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NetApp Lab on Demand (LOD) – Fast Track 301

Advanced Concepts for ONTAP 9


September 2016 | SL10280 Version 1.3

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Contents
Lab Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..………….3
PREREQUISITES……………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………3 Lab
Configuration………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...…….….4 Use
Case Scenario………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...5
CUSTOMER BACKGROUND………………………………………………………………………………………………..….5
CURRENT REQUIREMENT ..................................................................................................................................... 5
LAB ACTIVITIES WITH RELEVANCE TO CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS ................................................................ 5
LOG IN TO THE CLUSTER USING THE COMMAND LINE ........................................................................................ 6
LOG OUT OF THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE ......................................................................................................... 7
LOG IN TO THE CLUSTER USING SYSTEM MANAGER ......................................................................................... 8
Lab Activities……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…….12
ACTIVITY 1: ENABLING STORAGE EFFICIENCY FEATURES .............................................................................. 12
ACTIVITY 2: NONDISRUPTIVE VOLUME MOVE OPERATION................................................................................... 16
ACTIVITY 3: NONDISRUPTIVE LIF MIGRATION ................................................................................................... 19

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Lab Introduction
This document provides the steps to complete the Hands-on Lab for Advanced Concepts for clustered
ONTAP 9. This lab is customized for System Engineer (SE) Fast Track 301 program.

This lab begins by showing you how to log in to the cluster as an administrator. The “Before You Begin”
section describes how to log in to and out of PuTTY and OnCommand System Manager.

The lab focuses on some of the storage efficiency features of ONTAP 9, such as deduplication and
compression. This lab also provides steps to demonstrate the volume move operation nondisruptively.

Prerequisites
This lab builds on the concepts covered in the “Basic Concepts for Clustered Data ONTAP 9 Lab” and
requires the basic knowledge of ONTAP. Your starting point for this lab is a cluster named “cluster1”, with
two nodes named “cluster1-01” and “cluster1-02”. There are three SVMs, “svm1”, “svm2” and “svm3”,
each hosting a variety of volumes.

Note
The terms “Storage Virtual Machine (SVM)” and “Vserver” are used interchangeably in this lab. “SVM” is
used to describe virtualized storage systems as a concept. “Vserver” is the term used to refer to SVMs in
the clustered Data ONTAP command line and in the System Manager user interface. SVMs configured in
this lab follow the naming convention “svmN”, where “N” is a number, and “svm” is an acronym for
“Storage Virtual Machine”.

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Lab Configuration
Figure 1) Network configuration.

The following figure illustrates the network configuration.

Figure 2-1:

Table 1 shows the host information used in this lab.


Host Name Operating System Role/Function IP Address
cluster1 ONTAP 9 cluster 192.168.0.101
cluster1-01 ONTAP 9 cluster 1, node 1 192.168.0.111
cluster1-02 ONTAP 9 cluster 1, node 2 192.168.0.112
cluster2 ONTAP 9 cluster 192.168.0.102
cluster2-01 ONTAP 9 cluster 2, node 1 192.168.0.121
JUMPHOST Windows 2012 R2 primary desktop for lab 192.168.0.5
rhel1 Red Hat Linux 6.7 Linux server 192.168.0.61
DC1 Windows 2008R2 Active Directory/DNS 192.168.0.253

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Table 2 lists the user IDs and passwords used in this lab.

Host Name User ID Password Comments


JUMPHOST DEMO\Administrator Netapp1!
cluster1 admin Netapp1! Same for individual cluster nodes
cluster2 admin Netapp1! Same for individual cluster nodes
rhel1 root Netapp1!
DC1 DEMO\Administrator Netapp1!

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Use Case Scenario

Customer Background
MRD Industries Inc. is a top juvenile products and bicycle manufacturing company with 11,500 worldwide
employees in 24 countries. MRD hosts applications, such as proprietary Finance/Payroll software using
Oracle databases and they run their email messaging platform on Exchange in their primary data center.
They have a need for high availability (expected to be up 24X7). The primary data center also hosts 3
large (NAS) file servers including user file shares and home directories.

Current Requirement
MRD is looking at investing on storage system for their growing data needs. However, they are very cautious
about their purchase decisions as they have noticed the following in their current data infrastructure:

• Lot of duplicate data in their primary and the backup storage.


• Several of their storage aggregates get busier and fuller as compared to others which remain
underutilized.
• Peak workload in the Finance/Payroll application during a specific time every month. So, the data
admin needs to handle the peak workload without disrupting the data traffic.

