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1 Goin’ up the ladder

R ESO U RCES P CD1 track 1 (performance); CD2 track x (backing)

Information 1
When everyone feels confident, divide the choir into
‘Goin’ up the ladder’ is a call and response song, similar in two equal groups––one sings the call and the other the
style to many street games, work songs, and military response.
chants. Rarely pretty, the style is about being together
with others and singing with spirit. This type of song is Ideas
often accompanied by a physical activity such as skipping, 1
Experiment with who sings which part. Swap around
clapping, or dancing, which helps to cement the rhythm the groups in the choruses, so everyone gets to sing
and give a sense of pulse. both call and response, or perhaps use a soloist on part
This is an entry-level song, ideal for less experienced or 1 in the verses. Alternatively, to give as many as possible
younger singers. Both parts are suitable for all voices. the chance for a short solo spot, ask individuals to sing
the phrase after the counting in the verse:

Starting Group 1: Up one,


Group 2: Up one,

… 44 >Š Š Š >Š q >Š Š Š >Š q .


1
Start by clapping the following rhythm, in swing,
emphasizing the first and fourth quaver/eighth-note: Soloist: Work to be done.
1
The group can use this song as a basis to create their
own call and response. Perhaps invent new words using
1
As you repeat, make the second and third claps quieter, the existing melody or compose your own tune. The
and eventually just think them, clapping only first and counting rhyme in the verses can be extended as far as
fourth notes. you like, with the leader signalling the return to the
1
Now play the bass-line of the piano part, and ask the chorus.
1
group to listen to the rhythm and clap what they Try singing while jumping! Playing a game such as
hear––note that the rhythm just covered appears in the ‘double dutch’ while singing can improve breathing and
second bar. make the sound more powerful.
1
With more advanced singers, split the group into two
and get them to clap the piano and vocal parts together, Listen out
being sure to anticipate the beat in the piano part only. 1
1
Make sure all the singers remember where the key
The melody of this song is based on the major
change happens.
pentatonic scale. After some deep breaths, sing an F to
‘ah’––strong and simple. Expand the range down to D
1
#
Listen out for the tuning of the G on ‘heaven’ in bar
38––this is the only note outside the pentatonic scale.
and C, and then up to G and A. Finally, put them 1
Check that the rhythm of ‘You mean there?’ is secure in

V b44 Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š ‰ q
together starting on the fifth (C), focusing on each pitch
bar 53, with no gap between the entries in the first and
as you go:
second parts.
1
Is the tone suitable for this type of song? Keep the
sound bright and solid throughout. Try omitting the
pitch altogether at the end.
Teaching and rehearsing
1
This song is easily taught by rote. Start with the chorus, Performing
1
using call and response: you sing the first part to the This song works best if singers interact with each other
group, and they sing it back by ear. Practise the smears during performance, as if part of a street game. Have
on ‘Don’t hold me back!’. fun, and show this in your movements and facial
1
Next teach the last four bars, where the call is different expressions.
1
from the response. Add this to the section from bar 45 Stomp, clap, or click during the piece, or add
(a repeat of the opening). Note that this section is up a homemade percussion (pots, pans, brooms).
1
tone from the beginning. Try creating an assembly line or a ‘taking a break from
1
Finally, work on the verses, with the two parts singing work’ tableau.
1
together on ‘work to be done’, ‘gonna see it through’, Include the audience by asking them to join in with the
etc. chorus or movements.

2 1. Goin’ up the ladder


1 Goin’ up the ladder Music and words: Steve Milloy,

h = 84
with additional words by Norman Welch

V b 22 p q r #Š/ Š t eŠ
Funky march; swing
b
ˆˆ ‰‰
F7 B 7/F

bŠ Š >-
{ B b 22 r Š-. r Š-. t Š-e q .Š- - r Š-. r Š-.
t Še q
Piano mf

Š-. Š -

V b #Š/ Š r q q r #Š/ Š
5 F7

ˆˆ ‰‰ t eŠ b
B 7/F

bŠ bŠ Š >-
{ B b r Š r Š t Še q
Š-. -. -. - Š- Š
.
- r Š-. r Š-. t Še q
-

€V b mfŠ Š Š Š Š Š p ŠŠŠ Š Š p
Chorus
9

p p
Go-in’ up the lad-der, got-ta get up there.

