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CONTEMPORARY TEACHING

& LEARNING
Assignment 1
Abstract
The following report focuses on the improvement of a Stage 5 Year 9 Music Unit:
‘Notation through the years’. This unit was originally designed for a diverse learning
ability classroom within St Andrews College, Marayong.
This report highlights on recommendations for improved representation of the
outcomes in order of creating a progressive teaching/learning program that is inclusive
to all students within the program.
In order of achieving the recommendations, this unit follows the ‘UbD framework’ to
ensure the success of all students within the classroom.
The targeted areas for improvement throughout this report are implemented through
the sequence of learning. These areas for focus are literacy and numeracy, accessibility
for all learners and the development of personal and social capabilities.

Jasmine Breeze
18036116@student.westernsydney.edu.au
Table of Contents

Executive Summary .......................................................................................................... 3


Objective and Context ..................................................................................................... 3
Background Information ................................................................................................... 4
Goals ............................................................................................................................... 5
List of Recommendations ................................................................................................. 5

Comparative Table ........................................................................................................... 6

Recommendations ........................................................................................................ 7-9


Understanding by Design Framework ................................................................................ 7
Universal Design for Learning ........................................................................................ 8
Conclusion ................................................................................................................... 9

Reconstructed Unit ........................................................................................................ 10


Scope & Sequence .................................................................................................... 10-15
Concept Map ................................................................................................................. 16
Assessment Task & Marking Criteria .......................................................................... 17-23
Redesigned Unit Outline (Annotated) ........................................................................ 24-27

Reference ...................................................................................................................... 28
Appendices of original documents ......................................................................... 29-35

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Executive Summary
Objective & Context
This report has been created for the Creative Arts faculty at St Andrews College:
Marayong, which is situated in Western Sydney. St Andrews College is part of the
Parramatta Catholic Diocese and is an inclusive co-educational school which provides
music classes for students from years 7 to 12.

The population of the school context is highly diverse with 71% of the students
represented as LBOTE out of a total of 1083 enrolments in the year of 2017. St Andrews
College ranges higher than the average score of 1000 for the index of community socio-
educational advantage (ICSEA) and shows a higher distribution of students within the school
being of the higher middle class, with only 17% of students identified with low socio-
economic status (SES). St Andrews College has 50 more boys than girls enrolled. The school
only has 1% of Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander Students within the school context and
obtains a 94% attendance rate for the college.

With focus on literacy and numeracy, St Andrews College in the recent year of 2017
completed NAPLAN with the following results supplied in the photo below. Which identify
that Year 7 are close to the expected standard for ‘reading, writing, grammar and numeracy’
compared to Year 9 who are below the NAPLAN standards with averages ranging between
545 to 586 across the five factors for testing. Although the school results show positive
averaging for spelling. It is important to identify the following factors ‘reading, writing,
grammar and numeracy’ as factors for improvement within the implementation and
modification of the existing unit plan.

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This unit was originally used within the context of elective music stage 5 year 9 and was
made inclusive to all students through the implementation of the UbD framework. The
classes undertaking the current music unit consisted mostly of students ranging from ‘low
to high’ socioeconomic status and provide an inclusive environment for students with
learning difficulties.

Background Information

Statistics and tables above are retrieved from the MySchool Website.
https://www.myschool.edu.au/school/43221

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Goals

- Focus on the implementation of technology through the three learning experiences


to create a holistic learning and teaching experience for the students.
- Create challenges for students that will test their problem solving abilities through
collaborative approaches to learning.
- Encourage students to understand and demonstrate their learning through a
variety of means that will provide flexibility in completing high quality assessments.
- Provide an inclusive approach for all students through effective differentiation of
learning tools and strategies for each learner in the classroom.
- Work towards providing a progressive and meaningful unit program that provides a
learning sequence that is clear, adaptable and resourceful to the student’s
understanding of the three learning experiences and their outcomes.
- Improve the literacy and numeracy concerns throughout the learning and planning
of the unit and incorporate new strategies to promote the student’s academic
skills.

Recommendations
In application of the following recommendations, this unit is being taught in a
comprehensive classroom with students of mixed academic abilities.
Furthermore, students within this classroom may be affected by socioeconomic issues,
learning difficulties and identify as Indigenous and/or Torres Strait Islander. Therefore, the
recommendations within this report primarily focus upon differentiation, implementation
of literacy and numeracy skills based on the results of NAPLAN 2017, and the improvement
of lesson sequence and assessment within this unit.

R1. To improve the accessibility of differentiation for all students. Therefore, to ensure all
students have the equal opportunity to engage with the learning stimulus.

R2. Redesign of learning sequence to counter for integration of literacy and numeracy skills
to improve student academic skills as reflected through the ‘below average’ areas within the
NAPLAN 2017 results.

R3. To modify the unit outline, learning sequence and assessments to cater for social and
personal competence in meeting the required outcomes in the three learning experiences:
Performance, Composition and Listening. Particular focus will draw on the inclusion of all
learning experiences and social competence within the assessment task for the modified
unit.

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Comparative Table
Area of Strengths of Concerns of the area of Suggested Changes to Research
consideration the area of consideration counteract concerns support for the
consideration changes
suggested.

Word Level Understanding and Assessing student Linking


Terminology applying these key understanding through clear terminology to
Literacy terms to the actions instructions and regular background
within everyday lessons. recapping. Also questioning knowledge.
techniques and homework
topics for student referral at
later dates.
Activating Prior Set scaffold or lesson Implementation of learning “Learning
Learning sequence objective as seen throughout Objectives” -
other learning spaces within Schedules for
the school. Independent
learning
Understanding Mathematic equations Implementation of “Connection
of music of adding note values to mathematic equations between maths
Numeracy notation. particular time throughout lesson sequence ad music”
signatures. to test student understanding - Looking at
& knowledge. fractions
Knowledge of Mathematical execution The completion of a notated Three R’s
compositional of notation among composition that is written, “relevance,
devices compositions. presented and reflected upon. relationship and
reflection”

Critical thinking through Instil critical thinking through “Cooperative


Critical and the learning problem solving activities that learning”
Creative experiences is not the engage students in higher-
Thinking main focus. order thinking.
Creative Implying practical Creating opportunities for “UbD
thinking - Three aspects of the learning students to be creative Approach”
Learning experiences within the through the means of problem
Experiences theoretical driven solving tasks, every day
aspect of notation. application and assessment.
Personalisation of Engaging students within UDL approach
Personal and learning. learning through multiple
Social means of expression,
Capabilities representation and
engagement.
Confidence in social Collaborative learning CSCL
abilities. activities and the
implementation of technology
to assist social understanding
and competency.

