GENERAL GUIDELINES

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. This book is to be brought to the class daily. Students are not permitted to attend the class without the identity card, once issued. Students should be well on time right from the first class. Students should keep the Classrooms, Laboratories and Workshops clean. Writing on desks and walls is strictly prohibited, failing which the students will be fined heavily. If the identity of the individual is not established the entire class / students in the block will be fined. Students are advised to show due respect to all faculty regardless of their department and maintain affable personality. Students are to maintain absolute discipline and decorum, so as to promote the fair name of their college in all its activities. Students securing less than 85% attendance in any individual subject will not be allowed to take up the university exams. Students are informed to clarify their doubts in the respective subjects with the faculty by taking prior appointment. Students are to inform their parents that they should follow up the progress of their wards by being in touch with the college authorities at regular intervals. Ragging is punishable under Karnataka Education Act and is strictly prohibited. Any student involved in ragging, will be severely punished. Students who secure less than 60% in the University exam and / or who secure less than 60% in the internal test are to go through the Academic Support programme compulsorily. The guidelines will be issued separately by the concerned department. The suggestion boxes are maintained at strategic places in the campus. Students are to avail these facilities. Students are not supposed to alter the configuration of the system / any software on the system. Students are informed to follow the schedule as given in the calendar of events with respect to seminar work Students are informed to follow the schedule as given in the calendar of events with respect to Project work

13. 14. 15. 16.

SEMESTER - VIII - TIME TABLE
Day / Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 8.15 - 9.15 9.15 - 10.15 10.45 –11.45 11.45-12.45 1.30-2.30 2.30-3.30 3.45-4.45 4.45-5.45

SCHEME OF STUDY AND EXAMINATIONS FOR BE DEGREE COURSE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING
Sl. No Code No. Subject No. of Hr. / week Theory Practical Duration Examination I.A Marks Theory/Pract. Total Marks

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIP81 CS82

CS85 CS86

Constitution of India & Professional Ethics Advanced Computer Architecture Elective – IV (Group – D) Elective – V (Group – E) Project Work Seminar ( Contact Hours Total

04 04 04 04 --16
MARKS TEST 2

---

03 03

25 25 25 25 100 50 250

100 100 100 100 100 -500
ATTENDANCE REPORT 2

125 125 125 125 200 50 750

-03 -03 06 03 --06 15 STUDENT SELF APPRAISAL
TEST 3

SUBJECT Constitution of India & Professional Ethics Advanced Computer Architecture Elective – IV (Group – D) Elective – V (Group – E)

TEST 1

REPORT 1

REPORT 3

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

1

Faculty:
Class # 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

CIP81: CONSTITUTION OF INDIA AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS
Chapter Title / Reference Literature Preamble & Evolution Of Constitutional Law T2 - ChapterScope and Extent of Fundamental Rights, Details of Exercise of Rights, Limitations and Important Cases T2 Chapter-6 Pages : 522-603 Topic to be Covered Preamble to the constitution of India Evolution of constitutional Law Scope of fundamental rights under part - III Extent of fundamental rights under part - III Details of exercise of rights Details of exercise of rights Limitations and Important cases of rights

No. of Hours: 52

% of Portion Covered Reference Chapter Cumulative 5% 5%

17%

22%

Classification of Directive Scope of Directive Relevance Of Directive Principles Of Nature o Economic Democracy Envisaged State Policy Under Part - IV Socialistic pattern of society 42nd and 44th Amendments T1-Chapter-8 Directives and Fundamental Rights - comparison Pages: 721-834 Directives and Fundamental Rights – conflicts Non-Justiciability T2-Chapter-7 Utility of Directives Pages: 604-671 Implementation of Directives Directives in other parts of Constitution Significance of Fundamental DutiesSignificance of Fundamental Duties under part IVa T2 Union Executive - President, Vice President Council of Ministers Union Executive Prime Minister Parliament and Supreme Court of India State Executive - Governor Council of Ministers State Executive Chief Minister Legislature and High Courts Scheduled castes and Tribes Constitutional Provisions For Women and children Special Areas. Backward classes Emergency Powers Emergency Powers, Major Constitutional Amendments Emergency Powers Major constitutional Amendments Elections, Legislatorial powers, Decision of Disputes Electoral Process Amendments, Special Jurisdiction Election Commission Professional Ethics Scope and Aims of Engineering Ethics Moral Problem Solving T3: Chapters – 1, 3, 4 Organizing Principles Concepts of Responsibility Responsibility of Engineers – Impediments to Resp. Reasonable care and Good Works T3: Chapter – 5 Virtues and Impediments to Responsibility Ways of misusing the Truth Honesty, Integrity and Reliability Honesty on Campus T3 Chapter – 6 Integrity with respect to various aspects Conflicts of interest The codes and Engineering Practice Estimating Risks Risk Safety and Liability in Acceptable Risks Engineering Engineer’s Liability for Risks T3 Chapter – 7 Becoming a responsible engineer regarding Risk Honesty, Integrity and Reliability

17%

39%

5%

44%

7%

51%

7%

58%

7%

65%

7%

72%

5%

77%

5%

82%

5%

87%

7%

94%

6%

100%

Literature:
Book Type
Text Books Text Books Text Books Reference Books Reference Books Reference Books Reference Books

Code
T1 T2 T3 R1 R2 R3 R4

Title & Author
An Introduction to constitution of India (Students Ed), Durga Das Basu, Constitution of India, V.N.Shukla Engineering Ethics by Charles E Harris, Michael S Pritchard and M. J Robins Introduction to constitution of India, M.V. Pylee Ethics in Engineering by Mike W martin and Roland Schinzinger Introduction to Engineering Ethics by Roland Schinzinger and Mike W martin Introduction to constitution of India by Brij Kishore Sharma

Edition
19th / 20th Latest 2nd

Publication Info Publisher
PHI Thompson Asia Vikas

Year
2001 03-08-05 2002 2002 2002

PHI

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

2

OBJECTIVE OF THE SUBJECT: According to its constitution, India is a "sovereign, socialist, secular, democratic republic." India has a federal form of government. However, the central government in India has greater power in relation to its states, and its central government is patterned after the British parliamentary system. India's independent judicial system began under the British, and its concepts and procedures resemble those of Anglo-Saxon countries. The first nine chapters of the course focus on the main features of Constitution of India. The last four chapters focus on the ethical dimensions of engineering practice. Engineers play a vital role in protecting and assisting the public and this requires imagination, persistence and a string sense of responsibility. Personal ethics is a foundation for professional ethics. The importance and the different ways of developing it is given under these sections.

QUESTION BANK PREAMBLE OF CONSTITUTION OF INDIA AND EVOLUTION OF CONSTITUTION LAW

OBJECTIVE: The preamble summarizes the aims and objects of constitution. The purposes are • Source from which the Constitution derives its authority • Objects which the Constitution seek to establish and promote 1. 2. 3. 4. The preamble summarizes A. Aims B. Objects C. Both D. Amendments The purpose of preamble to our Constitution is A. Source of Constitution’s authority B. Stating Objects C. Both D. Representing Amendments The importance of preamble is pointed out in several decisions of our A. Parliament B. High Court C. Supreme Court D. All the above Pandit Nehru’s resolution is fully reflected in A. Constitution of India B. Preamble C. Both D. None of the above 2 2 2 2

OBJECTIVE: The Fundamental Rights embodied in the Indian constitution are guaranteed to all Indian citizens. These civil liberties take precedence over any other law of the land. They include individual rights common to most liberal democracies, such as equality before the law, freedom of speech and expression, freedom of association and peaceful assembly, freedom of religion, and the right to constitutional remedies for the protection of civil rights such as habeas corpus. In addition, the Fundamental Rights for Indians are aimed at overturning the inequities of past social practices. They abolish "untouchability"; prohibit discrimination on the grounds of religion, race, caste, sex, or place of birth; and forbid traffic in human beings and forced labor. They go beyond conventional civil liberties in protecting cultural and educational rights of minorities by ensuring that minorities may preserve their distinctive languages and establish and administer their own education institutions. 5. 6. 7. 8. Fundamental rights protects our A. Equality B. Liberty C. Both D. None The fundamental rights has been embodied under ------------- of Constitution of India A. Part I B. Part II C. Part III D. Part IV Fundamental Rights act as limitation upon A. Powers of Executive B. Powers of Legislature C. Both D. None In case of any transgression regarding our Constitution, ------------- is (are)
th

FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF INDIAN CITIZENS

2 2 2 2
3

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8

Semester CS

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

competent to declare a law unconstitutional. A. High Court B. Supreme Court C. both D. None Our Constitution follows A. American model B. English Model C. Mixed D. None The powers of Judiciary vis-à-vis the Legislature are weaker in A. United States B. British C. India D. All the above Which of these is not a fundamental right? A. Right against Exploitation B. Right of property C. Right to freedom of religion D. All the above The Constitution of India originally classified Fundamental Rights under A. 5 groups B. 6 groups C. 7 groups D. 8 groups Currently the Constitution of India has Fundamental Rights under A. 5 groups B. 6 groups C. 7 groups D. 8 groups With respect to Constitution of India, the right “Equality before Law” is available for A. only Citizens of India B. Only foreigners C. Both D. only Hindus

2 2 2 2 2 2

OBJECTIVE: An important feature of the constitution is the Directive Principles of State Policy. Although the Directive Principles are asserted to be "fundamental in the governance of the country," they are not legally enforceable. Instead, they are guidelines for creating a social order characterized by social, economic, and political justice, liberty, equality, and fraternity as enunciated in the constitution's preamble. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Which part of the Constitution of India contains the Directive Principles of State Policy? A. part I B. Part II C. Part III D. Part IV Who is responsible for administration and making of Directive principles of State Policy? A. The President B. The Central C. The State D. The people The Directives are not enforceable in court A. True B. False C. Not under emergency D. cannot say The Directives are implemented by Legislature A. True B. False C. Not under emergency D. cannot say It shall be the duty of the state to apply these principles in making laws A. True B. False C. Only under emergency D. cannot say 2 2 2 2 2

RELEVANCE OF DIRECTIVE PRINCIPLES OF STATE POLICY:

SIGNIFICANCE OF FUNDAMENTAL DUTIES

OBJECTIVE: The Fundamental rights have been provided at the cost of some fundamental duties. These are considered as the duties that must be and should be performed by every citizen of India. These fundamental duties are defined as: It shall be the duty of every citizens of India: • To abide by the Constitution and respect its ideals and institutions, the National Flag and the National Anthem; • To cherish and follow the noble ideals which inspired our national struggle for freedom; • To uphold and protect the sovereignty, unity and integrity of India; • To defend the country and render national service when called upon to do so; • To promote harmony and the spirit of common brotherhood amongst all the people of India transcending religious, linguistic and regional or sectional diversities; to renounce practices derogatory to the dignity of women; • To value and preserve the rich heritage of our composite culture; • To protect and improve the natural environment including forests, lakes, rivers and wild life, and to have compassion for living creatures; • To develop the scientific temper, humanism and the spirit of inquiry and reform; • To safeguard public property and to abjure violence;
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 4

• 20. 21. 22.

To strive towards excellence in all spheres of individual and collective activity so that the nation constantly rises to higher levels of Endeavour and achievement. 2 2 2

23.

24. 25.

How many are the fundamental duties A. 10 B. 20 C. 35 D. 46 There is no provision in the Constitution of India for direct enforcement of any Duties A. True B. False C. Not common for all duties D. President can The fundamental duties include which of the following? A. To abide by the Constitution of India B. To cherish the noble ideas which inspired the struggle or freedom C. To defend the country D. All the above Which of the following is not a fundamental duty? A. to protect the sovereignty B. to preserve the rich heritage of our composite culture C. to protect and improve the natural environments D. none of the above To safe guard one’s public property is his A. fundamental right B. fundamental duty C. both D. cannot say Hindu religion developed resilience to accommodate with tolerance the cultural richness and it is called as A. secularity B. sovereignty C. composite culture D. none of the above

2

2 2

UNION EXECUTIVE

OBJECTIVE: The Union Executive consists of the President, the Vice-President and Council of Ministers with the Prime Minister at the head to aid and advise the President. The government exercises its broad administrative powers in the name of the president, whose duties are largely ceremonial. The president and vice president are elected indirectly for 5-year terms by a special electoral college. Their terms are staggered, and the vice president does not automatically become president following the death or removal from office of the president. Real national executive power is centered in the Council of Ministers (cabinet), led by the prime minister. The president appoints the prime minister, who is designated by legislators of the political party or coalition commanding a parliamentary majority. The president then appoints subordinate ministers on the advice of the prime minister. The legislatures of the states and union territories elect 233 members to the Rajya Sabha, and the president appoints another 12. The elected members of the Rajya Sabha serve 6-year terms, with one-third up for election every 2 years. The Lok Sabha consists of 545 members; 543 are directly elected to 5-year terms. The other two are appointed. The Supreme Court consists of a chief justice and 25 other justices, all appointed by the president on the advice of the prime minister. 26. Electoral college consists of A. Elected members of both houses of Parliament B. Elected members of legislative assemblies of States C. Elected members of Legislative assemblies of Union Territories of Delhi and Pondicherry D. All the above Who among the following is disqualified for election as President? A. President of Union B. Governor of any State C. Minister of Union D. None The President shall hold the position of A. Member of Parliament B. Member of Legislature C. Any other profitable office D. None
5

2

27. 28.

2 2

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38.

A vacancy on the office of President may be due to A. Expiry of term B. By his resignation C. Removal by impeachment D. any of the above The vice president’s election does not involve A. Lok Sabha B. Rajya Sabha C. State Legislature D. All the above Who is the head of council of ministers? A. President B. Vice- president C. Prime Minister D. Governor The powers vested with the President are A. Administrative powers B. Military powers C. Legislative powers D. All the above Judicial powers include A. granting of pardons B. granting of reprieves C. Both D. None Who has the power to summon (Like English crown) the parliament? A. President B. Vice-president C. Both D. The People The President has powers to nominate certain members to both the houses. A. True B. False C. Only under emergency D. cannot say The Prime Minister is selected by A. President B. Vice-president C. The ministers D. The People It is possible to appoint a person outside the legislature as minister A. True B. False C. Only under emergency D. cannot say The resignation of Prime Minister A. Merely creates a vacancy B. Dissolves the cabinet C. Dissolves the Government D. All the above

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

STATE EXECUTIVE

OBJECTIVE: India has 25 states and 7 union territories. At the state level, some of the legislatures are bicameral, patterned after the two houses of the national parliament. The states' chief ministers are responsible to the legislatures in the same way the prime minister is responsible to parliament. Each state also has a presidentially appointed governor who may assume certain broad powers when directed by the central government. The central government exerts greater control over the union territories than over the states, although some territories have gained more power to administer their own affairs. Local governments in India have less autonomy than their counterparts in the United States. Some states are trying to revitalize the traditional village councils, or panchayats, which aim to promote popular democratic participation at the village level, where much of the population still lives. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. The head of executive power of state is A. President B. Vice President C. Governor D. Chief Minister Single person can be appointed as Governor for 2 or more states A. True B. False C. Only under emergency D. cannot say The Governor is A. elected by people B. Selected by cabinet ministers C. Appointed by President D. Any one of above The governor doesn’t have A. Executive powers B. Military powers C. Legislative powers D. All the above The head of state council of ministers is A. President B. Vice President C. Governor D. Chief Minister Governor will be under the control of President A. True B. False C. Only under emergency D. cannot say The governor can dismiss the chief minister at his pleasure A. True B. False C. Only under emergency D. cannot say The post of Advocate-General is corresponding to A. Vice-president B. Attorney – General C. Governor D. High court Judge
6

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

47.