2
 V b Š
mf
Š Š Š Š Š ŠŠŠ Š Š
Go-in’ up the lad - der, got-ta get up there.

V b #Š/ Š r q q
F7

r #Š/ Š ˆˆ ‰‰ t eŠ B 7/Fb
bŠ bŠ Š >-
{ B b r Š r Š t Še q
-. -. - .Š- - r Š-. r Š-.
Š t Še q
-
© Oxford University Press 2012

Š-.
This page may be photocopied 1. Goin’ up the ladder 3
€V b Še Š Še Š r q r t Še Š Š Š Š Š
13
(
 V b p Še Š Še Š r q r t Še
Don’t hold me back! I’m gon-na get up there.

(
V b #Š/ Š r q q
Don’t hold me back! I’m

r #Š/ Š ˆ
F7

bŠ bŠ ˆ
{ Š-. Š-. Š-. Š-e q Š- Š-. r Š-.
B b r r t r
€V b q
16

r Š Š r q
f
Še Š Še Š ( Š
b
V Š Š Š Š Š r Š Š r Še Š Še Š r
1. Up one, work to be done. Up
f (

bV r t b Š Š. Š. =b Š- .Š r Š. b ŠŠ. #Š/>Š . =ŠŠ. e r
>
gon - na get up there. 1. Up one, work to be done.
F7

f Š.
{ B b Š-. t Š-e q bŠ- >Š. Š- r Š-. t Š-e q
f

€V b Š r q
19

ŠŠŠŠ Š Š Š r q
V b r Š Š r Š Š Š Š Š r r Š Š r
two, gon - na see it through. Up three,

-Š > -
bV =b Š- .Š r Š. b ŠŠ. #Š/Š . =ŠŠ. e r Š. =b Š-Š .Š r Š. b ŠŠ.
Up two, gon - na see it through. Up three,

{ B b bŠ- >Š. Š- r Š-. t Š-e q bŠ- >Š. Š- r


© Oxford University Press 2012

4 1. Goin’ up the ladder This page may be photocopied


15 Hard Times Come Again No More
SSA or TBarB version

€V # # # # 4
Stephen Collins Foster

p . p p
h = 72
p
arr. Steve Milloy

[ 4
Contemporary country folk; earthy and hopeful

Voices

# # #
V # 44 r t Š/Š Š Š Š . Š/Š Š Š Š ‰‰ ŠŠ ‰‰ Š Š Š ŠŠ
( )

mff Š Š Š
A E E/B B9(sus4) E A E

{ #44
B# # # p .‰ Š Š ‰ ‰ ŠŠ Š.Š . ŠŠe
Piano

€V # # # # q Š Š ‰ Š Š Š ‰ Š Š Š Še Š Še
[ Š
(opt. solo or soli)
5 mp
( )
( (
1. Let us pause in life’s plea - sures and count its ma - ny tears,
2. While we seek mirth and beau - ty and mu - sic light and gay,
3. There’s a pale, droop - ing mai - den who toils her life a - way,

# #
V # ˆˆ t t
4. ’Tis a sigh that is waft - ed a - cross the trou-bled wave,

# e Š Š Š Š Š Še Š Š ‰ r ‰ Š
Š
#
Š ‰
E E/G A

{ # ˆˆ
B# # #
‰. Š ‰ ŠŠŠ ‰ ‰
mp

€V # # # # ‰ mfŠ Š Š ‰ ‰Š Še Š . Š Š Š ˆ
[ Š
9

( )
While we all sup sor - row with the poor;
There are frail forms faint-ing at the door;
With a worn heart whose bet - ter days are o’er:

# #
V # ŠŠ ‰ (=)Š Š Š/‰ Š Š ‰‰ Š ŠŠ Š Š Š
’Tis a wail that is heard up - on the shore,

#
E A E/B A6/B E A

{ # ‰ Š #Š ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
B# # # mf
© Oxford University Press 2012

82 15. Hard Times Come Again No More This page may be photocopied
€V #### q mp Š Š ‰ Š Š Š ‰ Š Š Š Še Š Še
[ Š
13

( )
( (
There’s a song that will lin - ger for - ev - er in our ears;
Though their voi - ces are si - lent, their plead-ing looks will say,
Though her voice would be mer - ry, ’tis sigh - ing all the day,

#
V # # t t
’Tis a dirge that is mur-mured a - round the low - ly grave.

# Š Š mp‰‰ Še Š Š Š Š Š Še Š Š ‰ r ‰ Š
‰ Š
E/G # # F m7 E E/G# A

{ #
B# # # ‰ ‰ ‰. Š ‰ ŠŠŠ ‰ ‰
€V # # # # ‰ ‰
17
Š.Š . Še Š Š Š
mf
Š ŠŠŠ ŠŠ ˆ q Š ŠŠ
Chorus
mf
f
(mel.)
1
2
[
# #
( ) (mel.)