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Recommendations
R - To reconstruct the initial unit by incorporating more attention to academic skills
(literacy and numeracy), social and personal competency, and improving unit design by
allowing for accessibility through the use of Understanding by Design (UbD) and Universal
Design for Learning Framework (UDL).

The existing unit outline provided was originally based around a UbD design that
incorporated the concepts and learning experiences of the music syllabus through limited
conceptual knowledge and more practical experiences. This unit provided mainstream
students with the essentials to begin designing and creating music but lacked the
opportunities for students with diverse learning needs. In review of this unit, I have created
the following documents; concept map, scope and sequence to allow other educators to
explore and perform this unit within their classroom settings. I believe these components
are significant in the effectiveness of teaching and learning programs as “it summarises
what is to be taught and the sequence in which it will be taught” (“NSW Syllabus: Advice on
scope and sequences”, 2018). A scope and sequence provides a clear structure for students
and subject specific advice for educators who may take over the unit with no existing
knowledge on the content to be delivered.
It is because of this change that I have redesigned the whole unit to better address clear
expectations of what is required throughout the unit to meet the outcomes of the NSW
Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 2003) and uphold high teaching and learning expectations
by incorporating strategies to accommodate for an inclusive classroom. Through
modification I hope to have achieved a unit design that provides rich engaging and relevant
learning experiences for all students by incorporating multiple strategies in particular the
multiple means of the UDL Framework (“UDL: The UDL Guidelines”, 2018).

The Understanding by Design Framework incorporates the idea of a backwards process to


learning, where students are working towards their assessment within classrooms by
addressing concepts and terminology that are needed and presented in forthcoming formal
assessment. The use of UbD in this unit is highlighted through the informal tasks within the
scope and sequence. The use of continuous assessment within the scope and sequence is to
provide teachers with a ‘deeper understanding on the student’s ability and skill level’
(United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 2017). This can assist
teachers through the incorporation of the quality teaching (QT) framework that draws
attention to the importance of significance, intellectual quality and quality learning
environment. The QT framework embodies the need for personalised learning and
assessment practices that draw upon the social, cultural, and personal experiences and
knowledge of the individual. These experiences must obtain relevance, relation and
meaning to the student’s understanding of music as a society and culture (NSW Department
of Education and Training, 2008). When exploring this unit, threshold concepts provide an
insight to the knowledge integration of the musical outcomes, objectives and meta-
language (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2008) that engage teachers and
students through a deep understanding of music as its own language with history, cultural
practices and technology influence. It is important when implementing threshold concepts
that we identify the relation of the learning experiences: composing, performing and
listening (Board of Studies NSW, 2003) to the learning context of notation as explored
throughout the reconstructed unit of work, assessment task and scope and sequence.

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The Universal design for Learning (UDL) Framework provides an inclusive approach to
student understanding and learning through multiple means of engagement, representation
and expression with specific insight into ‘how humans learn’ (“UDL: The UDL Guidelines”,
2018). The UDL framework provides differentiated learning for all students through ‘access
and participation in meaningful, challenging learning opportunities’ that question the
strategic networks of ‘why, what and how’ (“UDL: The UDL Guidelines”, 2018). The
presentation of UDL is explored throughout the redesigned unit in application of engaging
students within their learning to encourage students to see ‘why’ learning this content is
important, ‘what’ could this learning provide you, and ‘how’ will learning this content affect
your knowledge on ‘music notation’. In recognition of the redesigned teaching and learning
program, the following modification of the UDL approach creates opportunities for
independent learning through student choice, autonomy and self-regulation in mastering
their own performance and composition skills. Furthermore, the changes within
assessment, scope and sequence provide students with increased opportunities for
understanding the context through visual and auditory learning experiences. These
stimuluses allow students to actively participate in improving their academic skills through
comprehension of background knowledge, creative ideas, and the relationship that
language and symbols oppose in understanding the musical language. The examples of
stimulus provided below enhance and exercise literacy and numeracy skills through musical
concepts, notation and terminology. They include problem solving activities that involve
mathematical equations in identifying note values and symbols, and patterns within musical
scores. Other examples involve decoding of text through written lyrical content, written
reflection on questions as well as the composition process of navigating through assistive
technologies and inquiry-based tasks that stimulate personal ideas, and preferences for
problem solving tasks like ‘composing your own notated composition’.

Lastly, UDL recommends a focus on assistive technologies to assist students in their


learning. I believe that implementing the use of ICT in the classroom is beneficial in
improving the student’s academic skills through digital interaction. When highlighting
assistive technologies (AT) in music we are drawing focus to software, devices and resources
that make learning music more interactive, engaging, fun and relevant to today’s music
society and culture. The ‘digital-age’ is a time where students need to use technology ‘to
think critically, solve problems creatively, work in teams, communicate clearly in a range of
media and continue to learn new and ever-evolving technologies’ (NSW Department of
Education, 2016). To meet the introduction of technology the NSW Department of
Education has introduced a ‘Strategic Information Technology Plan (2016) to promote and
support innovative teaching and engaged learning. In relation to the three-year plan, I have
implemented the use of technology within the assessment, scope and sequence through the
incorporation of technology devices within compositional tasks, research and problem
solving tasks in collaborative learning, as well as virtual and physical learning spaces for
students to interact with in a more individualised personal manner. Some AT are resourceful
communication tools that share the ideas of music through programs like ‘sound cloud,
Spotify and iTunes’; where some AT entice the participation within the music culture
through ‘blogs, threads and websites’. Overall, these AT promote the use and influence of
technology within the subject of music as identified through the music syllabus outcome,
‘influence of technology’ (Board of Studies NSW, 2003).

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The strategic information technology plan (2016) fosters the idea of ‘collaboration,
communication and creativity, inside and outside the classroom’ (NSW Department of
Education, 2016). Which leads me to the explanation of how this unit conveys social and
personal competence through the Wellbeing Framework (NSW Department of Education
and Communities, 2015) and Collaborative Learning (Education Elements, 2018). “Social
wellbeing includes the extent to which we experience positive relationships and
connectedness to others” (NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2015). To
achieve positive relationships, we as teachers must form a professional relationship with
our students to ‘know how our students learn’ (BOSTES, 2011); and to encourage, support
and motivate our students throughout their educational career. In outlook of the unit plan I
have taken the idea of teacher-student relationships and individual choice to allow for
opportunities where students can be the leader of their own musical success and
development especially in instrument specific learning experiences like performance and
composition. In relation to collaborative learning (CL), research has found that group-work
activities are especially helpful in engaging and motivating students in specific curriculums
(Laal & Ghodsi, 2012). CL has been referred to as the most effective form of interaction in
which students develop a social support system as learners. Collaboration provides benefits
in three identified areas being social, psychological and academic; and is known as a
valuable technique for assessment to reduce student’s social anxiety, stress and personal
incompetency (Laal & Ghodsi, 2012). It is because of this reasoning and the values of the
Wellbeing Framework that I have implemented collaborative activities and tasks that
involve socialising with others students within the cohort to promote positive and respectful
relationships where students are valued, encouraged, supported and empowered to
succeed (NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2015).