5/6 of total number of members of state council shall be directly elected and 1/6 will be nominate by A. President B. Prime Minister C. Governor D. Chief Minister

2

OBJECTIVE: Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes are communities that are accorded special status by the Constitution of India. These communities were considered 'outcastes' and were excluded from the Chaturvarna system that was the social superstructure of Hindu society in the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years. These castes and tribes have traditionally been relegated to the most menial labor with no possibility of upward mobility, and are subject to extensive social disadvantage and discrimination, in comparison to the wider community. Under article 51A(e) it is the fundamental duty of every citizen of India to renounce practices derogatory to the dignity of women. In addition, the State must make provision for securing just and humane conditions of work and for maternity relief. Panchayati Raj Institutions are local government bodies established under the Constitution. Under article 243D, one-third of seats reserved for Scheduled Castes Tribes, are reserved for women, and one-third (including the number of seats reserved for women belonging to the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes) of the total number of seats to be filled by direct election in every Panchayat are reserved for women. There are proposals to reserve seats for women in the House of the People and in the Legislative Assemblies of the States by amending the Constitution. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. The Scheduled Areas doesn’t include A. Assam B. Tripura C. Meghalaya D. All the above The power to declare any area as ‘Scheduled Area’ in any state is given to A. President B. Prime Minister C. Governor D. Chief Minister of that state The tribal areas include the areas in the state A. Assam B. Tripura C. Meghalaya D. All the above Who can make regulations to restrict the transfer of land related to members of Scheduled Tribes A. President B. Prime Minister C. Governor D. Chief Minister of that state Who appoints the commission to report on the welfare of Scheduled areas A. President B. Prime Minister C. Governor D. Chief Minister of that state 2 2 2 2 2

CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS FOR SPECIAL AREAS

OBJECTIVE: NATIONAL EMERGENCY ART 352 (1) If the President is satisfied that a grave emergency exists whereby the security of India or any part of the territory thereof is threatened, whether by war or external aggression or armed rebellion, he may, by Proclamation, make a declaration to that effect, in respect of the whole or such part of the territory thereof........., ART 353 While a Proclamation of emergency is in operation, then not withstanding anything in this Constitution, the executive power of the Union shall extend to the giving of directions to any State as to the manner in which the executive power thereof is to be exercised. STATE: ART 356 If the President on a receipt of report from the Governor of a state or is otherwise satisfied that a situation has arisen in which the government of a state cannot be carried on in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution, the President may by Proclamation a. assume to himself all or any of the functions of the government of the state or any body or authority in the state except the powers of the legislature. b. declare that the powers of the legislature shall be exercisable by the Parliament, Provided nothing in this Art authorizes the President to assume to himself any of the powers vested in the High Court. The Proclamation shall be in operation for a period of 6 months.
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 7

EMERGENCY POWERS, MAJOR CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

53. 54. 55.

56.

57. 58.

Which is not an emergency situation? A. War B. Failure of constitutional machinery in states C. Financial emergency D. none of the above Existence of a condition in which an area is threatened by war or external aggression or armed rebellion is known as A. Emergency B. Election C. both D. None of above Under a proclamation of emergency in case of constitutional machinery, A. State legislature would continue to operate B. State legislature would be suspended C. State legislature is not related D. None of the above Under a proclamation of emergency A. Centre shall suspend State Government B. Centre cannot suspend State government C. Both Central and State Governments are suspended D. None of the above The duration for proclamation of emergency shall ordinarily be for A. 15 days B. One month C. 2 Months D. Not defined The maximum duration of extension of a proclamation is A. One month B. 2 Months C. One year D. Not defined

2 2 2

2

2 2

ELECTORAL PROCESS

OBJECTIVE: The Constitution of India has vested in the Election Commission of India the superintendence, direction and control of the entire process for conduct of elections to Parliament and Legislature of every State and to the offices of President and Vice-President of India. The Election Commission - Election Commission of India is a permanent Constitutional Body. The Election Commission was established in accordance with the Constitution on 25th January 1950. The Commission celebrated its Golden Jubilee in 2001. Originally the commission had only a Chief Election Commissioner. It currently consists of Chief Election Commissioner and two Election Commissioners; it had only the Chief Election Commissioner before 1989. The concept of multi-member Commission has been in operation since 1993, with decision making power by majority vote. Electoral Laws & System - Elections are conducted according to the constitutional provisions, supplemented by laws made by Parliament. The major laws are Representation of the People Act, 1950, which mainly deals with the preparation and revision of electoral rolls, the Representation of the People Act, 1951 which deals, in detail, with all aspects of conduct of elections and post election disputes. The Supreme Court of India has held that where the enacted laws are silent or make insufficient provision to deal with a given situation in the conduct of elections, the Election Commission has the residuary powers under the Constitution to act in an appropriate manner. Appointment & Tenure of Commissioners - The President appoints Chief Election Commissioner and Election Commissioners. They have tenure of six years, or up to the age of 65 years, whichever is earlier. They enjoy the same status and receive salary and perks as available to Judges of the Supreme Court of India. The Chief Election Commissioner can be removed from office only through impeachment by Parliament. 59. There shall be ---------- number of electoral roll(s) for every territorial constituency for 2 election A. 2 ( One for Parliament and one for State Legislature B. only one C. One for each community D. One for each party
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 8

60. 61.

62. 63.

64. 65.

For Adult suffrage basis, essential conditions are A. Citizenship B. Above 18 years of age C. no disqualifications by any law D. All the above Proportional representation has been prescribed for election to office of A. President B. Vice president C. Both D. None The supervision of entire election process is given to A. Parliament B. respective state legislatures C. Election commission D. All the above The provision for removal of ------------- makes Election commission , independent of executive control A. Control by High Court B. Control by President C. Election commissioner D. All the above The regional commissioners are appointed by A. President B. Election Commissioner C. Election commission D. Any of the above With regards to election disputes, questions can be agitated by A. Rising questions in Houses B. Filing case in High Court C. Filing case in Supreme Court D. Election Petition

2 2

2 2

2 2

SCOPE AND AIMS OF ENGINEERING ETHICS

OBJECTIVE: Professional ethics is the set of standard adopted by professionals insofar as they see themselves acting as professionals. It is the set of one’s own ethical commitments, usually given in early home or religious training and often modified by later reflection. Aims of engineering ethics are as follows: • Stimulating the moral imagination • Recognizing ethical issues • Developing analytical skills • Eliciting a sense of responsibility • Tolerating disagreement and ambiguity

66. 67.

68. 69.

70. 71. 72.

Engineering ethics is a type of A. Personal Ethics B. Professional Ethics C. Both D. Common morality The set of own ethical commitments, usually given in early home and modified by later reflection is A. Personal Ethics B. Professional Ethics C. Engineering ethics D. Common morality The set of moral ideas shared by most of a culture or society is termed as A. Personal Ethics B. Professional Ethics C. Engineering ethics D. Common morality An engineer refuses to design military hardware as he believes war is immoral. This refusal is based on A. Personal Ethics B. Professional Ethics C. Both D. Common morality A civil engineer refuses to design a project he believes will be contrary to the principles of sustainable development. This refusal could be based on A. Personal Ethics B. Professional Ethics C. Common morality D. All the above An engineer insists on complete honesty in the reporting of technical information to his client. This insistence could be based on A. Personal Ethics B. Professional Ethics C. Common morality D. All the above A professional codes of ethics should be followed by A. MNCs B. Educational Institutes C. Government Offices D. All the above
9

2 2

2 2

2 2 2

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

73. 74.

75. 76. 77.

78. 79.

80.

An implicit agreement among the professionals and between professionals and public is called as A. Code of Ethics B. International Standards C. Common morality D. All the above Professional ethics provides A. A focus for debate on how professional ethics should be modified B. A rationale for professionals to adhere to professional standards under any pressure C. A common agreed upon standards for professional conduct D. All the above A way to resolve values that comes as close as possible to satisfying all relevant obligations is A. Line Drawing B. Creative middle way C. Both D. None Cases that are uncontroversially wrong are A. Positive paradigm cases B. Negative paradigm cases C. Middle way D. All the above In evaluating moral problem, we can take the stand point of A. An agent actually immersed in the situation B. An external judge C. Both D. Should not image a different stand point What favors bringing about the greatest total amount of good that we can. A. Code of Ethics B. International Standards C. Common morality D. Utilitarian thinking What is the duty corresponding to this “ I have right not to be cheated” A. My duty to see that no body cheats me B. Others have a duty not to cheat me C. Both D. None of the above With respect to problem of conflicting rights, is it right when a plant manager attempt to save money b y emitting a pollutant that is highly carcinogenic? A. Yes B. No C. May be D. Cant say

2 2

2 2 2

2 2

2

OBJECTIVE: Responsibility is attributed to persons in both law and morality. In regard to responsibility for causing harm, we distinguish as • Intentionally caused harm • Negligently caused harm • Recklessly caused harm Reasonable care: The idea has moral basis, regardless of how it gets played out in courts of law. The third concept of responsibility is “Good Work” The responsibility can include virtues that go beyond fulfilling basic duties. Impediments: • Self-Interest • Fear • Self-Deception • Ignorance • Egocentric Tendencies • Microscopic vision • Uncritical Acceptance of Authority • Group Think

RESPONSIBILITY OF ENGINEERS

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

10

81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90.