#
[ ‰ ‰
V # Šmf. Še Š Š Š Š ŠŠŠ ŠŠ q Šmf Š Š
Oh, hard times come a -gain no more. ’Tis the song,

3
ˆ
# #
V # ŠŠ ‰ (=)Š Š Š Š Š Š ŠŠ ŠŠ Š Š Š
( )

# E A

Š Š/‰ Š
E/B

Š ‰‰ Š
A6/B E A E B5

{ # ‰ Š #Š
B# # # ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Š ŠŠ ‰ ‰
mf

€V # # # # ‰ r Š Š .. #ŠŠe ŠŠ Š (=)ˆ‰ Š =Š Š Š ‰ .. Š.
r Š. Še Š Š Š
f
22 f
f
# #
[
# #
( )

[ ‰ r
V Š Š . =Še Š Š ‰ . Š ‰ . r Šf . Še Š Š Š
the sigh of the wea - ry, Hard times

# #
V # Š Š/‰ ŠŠ .. = # ŠŠe ŠŠ ŠŠ = ŠŠ .. Šf Š Š ŠŠ ŠŠ .. ŠŠe ŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ .. ŠŠ ŠŠ Š
( )

#
b
Š
E E7( 5) E7 A E A6/B E

f
{ B## # ‰ ‰
#
ŠŠ ŠŠ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Š Š
© Oxford University Press 2012

mf f

This page may be photocopied 15. Hard Times Come Again No More 83
€V # # # # Š Š Š Š r
27

Š ŠŠŠ ŠŠ
mf unis.

ŠrŠŠŠ
mp
( ‰ Š Š Š ‰ Š
# # # #
[
[ Š Š Š Š r
V Šmf Š Š Š Š Š Š r mpŠ Š Š ‰ Š Š Š ‰ Š
( )
hard times come a-gain no more. Ma-ny days you have lin - gered a -

(
# .
V ## # ŠŠ . ŠŠf ŠŠ Š t eŠ Š Š Š Š t Še Š Š ‰
( )

# ˆˆ ŠŠ Š = ‰‰
# # # # #
Š
F m/C C m7 F7 B A/B E E/G

{ #‰ ‰
B# # # ‰ ‰ ŠŠŠŠ ‰. Š ‰ ŠŠŠ
dim. mp

€V # # # # Š e Š Še ‰ ‰ Š.Š . Še Š Š Š Š ŠŠŠ ŠŠ ˆ
ŠŠ
32
f dim.

f
(
#
[
#
(mel.)

#
( )

V
[ Š # Š Še Š Še ‰ ‰ Šf . Še Š Š Š Š ŠŠŠ ŠŠ
- round my ca-bin door; Oh, hard times come a - gain no more.

( ˆ
V #### r
( )

‰‰ ŠŠ ŠŠ ‰ (=) Š Š Š/‰ Š Š ‰‰ Š ‰‰ Š Š Š ŠŠ
dim.
A E A E/B A6/B E A E

{ #‰
B# # # ‰ ‰ Š #Š ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Š ŠŠ
f dim.

€V # # # # p .
37
p x4
p
rit.

p p
[##
V
[ # # p . p p p p
( )
x4

# #
V # ŠŠ .. Š/Šf Š Š Š . Š/Š Š Š Š Š Š
# Š ‰‰ ŠŠ F
( )

‰‰ Š‰ Š Š Š Š/ˆˆ
rit.
A x4 E E/B B9(sus4) E A E

{B#### ‰ q . ‰ Š Š ‰ ‰ Š
Š ‰‰
mpF
mf
ˆ
© Oxford University Press 2012

84 15. Hard Times Come Again No More This page may be photocopied
18 Guiding Light
R ESO U RCES P CD1 track 18 (performance); CD2 track x (backing)