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Key Existing Suggestions
Created Content
Recommendations
Reconstructed Unit Plan Q - Questions
a. Scope & Sequence R- Recap
Unit Name: Notation through the ages Course: Music Term: 1
Stage: 5 Class: Year 9 Lessons: 10 x 100 mins

Lesson Content Syllabus Learning Musical Concepts Assessment Resources Comments/


(implementation of lesson objectives, literacy, Outcomes Experiences Variations
numeracy & social/personal competency) P C L D D&E P S TC T
1 Q - What is notation? 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, x x x x x Partial Coverage Tutorials on
(Research and write in books) 5.5, 5.7, 5.9 of Assessment 1 reading and
Q - How do we notate music? (Discuss as class) Part B. creating traditional
(Composition) and non-traditional
Learning Intention: Compose a score as a class and notation.
perform this score using our own notation.
(introduction to assessment part B) Music theory.net

Students will start to explore the different types of


notation (traditional, non-traditional: graphics,
neumes) through visuals, class discussion and hands
on experiences

Practice designing graphics to represent particular


sounds or instruments.

Homework: Research the definition of a Neume in


your book.
2 Looking back through History 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, x x x x x x Performance Tasks Internet
In your books list the different types of notation? 5.5, 5.7, 5.8,
(CHECK HW) 5.9, 5.11 Research Task Song
“Alleluia”
Learning Objective: Explore the different types of
notation throughout time.

Students in pairs will research about Neumes and the


influence neumes has had in the development of
musical notation.
Q - What looks familiar to today’s notation?
Discuss Pope Gregory’s influence & contribution to
the development of music, not just religious music.

Students will create and notate their own neumes to


the original “Alleluia”. They will then switch their
neumes with another student and try to perform each
other’s Neumes.
3 Notating Music? 5.8, 5.9, x x x x x x x Research Task Video: “Notation
Learning Objective: Why do we write down (notate) 5.11 Through Ages”
music? (Brainstorm) Literacy
Internet/
Continue researching the history of notation. Technology Device
Watch the video supporting the development of
notation from Neumes to Modes and Traditional/Non-
Traditional Notation.
(Summarise and take down key points for a notation
timeline)

Encourage students to explain in 1-2 paragraphs what


the difference is between neumes, modes and notation
as we know it today.

Q - How does technology assist how we write (notate)


music today?

Homework: Use note brainer or musictheory.net to


revise the areas of note values and time signatures.
4 Traditional Notation 5.2, 5.4, 5.7, X X X X X X X Revision of Note Value
Learning Intention: Look over existing knowledge of 5.8, 5.9 existing Worksheet
notation and further extend our notation skills. knowledge of
notation. Selected Repertoire
Revise types of notes & rests through the note value Sheet Music
problem solving worksheet. HW: Identification
Hand out sheet music for selected repertoire using the skill test Musictheory.net
musical concepts scaffold analyse the concepts within
the musical piece. Note Brainer

Students will then learn to read and perform the song Musical concept
as a class. Scaffold

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Students are to look up musictheory.net and take notes
on Lesson 24: Key Signatures

Once students have completed taking notes on Key


signatures. They must independently select repertoire
to analyse, read and practice for the remainder of the
lesson.
Homework: Use Note Brainer or musictheory.net to
test your identification skills.
5 Traditional Notations through various Instruments 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, X X X X X X X X Performance Tasks Drum Notation
Learning Objective: To learn how to read different 5.7, Score x 2
types of instrument specific notation. 5.9, 5.10 Collaborative
Problem Solving Whiteboard
Students will start by learning how to read drum Tasks
notation. Teacher will run through reading drum Technology Device
notation on whiteboard and will leave up for students
to refer to. (Encourage students to take a photo on Work books
their devices and label the photo with correct
terminology to assist them in future reference) Guitar tablature x 3

Provide students with two selected drum repertoire. YouTube


Ask students to highlight any repetition of drum
patterns within the score and notate this pattern into Note Brainer
their books. Musictheory.net
As a class perform one selected repertoire to
experience the various techniques and patterns
describe through notation.

Students in pairs will be given a choice of three


selected repertoires to learn and perform in front of
each other. This means students will have to learn
how to read guitar tablature with some assistance from
tutorials on YouTube. Each student will play a guitar
riff individually. Working in pairs will allow them to
get help from their friends if needed.

Homework: Use Note Brainer or musictheory.net to


practice key signatures and notes within major and
minor keys.

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6 Assessment: Notation test 5.8, 5.9, X x x x x x x Assessment 1 Part Workbook
Students will have 15 minutes to revise notation: 5.11 A
clefs, stems, accidentals, key signatures; and musical Assessment Task:
terminology: musical concepts & compositional Notation Test
techniques.
Assessment Task:
Students will then conduct Part A: Notation test. They Part B Notice
will be given half the lesson to complete 10 multiple
choice questions and a few short answer questions on Scaffold Worksheet
terminology. for Part B.
The remaining 35 minutes of the lesson will be spent
on explaining Part B of Assessment 1. Students will
then brainstorm and plan their ideas on a scaffolded
worksheet.

Exit Pass: Sign the confirmation that you have


received and understood what is required of the
assessment task that will be completed within class.
7 Graphic Notation 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, X X X x X X X X Group Graphic Score x2
Learning Intention: Familiarise our knowledge on 5.4, 5.9, performance of
graphic notation and the different types of graphic 5.12 arranged graphic Instruments
notation. (Refer to existing knowledge of neumes) score.
Assessment 1 Part
Students will be split into two groups based on HW: B Notice
selected instruments. Students will then familiarise Understanding of
themselves with the following graphic score. types of graphic Garageband
Students will then attempt to arrange and perform the notation.
following score as a group with each member having
a specific role dedicated to them from the graphic
score.

Teacher to explain the types of graphic notation.


“Choice of expression” - Relate to Assessment 1 Part
B through the idea of expressing your ideas by the
representation of shapes that shown a key to engage
the audience in learning the composition of the piece.
(UDL) *Mention use of ICT in composing (Eg.
Garageband)

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Class Discussion: What are the pros/cons of graphic
notation?

