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Republic of the Philippines

Stratford International School


J. Catolico Avenue, Lagao General Santos City
Argumentation and Debate Final Exam

Name: Date:
Course/Year: Time:
I. Multiple Choices. For each question, choose the single best answer. Make your choice in
encircling the letter.

1. This form of public discussion may be held with any number of students on each side.
a. The open forum c. The congressional type
b. The symposium d. The mock trial
2. A type of public discussion wherein there is a chairman or moderator who will see to it that the
deliberation are orderly.
a. The open forum c. The congressional type
b. The symposium d. The mock trial
3. This type of public discussion is a mere imitation of actual trials in courts of law.
a. The open forum c. The congressional type
b. The symposium d. The mock trial
4. One of the type of public discussion where the chairman or moderator presides.
a. The open forum c. The congressional type
b. The symposium d. The mock trial
5. A document containing all the evidences and arguments, arranged in logical sequence, on a given side
of a given proposition.
a. General argumentative brief c. The purpose of the general argumentative brief
b. The brief distinguished from the outline d. Rules governing the drawing of the general
argumentation
6. A process by which one is made to believe a proposition by feeling and appreciating its truth.
a. Emotion c. Persuasion
b. Argumentation d. Conviction
7. A quick or intuitive appreciation of what is fit, proper, or right; fine or ready mental discernment
shown in saying or doing the proper thing.
a. Personality c. Sincerity or earnestness
b. Tact d. Modesty
8. It is generally taken to mean “freedom from boldness; unobtrusiveness.” It is also means freedom from
egotism, vanity, and self-conceit.
a. Personality c. Sincerity or earnestness
b. Tact d. Modesty
9. It is the quality of the speaker which connotes freedom from hypocrisy, deceit, or simulation.
a. Personality c. Sincerity or earnestness
b. Tact d. Modesty
10. Defined as the sum total of the qualities or characteristics peculiar to a person as a rational being.
a. Personality c. Sincerity or earnestness
b. Tact d. Modesty
11. In this type of debate, there are two or three speakers on each side.
a. The Oregon type c. The one-rebuttal debate type
b. The two-man terms and three-man terms debate type d. The Lincoln-Douglas debate type
12. In this type of contest debate, all speakers have a chance to refute the opponent, except the first
affirmative, who, however, is given a chance to close the debate with rebuttal speech.
a. The Oregon type c. The one-rebuttal debate type
b. The two-man terms and three-man terms debate type d. The Lincoln-Douglas debate type
13. In this type of contest debate, each team is composed of two or three members.
a. The Oregon type c. The one-rebuttal debate type
b. The two-man terms and three-man terms debate type d. The Lincoln-Douglas debate type
14. In this type of contest debate, there is only one speaker on each side.
a. The Oregon type c. The one-rebuttal debate type
b. The two-man terms and three-man terms debate type d. The Lincoln-Douglas debate type
15. This is a special rhetorical device whereby the refuter accepts for the time being the argument of his
opponent he proposes to refute, and then shows that the line of reasoning in the final analysis leads to an
absurdity.
a. Reductio ad absurdum c. Dilemma
b. Method of residues d. Turning the table
16. This is a special rhetorical device in the work of refutation whereby the debater reduces the case of
his opponent into two alternatives and shows that both alternatives are untenable.
a. Reductio ad absurdum c. Dilemma
b. Method of residues d. Turning the table
17. This rhetorical device consists in reducing the entire question in controversy into two or more
possibilities and showing that all the possibilities, except one, are untenable.
a. Reductio ad absurdum c. Dilemma
b. Method of residues d. Turning the table
18. The refuter shows to his reader or hearer that the arguments adduced by his opponents supports the
refuter’s case, not that of his adversary.
a. Reductio ad absurdum c. Dilemma
b. Method of residues d. Turning the table
19. One type of summary which one that is less abrupt and less brief and terse, the conventional
words-first, second, third, etc.-are not used.
a. Informal summary c. Largely persuasive summary
b. Formal summary d. Summaries