Responsibility is A. Fictional B. Instructive C. Both D. cannot say Intentionally, negligently and recklessly are the classification of A. Causing harm B. Accepting Duties. C. Cheating others D. All the above The area of Law where there is no attribution of fault or blame, but should have a legal responsibility to provide compensation is termed as A. Strict Liability B. Personal Ethics C. Common morality D. All the above A kind of negativity and exclusivity is given to responsibility by A. Code of Ethics B. International Standards C. Reasonable Care D. Minimalist view “Stay out of trouble” is the concern of A. Code of Ethics B. International Standards C. Reasonable Care D. Minimalist view The expression “above and beyond the call of duty” stands for A. Good works B. International Standards C. Reasonable Care D. Minimalist view Good works may be discouraged by A. Need to meet tight time schedules B. Limited budgets C. Press of other matters at hand D. All above Virtues normally include A. Attitudes and dispositions B. Conduct C. Moral Character D. All the above The obstacle for engineering responsibility is A. Self-interest B. Punctuality C. Patriotism D. All the above A strict adherence to minimalist view may result in A. Avoidable harms B. Over emphasis on attributing blame C. Both D. None

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

HONESTY, INTEGRITY AND RELIABILITY

OBJECTIVE: Engineering codes require engineers to be honest and impartial in their professional judgments. On the way of misusing the truth along with lying and deliberate deception, engineers can withhold the truth, fail to adequately promote dissemination of information, fail to seek out the truth, reveal confidential or proprietary information and allow their judgment to be corrupted. Integrity in expert testimony requires engineers to take cases only when they have adequate time for preparation. A conflict of interest exists for professional when acting in a professional role, they are subject to influences, loyalties, temptations or other interests that tend to make the professional’s judgment less likely to benefit the customer or client. 91. 92. 93. A tendency of individual members toward ---------------- results from a desire not to “rock the boat” A. Illusion of morality B. Self-censorship C. Illusion of unanimity D. Mind guarding An inherent morality of the group and thereby discouraging careful examination of the moral implications of its activities is termed as A. Illusion of morality B. Self-censorship C. Illusion of unanimity D. Mind guarding The act of protecting the group from dissenting views by preventing their introduction is call A. Illusion of morality B. Self-censorship C. Illusion of unanimity D. Mind guarding What is construing silence of a group member as Consent called? A. Illusion of morality B. Self-censorship C. Illusion of unanimity D. Mind guarding
11

2 2 2

94.

2

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

95.

96. 97.

98.

99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106.

107.

Direct pressure in groupthink means A. Protecting the group from dissenting views B. Pressure exercised by the group leader on those who show signs of dosagreement C. Construing silence of a group member as Consent D. An inherent morality of the group Symptoms of group think includes A. rationalizations B. Mind-guarding C. Direct pressure D. All the above A honest engineer is one who A. avoids dishonesty B. is committed to find the truth C. adequately promotes the dissemination of information D. all the above one can misuse the truth by A. Lying B. disclosing truth in appropriate circumstances C. withholding information D. all the above The process of smoothing the irregularities to make the data look extremely accurate and precise is called as A. cooking B. trimming C. forging D. plagiarism The process of retaining only those results that fit the theory and discarding others is called as A. cooking B. trimming C. forging D. plagiarism The process of inventing some or all of the research data that are reported is called as A. cooking B. trimming C. forging D. plagiarism The sue of intellectual property of others without proper permission or credit is called as A. cooking B. trimming C. forging D. plagiarism The documents issued by the government that allow the owner to exclude others from making use of the particular information for 20 years from the date of filling is known as A. trademarks B. copyrights C. Patents D. all the above The right to creative products that protect only the expression of idea, but not the ideas themselves is known as A. trademarks B. copyrights C. Patents D. all the above The words, phrase, symbols, sounds or designs associated with goods or services are known as A. trademarks B. copyrights C. Patents D. all the above “Engineers shall not attempt to attract an engineer from another employer by false or misleading pretenses” – this case come under A. Code of Ethics B. International Standards C. Common morality D. Professional Obligations An engineer can abuse client-professional confidentiality by A. breaking confidentiality when it is not warranted B. refusing to break confidentiality when higher obligation to public requires it C. both D. None

2

2 2

2

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

2

OBJECTIVE: Although fictional, this is instructive. What engineers do matters a great deal? Accidents are costly for us, for the environment and for the organization. Engineering codes require engineers to hold paramount the safety, health and welfare of the public. They have to protect the public from unacceptable risks. Balancing the protection of individuals against the promotion of the public welfare poses one of the most difficult problems for those responsible for managing risk.
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 12

RISK SAFETY AND LIABILITY IN ENGINEERING

108. 109. 110. 111. 112. 113. 114.

115.

The diagram of possible ways in which a malfunction or accident occurs is called as A. performance chart B. Risk chart C. Fault tree D. Risk Tree In ----------, we begin with an undesirable event, then moving further to determine what might have led to the event A. performance chart B. Risk chart C. Fault tree D. Event tree In ----------, we begin with an initial event and reason forward to a state of the system to which the event can lead A. performance chart B. Risk chart C. Fault tree D. Event tree Normal accidents include A. tight coupling B. Complex interactions C. Both D. None Processes that are connected in such a way that one is known to affect another within a short time is A. Tightly coupled processes B. complexly interactive C. Both D. None Parts of the system can interact in unanticipated ways. These processes are called A. Tightly coupled processes B. complexly interactive C. Both D. None The phenomenon of allowing increasing number of deviations from proper standards of safety is called A. tight coupling B. Complex interactions C. normalization of deviance D. All the above When the risk of harm is equaled by the probability of producing benefit, given the options available, the risk is termed as A. Risk of Benefit B. Acceptable risk C. Favorable risk D. Justifiable risk Marks 2 No. of Questions 115

2 2 2 2 2 2 2

2

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

13

ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Faculty: Class # 1,2,3 4,5 6 7,,8 9,10 11,12 13,14 15,16 17,18 19 20 21,22, 23 24,25, 26 27,28 29,30 31,32, 33 34,35, 36 37,38 39,40, 41 42,43 44,45, 46 47,48, 49 50,51, 52 Chapter Title/ Reference Literature Chapter #1: Parallel Computer Models T1: Page # 1 to 32. Chapter # 2: Program and Network Properties T2: Page# 51 to 96 Chapter # 3: Processors and Memory Technologies T1: Page # 157 to 188, 213 to 224, 239 to 248 Chapter # 4: Pipelining and Superscalar Techniques T1: Page # 265 to 308. Topics to be covered Parallel Computer Models: The state of computing Multiprocessors and Multicomputers Multivector and SIMD computers Program and Network Properties: Conditions Of Parallelism Program Partitioning and Scheduling Program Flow Mechanisms System Interconnect Architecture Processor and Memory Technologies: Advanced Processor Technology Superscalar and vector processor Backplane Bus System Shared Memory Organizations Pipelining and Superscalar Techniques Linear Pipeline Processors Non-linear Pipeline Processors Instruction Pipeline Design Arithmetic Pipeline Design Multiprocessor and Multi-computers Multiprocessor System Interconnects Cache Coherence and Synchronization Mechanisms Message Passing Schemes Parallel Programs Parallel Application Case Studies The Parallelization Process Parallelization of an Example Program Chapter # 7: Scalable Multiprocessors T1: Page # 453 to 486 Scalable Multiprocessors Scalability Realizing Programming Model 9.00% 100.00% 12.00% 91.00% 15.00% 79.00% 22.00% 64.00% No. of Hours: 52 % of portions covered Reference Cumulative Chapter 11.00% 11.00%

17.00%

28.00%

14.00%

42.00%

Chapter # 5: Multiprocessor and Multi-computers T1: Page # 331 to 368, 375 to 393.