Now, you are going to demonstrate the capabilities of clustered Data ONTAP with relevance to the customer
requirement.

Lab Activities with Relevance to Customer Requirements

Customer Environment/Requirement Relevant Lab Activity

Lot of duplicate data in the primary and the Enabling Storage Efficiency
backup storage.
 Deduplication
 Compression
Several of the storage aggregates get busier
and fuller as compared to others which Performing a Nondisruptive Volume Move
remain underutilized. Operation

Peak workload in the Finance/Payroll


application which requires the data admin to Performing a LIF Migration
increase the bandwidth by LIF migration.

This is a self-guided lab. The expected time for you to complete the entire lab is approximately 1 hour.

Before beginning this lab, you must understand how to log in to and out of the clustered Data ONTAP
system by using the CLI and System Manager.

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Before You Begin

Log In to the Cluster Using the Command Line


You can access the cluster management CLI through several methods. The primary method discussed in
this lab is to establish a Secure Shell (SSH) session to the cluster management LIF. This LIF is set up
when you first configure the cluster and automatically migrates across the cluster if the home port or home
node on which it is located goes down.

Use PuTTY to open an SSH session to the cluster management LIF, 192.168.0.101. This IP address is
preconfigured in your PuTTY manager as the session called cluster1.

Start PuTTY to connect to the cluster by clicking the PuTTY icon at the bottom of the desktop.

Once PuTTY is open, you see a dialog box similar to the following example:
1. By default, PuTTY launches into the “Basic options for your PuTTY session” display shown in the
screenshot. If you accidentally navigate away from this view, click Session in the Category pane on
the left side to come back.
2. Navigate to the cluster1 host and select it.
3. Click Load to populate the Host Name and Saved Sessions fields.
4. Click Open to initiate an SSH connection to the selected host. A terminal window opens and you are
prompted to log in to the host.

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Log in as admin with the Netapp1! password. You will see the prompt cluster1::>, which indicates
that you are in the cluster-scoped CLI.

Log Out of the Command Line Interface


To log out of the CLI, type exit at the cluster1::> prompt. The PuTTY window closes automatically.

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Log In to the Cluster Using System Manager
Starting with clustered Data ONTAP 8.3, System Manager has moved “on board” the cluster, meaning
that you no longer have to install a separate System Manager application on your management host.
You access the System Manager instance by using a web browser pointed at the cluster IP address.

All web browsers in this lab have their home pages set to the System Manager pages for the clusters in
the lab; to access System Manger, just open the web browser. The workflow in this lab guide uses the
Chrome browser, and there is a shortcut for Chrome on the desktop of the Windows jump host.

1. Click the Chrome browser icon on the task bar to open System Manager.

The Chrome browser opens with two tabs, one for cluster1 and one for cluster2. Log in to each cluster by
using the user name admin and the password Netapp1!.

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System Manager is now logged in to cluster1, and displays a summary page for the cluster. If you
are unfamiliar with System Manager, here is a quick introduction to its layout. Please take a few
moments to expand and browse these tabs to familiarize yourself with their contents.
1. Use the tabs in the top pane of the window to manage various aspects of the cluster. The
Dashboard tab in System Manager enables you to monitor the health and performance of a
cluster. You can also identify hardware problems and storage configuration issues by using the
dashboard.
2. You can access all the LUNs in the cluster by using the LUNs tab, or you can access the LUNs
specific to the SVM by using SVMs > LUNs.
3. The SVMs tab allows you to manage individual Storage Virtual Machines (SVMs, also
known as Vservers).
4. You can use the Network tab to view the list of network components, such as subnets, network
interfaces, Ethernet ports, broadcast domains, FC/FcoE adapters, and IPspaces, and to create,
edit, or delete these components in your storage system.
5. The Hardware and Diagnostics tab allows you to set up the physical storage, including assigning
disks to nodes, zeroing the spare disks, and creating aggregates.
6. You can use the Protection tab to create and manage mirror, vault, and mirror vault
relationships, and to display details about these relationships.
7. You can use the Configurations tab (you might need to expand your browser window to see this
tab) to gather the configuration information, creating cluster-management and node-management
interfaces, adding licenses, setting up the cluster time, and monitoring HA pairs.

Tip: As you use System Manager in this lab, you may encounter situations where buttons at the
bottom of a System Manager pane are beyond the viewing size of the window, and no scroll bar
exists to allow you
to scroll down to see them. If this happens, you have two options; either increase the size of the
browser window (you might need to increase the resolution of your Jumphost desktop to
accommodate the larger browser window), or in the System Manager window, use the tab key to cycle
through all the various fields and buttons, which eventually forces the window to scroll down to the
non-visible items.

