the bill encourages consolidation and partnerships in the fragmented
water supply systems across the county.
“The U.S. water sector is enormously fragmented with over 53,000 community drinking
water systems. To put that number in perspective, nationwide there are only 3,300 energy
utilities. As a result, many smaller and municipally-owned water systems find themselves
struggling to meet water quality standards, which puts community health at risk,” said ​NAWC
president and CEO Robert Powelson. “Increasingly, some systems lack expertise and financial
resources to operate and invest in their systems. Consolidation, partnerships and a more
integrated approach can help achieve economies of scale and facilitate capital attraction, as well
as technological and financial viability. The ‘America’s Water Infrastructure Act’ is a step in the
right direction.”
Click Here​ for a summary overview, a section by section summary and the text of the bill
prepared by the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
NewsClip:
NAWC Applauds Signing Of Federal Water Infrastructure Bill
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

News From Around The State

Wolf Announces Federal Aid For Schuylkill, Neighboring Counties Affected By July
Flooding

Gov. Tom Wolf Wednesday announced the


U.S. Small Business Administration
approved his request to declare a disaster in
Schuylkill County after significant flood
damage to homes and businesses was
sustained due to severe storms July 21-27,
2018.
Homeowners, renters and businesses
impacted by the storms in Schuylkill, as
well as neighboring counties Berks, Carbon,
Columbia, Dauphin, Lebanon, Lehigh,
Luzerne, and Northumberland may be
eligible for low-interest disaster loans
25
through the SBA Disaster Loan Programs.
[​Note:​​ Similar SBA help is also available in ​Lancaster and York counties​. Federal
pre-disaster and flood mitigation financial assistance​ applications from local government are also
being accepted by PEMA.]
“Record-breaking storms affected large portions of the commonwealth this summer,
disrupting the lives of those unfortunate enough to live in their path,” said Gov. Wolf. “Low
interest loan programs like this are important financial lifelines for families embarking on the
lengthy and difficult path to recovery.”
Low-interest loans of up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace
damaged or destroyed real estate. SBA regulations permit loans up to $40,000 to repair or
replace personal property.
Businesses and nonprofits can borrow up to $2 million to restore damaged or destroyed
buildings, inventory, equipment and assets. Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are
based on each applicant’s financial qualifications.
The SBA will establish a Disaster Loan Outreach Center (DLOC) to assist anyone who
wishes to apply for a loan. The DLOC will be open at the following location and times:
-- Tremont Municipal Office, 139 Clay Street, Tremont, PA 17981
Opening: Thursday, October 25: 11 a.m.
Days: Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturday, October 27: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Closed: Sunday, October 28
Closing: Thursday, November 1: 4 p.m.
SBA customer service representatives will be on hand at the disaster loan outreach center
to issue loan applications, answer questions about the disaster loan program, explain the
application process and help individuals to complete their applications.
Individuals and businesses unable to visit the centers in person may obtain information
and loan applications by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955
(1-800-877-8339 for the hearing impaired), or by sending email to:
disastercustomerservice@sba.gov​.
Loan applications can also be ​downloaded at the SBA website​. Applicants may apply
online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the ​SBA’s secure website​. Completed
applications should be returned to the local DLOC or mailed to: U.S. Small Business
Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX
76155.
The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is Dec. 24, 2018.
The deadline to return economic injury disaster loan applications is July 23, 2019.
NewsClips:
Lehigh Valley Utilities Prepped For First Coastal Storm Of The Season
Nor’easter With Rain From Hurricane Willa To Soak PA This Weekend
Flood Watch For Shore: Heavy Rain, Gale-Force Guts, Power Outages
Crable: Feds Declare Lancaster A Disaster Area After Flash Floods In August
York Flooding: Federal Aid Available
Williamsport Falls Short Of $5M Goal For Grafius Run Flood Mitigation Project
Grafius Run Flood Damage Surveys Considered Critical For Mitigation Study
Residents Question Harmar Flood Prevention Project

26
Lansdale Gets Look At Impact Of Stormwater
Editorial: Restructure Flood Insurance
Editorial: FEMA’s Work Must Include Understanding
Related Stories:
Gov. Wolf: Federal Flood Disaster Aid Now Available To Lancaster, York, Neighboring
Counties
Applications Now Being Accepted For Federal Pre-Disaster Mitigation And Flood Mitigation
Assistance From Municipalities, Counties
Gov. Wolf Criticizes FEMA Denial Of Western PA Disaster Declaration Request Appeal
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Awards $378,671 In Grants For Watershed Restoration
Projects

On October 18 the ​Schuylkill River


Restoration Fund​ awarded $378,671 in grants
to watershed improvement projects throughout
the Schuylkill River Watershed.
The grants will directly support nine
restoration projects ​(listed below)​ and three
land transaction grants, all of which will
improve water quality in the Schuylkill River
and its tributaries, a source of drinking water
for 1.5 million people.
The funded projects will mitigate stormwater
runoff and agricultural pollution, as well as restore streambanks, riparian areas, and floodplains.
The land transaction grants will assist with costs associated with permanent protection of land in
priority watershed.
The funded restoration projects include--
-- ​Berks County Conservation District​​ Chavous Equestrian Ag Project $47,250:​​ This project
will implement Best Management Practices on an equestrian boarding operation to aid in the
reduction of accelerated erosion, sedimentation, and nutrient runoff, caused by overgrazed
pastures and insufficient stormwater management.
-- ​Berks Nature​​ Brown Farm $90,000:​​ Installation of agricultural best management practices
on a steer and sheep farm in the Maiden Creek watershed. This project will remediate excessive
nutrient concerns and address local and regional drinking water issues. BMP’s will include
manure storage and transfer system, stormwater controls as well as streambank and wetland
exclusion fencing.
-- Berks Nature Burkholder Farm $50,000:​​ The Burkholder Farm is located in the Saucony
Creek watershed and will complete similar agricultural BMP’s as the Brown farm. The
installation of a manure storage facility will assist the farmer in safely storing manure produced
from farm production and will reduce excessive nutrient levels in the watershed.
-- Berks Nature Meister Property Conservation $4,000:​​ Grant funding will be used to assist
in the permanent protection and conservation easement of the 32+ acre Meister property in the
Hay Creek watershed located in Berks County.

27
-- ​Green Valleys Association​​ Graham Property Conservation $4,000:​​ Grant funding will be
used to assist in the permanent protection and conservation easement of the 22 acre Graham
property on the ​Welkenweir Preserve​ in Chester County. This property is located along the
Exceptional Value Beaver Run, a tributary of French Creek.
-- ​Fairmount Park Conservancy​​ Concourse Lake $23,393: ​The Conservancy will undertake
enhancements of the Concourse Lake and surrounding wetlands by improving stormwater runoff
and capturing over 2.5 acres of additional stormwater flow. This project will also improve the
riparian buffer by planting native trees and shrubs around the lake.
-- ​Natural Lands​​ Terada Property Conservation $4,000:​​ Grant funding will be used to assist
in the permanent protection and conservation easement of the 100+ acre Terada property. This
property will be added to the existing publicly accessible Buck Hollow Preserve that contains
several exceptional value streams.
-- ​Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy​​ Jacob Reiff Park $98,000: ​This project will work to
complete stream bank improvements along the West Branch of the Skippack Creek in Lower
Salford Township. BMP’s will include streambank restoration and riparian buffer plantings. This
project will also highlight one of the first restoration projects completed at the recently created
Skippack Watershed Coalition.
-- ​Schuylkill Headwaters Association​​ Porter Floodplain $59,325:​​ The Porter Floodplain
project will remove coal refuse from a previous settling basin in West Brunswick Township, and
will restore the project area to its natural floodplain. Currently, during high water events, the coal
silt on this property gets washed into the Schuylkill River through breached basin walls.
Contributors to the SRRF in 2018 included Exelon Generation's ​Limerick Generating
Station​, the ​Philadelphia Water Department​, ​Aqua PA​, and ​MOM's Organic Market​.
Administered by the ​Schuylkill River Greenways National Heritage Area​, the SRRF was
initiated 13 years ago with funds from Exelon Corporation, which has participated every year.
To date, the SRRF has awarded over $3.6 million to 106 projects that help reduce
pollution entering the Schuylkill River and its tributaries.
For more information on this program, visit the ​Schuylkill River Restoration Fund
website. Questions should be directed to Tim Fenchel by sending email to:
TFenchel@schuylkillriver.org​.
(​Photo:​ Sunny Acre Farm, Berks County, 2​ 017 Schuylkill Restoration Fund grant recipient.​ )
NewsClip:
DRBC Participates In Announcement Of Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Grants
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

Blacklick Creek Watershed Assn Undertakes Maintenance Projects On 5 Passive Mine


Drainage Treatment Systems In Indiana County

The ​Blacklick Creek Watershed


Association​ this year contacted
Stream Restoration Inc. to see if
funding for maintenance was
available from the ​Passive Treatment
Operation & Maintenance Technical
Assistance Program​ for 5 passive

28
mine drainage treatment systems in the ​Yellow Creek Project​ in Indiana County.
The O&M Program is implemented by the nonprofit ​Stream Restoration, Inc​. and funded
by grants from the Department of Environmental Protection’s Growing Greener Program and the
Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds​.
The oldest Yellow Creek Project was constructed in 1999 and the newest in 2004. A site
walk with a representative from SRI was conducted to inspect the systems and funding for the
maintenance was approved.
The five passive treatment systems are identified as 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B and 2C. Each of the
vertical flow ponds (VFP) were drained, and the organic layer was inspected and mixed.
Additional work included:
-- System 1A required that vegetation be removed from the “U” shaped channel to improve the
flow from the collection pond to the VFP.
-- Vegetation was also removed from systems from a channel that leads to the stream from
system 1A/1B settling ponds.
-- System 1B required that the ponds water level be adjusted and the intake unclogged.
-- Systems 2A and 2B treat the same discharge. The discharge is piped to a splitter box which
divides the water between systems 2A and 2B. The inlet to the pipe was partially clogged and
needed cleaned, also a brake in the pipe was repaired and the splitter box was repaired.
-- Additional work on system 2C included unfreezing the valves and removing vegetation from
the VFP.
Four out of the five treatment systems are operating. During a heavy rain several years
ago coal refuse washed into system 2C settling pond. The Association has requested assistance
from a local power plant to remove and dispose of the material. Hopefully this will occur shortly
and the 2C system will be operating again.
BCWA thanks SRI and their nonprofit contractor ​BioMost, Inc​. for their help in
maintaining the systems. ​Click Here​ for more information on maintenance services available for
passive mine drainage treatment systems.
Click Here​ for more on Blacklick Creek Watershed Association accomplishments this
year.
For more information on programs, initiatives and how you can become involved, visit
the ​Blacklick Creek Watershed Association​ website.
(​Photo:​ 1A Settling pond with suspended aluminum, 2A compost removed and drying.)

(Reprinted from the ​October newsletter​ from the B


​ lacklick Creek Watershed Association.​ )
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Brodhead Watershed Assn. Partners With PPL To Distribute More Than 200 Trees

The ​Brodhead Watershed Association


recently distributed more than 200 trees and
seedlings within Monroe County as part of
the ​PPL Community Roots Program​. PPL
Electric Utilities sponsored the free program
to help create “a cleaner, greener future.”
About 200 saplings and more than two

29
dozen potted trees arrived at BWA’s Mount Pocono office in September, delivered by PPL, and
were given to local municipalities including Stroudsburg Borough and Middle Smithfield and
Chestnuthill townships.
The ​Monroe County Garden Club​ selected trees to plant near its gardens, and volunteers
planted serviceberry shrubs in BWA’s demonstration rain gardens at Dansbury Depot in East
Stroudsburg.
More than 80 of the saplings were distributed to BWA members at the annual dinner
celebration, which addressed ways to combat climate change on a local level.
“We know that a properly planted tree can have a tremendous positive impact on the
environment,” said BWA Executive Director Bob Heil. “Even more gratifying is that most of the
tree species provided (river birch, swamp oak, serviceberry) were ideally suited for streamside or
wetlands areas, which makes this project all the more beneficial for the Brodhead watershed.”
The trees will not only beautify the Poconos and combat air pollution, but also preserve
water quality.
Riparian buffers-- an area of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous vegetation adjacent to a body
of water-- maintain stream system integrity, protect water quality/temperature and improve the
habitat of plants and animals on land and in the water.
BWA thanks PPL for its ongoing ​Community Roots Program​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Brodhead Watershed Association​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the
Association. ​Click Here​ to become a member.
NewsClips:
Ravenous Spotted Lanternflies Could Hitch A Ride On Your Christmas Tree
Schneck: 15 Things You Don’t Know About Nut Trees In PA
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

Call For Abstracts: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference April 29-May 2

The ​Center for Watershed Protection​ has put out


a ​call for abstracts​ for its ​2019 National
Watershed and Stormwater Conference​ to be
held April 29 to May 2 in Charleston, South
Carolina and online. Proposals are due
November 19.
The theme of the Conference is "Building
Resiliency in our Watersheds in an Era of
Uncertainty.”
The Center is seeking abstracts for technical
presentations, panels and workshops on a diverse and compelling set of watershed and
stormwater topics from meeting TMDL and MS4 (stormwater pollution reduction) requirements
to green infrastructure to urban forestry.
Click Here​ to submit an abstract.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Center for Watershed Protection​ website.
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

30
DCED Awards 5 Community Block Grants For Water, Wastewater System Improvements
Totaling Over $3 Million

The Department of Community and Economic Development Friday announced the award of 5
Community Development Block Grants​ totaling over $3 million to fund water and wastewater
system and other community improvements. The water infrastructure funding includes--
-- Armstrong County:​​ $1,000,000 to be used in Armstrong County for a water line extension
project to provide clean water to residents in Sugarcreek Township with private wells, cisterns,
or springs contaminated with unsafe levels of coliform, E. Coli, barium, and arsenic;
-- Susquehanna County:​​ $322,000 to be used in Susquehanna County to slip line nearly 4,500
linear feet of existing deteriorated clay sanitary sewer lines in Susquehanna Borough. The
restoration of these 100-year old lines will result in strong and durable pipes, increasing flow and
preventing infiltration;
-- Elk County:​​ $632,322 to be used in Elk County for the replacement of 94 residential water
meters, six business water meters, several fire hydrants, and asbestos-containing transite
waterlines. The new waterlines will provide clean water to residents in the Village of Force, Jay
Township.
-- Fulton County:​​ $137,000 to be used in Fulton County to replace approximately 1,704 feet of
sanitary sewer line to mitigate sewage backups impacting residents of the Cloverleaf Court
Mobile Home Park and reducing flow to the Fulton County Fair Grounds which is on the same
sanitary sewer line.
-- Lycoming County:​​ $1,000,000 to be used in Lycoming County to construct a new sanitary
sewer system for the residents of the Village of Lairdsville, Franklin Township. Currently, there
are no public sewage systems in Lairdsville, causing on-lot disposal system failures and water
contamination issues. The new sanitary sewer system will provide residents with clean, safe
drinking water and hygienic, efficient waste disposal.
For more information on this program, visit the ​DCED Community Development Block
Grant Program​ webpage.
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