Chapter # 6: Parallel Programs T2: Page # 75 to 121

Literature:
Book Type Text Book Text Book Reference Book Reference Book Code T1 T2 R1 R2 Title and Author Advanced Computer Architecture by Kai Hwang Parallel Computer Architecture by David E. Culler, Jaswinder Pal Singh, Anoop Gupta Computer Architecture and Organization by John P Hayes Parallel computers-Architecture and Programming by V Rajaraman, c Siva Ram Murthy Publication Specification Edition 1st 3rd Publication Tata McGraw-Hill Morgan Kaufmann Publishers McGraw-Hill Prentice Hall India Year 2001 1999 1998 2000

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

14

QUESTION BANK
OBJECTIVE: In this chapter, we model physical architectures of parallel computers, vector super computers, multicomputers, and massively parallel processors. Parallel processing has emerged as a key enabling technology in modern computers, driven by the ever-increasing demand for higher performance, lower costs, and sustained productivity in real life applications. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Explain computer development milestones. Explain elements of modern computers. Explain evolution of computer architecture. Write a note on implicit and explicit parallelism. Explain shared memory multiprocessors. Explain UMA & NUMA model. Explain COMA model. Write a note on Distributed-Memory Multicomputers. Explain data parallel processing. Write a note on vector supercomputers. Explain SIMD supercomputers. What are the fundamental design issues? Explain in detail. What is parallel computer? Discuss the need of parallel architecture. Differentiate among the following architectural classifications: a. SISD b. SIMD c. MISD and d. MIMD. Discuss the evolution of parallel computing from i) Technology point of view and ii) application point of view. 10 10 10 06 10 10 10 08 10 10 10 14 10 06 10

PARALLEL COMPUTER MODELS

PROGRAM AND NETWORK PROPERTIES

OBJECTIVE: This chapter covers fundamental properties of program behavior and introduces interconnection networks. Interconnection architectures introduced include static and dynamic networks. Network complexity, communication bandwidth, and data-routing capabilities are discussed. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Explain conditions of parallelism. What is data dependence in programs? What is control dependence? What is resource dependence? Explain hardware and software parallelism. Write a short note on role of compilers. Explain parallelism levels. What is grain size? Write a note on program partitioning. Explain the grain size problem. Explain node duplication. Explain program flow mechanisms. Write a note on control flow versus data flow. Write a note on task initiation diagram. Explain control dependencies. Explain data dependencies. Explain system interconnect architectures. Explain static connection networks. Write a note on network properties and routing. Define the following terms: a) Latency b) latency sequence c) average latency d) forbidden latency. Explain dynamic connection networks.
15

10 05 05 05 10 05 10 05 05 08 10 10 10 05 10 10 10 10 10 06 10

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

PROCESSOR AND MEMORY HIERARCHY

OBJECTIVE: This chapter presents modern processor technology and the supporting memory hierarchy. We begin with a study of instruction-set architectures including CISC and RISC, and we consider typical superscalar, VLIW, superpipelined, and vector processors. The third section covers memory hierarchy and capacity planning, and the final section introduces virtual memory, address translation mechanisms, and page replacement methods. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. Write a note on design space of processors. Write a note on instruction pipelines. Explain the concepts of multiprocessor simulation. Explain processors and coprocessors. Explain Instruction-set architectures. Briefly explain CISC scalar processors. Briefly explain RISC scalar processors. Explain the basic measures of multiprocessor performance. Write a note on superscalar processors. Explain VLIW architecture. Explain Vector processors. Explain Symbolic processors. Explain characteristics of symbolic processing. Explain hierarchical memory technology. Explain backplane bus specification. Write a note on addressing and timing protocols. Explain arbitration, transaction, and interrupt. Write a note on IEEE future bus+ standards. Write a note on memory interleaving. Write a note on pipelined memory access. Explain fault tolerance. Explain memory bandwidth. Explain memory allocation schemes. Write a note on redundancy for fault tolerance. 10 05 05 05 05 10 10 10 05 12 10 10 10 08 10 08 10 04 10 10 05 05 05 05

OBJECTIVE: This chapter deals with advanced pipelining and superscalar design in processor development. We begin with conventional linear pipelines and analyze their performance. A generalized pipeline model is introduced to include nonlinear interstage connections. Collisionfree scheduling techniques are described for performing dynamic functions. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. Write a note on linear pipeline processor. Explain synchronous and asynchronous models. Explain clocking and timing control. Write a note on speedup factor, efficiency, and throughput. Explain nonlinear pipeline processors. Explain latency analysis. Explain collision-free scheduling. Explain pipeline schedule optimization. What is greedy cycle? Explain instruction pipeline design. What are the mechanisms for instruction pipeline? Explain hazard avoidance. Explain dynamic instruction scheduling. Explain branch handling techniques. Explain branch prediction. Explain arithmetic pipeline design. Write a note on computer arithmetic principles.
16

PIPELINING AND SUPERSCALAR TECHNIQUES

10 10 10 05 05 10 10 10 05 10 10 10 10 10 06 10 10

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

78. 79. 80.

Write a note on static arithmetic pipelines. Explain multifunctional arithmetic pipelines. What are pipeline design parameters?

10 10 10

MULTIPROCESSORS AND MULTICOMPUTERS

OBJECTIVE: In this chapter, we study system architectures of multiprocessors and multicomputers. Various cache coherence protocols, synchronization methods, crossbar switches, multiport memory, and multistage networks are described for building multiprocessor systems. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. Discuss network characteristics. Explain hierarchical bus systems. Explain crossbar switch and multiport memory. Write a note on crosspoint switch design. What are switches? Explain briefly multistage and combining networks. Explain hot-spot problem. What is cache coherence problem? What are snoopy bus protocols? Explain directory-based protocols. What are hardware synchronization mechanisms? What are message-routing schemes? Write a note on routing. Write a note on routing mechanisms. Explain wormhole routing. Explain deadlocks. Discuss about virtual channels. Write a not on deadlock avoidance. Explain packet collision resolution. Explain adaptive routing. What is dimension-order routing? Explain multicast routing algorithms. Explain network partitioning. 05 10 10 10 10 05 04 10 10 10 10 10 05 10 08 10 10 10 10 10 05 10 10

OBJECTIVE: In this chapter we learn about the various case studies of parallel application. We also get to know about the steps involved in the parallelization process like decomposition of the computation into tasks, assignment of tasks to processes, orchestration of the necessary data access, communication, and synchronization among processes, mapping of processes to processors. 104. Explain different parallel application case studies. 105. What are the goals of parallelization process? 106. Explain the terms: a) Task b) Process c) Processor. 107. Explain the Equation solver Kernel. 108. Explain the different steps involved in creating a parallel program. 109. Considering the problem of simulating the ocean current, Explain how concurrency can be identified in a typical program? 110. Develop a pseudo code for the parallel equation solver kernel. 111. Explain the orchestration under data parallel model. 112. Explain assignment for the parallel equation solver. 113. Explain the orchestration under the shared address space model. 114. Explain the orchestration under the message passing model taking equation solver as an example. 115. A job is given to you and you have been asked to convert a given sequential execution
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 17

PARALLEL PROGRAMS

14 10 06 10 10 06 10 10 10 10 10 10

of a program into a parallel program. Identify the steps involved in the above problem and explain each step in detail. 116. Explain in brief what is meant by orchestration under data parallel model? Develop a pseudo code for the above problem and explain how data assignment, decomposition and parallelism lead to good load balance across processes in such an application. Include adequate comments in your pseudo code. 117. In a super market, vendors would be interested in extracting the information on the item-sets, the customers frequently purchase. Using the large database, indicating the set of items purchased by the customers in each purchase transaction, show how the information of recently purchased item sets could be obtained. Explain the parallelism that exists in the process. 118. Explain red-black ordering technique of decomposition for equation solver kernel.