Homework: Design your own graphic interface alike


the drum sequencer in Garageband. Focus on the
dynamics of each instrument within your table.
8 Graphic Notation Cont.… 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, X X X X X Draft: Resource List for
Learning Intention: Start to compose your assignment 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, Composition Assessment 1 Part
by referring to technology as a mean of engaging and 5.10 (A1:PB) B
representing your ideas.
Finale/ Sibelius
Students will be provided with a list of inspirational
resources for completing their composition for Technology Device
Assessment 1.
Workbook
Students will be asked to compose a draft composition
using traditional or non-traditional methods. They will
need to decide first on what instruments they would
like to use.

Students will then be introduced to notational


software (Finale or Sibelius). This option will be
available for students to use within their assessment.

Students will then spend the rest of the lesson either


working on their assessments or exploring the bounds
of notational software on their technology devices.

Exit Pass: Write in your book what instruments you


are planning to use and what compositional ideas you
have already. You can use this reflection towards your
Assessment self-reflection.
9 The influence of technology 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, X X X x x x x x x Soundtrack of YouTube excerpts
Learning Objective: To better understand how 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, Assessment 1 Part
technology has influenced how we capture sound and 5.8, 5.9, B Internet
musical ideas. 5.10, 5.12
Class Discussion Garageband
Q - How else can we “record” music other than
notating it? Voice memos

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Start class with question leading into the discussion of
modern technology and recording systems. Assessment Task
As a class, explore the multiple dimensions available Notice
to create, import and share music.
Workbooks
Q - If we were to think about these dimensions, how
do they support the idea of record and notating music?
Q - Do you know of any others
dimensions/software/devices that allow us to capture
our musical ideas and produce them to the world
around us?

Students today will engage in recording their musical


ideas from their composition in order of completing
the soundtrack for their assessment. Students may use
Garageband, Voice Memos, etc.

Exit Pass: Must be able to name 1 technology


system/device/ software etc. that assists in the
composing music or expanding musical ideas.
10 Assessment Part B: Presentations 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, X X X x x x x x x Assessment: Technology
Students will have the whole lesson to participate and 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, Composition, Devices
listen within class discussion and performances as a 5.10, 5.11, Soundtrack and
live audience and supportive member of the class. 5.12 Self-Reflection Apple TV

Students will have from when they entered the Participation as a Marking Criteria -
classroom to when the bell rings for the end of the live audience Printed x 30
class to complete any uncompleted work for the
assessment. Sleeves

Students must submit by the end of the lesson; Spare Assessment


- Composition Score Task Notifications
- Soundtrack
- Self-Reflection
- Assessment notice with student
declaration

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b. Concept Map

"Notation"

History Affect of
In Practice
behind Technology

Non- How do we
Traditional
Neumes Modes Traditional record music
Notation
Notation today?

Instrument Graphic Notation Recording


Neumes
Specific Notation Software Software
Key Existing Content
Created Content
Modified Content
c. Assessment Task & Marking Criteria Recommendations

KLA Creative And Performing Arts


COURSE Yr 9 Music
TASK NAME Compositional Project
TYPE OF TASK Composition Task + Musical Notation Test
TASK NUMBER 1
TASK WEIGHTING 25%
TASK MAXIMUM MARK 100
TASK OUTCOMES 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10
SYLLABUS COMPONENT Composing & Listening

LEADER OF LEARNING
KLA
TEACHER/S
DATE OF ISSUE Term 1 Week 2
DUE DATE Part A: Term 1 Week 6, Part B: Term 1 Week 9

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMISSION


• Students will need to submit their own notation for a 12 bar composition.
• The supporting music for the 12 bar composition.
• Attach the self-reflection on their compositional experience
• Complete the music notation test in class.

TASK DETAILS
Outcomes assessed:
5.5 Notate own compositions, applying forms of notation appropriate to the music
selected for study
5.6 Use different forms of technology in the composition process
5.7 Demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through the analysis,
comparison,
and critical discussion of music from different stylistic, social, cultural and historical
contexts
5.8 Demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through aural identification,
discrimination, memorisation and notation in the music selected for study
5.9 Demonstrates an understanding of musical literacy through the appropriate
application of notation, terminology and the interpretation and analysis of scores
used in the music selected for study
5.10 Demonstrates an understanding of the influence and impact of technology on music
Key Existing Content
Created Content
Modified Content
Recommendations

The student will:

Complete a written notation test to demonstrate their notation skills.


Create a composition that displays 12 bars of non-traditional notation.
Compose a soundtrack to support the 12 bars composition.
Reflect on the experience in creating your own music that reflects various methods of
compositional techniques.

Task Description:
Part A (40%)
Students will sit a notation test under exam conditions in week 6. It will cover:
- 10 Multiple Choice Questions: Notation (musical notes, types of notes & rests)
- Short written responses: Musical terminology
- 1 traditional notated bar

Part B (60%)
Students in class will have dedicated lesson time to create a 12 bar composition that represents a
form of non-traditional notation. This composition will need to be supported by a sound track that
will be presented to the class in week 9. In the lesson dedicated for composition presentations,
students will need to complete their self-reflection and submit the following documents below
before the end of the class.

- Composition (written score): melody, 12 bars, key for notation values,


instruments. Optional: lyrics.
- Soundtrack: Supporting evidence of written score to provide sound for the
music created.
- Self-reflection: Highlighting the experience of creating your own
composition and non-traditional notation methods.

Process on how to complete the task:

Students will learn, revise and study from the content delivered in weeks 1 to 4 in preparation for
the notation test in week 5. They will use the following apps to support their learning and test their
knowledge. Specific tasks will be set for homework each week using the following apps; “Note
brainer & Musictheory.net”

In week 1: Students will explore the practical idea of composing a notated composition.
Following the similar ideas of lesson 1. Students will continue to work on their own notated
composition in weeks 5 to 9 as part of a UbD approach.

This means that students will build upon ideas for their assignment within allocated lesson time
using the new knowledge gained to contribute towards the completion of a high quality
composition.

Students will explore the following areas that are within the task description in the allocated weeks
listed below, they will need to ensure that they are present for these lessons to gain vital
information and ask questions in relation to the completion of the assignment.

Week 7 - Graphic Notation (Composition Component)


Week 8 - Graphic Notation Cont… Start of modern technology (Soundtrack)
Week 9 - Influence of technology (Soundtrack & Self-reflection)

Compositional Score: Sheet Music

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Key Existing Content
Created Content
Modified Content
Recommendations
Self -Reflection

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1. In reflection of this assessment task, what notational methods have you consider or used
when creating your own composition.

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

2. How has technology affected or supported your composition? Explain your reasoning
with supporting technologies that may or may not have been used.

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

3. In reflection of another student’s composition, reflect on two qualities that you liked and
would consider within your own composition.

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

4. Where there any cultural, historical or social considerations that were implied within the
compositional process of your musical score?