Aqua America Water/Wastewater Company To Acquire Peoples Gas For $4.2 Billion

Aqua America Inc.​, a regulated water and wastewater utility, Tuesday announced it will acquire
Peoples Gas​ in an all-cash transaction that reflects an enterprise value of $4.275 billion, which
includes the assumption of approximately $1.3 billion of debt.
This acquisition marks the creation of a new infrastructure company that will be uniquely
positioned to have a powerful impact on improving the nation’s infrastructure reliability, quality
of life and economic prosperity.
Peoples consists of Peoples Natural Gas Company LLC, Peoples Gas Company LLC and
Delta Natural Gas Company Inc.
The multi-platform entity brings together the second-largest U.S. water utility and
fifth-largest U.S. stand-alone natural gas local distribution company (based on customers), and
will serve 1.74 million customer connections, which represent approximately 5 million people.
In 2019, the new company will have approximately $10.8 billion in assets and a projected

31
U.S. regulated rate base of over $7.2 billion. The transaction is not expected to have any impact
on rates.
The combined enterprise will be among the largest publicly traded water utilities and
natural gas local distribution companies in the U.S., uniquely positioned to meaningfully
contribute to the nation’s natural gas and water infrastructure reliability.
The transaction will bring together two companies that each have more than 130 years of
service and proven track records of operational efficiency, complementary service territories and
strong regulatory compliance.
Aqua will acquire Peoples from infrastructure funds managed by Sausalito,
California-based SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners. The resulting company will be well
positioned to grow and generate shareholder value through increased scale, a balanced portfolio
and stable capital structure, according to Aqua.
“The acquisition of Peoples is a great strategic fit and aligns directly with our growth
strategy and core competencies of building and rehabilitating infrastructure, timely regulatory
recovery, and operational excellence,” said Aqua Chairman and CEO Christopher Franklin.
“Both Aqua and Peoples place customers at the center of all we do. We care deeply for
employees and their safety, have expertise in pipe replacement, and prioritize stewardship of the
environment. Both companies have worked hard to earn credibility with regulators and respect of
other stakeholders, and to employ advanced operational efficiencies, all of which create
long-term value for customers, communities, employees and shareholders.”
The combined company will operate regulated utilities over a 10-state footprint and will
have its largest concentration in Pennsylvania, which will account for more than 77 percent of
the company’s total rate base.
Aqua’s rate base is growing annually at approximately 7 percent (2019-2021) and
Peoples’ rate base is growing annually at 8 to 10 percent (2019-2021), creating a strong
combined growth trajectory.
“By bringing together water and natural gas distribution utility companies that share a
core mission of providing essential services to customers, the resulting company will be
positioned to grow and drive value, as well as make a long-term, positive contribution to our
nation’s infrastructure challenges and ensure service reliability for generations to come,”
Franklin said. “The new leadership team will take an integrated management approach to
cooperatively running the utilities. We plan to leverage the combined breadth of experience from
both companies to lead our new combined company.”
Morgan O’Brien, who will continue to lead the natural gas company, said, “The planned
combination with Aqua creates a larger strategic utility committed to growing our region’s
economic future using the most responsible and innovative tools in our long-term infrastructure
replacement programs in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Kentucky.
“Our resulting company is deeply rooted in the long-established regulatory environments
where partnership opportunities will support growth and safety. We are focused on strongly
encouraging infrastructure replacement and expansion to better serve customers and fuel growth
opportunities. In addition, this larger entity will provide employees with enhanced opportunities
for career development.
“For example, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission has demonstrated its support
for our infrastructure investment program, through which we will replace more than 3,100 miles
of bare steel and cast-iron pipe in the coming years at a current rate of about 150 miles per year,”

32
said O’Brien.
Post-transaction close, the combined businesses will be led by Franklin. The company’s
corporate headquarters will be in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, and Aqua’s water and wastewater
operations will remain headquartered in Bryn Mawr. Peoples, the natural gas operating
subsidiary, and its employees will remain headquartered in Pittsburgh and other operating
locations will remain unchanged.
Transaction Details
The transaction is anticipated to be immediately accretive to earnings the first full year
after close and over the long term. Management anticipates enhanced future earnings growth and
continued long-term dividend growth.
Significant growth in rate base and earnings is expected to be driven by pipe-replacement
capital expenditures, new customer connections and continued success in municipal acquisitions.
As a larger publicly traded utility, the resulting company will have enhanced ability to access
capital and fund its infrastructure and capital expenditure needs.
The all-cash transaction reflects an enterprise value of Peoples of $4.275 billion, which
includes the assumption of approximately $1.3 billion of debt. The acquisition is supported by a
fully committed bridge facility. Permanent financing will include an appropriate mix of equity
and debt to target a strong balance sheet and investment-grade credit ratings.
The transaction is subject to regulatory approvals, including approval by the public utility
commissions in Pennsylvania, Kentucky and West Virginia. Assuming fulfillment of those
conditions, closing of the transaction is expected in mid-2019.
Following closing, the company’s operational makeup will consist of greater than 99
percent in regulated utilities.
Total rate base is expected to exceed $7.2 billion, with approximately 70 percent in water
and wastewater and 30 percent in natural gas. Total rate base is expected to grow approximately
7 percent a year for Aqua and 8 to 10 percent a year for Peoples through 2021.
2018 Aqua Guidance
Aqua reaffirms the prior guidance and qualifies its earnings per diluted common share
range to be exclusive of transaction expenses associated with the Peoples transaction.
-- Earnings per diluted common share of $1.37 to $1.42, excluding transaction expenses
-- Infrastructure investments of approximately $500 million in 2018 for communities served by
Aqua
-- Infrastructure investments of approximately $1.4 billion through 2020 in existing operations to
improve and strengthen systems
-- Total customer growth of between 2 and 3 percent for 2018
-- Aqua Pennsylvania filed a rate case in August 2018 with resolution expected in 2019.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs $10.5M For Lead Service Line Replacement
High Levels Of Lead Reported In Braddock Water
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs Winter Water Shutoff Moratorium
Peoples Gas To Be Acquired By Aqua America Water Company In $4.2 Billion Deal
Litvak: Old Pipes In The Ground Helped Fuel Aqua’s $4.2B Deal For Peoples Gas
Maykuth: Aqua America To Buy Peoples Gas For $4.3 Billion
State Aid For Lead Line Replacements Could Temper Pittsburgh Water Authority Debt
Op-Ed: Pittsburgh’s Water Authority Must Stay Under Public Control

33
AP: North Carolina Water/Sewer Authority Hit By Ransomware Attack After Hurricane
NAWC Applauds Signing Of Federal Water Infrastructure Bill
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

Susquehanna River Basin Commission Hearing On Water Project Applications Nov. 1

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ will receive public comment at a hearing on
November 1 on applications for one diversion of water and several water withdrawal and
consumptive use projects as well as Commission-initiated project approval modifications.
The hearing will be held at the State Capitol, Room 8E-B, East Wing, Commonwealth
Avenue in Harrisburg. The hearing will begin at 2:30 p.m. and end at 5 p.m. or when public
testimony concludes, whichever comes first.
The SRBC Commissioners are scheduled to vote on these and other action items at their
next business meeting on December 6 in Harrisburg.
Members of the public who are planning to present oral testimony at the public hearing
are encouraged to notify SRBC prior to the hearing of their intent and to indicate the subject of
their comment.
The notices are to be directed to Ms. Ava Stoops, Administrative Specialist, Susquehanna
River Basin Commission, 4423 N. Front Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110, Telephone:
717-238-0423, ext. 1302, Fax: 717-238-2436.
The lists of 21 project applications and 2 Commission-initiated project approval
modifications and options for submitting comments electronically are all available on SRBC’s
Meetings & Events​ webpage.
SRBC will accept written comments until Nov. 13, 2018; comments may be submitted
electronically through SRBC’s ​Meetings & Events​ webpage or mailed or faxed to Ms. Stoops.
For more information on programs, training opportunities and upcoming events, visit the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for SRBC’s newsletter.
Follow SRBC on Twitter​, ​visit them on YouTube​.
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Penn State: Fracking Wastewater Accumulation Found In Freshwater Mussel Shells

By Jennifer Matthews, ​Penn State News

Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element


associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have
accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels
downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites,
according to researchers from Penn State and Union
College.
"Freshwater mussels filter water and when they grow a
hard shell, the shell material records some of the water
quality with time," said ​Nathaniel Warner​, assistant
professor of ​environmental engineering​ at Penn State.
"Like tree rings, you can count back the seasons and the years in their shell and get a good idea

34
of the quality and chemical composition of the water during specific periods of time."
In 2011, it was discovered that despite treatment, water and sediment downstream from
fracking wastewater disposal sites still contained fracking chemicals and had become
radioactive. In turn, drinking water was contaminated and aquatic life, such as the freshwater
mussel, was dying.
In response, Pennsylvania requested that wastewater treatment plants not treat and release
water from unconventional oil and gas drilling, such as the Marcellus shale. As a result, the
industry turned to recycling most of its wastewater.
However, researchers are still uncovering the long-lasting effects, especially during the
three-year boom between 2008 and 2011, when more than 2.9 billion liters of wastewater were
released into Pennsylvania's waterways.
"Freshwater pollution is a major concern for both ecological and human health," said
David Gillikin, professor of geology at Union College and co-author on the study. "Developing
ways to retroactively document this pollution is important to shed light on what's happening in
our streams."
The researchers began by collecting freshwater mussels from the Allegheny River, both
100 meters (328 feet) upstream and 1 to 2 kilometers (0.6 to 1.2 miles) downstream of a National
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System-permitted wastewater disposal facility in Warren,
Pennsylvania, as well as mussels from two other rivers-- the Juniata and Delaware-- that had no
reported history of oil and gas discharge.
Once at the lab, they dissected the shell and then drilled and collected the powder from
the shell layer by layer to look for isotopes of two elements: oxygen, used to determine the year
and season, and strontium, both of which carry a distinctive signature of the rock formation
where they were produced.
The results were recently ​published in Environmental Science & Technolog​y.
What the team found was significantly elevated concentrations of strontium in the shells
of the freshwater mussels collected downstream of the facility, whereas the shells collected
upstream and from the Juniata and Delaware Rivers showed little variability and no trends over
time.
Surprisingly, the amount of strontium found in the layers of shell created after 2011 did
not show an immediate reduction in contaminants. Instead, the change appeared more gradually.
This suggests that the sediment where freshwater mussels live may still contain higher
concentrations of heavy metals and other chemicals used in unconventional drilling.
"We know that Marcellus development has impacted sediments downstream for tens of
kilometers," said Warner. "And it appears it still could be impacted for a long period of time. The
short timeframe that we permitted the discharge of these wastes might leave a long legacy."
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, up to 95 percent of new wells drilled today
are hydraulically fractured, accounting for two-thirds of total U.S. marketed natural gas
production and about half of U.S. crude oil production.
"The wells are getting bigger, and they're using more water, and they're producing more
wastewater, and that water has got to go somewhere," said Warner. "Making the proper choices
about how to manage that water is going to be pretty vital."
Warner added that there is not much difference between conventional and unconventional
wastewater from a pollution standpoint. He said high levels of strontium, sodium, chloride and
other contaminants are still present with conventional oil and gas development.

35
Now that the researchers know that freshwater mussels can be used as chemical recorders
of fracking pollutants in waterways, they would like to look at the soft tissue of the freshwater
mussels, since muskrats and fish feed off them.
They also hope to expand their research to include other specific pollutants that likely
bioaccumulated in areas of surface water disposal.
"We want to see what metals the mussel incorporates predictably and which ones it
doesn't," said Thomas Geeza, a doctoral student in environmental engineering at Penn State and
co-author on the study. "We're trying to develop this as a tool that can be used in other
waterways to answer other questions."
The mussels could also be used to investigate possible seepages occurring at facilities.
"We tested if fracking fluid discharge from a wastewater plant was recorded in shells, but
one could imagine also using this technique to investigate leaks from holding ponds or accidental
discharge into streams nearby fracking operations," said Gillikin.
Additional researchers include Bonnie McDevitt, a doctoral student in environmental
engineering, and Katherine Van Sice, a recent Penn State environmental engineering master's
degree graduate.
The National Science Foundation funded a portion of this project.
Related Stories:
PennDOT Wins Award For One Of The Largest Endangered Species Conservation Efforts In
North America; WPC Details Relocation Effort
After Century-Long Absence, Freshwater Mussel Found In Kiski River, Armstrong County
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Designates Critical Habitat For Freshwater Mussels In PA

(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)


[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants

The Department of Environmental Protection is now


accepting applications for recycling implementation
grants under Section 902 of Act 101, the Municipal
Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act.
The deadline for applications is March 22. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​
Only those projects involving municipalities
that have a mandatory trash collection program or
projects seeking support for a residential recycling
program that have a corresponding commercial
recycling program will be considered for funding.
Applicants seeking funds to replace curbside collection containers or collection vehicles,
or both, will need to demonstrate that the new equipment will increase collection efficiencies and
tonnage of materials.
The following elements will receive priority for funding--
-- Development and implementation of incentive-based pricing and collection programs designed
to increase the quantities and types of recyclable materials and reduce the quantity of waste

36
collected.
-- Development and implementation of multi-municipal collection, processing and/or a materials
marketing program where capital costs are reduced and/or recycling marketability is enhanced
due to intergovernmental cooperation.
-- Development and implementation of collection methods that will provide greater marketability
and value to collected recyclable materials.
-- New and innovative recycling educational programs that support the applicants' recycling
collection efforts.
In addition, communities whose existing recycling programs contain the following
components will receive additional consideration:
-- Publicly provided or municipally contracted waste and recycling services.
-- The collection of six or more of the following materials: newsprint, office paper, corrugated
paper, other marketable grades of paper, aluminum cans, steel or bimetallic cans, colored glass
containers, clear glass containers and plastics.
-- Incentive-based pricing and collection programs designed to increase the quantities and types
of recyclable materials and reduce the quantity of waste collected.
Potential applicants must contact the appropriate Department regional planning and
recycling coordinator to schedule a pre-application conference to discuss application
requirements and program particulars.
More information on Section 902 recycling grants will be available on DEP’s ​Recycling
Financial Assistance​ webpage. Read the full ​October 27 PA Bulletin notice​ for more
information.
NewsClips:
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

37
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?

