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SHAPES OF VEHICLE BODIES

In most cases, the body of a vehicle is a solid of revolution and consists of three elements:
nose-, mid-, and rear (or tail) sections, the latter sometimes known as the stern.
Nose section.
Figure shows possible nose-section designs representing tapered solids of revolution, solid or
with a flow passage. Nose-section shapes of this type reduce the aero- dynamic drag of the
body, but also reduce its useful volume. Nose sections are usually conical, ogival, or
parabolic in shape, and sometimes represent combinations of these forms.

The generatrix of the ogival nose takes the form of an arc of a circle with a certain radius.
The nose may meet the cylindrical section either tangentially or at a certain angle .
The ogival curve is said to be tangent in the former case and secant in the latter. The equation
of the ogival curve in dimensionless form is
This population may include geometrically similar bodies whose linear dimensions
differ by the same factor. Obviously, such bodies have the same fineness ratio and can be
placed in congruence with one another by uniform deformation, i.e. deformation that is the
same for all directions.
INFLUENCE OF MISSION AND TACTICAL-TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
ON SELECTION OF VEHICLE AERODYNAMIC LAYOUTS
The selection of one or another aerodynamic layout is closely tied in with the mission
of the vehicle and its tactical and technical specifications, in accordance with which the relative
positions of the launch and target points, the shape of the trajectory, the type of power plant
and control system, and characteristic design features are established. Thus, a specific
aerodynamic layout that meets tactical and technical specifications corresponds to a given
vehicle.