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________
Key Existing Content
Created Content
___________________________________________________________________________
Modified Content
Recommendations
Marking Criteria (Part A: Notation)

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A • Demonstrates an outstanding knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Outstanding accuracy at reading/writing treble clef notes
85 - 100
Outstanding accuracy at reading/writing bass clef notes
Outstanding knowledge of traditional notes and note values
Outstanding recognition of different types of notation
Extensive knowledge of music terminology
Outstanding interpretation of a musical score
Outstanding literacy skills displayed through short answer responses
B • Demonstrates a thorough knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
A high level of accuracy at reading/writing treble clef notes
70 - 84
A high level of accuracy at reading/writing bass clef notes
A thorough knowledge of traditional notes and note values
Excellent recognition of different types of notation
Thorough knowledge of music terminology
Is able to interpret a musical score at a high level
Is able to thoroughly explain their short responses with a high level of literacy.
C • Demonstrates an adequate knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Can read/write most treble clef notes
50 - 69
Can read/write most bass clef notes
Has knowledge of most traditional notes and note values
Is able to recognise most of the different types of notation
Good knowledge of music terminology
Is able to interpret a musical score at an adequate level
Conveys good literacy skills through the short answer responses
D • Demonstrates partial knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Can read/write some treble clef notes
30 - 49
Can read/write some bass clef notes
Has knowledge of some traditional notes and note values
Is able to recognise a few different types of notation
Has some knowledge of music terminology
Can interpret a musical score at a basic level
Completes short answers with some literacy skills.
E • Demonstrates little knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Unable to read/write treble clef notes
1 - 29
Unable to read/write bass clef notes
No knowledge of traditional notes and note values
Unable to recognise different types of notation
No knowledge of music terminology
Cannot interpret a musical score
Limited short answers provided with low literacy skills shown.

Key Existing Content


Created Content
Modified Content
Recommendations
Marking Criteria (Part B: Composition)

21
A • Demonstrates an outstanding knowledge of musical notation through the compositional
score.
85 - 100
Outstanding recognition of the different types of notation (graphic, traditional, modern)
Outstanding design and inclusion of musical concepts within the composition.
Outstanding representation of selected instruments through notational method.
Outstanding interpretation of compositional score through musical example.
B • Demonstrates a thorough knowledge of musical notation through the compositional
score.
70 - 84
Detailed recognition of the different types of notation (graphic, traditional, modern)
In-depth design and inclusion of musical concepts within the composition.
Thorough representation of selected instruments through notational method.
Detailed interpretation of compositional score within musical example.
C • Demonstrates an adequate knowledge of musical notation provided in the compositional
score.
50 - 69
Adequate recognition of the different types of notation (graphic, traditional, modern)
Satisfactory design and inclusion of musical concepts within the composition.
Adequate representation of selected instruments through notational method.
Sound interpretation of compositional score within musical example.
D • Demonstrates partial knowledge of musical notation presented by the compositional
score.
30 - 49
Limited recognition of the different types of notation (graphic, traditional, modern)
Adequate design and inclusion of musical concepts within the composition.
Limited representation of selected instruments through notational method.
Some interpretation of the compositional score within the musical example.
E • Demonstrates little knowledge of musical notation demonstrated within the
compositional score.
1 - 29
Little recognition of the different types of notation (graphic, traditional, modern)
Limited design and inclusion of musical concepts within the composition.
Minimal representation of selected instruments through notational method.
Lack of interpretation within the compositional score in relation to the musical example.

Marking Criteria (Part B: Self-Reflection)


A • Student Self Reflection provided great insights into the process of composition and in
detail discusses the influence of personal and social abilities.
85 - 100
B • Student Self Reflection showed a well-developed awareness of the process of
composition and well-roundly discusses the influence of personal and social abilities.
70 - 84
C • Student Self Reflection showed a sound awareness of the process of composition and
discusses a sound influence of personal and social abilities.
50 - 69
D • Student Self Reflection showed some awareness of the process of composition and makes
some mention to the influence of personal and social abilities.
30 - 49
E • Student Self Reflection showed a lack of awareness of the process of composition and
limited response on the influence of personal and social ability of the student.
1 - 29

22
ST ANDREWS COLLEGE

STUDENT EVALUATION AND DECLARATION

Circle a number in response to the following statements:


(1 = strongly agree to 5 = strongly disagree)

This is my best work. 1 2 3 4 5

I was organized. 1 2 3 4 5

I understood the task. 1 2 3 4 5

I used the marking guidelines. 1 2 3 4 5

The process for completion of task was useful. 1 2 3 4 5

This assessment task took me 0-1 2-3 4-5 6-7 8+ hours to complete.

The outcome I feel I have demonstrated the best:


_________________________________________________________________________________________

The outcome that was the most challenging for me:


_________________________________________________________________________________________

Next time I will:


_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________

STUDENT DECLARATION:

This is all my own work. I have not plagiarised the work of others.

Student Name:
______________________________________________________________________

Signed: _______________________________________ Date:


_________________________

Plagiarism, or the submission of someone else’s work under the pretence that it is your own, is not acceptable at St Andrews
College. It is not permissible to copy words, phrases, paragraphs or whole assignments from books, internet sites or other
students. Any student who is discovered plagiarising will face harsh penalties. This is deemed a serious offence in all
educational facilities.

23
Key Existing Selection
Created Content
Modified Selection
Recommendations
d. Redesign unit outline

St Andrews College
Program Lead Statement
Course: Music Unit name: Notation Through The Ages
Hours: 15 Weeks: 10 Term: 1 Teacher: Class:
Lessons: 10 x 100 min
Continuum of Learning: Links to previous and future content and skills

This unit concentrates on Notation. Students learn about the concepts of Pitch, Duration, Dynamics & Expressive
Techniques, Tone Colour, Texture & Structure through a variety of whole class, small group and individual activities and
through the learning experiences of Performing (P), Composing (C) and Listening (L). Students will learn why music is
written down (notated) and the different types of notation that is used and has been used throughout history. The activities
are varied & can be modified or extended depending of the needs of the students.

Students with prior knowledge of notation skills are used as peer tutors in the class, particularly during group work
activities.
Enduring Understanding: what do we want the students to understand a year or decade later?

Firstly we will improvise & create our own music. Students will be asked to “write” down what they have created. How
do we record this music? Without technology how do we “record” this music. We will then discuss why music is written
down.

Students will then experience the many types of music notation with the cultural context as well – graphic, neumes,
tablature, drum/percussion notation, traditional. We will revise notation skills, and students will be taught a range of
notational devices (key signature, time signature…) and tested on their notation skills through a variety of collaborative
problem solving activities.

Students will have the opportunity to perform various music repertoires that will be provided to cater for the different
reading ability levels.

Students will also have the opportunity to write music through multiple means to show understanding of a selected
notational method. As a class we will discuss and question if some notational methods are better for specific occasions?