20. A summary that does not marshal the arguments in a conventional manner. Rather, it represents the
arguments, which, while directed largely to the intellect, are pervaded by an appeal to the emotions.
a. Informal summary c. Largely persuasive summary
b. Formal summary d. Summaries
21. One that is brief and terse, it is characterized by conventional expressions; such as, first, second,
third, etc.
a. Informal summary c. Largely persuasive summary
b. Formal summary d. Summaries
22. A method of emphasis which consists in withholding an important idea or point, through a succession
of clauses, sentences, or paragraph, for the purpose of arousing curiosity on the part of the audience and
thereby fixing their attention upon what is being withheld.
a. Emphasis by suspense c. Emphasis by antithesis
b. Emphasis by striking phraseology d. Emphasis by climax
23. A method of emphasis which consists in making vivid an idea or a point through the use of an
impressive rhetorical expression that lends itself easily to memory.
a. Emphasis by suspense c. Emphasis by antithesis
b. Emphasis by striking phraseology d. Emphasis by climax
24. A method of consists which consists in giving a contrast of ideas or points, thereby belittling the idea
that the arguer desires the audience to reject and magnifying the idea or points he desires the audience to
accept.
a. Emphasis by suspense c. Emphasis by antithesis
b. Emphasis by striking phraseology d. Emphasis by climax
25. A method of emphasis whereby the speaker arranges his ideas or point in an ascending manner; i.e.,
in the order of their importance.
a. Emphasis by suspense c. Emphasis by antithesis
b. Emphasis by striking phraseology d. Emphasis by climax
26. It refers to the opening remarks after the salutation, intended to arouse the interest of the audience in
the problem under discussion and their favorable disposition towards the speakers.
a. Personal attitude and bearing c. Politeness
b. Persuasion d. The exordium
27. In defining a term in relation to other words used in the proposition, the debater should show to his
audience why the term means what it is alleged to mean.
a. By quoting an authority c. By tracing the etymological growth of the term
b. By giving an example d. By explaining the meaning of the term in the light of its
relation to other words in the proposition
28. This is a method of defining a term used in political science, for example, must be explained in the
light of definition given to it by a political scientist who is recognized by the judge and audience.
a. By quoting an authority c. By tracing the etymological growth of the term
b. By giving an example d. By explaining the meaning of the term in the light of its
relation to other words in the proposition
29. A type of audience who is antagonistic to the speaker or to his cause, or to both the speaker and his
cause.
a. The friendly audience c. The indifferent and apathetic audience
b. The hostile audience d. Humorous audience
30. An audience that is favorably disposed towards the speaker and his cause.
a. The friendly audience c. The indifferent and apathetic audience
b. The hostile audience d. Humorous audience
31. One assembled, not because of their high regard for the speaker, nor because of their interest in the
cause that the speaker advocates, but because it is their duty to do so.
a. The friendly audience c. The indifferent and apathetic audience
b. The hostile audience d. Humorous audience
32. This is any claim made by a defendant in a civil case, whether for money or otherwise, against the
plaintiff.
a. General denial c. Specific denial
b. Counterclaim d. Confession and avoidance
33. A type of defense in which the defendant denies each and every cause of action or allegation set forth
in the complaint of the plaintiff.
a. General denial c. Specific denial
b. Counterclaim d. Confession and avoidance
34. This an error in the work of refutation committed by the debater when he refuses his own arguments,
instead of his opponents.
a. Refuting too little c. Refuting too much
b. Refuting oneself d. Refuting awkwardly
35. This quality of the speaker is akin to sincerity. But it goes further than sincerity. It is the attribute of
being morally correct, just, and honest.
a. Dignity c. Fairness
b. Uprightness d. Aggressiveness

II. Essay Type. Answer the following questions in four to five sentences each. 5 points each item.

A. Distinguish between “argumentation” and “logic.”

B. Is argumentation needed only by lawyers? Why?

C. What is an “act of judgment”?