10

10

06

OBJECTIVE : In this chapter we learn the hardware organization and architecture (scalable to L / VL configurations), how the programming models are realized in terms of network transactions, spectrum of important design points organized according to the level of direct hardware interpretation of the network transaction. We will also know the basic organizational properties of machines using case studies: Viz. CM5, Intel paragon, Meiko CS-2, CRAY T3D, and CRAY T3E. 119. Give the generic diagram for a scalable multiprocessor architecture of a distributed memory type. Describe any one real scalable system, using high integration at the chip level or at the board level. 120. Explain the machine organization for dedicated message processing with symmetric processor. 121. What is scalability? Describe the different types of scalability. 122. Give the generic diagram for scalable multiprocessor architecture of a distributed memory type. Describe any one real scalable system, using high integration at the chip level or at the board level. 123. Explain the machine organization for dedicated message processing with symmetric processor. 124. Explain scalability. 125. Explain bandwidth scaling. 126. Explain latency scaling. 127. What is cost scaling? 128. Explain physical scaling. 129. Explain scaling in a generic parallel architecture. 130. Write a note on realizing programming models. 131. Explain primitive network transaction. 132. What is meant by shared address space? Explain? 133. Explain message passing. 134. What are active messages? 135. Explain communication architecture design space. 136. Write a note on node network interface. 137. Explain implementation communication abstractions. 138. What is dedicated message processing? 139. Explain shared physical address space. 140. State about clusters and network of workstations. 141. Explain with the help of appropriate diagrams the following message passing protocols identifying clearly the merits & demerits if any in each case. i) Synchronous message passing protocol. ii) Asynchronous message passing protocol. 142. What is scalability? Discuss the different types of scalability. 143. Considering the example of the ocean study problem, show that when the problem is scaled up and the processing system is fixed, the compute load per processor increases,
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 18

SCALABLE MULTIPROCESSOR

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

10 10

but the communication load per unit time decreases. 144. Techniques like message passing using physical DMA or dedicated message processing as done in Intel paragon system are used among others for obtaining highly scalable systems. Explain any one such message passing systems. 145. When systems are scaled up, processor cost and memory cost increase linearly with the no. of nodes n, while the switching network cost increases roughly as nlog2 n. Assuming in a 64 processor system, the cost is equally divided between processors, memory and interconnection networks, find the ratios of this cost division when the no. of nodes is increased to 8192 from 64. Marks 4 5 6 8 10 14 Total No of Questions 02 23 07 05 106 02 145

10 10

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

19

Faculty:
Class # 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. Chapter Title / Reference Literature Data Communications and Network Management Overview T: Chap. 1 Pages 3-55 Basic Foundations: standards, models and language T: Chap. 3 Pages 101-141

CS834: NETWORK MANAGEMENT
Topics to be Covered Introduction: Data Communications and Network Management Analogy of Telephone Network Management, Data and Telecommunication Network. Distributed Computing Environments, TCP/IP –Based network. Communications Protocols and Standards Case Histories of Networking Management. Challenges of Information Technology Managers. Network Management: Goals, Organization and Function. Network and System Management, Future of Network Management Basic Foundations: Standards, Models. And Organization Model Information Model, Communication Model Abstract Syntax Notation One:ASN.1 Encoding Structure, Macros Function Model SNMPv1 Network Management: Case Histories and Examples The history of SNMP Management Internet Organizations and Standards The SNMP Model The organization model System Overview Information Model Information Model cont. SNMPv1 Network Management: Communication Model SNMP Architecture, Administrative model, SNMP protocol specifications Operations and MIB Group Function Model SNMP Management: Remote Monitoring, RMON SMI and MIB RMON1 RMON2, ATM Remote Monitoring Case study of Internet Traffic using RMON Broadband Networks and Services, ATM Technology ATM LAN Emulation and Virtual LAN ATM Network Management: Reference Model Integrated Local Management Interface, ATM Management Information base M1 Interface and M2 Interface M3 Interface and M4 Interface, Digital Exchange Interface Broadband Network Management: Broadband Access Networks HFC Technology Data Over Cable Reference Architecture HFC Management DSL Technology, Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line Technology ADSL management, ADSL Configuration Profiles Network Management Applications: Configuration Management Fault Management, Performance Management Event Correlation Technique Security Management Accounting Management Report Management, Policy Based Management Service Level Management Question Paper Discussion

No. of Hours: 52
% of Portion Covered Reference Cumulative Chapter

12.3%

12.3%

7.9%

20.2%

SNMPv1 Network Management T: Chap. 4 Pages 141- 203 SNMPv1 Network Management: Function Model T: Chap. 5 Pages 203- 229 SNMP Management: RMON T: Chap. 8 Pages 322- 345 Broadband Network Management: ATM Network T: Chap. 9 Pages 345- 387

15.4%

35.6%

7.9%

43.5%

9.2%

52.7%

13.9%

66.6%

Broadband Network Management T: Chap. 10 Pages 387- 429

12.3%

78.9%

Network Management Applications T: Chap. 13 Pages 501- 557

21.0%

100%

Literature: Book Type Text Book Code T Title & Author
Network ManagementPrinciples &Practice Mani Subramanian,

Edition 7th

Publication Info Publisher Pearson Education

Year 2005

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

20

QUESTION BANK

INTRODUCTION

1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

You can discover the hosts in your subnetwork by using the ping command with your network IP address and host address of decimal 255. Discover all the hosts in the subnetwork that you are logged on. Send an e-mail to a remote site with a wrong userid, but correct node address. Explain the error messages that you get and the servers that sent them. You are given a class B IP address of 145.45.x.y for your network node. As a network engineer, you are asked to configure your network for 126 subnets (remember that 0 and 1 are reserved). a. How would you configure your address for subnets and hosts? b. What is the maximum number of hosts that each subnet can accommodate? Explain the terms: Protocol, SAP, Subnet, Internet and PDU. Explain the data and telecommunication networks. Explain client/server network in a distributed computing environment. Explain the Internet and Intranets model in an TCP/IP based networks. Explain Basic Communication Architecture and ISO Communication Architecture? Compare SNA, ISO and Internet Protocol Layer Model. Explain the goals of network management. Basic Foundations: Standards, Models and Language

04 04 04

05 05 06 06 08 10 08

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

17.

In brief mention network management standards. Explain the role of organization model, information model and function model in ISO network management model. What are the standards used for the various layers in an Ethernet-based network that is managed by the Internet management protocol? Assume that the Ethernet runs on 10 Mbps on an unshielded twisted-pair cable. Write an ASN.1 module that defines DaysOfWeek as an ENUMERATED data type with values from 0 to 6. Write an ASN.1 module that specifies DayOfWeek as a SEQUENCE type with each day of the week (day1, day2, …) as the type VisibleString. Write the ASN.1 description (a) for the structure and (b) for the value. For your home address which contains Name, Address, City, State and Zip Code: a. The informal record structure. b. An ASN.1 description of the record structure. c. The record value for your home address. a. Describe a list and an ordered list in ASN.1 syntax. b. Identify the differences between them. c. Using examples differentiate between list construction and repetitive construction.

10 10 04 08 10 08

10

SNMPv1 Network Management: Organization and Information Models 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. With an example explain a managed LAN Network. Explain SNMP based ASN.1 data type structures. Write about the evolution of SNMP Documents. With an example explain the Object-Type Macro. Explain the Two-Tier, Three-Tier and Proxy Server Organization Model. Explain SNMP Network Management Architecture. Write about aggregate managed object macro. What is meant by Management Information Base? Explain in brief. Access the Simple Gateway Monitoring Protocol (SGMP) RFC 1028 on the Internet. Describe the four message types defined in the document. Present the OBJECT IDENTIFIER for the object sun. products in two formats, one mnemonic and the other numeric. Encode IP Address 10.20.30.40 in TLV format. (refer to RFC 1213 for the following exercise) a. Write the ANS.1 specifications for sysServices. b. Illustrate the specifications with values for a bridge. c. Illustrate the specifications with values for a router. Write the object descriptor and syntax of the following SNMP managed entities: a. IP address. b. A row in the Interfaces table (row specification only) c. The MAC address of an interface card. 08 08 05 10 10 05 10 10 05 08 06 08

30.

08

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

21

31. 32. 33. 34. 35.

36.

Explain how you would determine whether a device is acting as a host or as a router using an SNMP command. A network manager discovers that a network component is performing poorly and issues an order to the technician to replace it. Which MIB group contains this information for the technician to find out the physical location of the component? How would you use one of the standard MIB objects to determine which of the stations in a LAN is functioning as a bridge to the external network? TCP is a connection-oriented protocol and UDP is a connectionless protocol. Identify the differences in the two MIBs that exemplify this difference. FDDI is heavily used as a backbone network in a corporate complex. a. Draw a MIB tree for FDDI MIB. Limit your tree to the top five groups. b. Develop a three-column table presenting entity, OID and brief descriptions of the groups and the tables under each group. What OBJECT TYPE would you use to identify the address of the neighboring gateway from your local gateway? SNMPv1 Network Management: Communication and Functional Models 37. 38. 39. 40.