Students will then explore the role of technology in modern day notation. They will experience ‘tutorials’ and other forms
of teaching/recording music through interactive technologies and software.

Targeted Literacy Skills Targeted Text Types Targeted General Capabilities


Reading Comprehension Strategies Exposition Numeracy
Activating Prior Learning Discussion Problem Solving
Main Idea Narrative Personal Competence
Question Explanation Social Competence
Visualizing Recount Ethical Behaviour
Inferring Procedure Intercultural
Evaluating Report Understanding
Synthesizing
Key Vocab ( Tier 3 words)

Writing Skills Targeted Research Skills Targeted Thinking Skills


word level – glossaries, use of understanding task requirements Remembering
dictionaries, thesaurus, text type verbs, locating and selecting information Understanding
spelling analyzing information Applying
sentence structure – simple, compound, evaluating sources Analyzing
complex referencing Evaluating
paragraph structure Creating
essay structure
Checklist – P.O.W.E.R

24
Key Existing Selection
Created Content
Modified Selection
Recommendations
Targeted ICT Skills
ICT Applications ITC Competencies
word processing collect, analyse and / or organize data and information
databases communicate ideas and information in a variety of formats
spreadsheets plan, prepare and present project work
multimedia presentations aid in cooperation and communication with individuals and groups
graphics to develop competence in working with teams
e communication and research design, develop and present solutions, using appropriate IT to solve
hardware and software problems
management using mathematical ideas and techniques when conducting calculations in
databases and spreadsheets, algorithm data representation and binary notations
pupil selection of and engagement with a variety of appropriate
software and hardware to solve the problem, developing
competence in selecting and using technology

Step – 1 Desired Results


Outcomes
5.1 performs repertoire with increasing levels of complexity in a range of musical styles demonstrating an
understanding of the musical concepts
5.2 performs repertoire in a range of styles and genres demonstrating interpretation of musical notation and the
application of different types of technology
5.3 performs music selected for study with appropriate stylistic features demonstrating solo and ensemble awareness
5.4 demonstrates an understanding of the musical concepts through improvising, arranging and composing in the styles
or genres of music selected for study
5.5 notates own compositions, applying forms of notation appropriate to the music selected for study
5.6 uses different forms of technology in the composition process
5.7 demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through the analysis, comparison, and critical discussion of
music from different stylistic, social, cultural and historical contexts
5.8 demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through aural identification, discrimination, memorisation and
notation in the music selected for study
5.9 demonstrates an understanding of musical literacy through the appropriate application of notation, terminology and
the interpretation and analysis of scores used in the music selected for study
5.10 demonstrates an understanding of the influence and impact of technology on music

Understandings Essential Questions


• The role of music in society • What is the best practice for notating music?
• The reasons for notating music • Will music ever stop being written down?
• How technology has influenced music notation • How has technology affected the way we notate
music?

Students will learn about Students will learn to

• recognising the use of musical concepts in a • perform individually and in groups a range of repertoire
range of repertoire and styles characteristic of the and styles characteristic of the compulsory and additional
compulsory and additional topics studied topics studied
• understanding how the musical concepts are used • perform individually and in groups musical compositions
and manipulated in compositions and and arrangements characteristic of the compulsory and
arrangements in a range of styles, periods and additional topics studied
genres • perform and interpret music from a range of styles that
• understanding and interpreting various forms of use various forms of musical notation and technologies
musical notation and the impact of technology on • improvise and arrange individually and in groups in the
musical styles, periods and genres styles of the compulsory and additional topics studied
• improvise and compose individually and in groups
• improvising and arranging music in various
musical ideas characteristic of the compulsory and
styles, periods and genres
additional topics studied
• creating individually and in groups compositions
• notate compositional work using a range of notational
characteristic of the compulsory and additional
forms and technologies
topics studied

25
Key Existing Selection
Created Content
Modified Selection
Recommendations
• notating compositions using various forms of • listen to, analyse and compare a range of repertoire
traditional and non-traditional notation and characteristic of the compulsory and additional topics
technologies studied
• analysing and comparing music of various styles, • identify, compare and discriminate between ways in
periods and genres characteristic of the which musical concepts have been used and manipulated
compulsory and additional topics studied in a broad range of repertoire
• identifying and discriminating between ways in • interpret the range of repertoire for listening and analysis
which musical concepts have been used and
manipulated
• interpreting and analysing a broad range of
repertoire characteristic of the compulsory and
additional topics studied
Stage 1 - Reality Check
Have I included only the essential knowledge? Have I prioritized the most important skills?

Step 2 – Assessment Evidence


Formal (Task Weighting 25%) Informal:
Part A: (40%) Performance & Composition Task:
Notation Test Creation of notated music and presentation to
wider audience.
Part B: (60%)
Composition Task & Self-Reflection Collaborative Problem Solving Tasks
Research activities in groups that involve small
projects reflected through modern technologies.
Stage 2 - Reality Check
Have I allowed students the opportunity to rethink, revise, re do? Have I given clear rubrics / criteria for
assessment? Have I made the distinction between performance and product clear in the marking criteria?
Step 3 – Learning Strategies / Adaptations / Resources / Registration
Introductory Strategies Registration

Adaptations

Developmental Strategies - Phase 1


• As a class, improvise & create music using modes. Students are then asked to “write” down what they
have created in any form they would like to. Students then perform each other’s written notation.
How accurate were they? Were they easy to read?
• Why do we write down (notate) music? Brainstorm. Discuss.
• Graphic Notation: Students learn how to read graphic notation. In groups they will perform different
graphic notation. What are the pros/cons of graphic notation?
• Neumes: Students research neumes. What looks familiar to today’s notation? Discuss. Discuss Pope
Gregory’s influence & contribution to the development of music, not just religious music. Students
create and notate their own neumes to their original “Alleluia” This was done after the celebration
Mass – we looked at the Neumes in the Mass booklet!
• Traditional Notation: revise types of notes & rests. Students play Note brainer to test their note
identification skills. Students will then play a variety of music (students choose depending on their
skill level) on their chosen instrument testing their traditional notation skills
• Guitar Tabs: Students learn how to read guitar tabs. They will then play a guitar riff individually,
reading the guitar tabs (they have several choices of guitar riffs that cover a range of skill levels).
They are to help each other read the tabs.
• Drum Notation: Students learn how to read drum notation. They are given a handout with a variety of
drum patterns, written in drum notation. Using the drum kit, and the drum sounds on garage band and
the keyboards, they are to try the different drum patterns.

26
• Revise/teach clefs, stems, accidentals, key signatures, time signatures – students play music that
includes this notation.
• The influence of Technology – how else can we “record” music other than notating it? Students look
at Tutorials on the internet and try to learn music without notation.