America Recycles Day​, a Keep America Beautiful


initiative, takes place annually on and around
November 15 to recognize the benefits of recycling
while providing an educational platform that helps
raise awareness about the value of reducing, reusing
and recycling – every day – throughout the year.
“America Recycles Day provides a means to
encourage recycling 365 days a year whether it’s at
school, home or whole communities,” said Shannon Reiter, President of Keep Pennsylvania
Beautiful. “Recycling helps protect our environment by saving natural resources such as trees,
water and minerals and reduces the amount of waste sent to our landfills. We are grateful to
Keep America Beautiful for providing these tools and resources to our local communities.”
Keep PA Beautiful invites you to plan your own ARD event by taking advantage of the
wide variety of tools and resources​ KAB offers to make event planning easy and successful.
Click Here​ to register your event at the America Recycles Day website. This allows your
event to become part of the national network of America Recycles Day events!
Sign the pledge to increase your recycling efforts and learn how to get involved by
visiting ARD’s ​Take The Pledge​ webpage.
For all the details, visit the ​America Recycles Day​ website.
Pennsylvania’s curbside/drop-off recycling program celebrates its 30th anniversary this
year and now reaches 94 percent of the state’s population. To learn more, visit DEP’s ​Recycling
In Pennsylvania​ webpage.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Keep
Pennsylvania Beautiful​ website. ​Click Here​ to become a member. ​Click Here​ to sign up for
regular updates from KPB, ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, ​Discover them on
Pinterest​ and visit their ​YouTube Channel​.
Also visit the ​Illegal Dump Free PA​ website for more ideas on how to clean up
communities and keep them clean and KPB’s ​Electronics Waste​ website.
NewsClips:
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act

38
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant

By: Marchella Verdi, ​Penn State News

The Borough of Bellefonte-- located in Centre


County, Pennsylvania-- announced at its most
recent Borough Council meeting that it had received
a grant of $388,000 from the Department of
Environmental Protection to make needed upgrades
to its compost facility site.
The grant application was based on work
done by Penn State students who partnered with
Bellefonte through the ​Sustainability Communities
Collaborative​, an engaged scholarship program
facilitated by ​Penn State’s Sustainability Institute​.
For Assistant Bellefonte Borough Manager Don Holderman, the students were
instrumental in receiving the grant.
“For a borough like Bellefonte, this is a significant grant award and will have a major
impact, both from an effective and efficiency standpoint in our future composting,” Holderman
said. “We could not be more thrilled to see a project that benefited both [Penn State] students and
the Borough being this successful.”
In 2016, Penn State students from University Park campus taking a two-semester course
sequence in Biological Engineering, BE 460 and BE 466W, worked with Bellefonte officials to
examine conditions at its compost facility where residents drop off biodegradable materials such
as grass clippings, leaves, and brush.
The borough currently turns these materials into compost for sale to residents, but it
wants to expand the facility to be able to sell compost to commercial entities by incorporating
food waste and, potentially, Class B biosolids.
Megan Marshall, associate teaching professor of agricultural and biological engineering,
led students in the capstone courses.
“While sustainability is not new to BE students, SCC projects challenge students to
determine the best solution to a problem,” Marshall said.
The SCC facilitates partnerships between Penn State classes and community partners
seeking help to advance their sustainability goals.
Students engage in applied, real-world research that benefits communities that otherwise
lack the time, resources, or expertise to undertake initial steps on their projects. The student
projects do not replace the work of professionals, but act as catalysts to begin new work.

39
In the case of Bellefonte, students created business plans for selling compost and
designed new, expanded site plans suitable for Bellefonte to be able to accept biosolids and food
waste in the future.
At the end of their research, the students also recommended that the Borough purchase a
mechanical screener to improve the quality of the compost, specifically for commercial buyers.
Bellefonte will use the DEP grant to execute the recommendations by the students and
work towards expanding their compost facility site.
Ilona Ballreich, SCC’s program manager, praised the grant as a tribute to the impactful
work and research done by the students.
“Students’ research not only provided the baseline data for a successful application, but it
prepared the borough to be more sustainable, employ professionals for the execution of the work,
and serve its residents,” Ballreich said. “This is a win-win for all.”
Currently six Penn State campuses employ the SCC model, which last year engaged 446
students on the University Park campus alone, led by 19 faculty from eight colleges on 46
projects serving 17 community partners.
“I can only hope that somehow [the students] are aware, wherever they may be today,
how instrumental and impactful their work was and how appreciative we are for their efforts,”
Holderman concluded.
NewsClips:
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg

(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)


[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back


Day - Oct. 27

40
Gov. Tom Wolf and his administration's Opioid
Command Center, the Department of Drug and
Alcohol Programs and State Police, encourage all
Pennsylvanians to take part in the Drug Enforcement
Administration’s 16th ​National Prescription Drug
Take Back Day​ on October 27.
During the event, individuals may drop off unwanted
prescription and over-the-counter medications at any
of the hundreds of secure locations throughout the
state. The service is free and anonymous.
“Part of our all-hands-on-deck approach to the opioid
crisis is encouraging Pennsylvanians to drop off unwanted and unused prescription drugs at one
of the hundreds of secure drop-off locations in the state,” Gov. Tom Wolf said. “Keeping
prescription medications out of the hands of those they were not intended for is one more way to
prevent the spread of substance use disorder.”
Since the inception of Pennsylvania’s drug take-back program in 2016, there has been
more than 440,000 pounds of prescription medication destroyed, with more than 800 take-back
boxes established in all 67 counties throughout the commonwealth.
Last year, the State Police installed prescription drug take-back boxes at 65 stations that
are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
“The department encourages all Pennsylvanians to clean out their medicine cabinets and
participate in this critically important day in combating the opioid crisis,” said DDAP Secretary
Jennifer Smith. “By safely eliminating these prescription drugs from our homes, we are each
doing our part to keep our communities and loved ones safe. If you are unable to participate
tomorrow, remember there are drug take-back boxes in our communities throughout the
commonwealth that can be used at any time.”
The DEA has offered National Prescription Drug Take Back Day since 2010 with the
goal of fighting prescription drug abuse by creating convenient ways to dispose of medication
that would otherwise be at risk of misuse in home medicine cabinets.
All medication collected will be destroyed by the DEA at EPA-approved incinerators and
waste-to-energy facilities.
During its 15th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day in April 2018, the DEA and
more than 4,600 law enforcement agencies participated, with more than 5,800 sites collecting
949,000 pounds of unused medication.
“Take-back boxes inside Pennsylvania State Police station lobbies are another resource in
the commonwealth’s fight against the opioid epidemic,” said Acting State Police Commissioner
Lieutenant Colonel Robert Evanchick. “Education and prevention are important parts of the
public safety function of the department, and providing a safe, secure way to dispose of unused
and unwanted prescription pills keeps these addictive drugs out of the hands of people who
would misuse them.”
For more information on this initiative, visit the ​National Prescription Drug Take Back
Day​ webpage.
Click Here​ to find one of Pennsylvania’s drug take-back locations.
NewsClips:

41
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Story:
PRC, PA American Water Drug Take-Back Events In Allegheny County
Related Stories This Week:
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County

Clinton County CleanScapes​ and its partners will hold a


Stewards Run Creek Cleanup​ on November 3 from 9:30 to
1:00 p.m. in Piatt Township, Lycoming County.
The cleanup will remove litter and tires from a forested
hillside adjacent to Stewards Run Creek. Directions will be
given to you when you register.
Lock Haven University students should register by
contacting Morgan Capobianco at LHU’s Student Activities
Office (PUB) by sending email to:
mpc7999@lockhaven.edu​ or call 570-484-2499.
Click Here​ for all the details. All other volunteers should
register by contacting Elisabeth Lynch McCoy by sending
email to: ​clintoncountycleanscapes@yahoo.com​ or call 570-726-3511.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Clinton County CleanScapes​ (Facebook) or the ​Clinton County CleanScapes​ website.
NewsClips:
PRC Lens On Litter Photo Contest Entries Due Oct. 31
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly

42
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July 24-26 In
Harrisburg
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Call For Presentation Proposals: Professional Recyclers 2019 Annual Conference July
24-26 In Harrisburg

The ​Professional Recyclers of


Pennsylvania​ are now accepting
submissions for presentations at their
2019 Recycling & Organics
Conference​ to be held July 24-26 in
Harrisburg.
The deadline for proposals is
December 3.
Share your experience and expertise
with colleagues in the recycling and or organics fields, including on these topics: Special
Collection Events, Electronics Waste; Education Programs; Single Stream, Commingled, Source
Separated Materials; Markets; and Organics.
Presentations may be delivered by a single person or multiple individuals, and held as a
traditional presentation or as a round-table discussion / panel.
Members of the Conference Committee will review all abstract proposals. Sessions will
last approximately 60 minutes, depending on the type of presentation and subject. Final
selections will be made by the Conference Committee.
Presentation proposals should include: Style of presentation, traditional, round-table,
panel; Subject of presentation; Description of presentation; and Presenter(s).
If your presentation is accepted, the description submitted will be used in promotional
materials.
Proposals should be submitted to Douglas Orner by sending email to:

43
dorner@proprecycles.org​. Questions? Call 717-441-6049 x 3.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Professional
Recyclers of PA​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from PROP. ​Click Here​ to
become a member.
NewsClips:
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Related Stories:
DEP Awards 195 Recycling Implementation Grants Totaling Over $37.2 Million
Feature: University Student Engagement Helps Earn Bellefonte DEP Composting Grant
DEP Accepting Applications For Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
DEP Solid Waste, Recycling Committees To Review 25 Recommendations For Changing Act
101 Recycling, Waste Program Nov. 5
Wolf Administration Encourages Participation In National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -
Oct. 27
Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup Nov. 3 In Lycoming County
Keep PA Beautiful Asks: How Will You Celebrate America Recycles Day Nov. 15?
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

DEP: Nov. 28 Hearing On Bruce Mansfield Power Plant, Little Blue Run Waste
Impoundment Discharge Permit, Beaver County

The Department of Environmental


Protection will hold a public
hearing November 28 to receive
testimony from citizens on the
National Pollutant Discharge
Elimination System (NPDES)
Permit No. PA0027481​, DEP
proposes to issue to FirstEnergy
Generation, LLC for discharges from the Bruce Mansfield Power Plant and associated Little
Blue Run Impoundment in Beaver County. ​(O ​ ct. 27 PA Bulletin page 6927​)
The hearing will start at 6:00 p.m. at South Side Area School District Middle/High
School Auditorium located at 4949 PA State Route 151, Hookstown, PA 15050. Doors will open
and onsite registration will begin at 5:30 PM.
The Bruce Mansfield Power Plant and Little Blue Run Impoundment are currently
operating under an administratively extended NPDES permit that expired on November 30,
2011.

44
There are fourteen discharges from the Bruce Mansfield Power Plant to the Ohio River
and Haden Run including cooling water, treated sewage, and stormwater.
There are an additional twenty-three discharges from the Little Blue Run Impoundment
to Mill Creek and Little Blue Run stream including treated industrial wastewaters and
spring/seep water from the impoundment.
In September, FirstEnergy announced ​plans to close the Bruce Mansfield Power Plant​ by
June 1, 2021.
In April of 2014, DEP issued a permit requiring the ​closure of Little Blue Run
Impoundment​ by December 2016. ​Click Here​ for more.
Individuals will have the opportunity to present up to five minutes of oral testimony
relevant to the NPDES application and draft NPDES permit. Those who wish to present
testimony are asked to register in advance by contacting DEP’s Community Relations
Coordinator Lauren Fraley by sending email to: ​lfraley@pa.gov​ or 412-442-4203.
Pre-registration will be taken through noon on November 27. Individuals will be called to
testify in the order they registered. In order to accommodate the greatest number of residents
interested in testifying, DEP requests that organizations designate one individual to speak on
their behalf.
DEP will record testimony and receive written comments throughout the hearing.
Testifiers should bring at least one copy of their testimony and exhibits for submission to DEP.
Persons unable to attend the hearing may submit three copies of a written statement and
exhibits within 10 days thereafter to the Department of Environmental Protection, Clean Water
program, 400 Waterfront Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 or send by email to:
RA-EPCW-SWRO@pa.gov​.
Written submittals must contain the following:
-- Name, address, and telephone number of the person submitting the comments.
-- Identification of the proposed draft NPDES Permit No. (PA0027481).
-- Concise statements regarding the relevancy of the information or objections to issuance of the
NPDES Permit.
DEP received written comments on the draft permit during an extended 45-day comment
period after the draft permit was published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin on August 11, 2018. The
draft permit and fact sheet are available for review on ​DEP’s Southwest Regional Office​ website.
Individuals in need of an accommodation in order to participate in the hearing, as
provided for in the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, should contact the Pennsylvania
AT&T Relay Service at 1-800-654-5984 (TDD) to discuss how DEP may accommodate your
needs.
(​Photo:​ Bruce Mansfield; L​ ittle Blue Run Impoundment - Allegheny Front​.)
Related Stories:
FirstEnergy To Close Its Last Coal-Fired Power Plant In Pennsylvania
Settlement With DEP On 10 Coal-Fired Power Plants Will Require Updating Of Water Quality
Discharge Permits
DEP Issues Permit Requiring Closure Of FirstEnergy’s Little Blue Run Impoundment
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

DEP To Adopt Change Recommended By IRRC To Final Noncoal Mining Fee Package

45
In response to a concern expressed by the ​Independent Regulatory Review Commission​ last
week, the Department of Environmental Protection withdrew the final regulation adopting an
increase in noncoal mining permit fees to return it to the Environmental Quality Board to add
clarifying language.
The IRRC asked DEP to add language to the regulation making it clear the fees adopted
in the package do not exceed the cost of administering the program as required by the Noncoal
Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act.
The language would not change the timing or amount of the phased-in fee increases
adopted in the package.
Returning the regulation to the EQB to add the clarifying language will delay finalization
of the regulation, however, the fee increase was not set to go into effect until January 1, 2020
anyway.
Because of the sine die adjournment of the General Assembly on November 30, DEP
expects to return the regulation to IRRC, after action by the EQB, for final action in March.
DEP expects to add similar clarifying language to other new fee packages as they are
developed by the agency. Regulations increasing permit fees generally run 2 to 3 years behind
actual need because of the lengthy adoption process.
Next up are expected to be proposed increases for the Air Quality and clean water
programs.
The noncoal mining fees were adopted as final by the EQB in August.
For more information on the regulation, visit the ​Environmental Quality Board​ webpage
and the August 21 meeting agenda.
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

EPA Raises Awareness Of Lead Paint Rules In Philadelphia

The U.S. Environmental Protection


Agency Thursday announced it is working
with local partners to raise awareness of
EPA’s lead-based paint rules in
Philadelphia neighborhoods.
"By educating the public about the dangers
of lead paint and increasing awareness of
lead paint rules, we can help reduce lead
poisoning in children," said EPA’s
Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator
Cosmo Servidio. “This initiative is a
focused effort with our local counterparts to reduce lead exposure in Philadelphia, where there is
a large amount of older housing stock with lead paint that has not been removed.”
The most common source of lead exposure is through deteriorating lead-based paint in
residences and commercial buildings built before 1978.
EPA, along with partners from other federal agencies, the city of Philadelphia, and
independent non-profit organizations are targeting communities where pre-1978 housing stock is
prevalent.
Outreach efforts include in-person meetings, distributing technical assistance

46
information, visits to paint/hardware stores, awareness training for city inspectors and providing
information to contractors/renovators and property management firms.
Information is also provided to daycare centers, childcare and healthcare focused
organizations.
EPA enforces and raises awareness of several rules. The Renovation, Repair and Painting
Rule (RRP) applies when a renovation or repair disturbs six square feet of interior (about the size
of a standard poster) or 20 square feet (about the size of a standard door) of exterior painted
surfaces.
The RRP rule requires that those working on pre-1978 housing be trained by an
EPA-accredited training provider, be employed by a certified firm, use the required work
practices to control exposure to lead/lead dust, and provide information on the rule to owner and
tenants.
The Lead-based Paint Disclosure Rule requires owners of residential rental properties and
sellers of residential property built before 1978 to disclose known information on lead-based
paint and lead-based paint hazards before a lease or sale becomes enforceable.
Sales contracts and leases must include a disclosure form about lead-based paint. Buyers
have up to 10 days to check for lead hazards.
Further, landlords and sellers must also provide the EPA publication "Protect Your
Family from Lead in Your Home."
To find Certified “​Lead-Safe” providers​, go to EPA’s ​Lead webpage​ or call
1-800-424-LEAD. The RRP rule does not apply to individuals doing work on their personal
residences.
For more information on becoming a Certified “Lead-Safe” firm or renovator, go to
EPA” ​Apply For Lead Safe Certification​ webpage or call the National Lead Information Center
at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).
Earlier this week, EPA released a report called “​Protecting Children from Lead
Exposures​” to highlight some of the ongoing programs being worked on across the various
program and regional offices.
The Agency continues to aggressively address lead issues across America, working with
communities and partners to further identify and eliminate lead exposure, especially for children
who are most vulnerable to lead poisoning.
For more information on lead, visit EPA’s ​Lead webpage​.
In Pennsylvania
The ​Senate Health and Human Services Committee​ last week reported out ​Senate Bill
1270​ (Yudichak-D-Luzerne), (Baker-R-Luzerne) requiring universal lead testing for children
(​sponsor summary​).
In June of 2017 the Senate passed ​Senate Resolution 33​ (Yudichak-D-Luzerne) creating a
bipartisan task force​ to investigate the scope of Pennsylvania’s lead exposure problem. The Task
Force report is due at the end of this year.
In October of 2017, the task force members were named and the Senate Environmental
Resources and Energy ​Committee held a hearing in Luzerne County​ on the issue.
Gov. Wolf has also called for​ the universal testing of blood-lead levels in children.
In February of this year, ​Senators Yudichak and Baker held a roundtable​ in Wilkes-Barre
on lead exposure and lead testing.
More information on lead in other media is available on DEP’s ​Lead In Drinking Water