06 04 10 06 10

04

Briefly explain the SNMP Communication Model. Describe SNMP Protocol Specifications. In brief explain the SNMP Operations. An SNMP manager sends a request for the values of the sysUpTime in the System group and ifType in the interfaces group for ifNumber value of 3. Write the PDUs with the fields filled in for a. The get-request PDU and b. The get-response PDU with noSuchName error message for ifType.

08 06 08 10

SNMP Management: RMON 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. What is meant by remote monitoring? Explain. Explain RMONI Groups and Functions In brief explain RMONI Common and Ethernet Group. Write about RMON2 Conformance Specifications. Explain RMON Token Ring Extension. In brief explain ATM Remote Monitoring a. Describe qualitatively how the utilization ( number of frames offered/number of frames transmitted) depends on frame size. b. How would you measure the distribution of the frame size on the LAN? a. Describe the two methods of measuring collisions on an Ethernet LAN. b. Compare the two methods in terms of what you can measure. How would you measure the types and distribution of frames in a token ring LAN? 06 05 08 06 04 06 05 06 06

Broadband Network Management: ATM Networks 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. Explain broadband services networks Explain ATM LAN Emulation. In brief explain ATM Network Management. Write short notes on M1 interface, M2 interface. Explain class I and class II Interface Management Functions of M3. With a neat diagram explain the Dual views of the M4 Interface. Although cell transmission of multimedia services offers numerous benefits, there is an inefficiency penalty. Calculate the maximum efficiency (data bytes/ (data bytes+ overhead bytes) for ATM transmission. Calculate the efficiency of transmission to transmit: a. An Ethernet packet of 1500 bytes (including the overhead with 6-bytes addresses). b. Equivalent data using ATM cells. Communication between two ATM switches is broken in a private ATM network. You are troubleshooting the problem from a network management station. What M interfaces would you use? Justify. Explain how networks can be interconnected. 05 04 10 10 06 04 04 06 04 04

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

22

Broadband Network Management 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. Network 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. Explain the broadband access networks and technologies. Write a short note on HFC technology. Explain the Protocol Layer Architecture in an HFC System. Write a short note on DSL Technology and ADSL Technology. With a neat diagram explain ADSL Architecture. With an ADSL reference model explain ADSL management framework. Write short note on ADSL Configuration Profiles. A half-duplex channel is carrying a 2-Mbps signal. Calculate the baud rate and bandwidth in Hz for the following modulated signals. a. ASK(binary) b. PSK(binary) c. QPSK d. 16QAM The downstream channel bandwidth for cable modem is 6Mhz. Calculate the bit rate if signal is a. QPSK b. 64 QAM Management Applications What is meant by Configuration Management? Explain in brief. Explain the different steps involved in Fault Management. Mention and explain different metrics in Performance Management What is meant by Case-Based Reasoning? Explain. Explain the Codebook Correlation Model. Mention in brief the various measures used in security management How does the Client/Server authenticate each other Write explanatory notes on PEM processes. Explain the policy management architecture. List and contrast the tools available to discover network components. You are responsible for designing the auto discovery module of an NMS. Outline the procedure and the software tools that you would use. What MIB object would you monitor for measuring the collision rate on an Ethernet LAN? 08 08 04 06 04 06 04 06 08

08 04 05 05 05 10 06 05 06 06 04 04

Marks 4 5 6 8 10 Total

No. of Questions 18 12 19 16 15 80

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

23

Faculty:
Class # 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52.

CS843: CRYPTOGRAPHY AND NETWORK SECURITY
Chapter Title / Reference Literature Chapter 1 Overview Symmetric Ciphers Page # 19-35 Text Book: T1 Chapter 2 Classical Encryption techniques Page # 41-66 Text Book: T1 Chapter 3 Block Cipher & Data Encryption Standard Page # 73-103 Text Book: T1 Chapter 6,7 Symmetric Ciphers Page #191-202 Page #219-244 Text Book: T1 Chapter 8,9,10 Public Key Encryption, Digital Signatures Page #251-260 Page #275-314 Text Book: T1 Chapter 11 Message Authentication and Hash Functions Page #329-345 Text Book: T1 Chapter 12,13 Message Digest Algorithm, Protocol Page #365-374 Page #397-416 Text Book: T1 Chapter 14,15,16 Network Security Page #417-436 Page #453-472 Page #499-518 Text Book: T1 TOPICS TO BE COVERED Symmetric Ciphers-Overview: Services Mechanisms and Attacks The OSI Security Architecture A model of network security Classical Encryption techniques: Symmetric Cipher Model, Substitution Techniques. Transposition Techniques Rotol Mechanisms Steganography Block Cipher & Data Encryption Standard: Simplified DES Block Cipher Principles The data encryption standard The Strength of DES Differential and Linear Cryptanalysis Symmetric Ciphers: Triple DES Blowfish algorithm Confidentiality using Conventional Encryption: Placement of Encryption function Traffic confidentiality Key Distribution Random Number Generation Number Theory: Prime Numbers, Formats Euler’s Theorems Testing for primality Public key Cryptography & RSA: Principles of Public key Cryptosystems The RSA Algorithm Key Management Diffie-Hellman Key exchange Message Authentication and Hash Functions Authentication Requirements Authentication Functions Message Authentication Codes MD5 Message Digest Algorithm Digital Signatures and Authentication Protocols Digital Signatures Authentication Protocols Digital Signature Standard Authentication Applications: Kerberos X.509 Directory Authentication Service Electronic Mail Security Pretty Good Privacy IP security IP security Overview IP Security Architecture Authentication header Encapsulating Security Payload Web Security Web Security Requirements Secure Sockets Layer Security Transport Layer Security Secure Electronic Transaction System Security Intruders , Viruses , Worms & Related Threats Countermeasures, Firewalls , Firewall Design Principles Trusted Systems Reference

No. of Hours: 52
Cumulative

% of portions covered

35%

35%

27%

62%

31%

93%

Chapter 17 Web Security Page #545-580 Text Book: T1 Chapter 18,19,20 System Security Page #581-654 Text Book: T1

7%

100%

Literature:
Book Type
Text Book Reference Book Reference Book

Code
T1 R1 R2

Title & Author
Cryptography and Network Security by William Stallings Network Security Private Communication in a Public world by Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman, Mike Speciner Cryptography and Network Security by Atul Kahate

Edition
3rd 2nd

Publication Info Publisher
Pearson Education/PHI PTR Prentice Hall Tata McGrawHill

Year
2003 2002 2003 24

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

QUESTION BANK CRYPTOGRAPHY
OBJECTIVE: At the end of this section the student will know the basics of Cryptography. The section deals with chapters on algorithms that are used with cryptography, public key cryptography, Authentication and Hash functions and the math that is required for a introductory understanding of Cryptography. 1. 2. Explain briefly the four types of security attacks that are normally encountered. Also distinguish between active and passive attacks. Bring out the differences between Diffusion and Confusion. Steganography and Cryptography. Known and Chosen plaintext Cryptanalysis. Explain a typical key distribution scenario. What are the tradeoffs involved in determining the life of a particular session key? Explain the differential Cryptanalysis mechanism. What is the need for public key cryptography? Explain its principle and how it can be adopted for Encryption and authentication. Explain the principle of Diffie-Hellman key exchange with a suitable example. Explain how hash functions can be used for message authentication. How are these susceptible to birthday attacks? Enunciate and explain the digital signature algorithm. What is triple encryption? How many keys are used here? What primitive operations are used in Blowfish? What is the key size for Blowfish? List ways in which keys can be distributed to two communicating parties. What is a key distribution centre? What is the difference between a session key and a master key? What is the difference between differential and linear cryptanalysis? 10 10

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

14 06 10 10 10 10 06 06 08 06

NETWORK SECURITY

OBJECTIVE: At the end of this section the student will understand the application of Authentication techniques learnt in the earlier chapter. Applications such as Kerberos, X.509 Directory, Email Security, SET are studied. IP security, Web Security, Firewalls and the related threats associated with it are also studied. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. What is Kerberos? Discuss the motivation and requirements for Kerberos approach. What are the key features of X..509 Certificate? How are they issued and revoked by the certificate authority? What is the purpose of the X.509 standard? Why is the segmentation and re-assembly function in PGP needed? How does PGP use the concept of trust? What is S/MIME? Why does PGP generate a signature before applying compression? What are the five basic services available for the users of Pretty good privacy? How are they provided? What the examples of and services provided by IPSec. What is Encapsulating Security Pay load? Why does ESP include a padding field? Explain the secure socket layer SSL-V3 architecture, indicating how the session state and connection state are defined. What is the need for dual signatures in SET? How are they constructed? What are the four basic techniques of choosing passwords? Compare their relative merits. List and briefly explain 3 classes of intruders and list three benefits of using intrusion detection systems. In general terms, how does a worm propagate? 10 10 05 05 05 05 20 06 06 10 10 10 06 06
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P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

27. 28.