Adaptations

Step 3 - Reality Check


Have I allowed reflective practice? Have I provided differentiation? Have I uncovered the content?

Registration of Unit:
Comments on effectiveness of teaching and learning strategies used, and any suggestions for the
future development of this unit:

Signature: Date:

27
References
Board of Studies NSW. (2003). Music Years 7 - 10 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.
Board of Studies Teaching and Educational Standards NSW. (2011). Australian Professional
Standards for Teachers. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW
Education Elements. (2018). Collaborative Learning Framework. Retrieved from
https://www.edelements.com/collaborative-learning-framework
Laal, M., & Ghodsi, S. (2012). Benefits of collaborative learning. Procedia - Social And
Behavioral Sciences, 31, 486-490. doi: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.12.091
NSW Department of Education. (2016). Strategic Information Technology Plan. Sydney:
NSW Department of Education.
NSW Department of Education and Communities. (2015). The Wellbeing framework for
schools. Sydney: NSW Department of Education and Communities.
NSW Government Department of Education and Training. (2008). Quality Teaching to
support the NSW Professional Teaching Standards. Sydney: Department of Education
and Training.
NSW Syllabus: Advice on scope and sequences. (2018). Retrieved from
https://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/scope-and-sequence-plans/
UDL: The UDL Guidelines. (2018). Retrieved from http://udlguidelines.cast.org/
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. (2017). Continuous
Assessment for Improved teaching and Learning: A Critical Review to Inform Policy and
Practice (p. 9). UNESCO International Bureau of Education.
Appendices of Original Documents

St Andrews College
Program Lead Statement
Course: Music Unit name: Notation Through The Ages
Hours: 15 Weeks: 6 Term: 1 Teacher: Class:
Lessons: Antonio Chiappetta
9 x 100 min
Continuum of Learning: Links to previous and future content and skills

This unit concentrates on Notation. Students learn about the concepts of Pitch, Duration, Dynamics & Expressive
Techniques, Tone Colour, Texture & Structure through a variety of whole class, small group and individual activities and
through the learning experiences of Performing (P), Composing (C) and Listening (L). Students will learn why music is
written down (notated) and the different types of notation that is used and has been used throughout history. The activities
are varied & can be modified or extended depending of the needs of the students.

Students with prior knowledge of notation skills are used as peer tutors in the class, particularly during group work
activities.

Enduring Understanding: what do we want the students to understand a year or decade later?

Firstly we will improvise & create our own music. Students will be asked to “write” down what they have created. How
do we record this music? Without technology how do we “record” this music. We will then discuss why music is written
down.

Students will then experience the many types of music notation with the cultural context as well – graphic, neumes,
tablature, drum/percussion notation, traditional. We will revise notation skills, and students will be taught a range of
notational devices (key signature, time signature…)

Students will have the opportunity to perform music written in different notation.

Students will also have the opportunity to write music in different notation. Is some notation better for specific occasions?

Students will then explore the role of technology in modern day notation. They will experience ‘tutorials’ and other forms
of teaching/recording music.

Targeted Literacy Skills Targeted Text Types Targeted General Capabilities


Reading Comprehension Strategies Exposition Numeracy
Activating Prior Learning Discussion Problem Solving
Main Idea Narrative Personal Competence
Question Explanation Social Competence
Visualizing Recount Ethical Behaviour
Inferring Procedure Intercultural
Evaluating Report Understanding
Synthesizing
Key Vocab ( Tier 3 words)

Writing Skills Targeted Research Skills Targeted Thinking Skills


word level – glossaries, use of understanding task requirements Remembering
dictionaries, thesaurus, text type verbs, locating and selecting Understanding
spelling information Applying
sentence structure – simple, compound, analyzing information Analyzing
complex evaluating sources Evaluating
paragraph structure referencing Creating
essay structure
Checklist – P.O.W.E.R
Targeted ICT Skills
ICT Applications ITC Competencies
word processing collect, analyse and / or organize data and information
databases communicate ideas and information in a variety of formats
spreadsheets plan, prepare and present project work
multimedia presentations aid in cooperation and communication with individuals and groups
graphics to develop competence in working with teams
e communication and research design, develop and present solutions, using appropriate IT to solve
hardware and software problems
management using mathematical ideas and techniques when conducting calculations in
databases and spreadsheets, algorithm data representation and binary notations
pupil selection of and engagement with a variety of appropriate
software and hardware to solve the problem, developing
competence in selecting and using technology

Step – 1 Desired Results


Outcomes
5.1 performs repertoire with increasing levels of complexity in a range of musical styles demonstrating an
understanding of the musical concepts
5.2 performs repertoire in a range of styles and genres demonstrating interpretation of musical notation and the
application of different types of technology
5.3 performs music selected for study with appropriate stylistic features demonstrating solo and ensemble awareness
5.4 demonstrates an understanding of the musical concepts through improvising, arranging and composing in the
styles or genres of music selected for study
5.5 notates own compositions, applying forms of notation appropriate to the music selected for study
5.6 uses different forms of technology in the composition process
5.7 demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through the analysis, comparison, and critical discussion of
music from different stylistic, social, cultural and historical contexts
5.8 demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through aural identification, discrimination, memorisation
and notation in the music selected for study
5.9 demonstrates an understanding of musical literacy through the appropriate application of notation, terminology
and the interpretation and analysis of scores used in the music selected for study
5.10 demonstrates an understanding of the influence and impact of technology on music

Understandings Essential Questions


• The role of music in society • What is the best practice for notating music?
• The reasons for notating music • Will music ever stop being written down?
• How technology has influenced music notation

Students will learn about Students will learn to

• recognising the use of musical concepts in a • perform individually and in groups a range of repertoire
range of repertoire and styles characteristic of the and styles characteristic of the compulsory and
compulsory and additional topics studied additional topics studied
• understanding how the musical concepts are used • perform individually and in groups musical
and manipulated in compositions and compositions and arrangements characteristic of the
arrangements in a range of styles, periods and compulsory and additional topics studied
genres
• understanding and interpreting various forms of • perform and interpret music from a range of styles that
musical notation and the impact of technology on use various forms of musical notation and technologies
musical styles, periods and genres
• improvise and arrange individually and in groups in the
• improvising and arranging music in various
styles of the compulsory and additional topics studied
styles, periods and genres

30
• creating individually and in groups compositions • improvise and compose individually and in groups
characteristic of the compulsory and additional musical ideas characteristic of the compulsory and
topics studied additional topics studied
• notating compositions using various forms of
traditional and non-traditional notation and • notate compositional work using a range of notational
technologies forms and technologies
• analysing and comparing music of various styles,
periods and genres characteristic of the • listen to, analyse and compare a range of repertoire
compulsory and additional topics studied characteristic of the compulsory and additional topics
• identifying and discriminating between ways in studied
which musical concepts have been used and • identify, compare and discriminate between ways in
manipulated which musical concepts have been used and
• interpreting and analysing a broad range of manipulated in a broad range of repertoire
repertoire characteristic of the compulsory and • interpret the range of repertoire for listening and
additional topics studied analysis

Stage 1 - Reality Check


Have I included only the essential knowledge? Have I prioritized the most important skills?