Continue using System Manager for your lab activities.

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Lab Activities

Activity 1: Enabling Storage Efficiency Features

Customer has duplicate data in their primary and the backup storage.
Deduplication saves storage space by eliminating redundant data blocks
within a FlexVol volume. In addition, Data compression enables customers
to reduce the physical capacity that is required to store data on a cluster by
compressing data blocks within a FlexVol volume. Data compression
optimizes the storage space and bandwidth that is required to replicate data
during volume operations, such as moving volumes and performing
SnapMirror transfers. You can compress standard data files, virtual disks,
and LUNs, but not file system internal files, NT streams, or metadata.

Access your data volume from an NFS client


1. Open the Putty, navigate to the rhel1 and select it.
2. Click Open.

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Log into the Linux Machine
1. Log in to the Linux machine.
a. Userid: root
b. Password: Netapp1!
2. Enter the following:
 mkdir /mnt/ft301
3. Using the IP address of either data LIF within svm1, access svm1 exports through NFS.
 mount -t nfs 192.168.0.140:/parent /mnt/ft301
4. Explore NFS mount.
 cd /mnt/ft301

 ls
What are the names of the three directories? ____________________________
How would you find out which ONTAP volumes are associated with these directories?
___________________________________________________
5. Create a 2 GB file on svm1_vol02. The write operation takes about 2 minutes too complete.
 cd child1
 dd if=/dev/zero of=hugefile bs=4K count=200000

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Enable deduplication and compression on svm1_vol02

Return to the System Manager within the Chrome web browser previously explored in this lab.

1. Select the Storage Virtual Machine tab.


2. Select svm1.

3. Select volumes
4. Select svm1_vol02
5. Select the Storage Efficiency tab
6. Select Edit

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The Edit Volume dialog box opens up on screen. Enable on-demand deduplication and data compression
for this volume.

1. In the Edit Volume dialog box, click the Storage Efficiency tab.
2. Check the Background Deduplication checkbox.
3. Click On-demand deduplication.
4. Check the Background Compression checkbox.
5. Click Save and Close.

6. In the Volumes page (ensure that the svm1_vol02 is still selected), click Storage Efficiency.

7. In the Storage Efficiency dialog box, check Scan Entire Volume checkbox.
8. Click Start.

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9. Click the Storage Efficiency tab at the bottom of the page. Observe the storage efficiency statistics.

10. Come back to the Volumes page and compare the statistics.

Note: The storage efficiency chart is only depiction for this environment. In a real-life scenario, you will be
able to better demonstrate the storage efficiency charts with near accurate data.

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Activity 2: Nondisruptive Volume Move Operation

Clustered Data ONTAP enables your customers to move a volume from one
aggregate or node to another within the same SVM for capacity utilization,
improved performance, and to satisfy SLAs. The volume move is a
nondisruptive operation. During the volume movement process, the original
volume is intact and available for clients to access. You can move a FlexVol
volume to a different aggregate, node, or both within the same SVM. The
data transfers to the destination node via the cluster interconnect.

Perform a Volume Move


1. On your Linux machine, write a 4 GB file into volume ft301 (this is the same volume you used
previously)
dd if=/dev/zero of=hugefile bs=4K count=400000

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2. While hugefile is being written, move volume svm1_vol02 from aggr1_cluster1_02 to
aggr1_cluster1_01.
1. Select svm1_vol02 in the svm1 volume list, and click the Move button.
2. Select aggr1_cluster1_01 as the destination aggregate, then click the Move button.
This will move the volume to another aggregate across the cluster interconnect, without
interrupting the write operation.

3. In the Move Volume dialog box, click Move.

4. Click OK to acknowledge the job in progress.

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5. Click the Refresh button to monitor the creation of the temporary file on the destination aggregate,
and the progress of the move operation. Also check the Linux machine to verify progress and eventual
completion of the write operation.
Note: Depending on the time that you take to complete the above steps, you may/ not be able to see
the result of this step.

6. When the move completes, verify that the volume now resides on aggr1_cluster1_01.
7. Bonus. Move the migrated volume home.

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Activity 3: Nondisruptive LIF MIGRATION

A LIF is a logical network interface that virtualizes your SAN and NAS network
connections. LIF migrate lets you move LIFs from one network port to another, on
the same or a different cluster node. LIF migrate gives you the same ability to move
network connections that volume move gives you for data volumes.