47
webpage and the Department of Health’s ​Lead Poisoning​ webpage.
Related Stories:
EPA Settles Lead Safe Renovation Violations With Bucks County Contractor
PennVEST Awards $93M For Drinking Water, Wastewater, Nonpoint Source Projects,
Including Nearly $50M For Lead Service Line Replacement In Pittsburgh
Report: Blood Lead Levels In Allegheny County Children Going Down
Pittsburgh Water Authority Replaced Over 1,341 Lead Water Service Lines By June 30
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

EPA Settles Lead Safe Renovation Violations With Bucks County Contractor

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Tuesday announced ​Global Home Improvements,
Inc.​ (GHI) of Feasterville, Bucks County will pay a $28,000 penalty to resolve alleged violations
of the lead-based paint ​Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule​.
This rule protects the public from toxic lead hazards created by renovation activities
involving lead-based paint. RRP safeguards are designed to ensure “lead safe” practices in the
renovation and repair activities involving “target housing” built before the 1978 federal ban on
lead-based paint.
EPA alleged that during multiple renovations of target housing in 2016 and 2017, GHI
violated the RRP “lead safe” requirements by:
-- Performing renovations after its lead-safe firm certification expired on June 28, 2015;
-- Failing to document whether 16 target housing owners who contracted with GHI for
renovations had timely received the required lead hazard information pamphlet, titled “Renovate
Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers and Schools;”
-- Failing to document GHI’s compliance with the “lead safe” work practice standards during 17
target housing renovations.
As part of the settlement, the company did not admit these alleged violations, but has
cooperated with EPA in resolving this matter and certifying its compliance with applicable RRP
requirements.
Infants, children, and pregnant women are especially vulnerable to lead exposure, which
can cause lifelong impacts including developmental impairment, learning disabilities, impaired
hearing, reduced attention span, hyperactivity, and behavioral problems.
Because of these health risks, the U.S. banned lead-based paint in 1978. However, EPA
estimates that lead-based paint is still present in more than 30 million homes nationwide.
For more information on this program, visit EPA’s ​Renovation, Repair and Painting
(RRP) Rule​ webpage.
Related Story:
EPA Raises Awareness Of Lead Paint Rules In Philadelphia
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

DEP: Nov. 26 Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Pipeline Compressor
Station In Mercer County

The Department of Environmental Protection will hold a public hearing, if requested, on the
RACT II Air Quality Plan for the Tennessee Gas Pipeline compressor station in Jefferson

48
Township, Mercer County. ​(​Oct. 27 PA Bulletin pages 6889 and 6925​.)
The hearing will be held at DEP’s Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in
Meadville, Crawford County starting at 10:00 a.m.
To request a hearing or to see if a hearing will be held, contact Melanie Williams at
814-332-6615 or send email to: ​melanwilli@pa.gov​.
​ ct. 27 PA Bulletin pages 6889
Read the entire PA Bulletin notice for additional details ​(O
and 6925​).
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

PennDOT Announces Opening Of 13th CNG Transit Fueling Station In Adams County

The Department of Transportation Friday


announced the opening of its 13th compressed
natural gas (CNG) fueling station at the ​Central
Pennsylvania Transportation Authority​ in
Gettysburg.
The station is part of a ​Public Private Partnership
including PennDOT and Trillium CNG​ that plans to
open 29 CNG fueling stations across the state.
Through the $84.5 million statewide P3 project,
Trillium is designing, building, financing and will operate and maintain CNG fueling stations at
29 public transit agency sites through a 20-year P3 agreement.
Other stations will be constructed over the next several years, and Trillium is also making
CNG-related upgrades to existing transit maintenance facilities.
When the project is completed, the fueling stations will supply gas to more than 1,600
CNG buses at transit agencies across the state.
As part of the conversion, CPTA-Gettysburg will convert 15 shared ride and three
full-sized buses to CNG. The authority estimates saving roughly $125,000 annually based on
current diesel costs and their diesel usage of roughly 100,000 gallons per year.
PennDOT’s overall P3 project includes CNG fueling accessible to the public at six transit
agency sites, with the option to add to sites in the future.
PennDOT will receive a 15 percent royalty, excluding taxes, for each gallon of fuel sold
to the public at public sites, which will be used to support the cost of the project.
Using the P3 procurement mechanism allows PennDOT to install the fueling stations
faster than if a traditional procurement mechanism were used for each site, resulting in
significant estimated capital cost savings of more than $46 million.
Click Here​ for a list of CNG fueling stations opened so far and those planned. ​Click Here
for more information on this P3 project by PennDOT.
Other Clean Vehicle Grants/Rebates
Application periods are open for several other clean vehicle, charging station grants or
rebates, including--
-- December 14:​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ (First-Come)
-- December 14: ​DEP ​Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
-- January 25:​​ ​DEP Zero Emission Vehicle, Electric Charging Station Rebates
-- March 31​​: ​DEP Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates

49
Visit DEP’s ​Driving PA Forward ​website for more information on clean vehicle
initiatives.
Related Stories:
DCNR: Public Electric Car Charging Stations Coming To 40 State Park, Forest Locations
Gov. Wolf: First Round Of Grants Awarded From EPA Volkswagen Settlement To Reduce
Diesel Pollution
DEP Now Accepting Applications For Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates;
Webinars Set On All Charging Station Grant Programs
DEP's Driving PA Forward Offers Grants, Rebates For Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
Related Stories This Week:
Joint State Government Commission: Removing PA Counties From Vehicle Emissions Testing
Program Not Authorized By Federal Law
AG Shapiro, 20 Other Attorneys General File Comments Asking EPA To Withdraw Proposal To
Roll Back Clean Car Rules
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

Canadian, Colorado Companies Enter Into Agreement To Reduce Methane Emissions


From Closed Cambria 33 Mine

The Inlandsis Fund​, established in Québec, and ​Vessels Coal Gas Inc.​, a Colorado-based firm,
Tuesday announced they have entered into a long-term agreement to dramatically reduce the
emissions of methane from the ​Cambria 33 mine​.
The mine, which ceased operations in 1994, is located in Ebensburg, Cambria County.
Methane is the second largest source of greenhouse gases, contributing an estimated 20
percent to climate change. VCG uses an enclosed combustor to capture and destroy methane
emissions from the mine.
The project began operating in June 2018.
According to David Moffat, CEO of the Inlandsis Fund, "an expertise in financing tied to
carbon credits is central to making this project happen." In this case, the credits are generated in
the linked California-Québec carbon markets.
The project replaces an earlier methane reduction project that recovered the methane for
generation of electricity and injection into a nearby natural gas utility pipeline. The drop in
natural gas prices forced that project to end in 2015.
During that period, VCG captured 624,731 mcf of methane, equivalent to reducing nearly
one million tons of CO2, the annual emissions from over 210,000 passenger vehicles.
Tom Vessels, CEO and president of VCG, is very pleased at how the technical, financial,
and environmental aspects of the current project have aligned for success-- "From a technical
perspective, our team has over twenty years of experience developing and managing mine
methane reduction projects. From a financial perspective, the innovative capital of Inlandsis has
been essential to achieving our economic and environmental goals." 
Vessels Coal Gas Inc. has implemented three other MMC projects that have generated
offset credits in the WCI carbon market.
VCG installed the ​North Fork Energy LLC​ Bear Creek Combustors which commenced
operations on the abandoned Elk Creek Mine in Colorado in 2017.
VCG installed the 3MW LLC electricity generation and the North Fork Energy LLC Elk

50
Creek combustor both on the then active Elk Creek Mine which commenced operations in 2012
and have continued to operate after the mine's closure in 2016.
All three Colorado projects have together captured 3,285,445 mcf of methane, equivalent
to over five million tonnes of CO2, the annual emissions from over 1,100,000 passenger
vehicles.
Vessels Cambria 33 Resources LLC​ (VCG 33), a subsidiary of VCG, was created in 2007
to develop the Cambria 33 MMC project. It is responsible for operating and overseeing the
current methane combustion project.
The Inlandsis Fund was established by Fondaction, a $1.9 billion labour-sponsored fund
based in Montreal (QC), and Coop Carbone in 2017 with a shared commitment to harness
markets to address climate change.
Capitalized by Fondaction, Inlandsis is the only Canadian fund, and one of a handful
globally, that exclusively finances carbon emission reductions. It offers a unique project finance
solution that provides upfront capital in return for carbon credits – a critical innovation for
making many carbon reduction projects a reality.
The Fund deploys a variety of financing structures and is able to quickly close
investments. Its growing portfolio includes 25 projects in Alberta and linked California &
Quebec carbon markets.
The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported coal bed methane recovery
projects in Pennsylvania produced ​10 billion cubic feet of methane in 2016​ ​(the latest year
available).
DEP’s draft 2017 Pennsylvania Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory reports greenhouse
gas emissions from coal mining and abandoned coal mines were ​10.65 million metric tons of
carbon dioxide equivalent in 2014​.
To learn more about coal bed methane in Pennsylvania, visit DCNR’s ​Methane From
Coal ​webpage.
Related Stories:
Bloomberg Philanthropies Names Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, 2 Other Cities Winners In American
Cities Climate Challenge
Canadian, Colorado Companies Enter Into Agreement To Reduce Methane Emissions From
Closed Cambria 33 Mine
New National Wildlife Federation Unnatural Disaster Interactive Map On Growing Climate
Impacts
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

New National Wildlife Federal Unnatural Disaster Interactive Map On Growing Climate
Impacts

The ​National Wildlife Federation​ Monday


launched a new interactive story map showing
where hurricanes, algal outbreaks, wildfires,
droughts, and floods have hit in recent years
across the United States, detailing how they’ve
harmed local economies and wildlife.
Unnatural Disasters: Climate Change and the

51
Mounting Threats to People and Wildlife ​also explains how scientists now have the tools to
attribute certain worsening natural disasters to climate change, which is making them more
frequent and damaging than ever before.
In 2017 alone, disasters like Hurricanes Harvey and Maria and wildfires in the West led
to more than 3,000 fatalities and caused $306 billion in cumulative costs — a new record.
Although Pennsylvania is not a coastal state, we are still susceptible to the power of
hurricanes. In 2011, Hurricane Irene ravaged parts of Pennsylvania, along with 13 other states,
to the tune of $40 billion.
"As the ocean continues to heat up, providing more fuel for devastating hurricanes, we
can expect Pennsylvanian's to experience future catastrophic losses from floods and wind
damage," said Ed Perry, Pennsylvania Outreach Coordinator for the National Wildlife
Federation's Climate Change Campaign. "In addition to the human toll, these torrential
downpours tear up the stream banks of our world class trout streams, putting our state fish, the
brook trout, in harms way.
"The forecast for brook trout in a warming world is already grim, so any additional stress
on these fish will only hasten their demise,” said Perry. ​(Perry can be contacted by sending email
to: ​paglobalwarmingoutreach@gmail.com​.)
Frequent and sustained smaller stream flooding this past summer across a wide area of
Pennsylvania not only caused significant property damage, but landslides in Western parts of the
state, repeated property losses and sinkholes in the Northcentral and Eastern areas and a dramatic
increase in the mosquito population carrying West Nile Virus.
A Penn State/Florida Gulf Coast University study done for the ​Center for Rural
Pennsylvania in 2017​ (and updated this year) found ​very heavy precipitation events have
increased 71 percent​ over the last 50 years and the frequency is likely to keep increasing.
The ​2015 Draft Pennsylvania Climate Impacts Assessment Update​ done for ​DEP’s
Climate Change Advisory Committee​ by Penn State’s ​Environment and Natural Resources
Institute​ found “There are substantial and increasing flooding risks in Pennsylvania for both
urban areas and infrastructure in rural areas. Adaptation strategies that focus on increasing flood
preparedness, reducing vulnerabilities and increasing resilience in more extreme and more
frequent flooding scenarios are of high priority.”
The ​June 2018 update to Pennsylvania’s Hazard Mitigation Plan​ submitted by the PA
Emergency Management Agency to FEMA for the first time include a more “robust” evaluation
of how climate change would affect the risk of flooding and other natural disasters in the state.
The Plan concluded, in part-- “Across the United States, natural and human-made
disasters have led to increasing levels of deaths, injuries, property damage, and interruption of
business and government services. This trend is projected to increase due to the impacts of
climate change, therefore adding data, analysis, and action related to climate change was an
important component of this plan update.”
“The threat of climate change-fueled natural disasters cannot be contained to any one
region or state — and it’s a problem we all need to urgently address together. The latest science
is shouting a warning to all of us: we may only have a decade to prevent irreversible damage to
the global climate and the people and wildlife living on Earth. There’s no better time to roll up
our sleeves and get to work than right now,” said Shannon Heyck-Williams, senior manager for
climate and energy at the National Wildlife Federation. “We urgently need lawmakers and other
leaders in the public and private sectors to support cuts in industrial carbon pollution,