Information 1
Rounds are much more interesting to sing from
‘Guiding Light’ is a contemporary R&B ballad for female memory, so try to memorize the song as you go, over a
voices, inspired by artists such as Mary J. Blige and couple of sessions. This will ultimately encourage
Corinne Bailey Rae. The scoring is flexible, making the listening among the group, and develop ensemble skills.
song ideal for a mixed-ability group of girls containing
both high and low voices. A less-experienced group can Ideas
sing it straight through in two to four parts, while more 1
Try giving each line a different tone quality. The first
advanced singers can perform it as a round, with each part could be smooth and personal, mid-level, with
person starting with Part 1 and continuing all the way chest resonances. Part 2, with its low
through to Part 4. semiquavers/sixteenth-notes, needs clearer diction so
that the words cut through the texture. Parts 3 and 4
Starting should be light and floating, in head voice, possibly
1
Stretch up high with both hands. Reach up higher and with some breathiness (see the ‘voo, voo, voo’ exercise
towards the centre with one hand, and lean sideways. on p. x).
1
Feel the stretch up that side of your body from your Experiment with different forms. Here are some ideas:
0
hips to your shoulders. Repeat on the other side, and Have a soloist perform Parts 1 and 2 to open the song.
0
then release slowly, exhaling as you do so. Perform the whole song as a round initially, then split
1
a
Establish the pulse at = 66, counting four beats in a it up into separate lines.
0
bar out loud. Subdivide into quavers/eighth-notes, Add an instrumental verse without singing.
1
saying ‘1-an-2-an-3-an-4-an’, and then finally Dynamics have not been given for the vocal parts, so
semiquavers/sixteenth-notes: once you’ve decided on a form, experiment to see what
‘1-ee-an-a-2-ee-an-a-3-ee-an-a-4-ee-an-a’. With this works for your group. One option would be to build the
subdivision in mind, say the words ‘Nothin’ left to fear’. dynamics gradually as the different parts enter.
1
Sing a low ‘ah’, with a warm, rich tone. Yawn, and try
again, aiming for a feeling of space at the back of your Improvising toolbox
mouth as you raise your soft palette. Now try singing 1
Try adding an improvised line above the round, or
the word ‘light’ instead, again on long, low notes. If you include a section with solo or group improvising. You
keep the yawning feeling at the back of your mouth, can use the piano part as a backing, or sing a cappella.
you shouldn’t need to open your jaw too much. 1
To start, sing the minor pentatonic scale on A to ‘oh’,

VŠ Š Š Š Š Š
‘do’, and ‘yay’:
Teaching and rehearsing
1
Start with everyone on Part 1, singing in any octave
that is comfortable at this stage. Focus on creating a

V Š Š Š bŠ =Š Š Š
sustained sound on the long notes, and on careful
tuning.
1
=
Make this into a blues scale by adding in an E :

1
For Part 2, say the words to the rhythm first, aiming for
clarity and referring back to the exercise above if
necessary. Sing it through, and then put Parts 1 and 2
1
together. Now try out some fragments that you can use in your
1
If you prefer a simpler version of the song, end with the improvising. It can help to see the scale in two parts. In
‘last time’ bar after Part 2. Otherwise, move on to Parts 3 the lower half, try A C A, then A C ‘D C A, then A C D
and 4. These lines are best suited to higher voices, and
they work well as backing vocals, since the rhythms are
1
b = = =
E D C A; and in the upper half E G E , then E G A G A.
Also try playing a copying game. In a circle, one person
similar. chooses and sings a phrase from the song (such as
1
Finally, either allocate a group of singers to each part ‘You’re my light’) and everyone sings it back. Repeat
and end with the ‘last time’ bar or, if your singers have this with a different person and phrase, and so on. Do
the range to perform all four parts, sing the whole song the same again, but this time each singer makes up their
in sequence as a round, as on the CD demo. own phrase, wordless or with lyrics, and everyone