You can use LIF migrate to move all data LIFs (and thus all network traffic) off of a
particular node to accomplish hardware maintenance or replacement. You can use
LIF migrate to move a LIF to a different port on the same node. For instance, you
might have a LIF configured on a GbE port. If that LIF requires more bandwidth, you
could move it temporarily or permanently to a 10GbE port on the same node.

In this activity, you’ll use a NetApp utility named sio, or Simple I/O Load Generator, to start an I/O load on a
client to a volume on svm1 using CIFS. You will then migrate a LIF supporting that connection to the other port in
the cluster, observing along the way that the I/O load to the volume is not disrupted by the LIF migration.
Note: You can perform this activity using NFS also. However, in this lab the CIFS example is used.

Perform a LIF Migration

1. On your Windows machine, open PowerShell and then launch sio using the following syntax:
sio 0 0 4k 0 50m 600 2 Z:\child1\cifs.sio –create

Note: The sio command will continue running until the specified duration is reached or it encounters
an error, in which case it will generate an error message. You will see an error message if the sio
command is disrupted by the LIF migration.
2. In System Manager, observe the current port assignments for the NAS LIFs for svm1.
3. In the top of System Manager, select the Network tab.
4. In the Network pane, select the Network Interfaces tab.

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5. In the list of interfaces, locate the entry for “svm1_cifs_nfs_lif1” and note its current port assignment,
which should be cluster1-01:e0d.

Note: If you’ve configured svm to use DNS load balancing for its NAS LIFs, so you cannot predict in advance
which of those two LIFs the host running sio will be using to send I/O to the NFS-mounted volume. You will now
need to access the clustered Data ONTAP CLI so you can determine which LIF is handling that traffic. However,
in this lab we have only one LIF.
6. Open a new PuTTY session to log in to cluster1. The credentials you will use to log in to cluster1 are
the username admin and the password Netapp1!.
7. Once logged in, execute the following command to see current network statistics for the NAS LIFs on
svm1. The command will take 5 seconds or so to generate any output.

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cluster1::> statistics lif show -lif svm1_cifs_nfs_lif1

Note: In the preceding command output, notice that svm1_cifs_nfs_lif1 is carrying all the traffic, so in
this example that is the LIF that you would want to migrate. Now go back to System Manager to begin
the LIF migration.
8. In the Network pane of System Manager, locate the LIF you identified. Make note of the current port
assignment for your LIF as you will need this information later. The LIF in this example is located on
node cluster1-01 port e0d.

9. Select the LIF and click Migrate. 9

10. A Warning dialog opens and you are prompted that this LIF is supporting CIFS and that migrating the
interface may be disruptive to CIFS connections. Since jumphost is running Windows 2012 R2, it is
using a newer version of SMB which will not be affected. Click Yes to continue.

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The Warning dialog closes, and is replaced by the Migrate Interface window.

11. In this window, you will select the node and port that you want to migrate the LIF. In the example
shown here, the LIF “svm1_cifs_nfs_lif1” was located on node cluster1-01 port e0d. You will migrate
the LIF to another port e0e in the same node. Expand the cluster1-01.
12. Select the port e0e.
13. Click Migrate.

Note: Although you are not using it in this exercise, notice the “Migrate Permanently” checkbox in this
window. If you check this box it indicates that the LIF’s home port should also be set to this new port
value.
The Migrate Interface window closes, and focus returns to the Networks pane in System Manager.

The LIF quickly migrates over to the new node and port, and the sio program generates no error
messages during or after the migration, indicating that it was unaffected by the operation.

14. The “Current Port” value shown for the LIF in the Network Interfaces list has changed to reflect the
nodes’ new port assignment. The small red X next to the current port entry indicates that the LIF does
not currently reside on its configured home port.

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Most likely you do not want to leave this LIF on this alternate node and port indefinitely. In most cases,
you would perform any maintenance that required you to move the LIF in the first place, and when
finished you would move the LIF back to its original location, so now send the LIF back to its home
port.

15. Select the LIF and click Send to Home from the context menu.

16. The LIF migrates back to its home port, once again without disrupting the sio utility.

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When sio starts it generates several lines of output, and then goes silent until it reaches the end of its
scheduled execution interval, at which point it outputs quite a few lines of statistical information about
the execution before exiting. If the LIF migration disrupted any of sio’s write operations to the target file
then you will see obvious error messages in the sio output, and sio will have terminated abnormally.
You should see no such error messages during this exercise as LIF migration is non-disruptive.
17. The Current Port value for the LIF returns to its original value in the Network Interfaces list, and the red
X disappears to indicate that the LIF is back on its home port.

END OF EXERCISE

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