List the 3 goals for a firewall. List four techniques used by firewalls to control access and enforce security policy. What is a virus? What are the typical stages it passes through in its lifetime? Suggest suitable virus architecture. Marks 5 6 8 10 14 20 Total No. of Questions 4 9 1 12 1 1 28 NOTES

06 10

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

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CS845: DATA MINING
Faculty: No of Hours: 52

Class # 1 2,3 4,5 6,7 8 9 10 11 12 13,14 15,16,17 18,19 20,21 22,23,24 25 26,27 28,29 30 31,32 33,34 35 36 37,38 39 40 41,42 43,44 45 46 47,48 49,50,51

CHAPTER TITLE/ Reference literature

% of portions covered Topic to be Covered What is Data Warehouse? A multidimensional Data Model Data Warehouse Architecture Data Warehouse Implementation Data cube Technology From Data warehousing to Data Mining Data cleaning Data integration and Transformation Data Reduction Data Mining Primitives, Presentation and Visualization of discovered patterns 15% A Data Mining Query Language Association Rule Mining Single-Dimensional Boolean Association Rules from Transactional Databases Mining Multilevel Association Rules from Transactional Databases Issues Regarding Classification and Prediction Classification by Decision tree induction Bayesian Classification Classification by Back propagation Classification Based on the concepts from association rule mining Other classification methods Prediction What is Cluster Analysis? Types of data in Cluster Analysis: A Categorization of Major Clustering Methods 33% Reference chapter Cumulative

Chapter# 1 Introduction T1:Page# : 39-98, 109-130

18%

18%

Chapter# 2 Data Mining Primitives, languages and System Architectures T1:Page# : 146-170 Chapter# 3 Mining Association Rules in Large Data bases T1:Page# : 225-269

12%

45%

Chapter# 4 Classification and Prediction T1:Page# : 279-322

22%

67%

Chapter# 5 Cluster Analysis T1:Page# : 335-388

Partitioning Methods Hierarchical Methods Density-Based Methods Model-Based Clustering Methods: Statistical Approach & Neural Network Approach Outliner Analysis Data Mining Applications

18%

85%

Chapter# 6 Applications and Trends in Data Mining T1:Page# : 451-480

Data Mining System Products and Research Prototypes Additional Themes on Data Mining, Data Mining and Intelligent Query Answering Trends in Data Mining

15%

100%

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Literature

Book type Text Book

Code T1

Title and Author Data Mining Concepts and Techniques By Jiawei Han and Micheline Kamber Data Mining A Hands-On Approach for Business Professionals By Robert Growth Data Warehousing Fundamentals A Comprehensive Guide for IT Professionals By Paulraj Ponniah

Edition 1st 1s 1s

Publication specification Publication Year Morgan KaufMann 2003 Publishers Prentice Hall PTR John Wiley & Sons 1998 2001

Reference Boo R1 Reference Bo R2

Syllabus for Tests Test 1: Class 1-12 Test 2: Class 13-27 Test 3: Class 28-38
P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS 27

GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT WORK [CS85] General: 1. Batch formation :
i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) Students can do their project work in batches. However the batch size can vary from 1[min] to 4[max]. Students are to be regularly in touch with their guide on a weekly basis or as is needed by. Students can form their own batches within the stipulated time otherwise department will form batches and students have to accept it. Batch once formed cannot be changed. Each batch will have a designated staff in charge to monitor the work progress at every stage. All the projects are to be demonstrated with source code for all the evaluations. Evaluation process will be in 2 stages. S1. 1. Panel Approval : 20 Marks. 2. Guide Evaluation : 40 Marks. S2 1. Final Project Presentation: 40 Marks. S3 Total Evaluation Marks (20+40+40):100Marks. 2. Work Progress & Monitoring Procedure : Stage – 1: Week No 01 02 Stage – 2: Week No 03 04 05 Stage – 3: Week No 06 07 Stage – 4: Week No 08 09 10 11 Date Mar 19 – Mar 24 Mar 26 – Mar 31 Apr 02 – Apr 07 Apr 09 – Apr 14 Implementation & coding Implementation, Coding & unit testing. Implementation, Coding & unit testing. Integration & Testing.
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Date Jan 29 – Feb 3 Feb 5– Feb 10 Date Feb 12 – Feb 17 Feb 19 – Feb 24 Feb 26 – Mar 03 Project title finalization, Place and Guide. Literature survey document with detailed synopsis. Software requirement document [SRS] to be submitted. Batch Submission in the prescribed format. Final approved batch list along with staff in charge.

Date Mar 05 – Mar 10 Mar 12 – Mar 17 Design Design document to be submitted. Viva-voce to be conducted.

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

Stage – 5: Week No 12 13 Date Apr 16 – Apr 21 Apr 23 – Apr 28 Unbounded draft copy of final report in the prescribed format to be submitted for approval. Evaluation – presentation and viva-voce by departmental council.

Stage – 6:

Week No 14

Date Apr 30 – May 05 Final bounded report to be submitted to the department duly signed by the guide

Note: The details regarding the color of binding, format for the report submission, and its contents notified later. will be

CS85: PROJECT WORK SCHEDULE Week No 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 COMPONENT Batch Submission in the prescribed format. Final approved batch list along with staff incharge. Project title finalization, Place and Guide. Literature survey document with detailed synopsis. Software requirement document [SRS] to be submitted. Design Design document to be submitted. Viva-voce to be conducted. Implementation & coding Implementation, Coding & unit testing. Implementation, Coding & unit testing. Integration & Testing. Unbounded draft copy of final report in the prescribed format to be submitted for approval. Evaluation – presentation and viva-voce by departmental council. Final bounded report to be submitted to the department duly signed by guide.

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

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GUIDELINES FOR SEMINAR [CS86] General: viii) ix) x) xi) xii) xiii) xiv) xv) Student has to individually carry out the seminar work Students are to be regularly in touch with the guide. The seminar topic has to be a paper selected from leading journals in the area of interest of the individual. Formal permission has to be taken from the author of the paper. Every student will have a designated staff in charge to monitor the work progress at every stage. The seminar is to be presented as per the guidelines to be given later. Seminar doesn’t have external evaluation. Evaluation process will be in 2 stages. Continuous evaluation by guide: 20 Marks. Final Seminar Presentation (panel Evaluation): 30 Marks. Total Evaluation Marks (20+30): 50 Marks. Work Progress, Monitoring Procedure & Seminar Schedule Week No 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 Date Jan 29 – Feb 3 Feb 5– Feb 10 Feb 12 – Feb 17 Feb 19 – Feb 24 Feb 26 – Mar 03 Mar 05 – Mar 10 Mar 12 – Mar 17 Mar 19 – Mar 24 Mar 26 – Mar 31 Apr 02 – Apr 07 Apr 09 – Apr 14 Apr 16 – Apr 21 Schedule Title Submission in the prescribed format. Final approved seminar list along with staff In-charge. Submission of synopsis Literature survey Literature survey document to be submitted Understanding the methodology/approach Understanding the methodology/approach Understanding the methodology/approach Gist of the paper to be submitted Preparation for the seminar in consultation with the guide Draft copy approval of seminar report Final Seminar Presentation*

*During the FSP the following documents have to be submitted.
• •

Soft bound, grey color seminar report (1 copy). Two sets of handouts.

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

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PORTIONS FOR TEST

Subject

Subject Code
Test 1

Test Portions
Class # 1-18

CIP

CIP81

Test 2

Class # 19-33

Test 3

Class # 34-52

Test 1

Class #1 – Class #20

ACA

CS82

Test 2

Class #21 – Class #38

Test 3

Class #39 – Class #52

Test 1

Class #1 – Class #20

CNS

843

Test 2

Class #21 – Class #36

Test 3

Class #37 – Class #52

P E S Institute of Technology – Education for the Real World – Course Information – B.E. 8th Semester CS

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