52
investments in renewable energy and transit, and expanded adaptation and resilience plans to
reduce risks from climate impacts.”
The ​U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued a new report​ this month
warning of cataclysmic levels of global warming unless policymakers begin "rapid and
far-reaching" transitions in land management, energy, industry, building efficiency,
transportation, and smart growth.
Among the disasters fueled by climate change highlighted in Unnatural Disasters:
-- Monster storms and record flooding: ​In addition to devastating communities, hurricanes can
flood the habitats endangered species depend on, placing them at greater risk of extinction. In
2017, Hurricane Irma wiped out as much as 22 percent of Florida’s Key deer (previously
estimated to be just 1,000 deer) and Hurricane Harvey decimated the wild population at Texas’
Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge down to just 12 birds.
-- Toxic algae outbreaks: ​A threat from coast to coast, Florida’s 2018 red tide and blue-green
outbreaks sickened dozens of people and killed thousands of fish, and killed or sickened
hundreds of birds and endangered sea turtles, along with manatees, dolphins, sea turtles, and a
whale shark. In 2007, dead or dying sea otters were found in California, with investigators
blaming toxic blue-green algae that washed into marine ecosystems.
-- Extreme heat and drought:​​ It’s not just fish that are hurt by drought – many snow-dependent
species, like wolverines, are already being hurt by reduced snowpack. Scientists say late-spring
snow will decline by up to 60 percent in the Northern Rockies over the coming century,
potentially drying up all wolverine habitat in the Lower 48.
Click Here​ to visit the NWF’s Unnatural Disasters story map. ​Click Here​ to read the
National Wildlife Federation’s climate change policy recommendations for adaptation and
mitigation.
NewsClips:
AP: Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 2 Other Cities Win Bloomberg Support For Plans To Curb Climate
Change
Bloomberg, Pittsburgh Mayor Talk Climate Change Fight In Pittsburgh
Bloomberg Announces $2.5 Million Award To Help Pittsburgh’s Environment
Kummer: Philly Wins $2M From Bloomberg For Climate Efforts
Philadelphia Wins Major Bloomberg Grant For Environmental Work
Sisk: Bloomberg Announces $2.5M Gifts To Tackle Climate Change In Pittsburgh, Philly
Bloomberg Visiting Pittsburgh To Spotlight Climate Program
Editorial: Pittsburgh Shows Leadership In Climate Change
Cusick: Climate Change: A Crisis For Humanity, Not A Big Deal In Governor’s Race
Scientists Urge Crash Program To Scrub Carbon From The Air To Slow Climate Change
Climate Change: 5 Cheap Ways To Remove CO2 From The Atmosphere
Politicians Say Nothing, But U.S. Farmers Are Increasingly Terrified By Climate Change
Climate Change Is Exacerbating World Conflicts, Red Cross President
What Migrants Displaced By The Dust Bowl And Climate Events Can Teach Us
Brewers Say They’ve Got A Plan On Climate Change
U.S. Supreme Court Pauses Kids’ Climate Change Suit Before Trial
Exelon CEO: Carbon Price Preferable To Band-Aid Nuclear Plant Subsidies
U.S. Supreme Court Pauses Kids’ Climate Case In Win For Trump
Op-Ed: What Trump’s EPA Chief Won’t Tell You At Shale Conference In Pittsburgh

53
GM Honda Join California In Criticizing EPA Roll Back Of Clean Vehicle Plan
Related Stories On This Issue:
NWF Report: Global Warming Picks A Winner, The Rise Of Noxious Insect Pests
Op-Ed: Our Health, Native Plants, Wildlife Compromised By Climate Change
Report: Climate Change Could Affect Pennsylvania's Big Game
71% Increase In Very Heavy Precipitation Events In Last 54 Years, 831,000 Pennsylvanians
Living At Risk On Floodplains
Related Stories This Week:
Bloomberg Philanthropies Names Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, 2 Other Cities Winners In American
Cities Climate Challenge
Canadian, Colorado Companies Enter Into Agreement To Reduce Methane Emissions From
Closed Cambria 33 Mine
Sustainable Pittsburgh Names Joylette Portlock New Executive Director
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Penn State Class Of 2019 Chooses Pollinator Garden Entry Gate As Class Gift

By Will Dunn,​ Penn State News

Penn State’s class of 2019 has chosen as its class


gift legacy the ​Pollinators’ Garden Entry Gate​ at the
Arboretum at Penn State​.
The 2019 Class Gift Committee made the
announcement on October 24 at an event held in the
HUB-Robeson Center, in front of the Monumental
Staircase. Seniors voted during the week of Oct.
15-19.
“I am un-BEE-lievably happy to announce the Class
of 2019 has chosen to support the Pollinators’
Garden Entry Gate!” said Tom Beeby, committee
executive director, to an appreciative crowd. “This
entry gate will provide a beautiful and unique experience for visitors; inviting them to explore
and learn the importance of pollination in our environment.”
The forthcoming garden is the result of a partnership with the ​Center for Pollinator
Research at Penn State​ to create a one-of-a-kind garden with the ambitious goal of attracting
every pollinator species in the region.
The garden will implement the latest understanding of native plant selection and habitat
creation to create a beautiful and pleasant landscape, one that will educate visitors and improve
people’s understanding of pollinators' role in agriculture and food production.
After Beeby gave his remarks, he handed the microphone over to Rich Bundy, Penn
State’s vice president for Development and Alumni Relations.
“The class gift connects your class to every Penn State before you and every Penn State
class that comes after you,” said Bundy.
“The class of 2019 will leave a lasting imprint on a treasured campus resource,” said
Bundy. “To offer a little context on this gift: The Arboretum will soon fulfill its long-standing

54
vision for a garden that will attract pollinator species of birds and insects. With construction
scheduled to begin in 2019, the new Pollinators’ Garden will advance research that will help to
counteract the decline in native pollinator populations, an issue that affects all of us, because all
of us depend on pollinators for food.”
Penn State’s class gift tradition began when graduates of the class of 1861, at their 1890
reunion, gave the University a portrait of Penn State’s first president, Evan Pugh, which still
hangs in the lobby of Old Main.
Members of the Class Gift Campaign will be soliciting gifts through events, emails and
phone calls to students graduating in May, August or December 2019. Seniors can also ​make a
gift online​.
The 2019 Class Gift Campaign Executive Committee members are Tom Beeby,
executive director; Jack Davenport, communications; Will Dunn, communications; Ann Thoet,
fundraising; Nick Pazuchanics, events/logistics; and Katie Solomon, student outreach.
Click Here​ for the detailed plan.
Pollinator Resource Links:
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​ ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Related Story:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Agriculture, Penn State Release PA Pollinator Protection Plan Recommendations
Pollinator Population Is Going Down In PA Due To Pesticides, Parasites And Pathogens

(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)


[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

Eckley Miners' Village Receives ARC Grant For Strategic Planning Initiative

The federal ​Appalachian Regional


Commission​ has awarded a $50,000
grant to ​Eckley Miners’ Village​ in
Luzerne County for the development of a
strategic plan.
The plan will explore sustainable funding
and management options to ensure a
stable future for the National
Register-listed historic site in the
Anthracite Region.
Eckley Miners’ Village is administered by the PA Historical and Museum Commission.
“Eckley is one of the most significant state historic sites in Pennsylvania representing the
experiences of the many families who immigrated to this country, found work in our burgeoning

55
and often dangerous industries, and laid the foundation of our rich and dynamic American
culture. It is also one of only a few company towns actively preserved and interpreted in a
heritage context in the United States today,” said Brenda Reigle, director of PHMC’s Bureau of
Historic Sites and Museums. “Unfortunately, maintaining and operating a mile-long,
200-structure townsite with limited fiscal resources presents a long-term challenge to the PHMC
mission to preserve the Commonwealth’s heritage.”
With the $50,000 ARC award and the $50,000 PHMC match, a total of $100,000 will be
dedicated to funding a strategic plan aimed at identifying new revenue streams and producing a
long-term sustainable future for the site.
Founded in 1854, Eckley was a company town for several anthracite mining companies
before serving as the location set for the 1970 film ​The Molly Maguires.​ The site also offers
education programs and sponsored events at the site since 1971.
Also supporting the site and its operations is the nonprofit ​Eckley Miners’ Village
Associates​.
For more information, visit the ​Eckley Miners’ Village​ website.
NewsClips:
McConnell Hints At Action To Preserve Tax Supporting Black Lung Fund
Pennsylvania Coal Miners Still Await A Comeback
Coal Mine Accident In Eastern China Leaves 22 Trapped
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon
County

The Department of Conservation and


Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams
Dunn Tuesday joined Bureau of State Parks
officials in breaking ground for a new
visitor center at ​Hickory Run State Park​,
near White Haven, Carbon County.
“The visitor center will serve as a
main contact point for visitors providing
new exhibit space, comfort facilities,
campground registration, and park
administrative services,” Dunn said. “This
new park facility will also offer visitors
expanded environmental education and the
latest in energy efficient heating, cooling, and lighting.”
In line with the Wolf Administration’s initiative stressing energy efficiency and
sustainability, the structure will be built incorporating key Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED) criteria.
In cooperation with the state Department of General Services, its construction on a
six-acre site will incorporate proven, economically sustainable techniques and technologies
including:
-- Lobby timber trusses and wood paneling made from reclaimed timber and siding;

56
-- Rain gardens for onsite stormwater collection and infiltration;
-- High-performance geothermal heating and cooling;
-- Maximum utilization of daylighting, combined with controlled, automated user-demand
lighting.
Providing modern public comfort facilities, interpretive displays, an in-door classroom,
and park administrative areas, the new building will be the hub and primary contact point for
information and activities in the park.
It will serve as the base of the park’s Environmental and Interpretive Program, enabling
staff to oversee year-round programming, group activities and special events, enabling visitors of
all ages to better appreciate the natural world around them.
New exhibits will provide a starting point for visitors, equipping them for a variety of
meaningful experiences at Hickory Run and ​Lehigh Gorge State Parks​.
Exhibits will be designed to entice visitors to explore the parks’ natural and cultural
history, while fostering safe, respectful behavior and encouraging conservation of the park for
future generations.
Visitors enjoy many activities at Hickory Run State Park Complex including fishing,
hunting, swimming, boating, camping, hiking, orienteering, and sightseeing.
Two unique activities specific to Lehigh Gorge are whitewater rafting, conducted by four
licensed commercial outfitters, and biking along a 26-mile section of the ​Delaware & Lehigh
National Heritage Corridor​.
Winter activities include ice-skating, sledding, cross-country skiing, and snowmobiling.
Either educator directed or self-guided, the new exhibits, classroom, and teaching porch
will provide both indoor and outdoor learning environments designed to create a welcoming
atmosphere for park visitors of all ages.
The surrounding environs of the new office will provide the park visitor with outdoor
classrooms, wildlife viewing opportunities, over forty miles of nature trails to explore and access
information for fishing and hunting excursions within the park.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo

57
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Thursday announced grant funding for
two trail projects in Montgomery County: creating a 1-mile section of the ​Cross County Trail​ in
Whitemarsh Township and a 3/4-mile segment of the Tookany Creek Trail in Cheltenham
Township.
A total investment of $350,000 in these two projects will help the communities link
natural resources to community revitalization and improve well-being for residents by increasing
recreation opportunities in the county.
“Local parks and trails improve the everyday lives of people of all places, ages, and
backgrounds, while serving as a primary venue for outdoor recreation for Pennsylvanians,”
DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said. “We are happy to assist these communities in
Montgomery County create spaces where people can walk a trail, play outdoors, and enjoy
nature close-to-home.”
The $200,000 grant to Montgomery County will support the construction of 1-mile of the
multi-use Cross County Trail on a large conserved property known as the Erdenheim Farm. The
project will include installation of retaining walls, drainage features, benches, and planting of
more than 110 trees and shrubs.
This segment will partially fill a gap on the trail that will connect the ​Schuylkill River
Trail​ in Conshohocken and the ​Wissahickon Trail​ in ​Fort Washington State Park​.
The $150,000 grant to Cheltenham Township will construct a 10-foot wide paved trail
segment in the township-owned Gimbel Field between Harrison Ave. and New Second Street
The Tookany Creek Trail is a part of ​The Circuit​ -- a large regional trail system. Other
partners in the project are the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission and the
Department of Transportation.
For more information on trails near you, visit the ​Explore PA Trails​ website.
DCNR Grant Workshops
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
A new grant round is opening soon.

58
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana


Counties

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources this week announced grants from the
Keystone Fund​ to support local recreation projects in Delaware and Indiana counties.
Delaware County
DCNR awarded a $85,600 grant from the Keystone Fund to expand the Mickey Vernon
Park playground area in Marcus Hook Borough, Delaware County to include new features, to
help improve well-being for residents by increasing recreation opportunities.
The work includes the expansion and playground tower, new swings and spins, ADA
accessible ramps and paths, removing trees from locations that hinder access and replacing them,
lining the perimeter, and filling the area with mulch.
The project also will include a fence between a ball field and the playground, and a new

59
backstop on the softball field.
Mickey Vernon Park is 4.4 acres located at Market St. and 7th St. The park is named for
Marcus Hook born and raised baseball star James Barton “Mickey” Vernon, who played for the
Washington Senators for the majority of his career. The park, located in the center of the
borough, is next to the Marcus Hook Elementary School.
Indiana County
A investment of $399,000 from the Keystone Fund will help pay for improvements to the
S&T Bank Arena in White Township, Indiana County update and restore aging structural and
mechanical systems, and will include green energy initiatives at the indoor facility in the White
Township Recreation Complex.
The 1,000 seat arena along East Pike Road includes an ice rink, astroturf, tennis courts,
fitness area, and meeting rooms. It hosts local sporting events as well as offers
community-based programs and services. The 50-acre complex also includes turf fields, tennis
courts.
Keystone Fund
The ​Keystone Fund​ is currently celebrating 25 years of supporting thousands of
community improvements in Pennsylvania.
In Pennsylvania, outdoor recreation generates $29.1 billion in consumer spending, $1.9
billion in state and local tax revenue, $8.6 billion in wages and salaries, and sustains 251,000
direct Pennsylvania jobs.
DCNR Grant Workshops
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
A new grant round is opening soon.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
DCNR Keystone Fund, Federal Land & Water Conservation Grants Support Local Recreation,

60
Parks Projects In 9 Counties
DCNR Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Allegheny, Berks, Blair, Bradford,
Chester, Montour Counties​s
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In
Luzerne County

Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn
Thursday joined conservancy, Bureau of
Forestry officials and local legislators in a
dedication ceremony celebrating the addition
more than 1,500 acres to ​Pinchot State Forest​ in
Luzerne County.
“Visitors will appreciate the increased access
and recreational potential this land affords, and
we salute the ​Earth Conservancy​ and ​North
Branch Land Trust​ for working tirelessly to
make this happen,” Dunn said. “With the addition of the Wanamie and Crystal Lake land parcels,
both in Luzerne County, comes increased watershed protection and assistance in the bureau’s
efforts to curtail forest fragmentation and safeguard state forestlands.”
The acquisition of the 1,132-acre Wanamie property in Newport Township, Luzerne
County, was facilitated by the Earth Conservancy; and the purchase of the 389-acre Crystal Lake
tract, was overseen by North Branch Land Trust, in Bear Creek Township.
“We are extremely pleased to have participated in the collaboration,” said Mike Dziak,
Earth Conservancy president and CEO. “Projects like this are critical to Earth Conservancy’s
mission of revitalization in the region. Not only does preserving this land protect open space and
wildlife in the area, but it also adds to outdoor recreational resources for the public.”
Click Here​ to watch a video of remarks by ​Sen. John Yudichak​ (D-Luzerne), Minority
Chair of the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, at the dedication event.
Deeded to the Bureau of Forestry by the Earth Conservancy, the Wanamie tract has an
existing mountain bike path that is maintained by the conservancy. Its acquisition will enhance
other state forest recreational opportunities, including camping, hiking, wildlife watching, and
hunting.
The North Branch Land Trust recently purchased the 389-acre tract in Bear Creek

61
Township, with an eye to protecting the Delaware River watershed and improving public access
and recreation opportunities on land surrounding Crystal Lake. It, too, has deeded the property to
the bureau.
The tract sits atop the Delaware River Watershed and harbors wetlands and headwater
streams feeding into the Delaware River via the Bear Creek and Lehigh River. Trails on the
property connect to existing trail networks on the neighboring state forest land.
Both land purchases were facilitated through grant support from DCNR’s Bureau of
Recreation and Conservation Community Conservation Partnership Program, with funding from
the ​Keystone Recreation, Park, and Conservation Fund​; and the ​Open Space Institute’s Delaware
River Watershed Protection Fund​, made possible with funding from the ​William Penn
Foundation​.
Keystone Fund
The ​Keystone Fund​ is currently celebrating 25 years of supporting thousands of
community improvements in Pennsylvania.
In Pennsylvania, outdoor recreation generates $29.1 billion in consumer spending, $1.9
billion in state and local tax revenue, $8.6 billion in wages and salaries, and sustains 251,000
direct Pennsylvania jobs.
DCNR Grant Workshops
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail, recreation and
land conservation projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community
Conservation Grant Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
A new grant round is opening soon.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​, ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog,​ ​Click Here​ for upcoming events, ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
NewsClips:
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation

62
Conference
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference

The ​PA Land Trust Association​ is now accepting


proposals for workshops at the ​2019 PA Land
Conservation Conference​ set for May 16-18 at
Skytop Lodge​ in Monroe County. Proposals are
due November 9.
The Conference is Pennsylvania’s annual
educational, networking, and inspirational event
for private and public land and water conservation.
Attendance expected is 350–400 attendees and will
include conservation practitioners,
farmland-preservation advocates, attorneys,
appraisers and real estate specialists, planners, municipal and county officials, state officials,
landscape architects, and organizational development and fundraising experts from across
Pennsylvania and beyond.
Sessions can range from 75 minutes to two hours. We cannot guarantee specific days or
times, so presenters must be available for all three days of the conference.
Click Here​ to submit a proposal or for more information.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA Land
Trust Association​ website, ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from PLTA, ​Like them on
Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, and ​Join them on Google+​. ​Click Here​ to support their
work.
NewsClips:
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park

63
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna County
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Countryside Conservancy Opens 82-Acre Gardner Spencer Preserve In Lackawanna


County

The ​Countryside Conservancy​ Tuesday will open its


newest property acquisition to the public, the 82-acre
Gardner Spencer Preserve​ in Benton Township,
Lackawanna County, with a “rugged ribbon cutting.”
Attendees will hike approximately a half mile up a trail
to the gathering location (guided hikes are available).
This is the Conservancy’s 13th preserve to date.
Grant funding from the Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources’ recreation and conservation
grant program helped with the purchase of the land in
2017. Matching funds for the grant were provided by
the ​Ross Family Foundation​ and more than 20 individual supporters of the Conservancy.
Also integral to the acquisition was the strong commitment to conservation by the seller,
Patricia Gardner, and her willingness to significantly discount the sales price.
So far, 2.6 miles of singletrack hiking and biking trails have been constructed on the
preserve in partnership with the ​Lackawanna State Park​ Trail Crew and professional trail builder
Dave King of ​DirtSculpt​, based in Allentown.
Seventy-three volunteers have collectively contributed over 400 hours of labor to help put
the finishing touches on the trails.
The trails are generally smoother and more accessible for beginner riders and less-mobile
hikers than other trails in the Lackawanna State Park/ Countryside Conservancy Trail System.
Funding for this unique trail-building project was provided by the ​Scranton Area
Community Foundation​, the ​PA Environmental Council’s Pocono Forests & Waters
Conservation Landscape​, the ​Frieder Foundation​, ​PNC Bank​, and an anonymous donor.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Countryside Conservancy​ website.

64
NewsClips:
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Related Stories:
DCNR's Keystone Fund Supports Local Recreation Projects In Delaware, Indiana Counties
DCNR Invests $350,000 In Montgomery County Trail Projects
Conservation Leaders, DCNR Dedicate 1,500 Acre Addition To Pinchot State Forest In Luzerne
County
PA Land Trust Assn. Accepting Workshop Proposals For May 2019 Land Conservation
Conference
DCNR Breaks Ground On New Green Hickory Run State Park Visitor Center In Carbon County
PA Parks & Forests Foundation Seeking Nominations For 2019 Annual Awards Program
Week 5: DCNR Fall Foliage Continues To Move Toward Peak Colors In More Areas
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Game Commission Accepting Public Comment On Proposal To List 3 Bat Species As


Endangered, Make Other Listing Changes

The Game Commission Monday announced it is accepting


public comment on preliminarily approved action to list as
state endangered species three cave bats decimated by
white nose syndrome​, as well as change the status of three
wild birds.
The agency’s Board of Game Commissioners ​in late
September preliminarily approved​ a measure to update the
state’s list of threatened and endangered species by adding
the northern long-eared bat, tri-colored bat and little brown
bat.
As part of the overall state status-change package, the
board also preliminarily agreed to upgrade the peregrine falcon from endangered to threatened;
upgrade the ​piping plover​ from extirpated to endangered; and add the red knot-- already listed
federally as threatened-- as a threatened species.

65
The northern long-eared bat already had been listed federally as a threatened species for
more than three years. In addition, tri-colored bats and little brown bats currently are being
evaluated for U.S. Endangered Species Act protection.
Written comment will be accepted on this status-change package until December 31. The
Board of Game Commissioners also will accept public comment-- limited to five minutes-- at its
January 27 and 28 meetings. Final adoption of the proposal will be considered at the Board’s
January 29 meeting.
Public comments on the bat listings should be emailed to: ​batcomments@pa.gov​;
comments on bird listings should be sent to: ​peregrinecomments@pa.gov​. Both accounts accept
email attachments.
Background
These listings historically have ensured the Game Commission and other resource
agencies work with industry if projects could be affected by the presence of endangered or
threatened species.
All projects are screened for potential conflicts through a state environmental review,
which has been in place since the early 1980s and now is called the ​Pennsylvania Natural
Diversity Inventory​ (PNDI).
PNDI was established to provide current, reliable, objective information to help inform
environmental decisions and guide conservation work and land-use planning. Resource agencies
continually update PNDI’s species records to ensure the best guidance and conservation possible.
Northern long-eared bats currently are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species
Act. If they become state listed, the Game Commission will continue to defer comments on
potential impacts to northern long-eared bats to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No additional
coordination with the Game Commission will occur.
Since tri-colored and little brown bats currently are not federally listed and the Game
Commission, as part of its status-change package, proposes to protect mothers and their young in
summer (maternity) habitat by requiring consultation with the PGC for projects located within
300 meters of known roost locations.
Likewise, projects located with 300 meters of known hibernacula that do not contain
federally listed bats will trigger Game Commission consultation.
“Sites that held these bats prior to the arrival of white-nose syndrome, but not since,
won’t affect projects,” said Dan Brauning, Wildlife Diversity Division supervisor. “That
distinction alone immediately reduces the potential for conflicts when you consider bats have
lost upward of 97 percent of their historic populations in Pennsylvania.”
For perspective, there are about 30 hibernacula and 120 maternity sites known to support
little brown and tri-colored bats that will be added to PNDI.
Prior to white nose syndrome appearing in 2008 in Pennsylvania, there were about 250
bat hibernacula and 300 maternity sites listed in PNDI, according to Greg Turner, Game
Commission Endangered and Nongame Mammals Section supervisor.
The Game Commission will continue to coordinate with applicants to resolve conflicts,
agency Executive Director Bryan Burhans Brauning pointed out.
“The Game Commission strives to work whenever possible with industry, to save jobs,
and be a part of sound state government,” emphasized Burhans. “But we cannot look the other
way as bats tumble toward extinction. This agency has statutory and state constitutional
commitments to represent and conserve all wildlife for today and tomorrow.”

66
What works against these cave bats is their annual reproduction provides limited
replacement. Most female cave bats have one pup per year, a rate that would place their potential
recovery more than a century away.
The peregrine falcon has seen a steady statewide recovery, which qualifies its status to be
upgraded to threatened under the agency’s Peregrine Falcon Management Plan. This upgrade
would keep PNDI screening and Game Commission coordination at status quo.
Upgrading the piping plover’s status to endangered recognizes its return to breeding in
Pennsylvania. After more than 60 years of absence, piping plover pairs successfully nested at
Presque Isle State Park​ in 2017 and 2018.
And changing the status of the red knot – a rare migrant bird found in Pennsylvania
mostly at Presque Isle State Park – recognizes its vulnerability to further declines.
Both piping plovers and red knots currently are federally listed. The Game Commission
would continue to defer potential conflict coordination for both species to the USFWS.
For more information on animal species of concern, visit the Game Commission’s
Threatened & Endangered Species​ webpage.
(​Photo:​ Little brown bat.)
Related Stories:
Game Commission Proposes To Reclassify 3 Bat Species As Endangered, Make Other Changes
to Threatened, Endangered List
Game Commission: Piping Plovers Nest Again On Presque Isle In Erie
Related Story This Week:
Game Commission’s New Mobile App For Hunters Has It All
[Posted: Oct. 22, 2018]

Game Commission’s New Mobile App For Hunters Has It All

Whether you’re looking for a place to


hunt, need a license or want an easy way
to report your deer or turkey harvest, the
Game Commission’s ​new mobile-device
app​ is a one-stop shop that’s loaded with
information hunters and trappers need
most.
Through the app, which is free to
download at the iTunes and Google Play
stores, hunters can find out what’s in
season and where, when hunting hours
start and end, and whether they’ll need to wear fluorescent orange while in the field, and how
much.
The app provides instant access to the ​Hunting & Trapping Digest​-- the Game
Commission’s complete regulations handbook-- as well as the agency’s Mapping Center, which
charts hunting opportunities including pheasant releases on state game lands and other hunting
properties.
Those in need of licenses can buy them online through the app, or find an issuing agent
nearby where they can pick up a license in person.

67
And those who are successful in big-game pursuits can report their harvests through the
app, learn the locations of bear and elk check stations, or find a processor where they can donate
venison through the Hunters Sharing the Harvest program.
Wildlife-law violations can be reported through the app, and hunters can document their
exact location to share in the case of an emergency.
“With this handy and easy-to-use offering, Pennsylvania’s hunters and trappers have all
the information they need, right at their fingertips,” said Game Commission Executive Director
Bryan Burhans. “Whether seeking immediate answers while in the field, or planning the next
day’s hunt from home or camp, all you need is a cell phone signal or network connection to learn
whatever you need to know.”
For more information, visit the Game Commission’s ​Mobile App​ webpage.
Related Story​​:
Game Commission Accepting Public Comment On Proposal To List 3 Bat Species As
Endangered, Make Other Listing Changes
[Posted: Oct. 25, 2018]

Sustainable Pittsburgh Names Joylette Portlock New Executive Director

The ​Sustainable Pittsburgh​ Board of Directors Tuesday


named Joylette Portlock, Ph.D. as the organization’s new
Executive Director following a national search.
Portlock replaces Sustainable Pittsburgh’s founding
executive director, Court Gould, who served in the role
for 20 years. Gould accepted a position at The Erie
Community Foundation earlier this year.
Portlock, who studied biology and anthropology at MIT
and completed her Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford
University, has most recently served as Associate Director of Science and Research at the
Carnegie Museum of Natural History​ and executive director of Communitopia.
Communitopia​ is a nonprofit based in Pittsburgh that focuses on climate change
communication and building healthier communities.
“As Sustainable Pittsburgh looks to its next 20 years of service, the future remains
bright,” said Shawn Wray, Sustainable Pittsburgh Board Chair. “With Joylette at the helm, we
are excited to build upon past accomplishments and chart a future towards further advancing
Sustainable Pittsburgh’s vision of our region having a strong economy in which all people can
live to their potential, are engaged, and prosper within the means of a clean and healthy
environment.”
Established in 1998, Sustainable Pittsburgh serves as a convener and trusted advisor
among diverse sectors.
Having a mission to accelerate the adoption of sustainable policies and practices
throughout the region, the organization uses a three-pronged approach: formal sustainability
performance programs for workplaces and communities, professional development, and
collaboration on regional policy initiatives.
Examples of SP’s work include ​CEOs for Sustainability​, the first executive council of its
kind in the region, comprising CEOs from leading private-sector companies; the ​Sustainable

68
Pittsburgh Restaurant program​, helping to transform Pittsburgh from a “foodie” city to a
“sustainable foodie” city; and the ​Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge​, a 12-month competition that
cumulatively has seen 250+ employers save $11 million in energy and enough water to fill Heinz
Field 232 feet!
A subject matter expert and dynamic communicator, Portlock’s expertise aligns well with
Sustainable Pittsburgh’s work to convene communities of decision-makers, its focus on
outcomes, and its evolution towards working with consumers to help transform the marketplace.
She is a practical leader, bringing people together to create needed, innovative change.
Her success stems in part from her ability to take complex matters of urgency (e.g. climate
change) and translate them into something more relevant for individuals, empowering them to
make well-informed decisions in their daily lives.
She served as project lead and star for the ​Don’t Just Sit There – Do Something!​ video
series, comprising 34 short episodes rooted in science and humor that communicate societal
challenges to a broad audience.
Through the videos and elsewhere in her work, Portlock successfully and creatively
bridges the gaps among scientists, stakeholder organizations, and the public.
“It’s so exciting to be joining Sustainable Pittsburgh at this moment in time,” Portlock
said. “Given the dire report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change earlier this
month, it has never been more important for us, across all sectors of society, to come together
and forge appropriate solutions to the challenges before us. Sustainable Pittsburgh, given its
history, programs, and potential, will play a critical role in that conversation. By investing in
sustainability now, we have the power to define the terms, and make sure that the future we’re
building is one we want.”
Portlock has worked on environmental issues at the local, state, and federal level, with a
focus on global climate change since 2007. Previously she has worked for ​The Climate Reality
Project​, a nonprofit founded to increase public awareness of climate change, where she
organized the national community of climate presenters.
Later, she served as Western Pennsylvania Outreach Coordinator with ​PennFuture​, a
statewide environmental advocacy group where she worked with the organization's members,
elected officials, and the public on energy, air, water, mining, and transportation issues.
“Joylette’s passion and vision for a more sustainable Pittsburgh is evident,” said Wray.
“She is well positioned to lead the organization into its next chapter, advancing creative solutions
with meaningful impact for the community.”
Portlock currently serves on the Allegheny County Board of Health, is co-chair of the
Climate Reality Project Pittsburgh and Southwestern PA Chapter and was the founding organizer
of the Swissvale Farmers Market, among other roles in the community.
She will begin her position at Sustainable Pittsburgh in December 2018.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Sustainable
Pittsburgh​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates. ​Like them on Facebook​, ​Follow
them on Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
To learn more about green innovation in the Pittsburgh Region, visit the ​Pittsburgh Green
Story​ website.
Related Stories:
Bloomberg Philanthropies Names Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, 2 Other Cities Winners In American
Cities Climate Challenge

69
Canadian, Colorado Companies Enter Into Agreement To Reduce Methane Emissions From
Closed Cambria 33 Mine
New National Wildlife Federation Unnatural Disaster Interactive Map On Growing Climate
Impacts
[Posted: Oct. 23, 2018]

Help Wanted: Susquehanna River Basin Commission Policy & Legislative Director

The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ is seeking qualified candidates to fill the position of
Policy and Legislative Director.​ The deadline to apply is November 25.
The Policy and Legislative Director will coordinate policy development efforts and lead
overall governmental affairs functions to advance the Commission’s mission and water resource
management objectives.
Click Here​ for all the details.
For more information on programs, training opportunities and upcoming events, visit the
Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for SRBC’s newsletter.
Follow SRBC on Twitter​, ​visit them on YouTube​.
[Posted: Oct. 26, 2018]