102 18. Guiding Light


copies back. Encourage singers to use ideas from the Performing
game in their improvisation. 1
Remember that you can vary the form each time you
perform the song. This will keep the performance fresh
Listen out and singers on their toes. Each line works on its own, so
1
Listen carefully to words like ‘guide’ (‘g-ah-ee-d’), which most performances should include some sections in
contain diphthongs, and ask singers to identify other unison and some in parts. This will also enable the
examples. Are they aware of when they move from the audience to hear the story of the song, and to recognise
‘ah’ to the ‘ee’ on long notes? Do they move together? parts sung in combination that they initially heard one
1
Rather than positioning singers according to part, try by one.
1
mixing everyone up. This can teach inexperienced Think about the person being described in the song,
singers to sing their own part with added confidence. and the strong commitment the singer feels to them.
1
Rounds can be tiring to sing, so listen out for signs of How might that affect the way you sing?
1
fatigue. Decide on a form and length to suit the group. The director should cue the Coda clearly, as singers can
easily get lost in a round.

18 Guiding Light Music: Charles Beale

€V 4 p i = 66
q
Words: John Moysen

Š Š
R&B ballad; melancholy

1
4
V 44 p p
You’re my

3 V 44 p p
4
V 44 p p
i = 66
V 44 ŠŠ =# ŠŠ ... t Š
R&B ballad; melancholy

ŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ
Fmaj7 #
E7( 9)

(#)Š
{ B 44 Š Š. Š Š. e Š Še Š . t r t Š bŠ
Piano p
© Oxford University Press 2012

* Sing each part through in sequence.

This page may be photocopied 18. Guiding Light 103


€V r
ˆ Š Š Š
3 Part 1*

V ŠŠ t .
Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š
Š tŠ . 
life, like a

Š
Part 2
( (
V ‰. Š Š ‰. r
no-thin’ left to fear when your love is near, I on-ly need to hear your voice, my dear. There’s
Part 3

V ‰. ŠŠ Š r r tŠ Š
guid - ing light,
Part 4

V . ŠŠ ŠŠ .. ŠŠ. r r #= ŠŠ ŠŠ ... ŠŠ r
guid - ing light, you’re my

ŠŠ
Dm7 # E7( 9)

..
{ .Š
B mp
Š Š. Š Š . Š .ue
Š.- Š Š Š Š. Š u Še.
-
€V r
Š Š Š ‰ Š Š Š
5

VŠŠ t . t .
star at night. In my

Š Š
Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š Š
( (
V ‰. Š Š. Še Š t ŠŠ
no-thin’ in the world that I’d ra-ther do than sit a-round and spend my life with you. There’s

Š
V ‰. ŠŠ Š r r tŠ Š
guid - - - ing ligh - - - hight, you’re my

uŠ Še.
guid - - - ing light, you’re my

V =ŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ b ŠŠ Š b ŠŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ ..
Am7 Fm(add4)/A b Gm11 C9(sus4) b
Em7( 5)