Step 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks Other Evidence
Notation Test Students performing music written in different
20% 5.8, 5.9 notation

Stage 2 - Reality Check


Have I allowed students the opportunity to rethink, revise, re do? Have I given clear rubrics / criteria for
assessment? Have I made the distinction between performance and product clear in the marking criteria?
Step 3 – Learning Strategies / Adaptations / Resources / Registration
Introductory Strategies Registration

Adaptations

Developmental Strategies - Phase 1


• As a class, improvise & create music using modes. Students are then asked to “write” down what 31/1/17
they have created in any form they would like to. Students then perform each other’s written
notation. How accurate were they? Were they easy to read?
6/2/17
• Why do we write down (notate) music? Brainstorm. Discuss.
• Graphic Notation: Students learn how to read graphic notation. In groups they will perform 6/2/17
different graphic notation. What are the pros/cons of graphic notation?
• Neumes: Students research neumes. What looks familiar to today’s notation? Discuss. Discuss Pope 24/2/17
Gregory’s influence & contribution to the development of music, not just religious music. Students
create and notate their own neumes to their original “Alleluia” This was done after the celebration
Mass – we looked at the Neumes in the Mass booklet!
• Traditional Notation: revise types of notes & rests. Students play Note brainer to test their note 14/2/17
identification skills. Students will then play a variety of music (students choose depending on their
skill level) on their chosen instrument testing their traditional notation skills 20/2/17
• Guitar Tabs: Students learn how to read guitar tabs. They will then play a guitar riff individually,
reading the guitar tabs (they have several choices of guitar riffs that cover a range of skill levels).
They are to help each other read the tabs.
• Drum Notation: Students learn how to read drum notation. They are given a handout with a variety 24/2/17
of drum patterns, written in drum notation. Using the drum kit, and the drum sounds on garage band
and the keyboards, they are to try the different drum patterns.

31
• Revise/teach clefs, stems, accidentals, key signatures, time signatures – students play music that 24/2/17
includes this notation.
• The influence of Technology – how else can we “record” music other than notating it? Students 28/2/17
look at Tutorials on the internet and try to learn music without notation.

Adaptations

Step 3 - Reality Check


Have I allowed reflective practice? Have I provided differentiation? Have I uncovered the content?

Registration of Unit:
Comments on effectiveness of teaching and learning strategies used, and any suggestions for the
future development of this unit:

32
KLA Creative And Performing Arts
COURSE Yr 9 Music
TASK NAME Notation Test
TYPE OF TASK Written Test
TASK NUMBER 1
TASK WEIGHTING 20%
TASK MAXIMUM MARK 100
TASK OUTCOMES 5.7, 5.8, 5.9
SYLLABUS COMPONENT Listening
LEADER OF LEARNING Mrs Ryan
KLA
TEACHER/S Mr Chiappetta
DATE OF ISSUE Term 1 Week 5
DUE DATE Term 1 Week 7

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMISSION


• Students will sit a written exam

TASK DETAILS

Outcomes assessed:
5.7 demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through the analysis, comparison,
and critical discussion of music from different stylistic, social, cultural and historical contexts
5.8 demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through aural identification,
discrimination, memorisation and notation in the music selected for study
5.9 demonstrates an understanding of musical literacy through the appropriate
application of notation, terminology and the interpretation and analysis of scores
used in the music selected for study

The student will:

Sit a Written Notation Test to demonstrate their notation skills.

33
Task Description:

Students will sit a notation test under exam conditions. It will cover:
1. Notation (musical notes, types of notes & rests)
2. Musical terminology

Process on how to complete the task:

Revise & study for the test


Use the Notebrainer APP to prepare

Marking Criteria
A • Demonstrates an outstanding knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Outstanding accuracy at reading/writing treble clef notes
85 - 100
Outstanding accuracy at reading/writing bass clef notes
Outstanding knowledge of traditional notes and note values
Outstanding recognition of different types of notation
Extensive knowledge of music terminology
Outstanding interpretation of a musical score
B • Demonstrates a thorough knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
A high level of accuracy at reading/writing treble clef notes
70 - 84
A high level of accuracy at reading/writing bass clef notes
A thorough knowledge of traditional notes and note values
Excellent recognition of different types of notation
Thorough knowledge of music terminology
Is able to interpret a musical score at a high level
C • Demonstrates an adequate knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Can read/write most treble clef notes
50 - 69
Can read/write most bass clef notes
Has knowledge of most traditional notes and note values
Is able to recognise most of the different types of notation
Good knowledge of music terminology
Is able to interpret a musical score at an adequate level
D • Demonstrates partial knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Can read/write some treble clef notes
30 - 49
Can read/write some bass clef notes
Has knowledge of some traditional notes and note values
Is able to recognise a few different types of notation
Has some knowledge of music terminology
Can interpret a musical score at a basic level
E • Demonstrates little knowledge of musical notation and musical terminology
Unable to read/write treble clef notes
1 - 29
Unable to read/write bass clef notes
No knowledge of traditional notes and note values
Unable to recognise different types of notation
No knowledge of music terminology
Cannot interpret a musical score

34
ST ANDREWS COLLEGE

STUDENT EVALUATION AND DECLARATION

Circle a number in response to the following statements:


(1 = strongly agree to 5 = strongly disagree)

This is my best work. 1 2 3 4 5

I was organized. 1 2 3 4 5

I understood the task. 1 2 3 4 5

I used the marking guidelines. 1 2 3 4 5

The process for completion of task was useful. 1 2 3 4 5

This assessment task took me 0-1 2-3 4-5 6-7 8+ hours to complete.

The outcome I feel I have demonstrated the best:


_________________________________________________________________________________________
____

The outcome that was the most challenging for me:


_________________________________________________________________________________________
_____

Next time I will:


_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________

STUDENT DECLARATION:

This is all my own work. I have not plagiarised the work of others.

Student Name:
______________________________________________________________________

Signed: _______________________________________ Date:


_________________________

Plagiarism, or the submission of someone else’s work under the pretence that it is your own, is not acceptable at St Andrews
College. It is not permissible to copy words, phrases, paragraphs or whole assignments from books, internet sites or other
students. Any student who is discovered plagiarising will face harsh penalties. This is deemed a serious offence in all
educational facilities.

35