Help Wanted: PennFuture Clean Water Advocacy Campaign Manager-Philadelphia

PennFuture​ is seeking qualified candidates to fill the position of ​Clean Water Advocacy
Campaign Manager​ based in Philadelphia.
The Campaign Manager will lead a high impact campaign around clean water issues in
Philadelphia, with a focus on green stormwater infrastructure.
The Campaign Manager will develop and lead a bold, sophisticated, and integrated
campaign that will elevate green stormwater solutions and infrastructure as a key environmental
issue among Philadelphia’s municipal leadership and residents, including around projects like the
Rebuild Initiative.
Click Here​ for all the details. Deadline for applications November 16.
[Posted: Oct. 24, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

Cusick: Watch Now Online: The Story Of Environmental Rights In Pennsylvania


Energy, Explained Podcast: Environmental Rights In PA, New Life For A Forgotten Amendment
PA Supreme Court Environmental Rights Amendment Ruling Wild Card For Energy Developers
Politics
Cusick: Climate Change: A Crisis For Humanity, Not A Big Deal In Governor’s Race
70
Op-Ed: Pennsylvania Is Being Left Behind, Need Natural Gas Infrastructure - Jeff Bartos
Op-Ed: Opioid Crisis, Natural Gas Tax Among Key Issues - John Fetterman
Op-Ed: I’m A Puerto Rican Refugee From Hurricane Maria, Why I Care About PA Midterms
Op-Ed: Natural Gas Industry Already Pays Its Fair Share In Taxes - PA Chamber
Letter: PennLive Editorial On Shale Gas Political Contributions Doesn’t Tell Whole Story
Op-Ed: Everyone Can Vote For The Green Ticket - Burpee CEO
Air
Erie Coal Coking Plant Still Operating After Sister Plant Closes
Op-Ed: Cleaner Air Legacy Of Donora Smog
GM Honda Join California In Criticizing EPA Roll Back Of Clean Vehicle Plan
Awards & Recognition
PRC Lens On Litter Photo Contest Entries Due Oct. 31
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
Ravenous Spotted Lanternflies Could Hitch A Ride On Your Christmas Tree
Editorial: Vanishing Insects Are A Silent Threat
Budget
Franklin County Municipalities Deal With Stormwater Requirements, Cost
Williamsport Authority Stormwater Takeover Could Mean Added Fees
Op-Ed: Natural Gas Industry Already Pays Its Fair Share In Taxes - PA Chamber
Editorial: Fair Natural Gas Tax Closer To Reality
Exelon CEO: Carbon Price Preferable To Band-Aid Nuclear Plant Subsidies
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
NAWC Applauds Signing Of Federal Water Infrastructure Bill
Citizen Action
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Chesapeake Bay
Op-Ed: The Chesapeake Bay’s Environmental Success Story Is In Danger - CBF
Lancaster Schools To Enhance Science Programming Thanks To Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Grant
State: Progress With Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Bay Journal-Morelli: Brunner Island Power Plant Accused Of Illegal Discharges
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Climate
AP: Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 2 Other Cities Win Bloomberg Support For Plans To Curb Climate
Change
Bloomberg, Pittsburgh Mayor Talk Climate Change Fight In Pittsburgh
Bloomberg Announces $2.5 Million Award To Help Pittsburgh’s Environment
Kummer: Philly Wins $2M From Bloomberg For Climate Efforts

71
Philadelphia Wins Major Bloomberg Grant For Environmental Work
Sisk: Bloomberg Announces $2.5M Gifts To Tackle Climate Change In Pittsburgh, Philly
Bloomberg Visiting Pittsburgh To Spotlight Climate Program
Editorial: Pittsburgh Shows Leadership In Climate Change
Cusick: Climate Change: A Crisis For Humanity, Not A Big Deal In Governor’s Race
Scientists Urge Crash Program To Scrub Carbon From The Air To Slow Climate Change
Climate Change: 5 Cheap Ways To Remove CO2 From The Atmosphere
Politicians Say Nothing, But U.S. Farmers Are Increasingly Terrified By Climate Change
Climate Change Is Exacerbating World Conflicts, Red Cross President
What Migrants Displaced By The Dust Bowl And Climate Events Can Teach Us
Brewers Say They’ve Got A Plan On Climate Change
U.S. Supreme Court Pauses Kids’ Climate Change Suit Before Trial
Exelon CEO: Carbon Price Preferable To Band-Aid Nuclear Plant Subsidies
U.S. Supreme Court Pauses Kids’ Climate Case In Win For Trump
Op-Ed: What Trump’s EPA Chief Won’t Tell You At Shale Conference In Pittsburgh
GM Honda Join California In Criticizing EPA Roll Back Of Clean Vehicle Plan
Coal Mining
McConnell Hints At Action To Preserve Tax Supporting Black Lung Fund
Pennsylvania Coal Miners Still Await A Comeback
Coal Mine Accident In Eastern China Leaves 22 Trapped
Delaware River
Delaware RiverKeeper Files Lawsuit To Protect Tinicum Creek In Bucks County
DRBC Participates In Announcement Of Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Grants
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct 26 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs $10.5M For Lead Service Line Replacement
High Levels Of Lead Reported In Braddock Water
Pittsburgh Water Authority OKs Winter Water Shutoff Moratorium
Peoples Gas To Be Acquired By Aqua America Water Company In $4.2 Billion Deal
Litvak: Old Pipes In The Ground Helped Fuel Aqua’s $4.2B Deal For Peoples Gas
Maykuth: Aqua America To Buy Peoples Gas For $4.3 Billion
State Aid For Lead Line Replacements Could Temper Pittsburgh Water Authority Debt
Op-Ed: Pittsburgh’s Water Authority Must Stay Under Public Control
AP: North Carolina Water/Sewer Authority Hit By Ransomware Attack After Hurricane
NAWC Applauds Signing Of Federal Water Infrastructure Bill
Education
Frye: Be An Outdoor Mentor To Promote Appreciation For Nature, Wildlife, Adventure
Lancaster Schools To Enhance Science Programming Thanks To Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Grant
Emergency Response
DEP: Truck Fire Leads To Anti-Freeze Spill, Turns Creek Green
Energy
Cusick: PA So Far Not Joining Rush To Support Struggling Nuclear Plants
Op-Ed: Legislature, Take Action To Save Three Mile Island
Natural Gas Power Plant In Westmoreland Starts Testing To Go Online In December

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Evoke Solar Aiming For Sustainable Growth In Still-Maturing Industry
Pennsylvanians Speak Out Against Energy Pollution
Bay Journal-Morelli: Brunner Island Power Plant Accused Of Illegal Discharges
Op-Ed: What Trump’s EPA Chief Won’t Tell You At Shale Conference In Pittsburgh
U.S. DOE Secretary Stumps For All Of The Above Energy In Philadelphia
Massachusetts Town Struck By Gas Explosions Still Without Heat As Winter Nears
Trump Names Chatterjee FERC Chair
Ailing FERC Chair Prompts Trump To Reshuffle Key Energy Commission
GM Honda Join California In Criticizing EPA Roll Back Of Clean Vehicle Plan
Energy Conservation
Legislators, Industry Leaders Tour Energy Efficient HQ Of Aerzen In Chester County
Environmental History
Op-Ed: Cleaner Air Legacy Of Donora Smog
Environmental Policy
Stitcher:Interview With Josh McNeil, Conservation Voters Of PA
Farming
Lancaster County Adopts Plan To Stop Sprawl, Save Farms This Time Pledging Action
Lancaster Farming: Good Pasture Starts With Soil
Penn State Class Of 2019 Chooses Pollinator Garden Entry Gate As Class Gift
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Rainy 2018 Yielded Soggy Fall Harvest, Philly Growers Say
Flooding
Lehigh Valley Utilities Prepped For First Coastal Storm Of The Season
Nor’easter With Rain From Hurricane Willa To Soak PA This Weekend
Flood Watch For Shore: Heavy Rain, Gale-Force Guts, Power Outages
Crable: Feds Declare Lancaster A Disaster Area After Flash Floods In August
York Flooding: Federal Aid Available
Williamsport Falls Short Of $5M Goal For Grafius Run Flood Mitigation Project
Grafius Run Flood Damage Surveys Considered Critical For Mitigation Study
Residents Question Harmar Flood Prevention Project
Lansdale Gets Look At Impact Of Stormwater
Editorial: Restructure Flood Insurance
Editorial: FEMA’s Work Must Include Understanding
Flooding - ​Hurricanes
Luzerne County Natives Rode Out Hurricane Michael In Florida Panhandle
Crowdsourcing To Find Survivors Of Hurricane Michael
No Power, No Water, No Internet: Life In Post-Michael Florida
Some Hurricane Hit Florida Residents Worry Officials Will Be In Too Great A Hurry To Move
On
Editorial: Lending A Helping Hand To Hurricane Survivors
U.S. Mariana Islands Brace For Being Without Electricity For Months After Super Typhoon
Puerto Ricans Still Fighting For Insurance Money A Year After Mari
Op-Ed: I’m A Puerto Rican Refugee From Hurricane Maria, Why I Care About PA Midterms
Hurricane Willa Becomes Category 5 Storm Off Mexico’s Pacific Coast
Hurricane Willa Makes Landfill On Mexico’s Pacific Coast As Category 3 Storm

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Eastern Pacific Ocean Has Seen Its Most Active Hurricane Season On Record
Forests
Ravenous Spotted Lanternflies Could Hitch A Ride On Your Christmas Tree
Schneck: 15 Things You Don’t Know About Nut Trees In PA
Leaf Colors Fall Flat
Fiery Fall Foliage Still Missing In Action Across The Mid-Atlantic
Geologic Hazards
Elliott, Mount Washington See Road Improvements After Landslides
Green Infrastructure
Franklin County Municipalities Deal With Stormwater Requirements, Cost
Lansdale Gets Look At Impact Of Stormwater
Williamsport Authority Stormwater Takeover Could Mean Added Fees
Lancaster Farming: Good Pasture Starts With Soil
Land Conservation
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Land Use Planning
Lancaster County Adopts Plan To Stop Sprawl, Save Farms This Time Pledging Action
Pittsburgh Hosts Conference Pushing Development Around Transit Facilities
Littering/Illegal Dumping
PRC Lens On Litter Photo Contest Entries Due Oct. 31
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Oil & Gas
Natural Gas Power Plant In Westmoreland Starts Testing To Go Online In December
Op-Ed: Natural Gas Industry Already Pays Its Fair Share In Taxes - PA Chamber
Letter: PennLive Editorial On Shale Gas Political Contributions Doesn’t Tell Whole Story
Editorial: Fair Natural Gas Tax Closer To Reality
Editorial: Fair Natural Gas Tax Is Closer To Reality
Peoples Gas To Be Acquired By Aqua America Water Company In $4.2 Billion Deal
Litvak: Old Pipes In The Ground Helped Fuel Aqua’s $4.2B Deal For Peoples Gas
Maykuth: Aqua America To Buy Peoples Gas For $4.3 Billion
UGI Gets More Time To Respond To Fatal House Explosion In Lancaster
Litvak: Trump EPA Chief To Oil & Gas Industry: New EPA Will Remove Barriers
Acting EPA Administrator Praises Reduced Regulation At Pittsburgh Shale Gas Conference
Frazier: EPA Head Says Rollbacks Will Keep Environment Clean, Economy Up
This Is What Indigenous Resistance To Fracking Looks Like In PA
Hopey: Water Ceremony Kicks Off Protest Against Shale Gas, Petrochemical Industries
EQT Drilling Shakes Up Executive, Board Leadership Posts
Massachusetts Town Struck By Gas Explosions Still Without Heat As Winter Nears
Intense Fight Over Colorado Oil, Gas Setbacks Could End With National Precedent
Op-Ed: What Trump’s EPA Chief Won’t Tell You At Shale Conference In Pittsburgh
Pipelines
Litvak: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Ruptures, Problems Bring New Scrutiny To PA’s Pockmarked
Geology

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Litvak-Legere: Lessons Of Mariner East 2 Pipeline Construction
A Pipeline, A Protest, And The Battle For Pennsylvania’s Political Soul
PA Order Of Nuns Asks U.S. Supreme Court To Uphold Religious Rights In Pipeline Dispute
Sunoco Expects Mariner East 2 Pipeline To Enter Service In 4th Quarter
Trump Names Chatterjee FERC Chair
Ailing FERC Chair Prompts Trump To Reshuffle Key Energy Commission
Radiation Protection
Cusick: PA So Far Not Joining Rush To Support Struggling Nuclear Plants
Op-Ed: Legislature, Take Action To Save Three Mile Island
Exelon CEO: Carbon Price Preferable To Band-Aid Nuclear Plant Subsidies
Recreation
Leaf Colors Fall Flat
Fiery Fall Foliage Still Missing In Action Across The Mid-Atlantic
6 Gorgeous Philly-Area Hikes Near Breweries
Mountain Areas In Westmoreland, Somerset See First Sign Of Winter
Lifelong Dedication To Volunteering Gives Steve Beals Pride (Chair, Friends Of Prince
Gallitzin State Park)
Money From Keystone Fund Went To Many Lycoming County Improvements
Oct. 26 Take Five Fridays With Pam (She’s Back!), PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Allegheny Commons Park Restoration Digs Up Surprises
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Discovering The Locks, Canals Of The Hidden River- Schuylkill River
Philadelphia Rail Park Expected To Generate Development, Instead A Self-Storage Facility
Column: Behind Opposition, Support Grows For Dirt Bikes In Philly
Op-Ed: Let ‘em Ride! Philly Needs A Bike Park
More Improvements Set For Presque Isle Lighthouse In Erie
Flight 93 Friends Meeting Nov. 3 To Cover Latest Improvements To Memorial
Future Of Federal Land & Water Conservation Fund That Pays For Parks In Limbo
Op-Ed: PA’s Outdoor Spaces At Risk Over Failure To Reauthorize Federal Land & Water
Conservation Fund
Recycling/Waste
Some Of Philly’s Recyclables Are Being Burned, Not Reused
Trash Talk: Bigger Fines, Free Neighborhood Trash Cans In Philly
Lackawanna Recycling Center Charging Municipalities For Yard Waste
Lackawanna Yard Waste Fees For Municipalities Halted
Editorial: Re-Examine Lackawanna County Recycling Center Contract
Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Participate In National Drug Take Back Day
Cut Food Waste, Promote Sustainable Eating, Farming Approaches
Proposed Slate Belt Sludge Treatment Plant To Be Subject Of State Hearing
Scranton Reviews Trash-Fee Structure
Renewable Energy
Northampton Community College To Power 2 Campuses With Wind Energy
Maykuth: DOE Awards Philly $1.25 Million Solar Workforce Grant
Sheep, Solar Panels Keeping Susquehanna University Green
Maykuth: Solar Panel Fight Ends In Triumph For Chester County Man

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Evoke Solar Aiming For Sustainable Growth In Still-Maturing Industry
Advocates Warn New Jersey Solar Market Could Collapse Again
Schuylkill River
DRBC Participates In Announcement Of Schuylkill River Restoration Fund Grants
Stormwater
Franklin County Municipalities Deal With Stormwater Requirements, Cost
Williamsport Authority Stormwater Takeover Could Mean Added Fees
Lansdale Gets Look At Impact Of Stormwater
State: Progress With Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Sustainability
Sustainable Pittsburgh Names New Executive Director: Joylette Portlock
Wastewater Facilities
AP: North Carolina Water/Sewer Authority Hit By Ransomware Attack After Hurricane
Watershed Protection
State: Progress With Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Op-Ed: The Chesapeake Bay’s Environmental Success Story Is In Danger - CBF
Franklin County Municipalities Deal With Stormwater Requirements, Cost
Williamsport Authority Stormwater Takeover Could Mean Added Fees
Lancaster Schools To Enhance Science Programming Thanks To Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Grant
Bay Journal-Morelli: Brunner Island Power Plant Accused Of Illegal Discharges
Lansdale Gets Look At Impact Of Stormwater
Delaware RiverKeeper Files Lawsuit To Protect Tinicum Creek In Bucks County
Delaware RiverKeeper Oct 26 RiverWatch Video Report
Kummer: Group Sues To Block Replacement Of 206-Year Old Bridge In Bucks County
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Frye: Be An Outdoor Mentor To Promote Appreciation For Nature, Wildlife, Adventure
Venesky: Luzerne A Dangerous Place For Injured, Sick Deer
Motorists Cautioned Deer Are More Active
Jet Hits Deer Aborts Takeoff At Williamsport Airport
Game Commission Chronic Wasting Disease Drop Off Locations In Berks County
Schneck: Bald Eagle Nest Cam Likely To Continue Without Game Commission
Steelhead Fisheries Lure Anglers To Erie County
Elk Creek Steelhead Fishery Targeted For Improvements
Fall Trout Making Appearances In Western PA Waters
Fish & Boat Commission Hatchery Trout Spawning In Cumberland County
Frye: Perhaps A State Record Smallmouth Bass
Muncy Boat Launch Project Funding Announced
Sandhill Cranes Spotted In Waterford, Songbirds On The Move
Corps Varies Kinzua Dam Water Release To Study Impacts On Mussels, Fish
Penn State Class Of 2019 Chooses Pollinator Garden Entry Gate As Class Gift

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West Nile/Zika Virus
Crable: West Nile Virus Concerns Prompt Free Tire Collection In Lancaster City

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

Note:​​ DEP ​published the 2018 meeting schedules​ for its advisory committees and boards.