Š. Š .
{B Š Š .Š Š Š bŠ Š. =ŠbŠ Š. Š. u Š-e.
© Oxford University Press 2012

104 18. Guiding Light This page may be photocopied


19 Gonna Make a Wish
R ESO U RCES P CD1 track 19 (performance); CD2 track x (backing)

Information 1
Finally work on verse 3, after the key change. This
Many classic 1960s pop tunes were heavily influenced by should build up considerable intensity, allowing the top
the vocal inflections and forms of the gospel music of US F in the lead part (bar 30) to be confident and soaring.
black churches. For this reason, pop, early R&B, gospel
jazz, soul, and Motown overlapped to a considerable Ideas
degree, with artists such as Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, and 1
To lengthen the arrangement (and give the singers a
Tina Turner paving the way for the likes of Elvis Presley break!), try repeating the form of the first two verses
and the ‘queen of blue-eyed soul’, Dusty Springfield. with an instrumental solo replacing the voices.
‘Gonna make a wish’ embodies the spirit of that gospel
soul style.
Listen out
Presented here for lead voice and backing vocals (any 1
Are the words and rhythms coming across clearly at
octave), the song would work equally well for SSAB or SAB tempo? Rehearse slowly to ensure clarity, and then try
plus soloist. singing faster than the given tempo to loosen things up.
When you go back to the original speed, the song
Starting should feel relaxed but forward-moving.
1
1
Stand still in silence and become aware of tension in Listen carefully to the key change. Does the group really
your body. Release it as best you can. Feel your head rise a complete semitone/half-step? If in doubt, invent a
floating up and forward away from your body, and warm-up where first one note and then a familiar
swing your arms from side to side. Feel naturally tall, melody is sung twice––once at pitch and again up a
without trying. half-step.
1
1
Next massage your own neck for a few seconds, and The phrase ‘really can come true’ repeats many times
then massage a friend’s. Shrug your shoulders, and find and needs care to ensure that the anticipation of the
the place where they float in a relaxed way, not too far beat on ‘true’ sounds relaxed. Encourage singers to
forward or back. listen carefully to the piano part to help the groove to
1
Once everyone’s relaxed, add some energy. To the lock in.
groove of the music, sway flexibly from side to side, as if
the top half of your body is disconnected from the Performing
bottom. As you sway, take a deep, relaxed breath and 1
In the 1960s there was a certain formality to the
sing ‘Gonna make a wish’. Feel how the body presentation of this type of song, especially on big TV
movement frees up your breathing apparatus and occasions. Smart dress is therefore to be encouraged,
connects the voice with the breath. ideally with glamour!
1
This song is ripe for a 60s-style dance routine. For
Teaching and rehearsing inspiration, look up old video clips featuring the Twist,
1
Start by singing the first verse in unison to get the the Mashed Potato, the Watusi, or the Pony.
overall shape. Take a moment to work on the tone
quality and vowel sound, especially for the low Bs.
1
Assign parts for verse 2. If using mixed voices on each
part, aim for approximately half the group singing the
lead line and half the backing vocals (divided into
three). Listen for balance and adjust as necessary.
1
Next focus on the final build-up from bar 37. Check
that ‘really’ becomes ‘really, really’ at the right time (on
cue at bar 39), and make the most of the interplay
between the parts. The ‘hoo!’s in the lead part are just a
bit of fun, so the tone can be less pretty and more
piercing.

19. Gonna Make a Wish 107


19 Gonna Make a Wish
> ^
Music and words: Charles Beale,
i = 168
# # # t ^ e t t ^ > ^
with additional words by David Major

V 4 r Š Š =Š Š. Še Š Š Š . Š Še Š Š =Š Š. Še Š ŠŠ ŠŠ .. ŠŠe .
# Š Š . Š
Sassy 1960s gospel soul
E A E
E A E

> >
4
^ ^ ^ ^
{ # 4 r Š Š f Š. f Š Š Š f Š Š. Še .
B# # # f .t
=Š Š Š Š Š Š t e =Š .
Š t Š Š
Piano

4
€V #### . t mf Š r q t
Še Š Š =Š Š Še Š Š =Š Š Š
5

Lead
[
( ( )

#
( )

# # p p
1. I’m gon-na make a wish, ’cos it - ’ll set me

V[ # . mp e e
r ŠŠ ŠŠ Š
2. I’m gon-na have a dream; gon-na scream and
2nd time only
1

# #
2

V[ # # . p r f fmpŠ Š Š Š Š p
Backing ( )
(2.) Gon-na have a dream;
vocals 2nd time only
3

# #
V # . r Š Š =Š Š. r ŠŠ ŠŠ .. ŠŠe r Š Š =Š Š.
#
( )
(2.) Gon-na have a dream;
E A E

. .
{ B# # # # . r Š Š =Š .
Š Š . Še Š. e Š. r Š Š =Š .
Š
Piano mf

€V # # # # r q t e =Š Š ‰ ‰ =Š Š Š Š Š
Š ŠŠŠ
8
(
# #
[
V[ # r Š Š Še Š Še p ˆ
#
( )
free! I’m gon-na tell the whole world who I want to be.

ˆ
shout! I’m gon-na tell the whole world what I dream a - bout.

V # # # # r Š Š Š Š Š p ˆ (#)ˆ
[
( )

f f
gon-na scream and shout! ah

# # # #
V r ŠŠ ŠŠ .. ŠŠe r Š Š =Š Š. r ŠŠ ŠŠ .. r Š. Š .. t # t
( )
gon-na scream and shout! ah
E A E E E6 C m7

B# # . . . .
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# =Š Š Š. Šf ‰ Š. Še ‰
© Oxford University Press 2012

108 19. Gonna Make a Wish This page may be photocopied


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Just be - lieve wish-ing makes the world brand new

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Just be - lieve dream-ing makes the world brand new

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And all your wish - es real - ly can come true.

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© Oxford University Press 2012

This page may be photocopied 19. Gonna Make a Wish 109