October 27-- ​PA Resources Council​, ​PA American Water​. ​Drug Take-Back Event - 3 Locations
in Allegheny County​. 10:00 to 2:00--
-- Green Tree Borough Building, 10 W. Manila Ave.
-- Medical Rescue Team South, 315 Cypress Way, Mt. Lebanon
-- The Mall At Robinson (parking lot near Dick’s Sporting Goods), 100 Robinson Centre Dr.

October 27--​​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Water Wiser Kids: Stars At Skywood Park
Hike​. Monroe County. 7:30 to 9:00.

October 30--​​ ​DEP Meeting With Potential Contractors On Proposed Mine Drainage Treatment
Site Maintenance Projects In Bedford, Cambria, Indiana, Somerset Counties​. ​DEP’s Cambria
District Mine Office, 286 Industrial Park, Ebensburg, Cambria County. 10:00

October 30--​​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Clear Creek State Forest District​.
District Office, 158 South Second Ave., Clarion, Clarion County. 6:30 to 8:00. ​Click Here​ for
more.

October 30--​​ ​PA Chamber Fall Regional Environmental Conference In King of Prussia​.

October 30-31--​​ ​Northeast Recycling Council Fall Conference​. Sheraton Hartford South Hotel,
Rocky Hill, Connecticut.

October 31--​​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP State Board for Certification of Sewage Enforcement
Officers​ meeting. Conference Room 11B, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Kristen
Szwajkowski, 717-772-2186, ​kszwajkows@pa.gov​.

October 31--​​ ​NEW​. ​DCNR Snowmobile and ATV Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DCNR Contact: Jacob Newton 717-783-3349. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

November 1--​​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ hearing on proposed water withdrawal
permits and other actions (​Click Here​ for agenda). Room 8E-B East Wing, Capitol Building,
Harrisburg. 2:30. SRBC Contact: Ava Stoops, 717-238-0423. ​(f​ ormal notice​) C
​ lick Here​ for
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more.

November 1-- ​DCNR State Forest District Management Plan Meetings​ - ​Loyalsock State Forest
District​, Resource Management Center,, 6735 Route 220, Dushore, Sullivan County. 6:00
to 8:00.

November 1--​​ ​U.S. Green Building Council Central PA Chapter Forever Green Awards
Ceremony.​ Civic Club of Harrisburg.

November 1--​​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Giant Food Store
Community Room, 3301 Trindle Road, Camp Hill, Cumberland County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click
Here​ for more.

November 1--​​ ​Pike County Conservation District Celebrates Natural Resources Annual Dinner.
The Waterfront Room at​ ​Silver Birches Resort​, Lake Wallenpaupack. 6:00 to 8:00.

November 1-2--​​ ​PA Water And Wastewater Technology Summit​. ​Penn Stater Conference
Center Hotel, State College.

November 3--​​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. ​Construction Junction​,


Point Breeze, Allegheny County. 11:00 to 12:30.

November 3--​​ ​Tree Pittsburgh​. ​Free Tree Give Away In Allegheny County​. ​North Park Ice
Rink​, 1200 Pearce Mill Road, Wexford. 10:00 to 2:00.​ ​Click Here to register​.

November 3--​​ ​Hawk Mountain Sanctuary​. ​Golden Eagle, North America’s Largest Bird Of Prey
Program​. ​Sanctuary's Outdoor Amphitheater, Berks County. Noon and 2:00.

November 3--​​ ​Allegheny Land Trust​. ​Project Wet 2.0 Healthy Water, Healthy People Facilitator
Workshop​. ​Millbrook Marsh Nature Center​ in State College, Centre County. 8:00 to 4:00.

November 3-- ​NEW​. ​Clinton County CleanScapes Stewards Run Creek Cleanup, Piatt
Township, Lycoming County​. 9:30 to 1:00.

November 5--​​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​/ Recycling Fund
Advisory Committee Act 101 Workgroup meets. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.
DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713 or send email to: ​lahenry@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)
-- Finalizing recommendations on Act 101 ​Click Here​ for more background.

November 5--​​ ​Penn State Extension Protect Your Springs, Wells, Septic Systems & Cisterns
Workshops (2)​. ​Terre Hill Community Center​, 131 West Main Street, Terre Hill, Lancaster
County . 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00

November 6--​​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. North Park Rose Barn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

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November 6--​​ ​PA Association of Environmental Professionals​, ​Capital Chapter Society of
Women Environmental Professionals​. ​Workshop On Ways Projects Can Avoid Endangered
Indiana Bats​. ​Radisson Hotel​, 1150 Camp Hill Bypass, Camp Hill (across the river from
Harrisburg). 11:30 to 1:30.

November 7--​​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Aggregate Advisory Board​ meeting. 10th Floor Conference
Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Daniel Snowden 717-783-8846 or send
email to: ​dsnowden@pa.gov​.

November 7--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Next
scheduled meeting is March 21. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

November 7-- ​DEP Hearing (If Needed) on RACT II Air Quality Plan for a Tennessee Gas
Pipeline Compressor Station In Howe Township, Forest County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional
Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford County. 9:00

November 7--​​ ​DEP Meeting/Hearing On Proposed NPDES Stormwater Permit For Slate Belt
Heat Recovery Center LLC Biosolids Processing Facility At The Grand Central Landfill In
Plainfield Township, Northampton County​. ​Wind Gap Middle School, 1620 Teels Road, Pen
Argyle. 6:00 to 9:30. ​(S​ ept. 29 PA Bulletin,​ page 6335)

November 7--​​ ​DEP Hearing On Air Quality Permit For ​Slate Belt Heat Recovery Center LLC
Biosolids Processing Facility At The Grand Central Landfill In Plainfield Township,
Northampton County​. Wind Gap Middle School, 1620 Teels Road, Pen Argyle, Northampton
County. 6:00 to 9:00.​ (​Oct. 20 PA Bulletin, page 6671)​

November 7--​​ ​DEP Informational Meeting On Swoyersville Culm Bank Removal Project In
Luzerne County​. ​Swoyersville Hose Company No. 2, 299 Slocum Street, Swoyersville. 6:00 to
9:00.

November 7--​​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Unitarian


Universalist Fellowship of Centre County, 780 Waupelani Drive Ext., State College, Centre
County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Rothrock State Forest District​,
Shaver’s Creek CFD Community Building, 8707 Firemans Park Ln, Petersburg, Huntingdon
County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 8--​​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Weiser State Forest District​,
District Office, 16 Weiser Lane, Aristes, Columbia County. 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 9-- ​DEP Small Water Systems Technical Assistance Center Board​ meeting. Room

79
105 Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. DEP Contact: Dawn Hissner 717-787-9633 or send email to
dhissner@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

November 9--​​ ​Schuylkill Action Network Celebrates 15 Years Of Action​. ​Albright College
Campus Center, 1442 Bern Street, Reading, Berks County.

November 13-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

November 13-- ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
10:00. Contact: Keith Saladar, Executive Director, ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or call 717-787-8171.
[​Note: ​The last meeting of 2018]

November 13--​​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Pinchot State Forest District​.
District Office, 1841 Abington Road, North Abington Township, Lackawanna County. 6:00 to
8:00. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 13--​​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Trinity Point
Church of God, 180 W. Trinity Drive, Clarion, Clarion County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 14--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting.


Rescheduled to November 29. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

November 14--​​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. South Park Buffalo Inn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.

November 14--​​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Collier township
Community Center, 5 Lobaugh Street, Oakdale, Allegheny County . 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here
for more.

November 15-- ​ ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to: ​jmelnic@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

November 15--​​ ​NEW​. ​America Recycles Day​.

November 15--​​ ​Penn State Extension Agricultural Production & Shale Gas Development
Webinar​. 1:00 to 2:00.

November 15-16--​​ ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​, Penn State. ​Northeast Cover
Crops Council Conference​. ​Ramada Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

November 16--​​ ​PA State Assn. Of township Supervisors​.​ PA Stormwater Conference​ [Eastern].

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Montgomery County.

November 17--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Day​. ​Wallenpaupack Environmental


Learning Center​, Hawley, Wayne County.

November 20--​​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 of the Rachel Carson Building. 9:00 a.m. to Noon. ​Click Here​ to pre-register to join the
meeting by webcast. Participants will also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 643 952
548.

November 20--​​ ​South Mountain Partnership Trails Workshop - Building Strong Community
Connections​. ​Shippensburg University​, Cumberland County. 8:30 to 5:00.

November 26--​​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Hearing On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Pipeline Compressor
Station In Jefferson Township, Mercer County​. ​DEP’s Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut
Street in Meadville, Crawford County. 10:00.

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On Karns City Refining RACT II Air Quality Plan,
Butler County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford
County. 9:00

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On Lord Corporation RACT II Air Quality Plan,
Crawford County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford
County. 10:00

November 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Hearing On Bruce Mansfield Power Plant, Little Blue Run Waste
Impoundment NPDES Discharge Permit​. South Side Area School District Middle/High School
Auditorium, 4949 PA State Route 151, Hookstown, Beaver County. 6:00. ​(O​ ct. 27 PA Bulletin
page 6927)​

November 29--​​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

November 29--​​ ​Stroud Water Research Center Water’s Edge Gala - Freshwater Excellence
Award Celebration​. ​Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library​, Winterthur, Delaware.

November 29-- ​Academy Of Natural Sciences of Drexel University​. ​Delaware Watershed


Research Conference​. Academy Offices in Philadelphia.

November 30--​​ ​Gov. Wolf’s PFAS Action Team Public Meeting​. LTBA.

December 1--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Volunteer Training Day​. ​Inn At
Lackawaxen​, 188 Scenic Drive, Lackawaxen, Wayne County. 9:00 to 1:00.

December 4-​​- ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson

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Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

December 4--​​ ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​.

December 5-- ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

December 5-​​- ​DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​ meeting. DEP Laboratory
Building, 2575 Interstate Dr. Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Aaren Alger, 717-346-8212 or
send email to: ​aaalger@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

December 6--​​ ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609, ​mmaddigan@pa.gov​.

December 6--​​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ business meeting on proposed water
withdrawal permits and other actions (​Click Here​ for agenda). Location To Be Announced..
SRBC Contact: Ava Stoops, 717-238-0423. ​(f​ ormal notice)​ C​ lick Here​ for more.

December 6--​​ ​10,000 Friends Of Pennsylvania Commonwealth Awards Dinner​. ​ArtsQuest​,


Bethlehem.

December 7--​​ ​Penn State Extension Understanding Dairy Business For Conservation
Professionals Workshop​. ​Lancaster Farm and Home Center​, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster.
10:00 to 2:00

December 12--​​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

December 12--​​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Fund Advisory Committee
meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713,
lahenry@pa.gov​.

December 12--​​ ​DCNR State Forest District Management Plan Meetings​ - ​Bald Eagle State
Forest​, District Office, 18865 Old Turnpike Road, Millmont, Union County. 6:00 to 8:00.

December 13--​​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)
-- Draft regulations setting methane emission limits for oil and gas operations

December 17--​​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room

82
105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 644 895 237.

December 18-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

January 12--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00,​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 26--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. Noon to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 27-30--​​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

February 2--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

February 12-13--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​.


Dauphin County Agriculture & Natural Resources Center​, 1451 Peters Mountain Road, Dauphin,
Dauphin County.​ ​Click Here to register​.

March 2--​​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 9--​​ ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 27-28--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

April 29 to May 2--​​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 8-10--​​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 16-18--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​. Monroe
County.

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July 24-26-- ​NEW​. ​Professional Recyclers Of PA​. ​Annual Recycling & Organics Conference​.
Harrisburg.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.

Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events

Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule

You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

October 31--​​ ​PA Resources Council Gene Capaldi Lens On Litter Photo Contest
October 31--​​ ​Axalta, Philadelphia Eagles All-Pro Teachers Program
October 31--​​ ​Dept. of Agriculture Spotted Lanternfly Student Calendar Contest
November 9-- ​Chesapeake Bay Land And Water Initiative Grants
November 9--​​ ​POWR/DCNR 2019 River Of The Year
November 15--​​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission Fall Photo Contest
November 16--​​ ​WPC Western PA Canoe, Kayak Access Project Grants
November 16--​​ ​DCNR 2019 PA Trail Of The Year
November 16-- ​PA Housing Finance Agency RFP For Housing Proposals
November 20--​​ ​PA Visitors Bureau Scenic Beauty Photo Contest In 5 Counties
December 1-- ​USDA Rural Community Water Infrastructure Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 14--​​ ​FEMA/PEMA Pre-Disaster & Flood Mitigation Grants
December 15--​​ ​Coldwater Heritage Partnership Grants
December 17--​​ ​Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence
December 17--​​ ​NEW​.​PA Parks & Forests Foundation 2019 Awards
December 21--​​ ​ORSANCO Ohio River Sweep Student Poster Contest
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December 31--​​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants
January 11-- ​PennDOT Green Light-Go Program, LED Light Upgrades
January 25--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 31--​​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
July 15--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
December 16--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​​ ​NEW.​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

The Environmental Quality Board published notice of final regulations updating Radiological
Health regulations in the October 27 PA Bulletin (​page 6791​).

The Environmental Quality Board ​published notice​ in the October 27 PA Bulletin of proposed
regulation changes to meet federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement
program consistency requirements. Public comments are due November 26.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - October 27, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

No new technical guidance was published this week.

Permits ------------

Note:​​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 58 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the October 27 PA Bulletin -
pages 6869 to 6927​.

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The ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ published notices in the October 27 PA Bulletin of
projects approved​ and ​projects rescinded​ for consumptive water uses in September.

Related Tools ----------------------

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
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