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Issue #750 Harrisburg, PA Nov.

12, 2018

PA Environment Digest Blog​​ ​Twitter Feed​​ ​ Facebook Page

Dept. Of Health Confirms 6th Death From West Nile Virus, This Time In Dauphin County

On November 7, the Department of Health confirmed there has been a 6th death from ​West Nile
Virus​ this season, this one occurring in Dauphin County. There have been ​100 human cases​ of
West Nile Virus identified this year.
Previous deaths occurred in Lancaster (20, Lebanon, Philadelphia and Westmoreland
counties.
In 2017, the Department of Health reported 20 human cases of West Nile Virus and 3
deaths.
For more information about West Nile virus and the state's surveillance and control
program, please visit the ​West Nile Virus​ website. [Note: Unfortunately this website is not being
updated.]
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

Wolf, Casey Win, Democrats Add Members In Senate, House And Congress; What’s Next?

November 6 was a good night in Pennsylvania


for Democrats with Gov. Tom Wolf and U.S.
Senator Bob Casey both easily winning the
statewide races. ​Click Here​ for detailed results.
Although the control of the state House and
Senate have not changed, Democrats made gains
in each chamber, primarily from districts in the
Southeast.
Democrats won five state Senate seats from
Republicans, with incumbent Republican
Senators McGarrigle (Delaware) and Rafferty
(Montgomery) losing. Republican Sen. Tomlinson (Bucks) won his seat with a 100 vote margin.
The split in the Senate is now 29 Republicans and 21 Democrats. It was 34 Republicans
(including 1 vacant seat) and 16 Democrats. ​Click Here​ for detailed results.
In the House, Republican incumbents Alexander Charlton (Delaware), Rebecca Corbin

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(Chester), Kate Harper (Montgomery), Warren Kampf (Chester/Montgomery), Duane Milne
(Chester), Thomas Quigley (Montgomery), Eric Roe (Chester) and James Santora (Delaware)
lost their bid for reelection.
Democrats lost two incumbents -- Bryan Barbin (Cambria) and Helen Tai (Bucks).
The split in the House is now 110 Republicans and 93 Democrats (including some open
seats). It was 121 Republicans and 82 Democrats. ​Click Here​ for detailed results.
Interesting fact: just short of 20 percent of the House and Senate combined will be new
members to those chambers-- 49 new members out of 253-- with 1 vacancy in the House due to a
death. An opportunity for education and exchanging information!
In U.S. House seats, Democrats picked up enough seats so the state Congressional
delegation is evenly split between Republicans and Democrats 9 to 9. ​Click Here​ for detailed
results.
Visit the Department of State ​Election Results​ website for all the details on statewide,
House, Senate and Congressional election results.
Reaction
On November 7, the ​Conservation Voters of PA​ announced 24 new pro-environment
leaders were elected in the state House and Senate during midterm elections Tuesday.
43 of Conservation Voters of PA’s 56 endorsed pro-environment candidates won their
elections, with one race still too close to call.
“Harrisburg will be a lot greener, younger, and full of powerful women in January” said
Josh McNeil, Executive Director of Conservation Voters of Pennsylvania. “In one of the most
pro-environment elections in Pennsylvania history, voters sent dozens of champions for clean air
and clean water to fight for all of us in the legislature.”
Conservation Voters of PA and its affiliated PACs made the largest investments in their
history in the 2018 cycle to elect environmental champions to state and legislative offices,
including investing more than $141,000 in independent expenditures in Chester County, a region
where pipeline development is rapidly threatening drinking water quality and open space
conservation.
In total, Conservation Voters of PA Victory Fund knocked 38,038 doors and made
74,000 phone calls, contacting 112,038 voters and helping to secure key victories for Melissa
Shusterman, Chris Sappey, and Kristine Howard.
Conservation Voters of PA Action Fund partnered with the Sierra Club Pennsylvania
Chapter to contribute $210,000 to legislative candidates, helping elect Danielle Friel Otten, Chris
Sappey, Melissa Shusterman, Lindsey Williams, Tim Kearney, and Steve Santarsiero.
Conservation Voters and Sierra Club made their largest investment in Danielle Friel
Otten, who ran because a pipeline threatened the backyard where her kids played. Friel Otten
won a tough race in Chester County by almost 10 points.
“We believe that good environmental laws are made by good environmental lawmakers
and leaders. That’s why we work to elect leaders committed to a cleaner, safer Keystone State.
We’re proud to say that the majority of Pennsylvanians agreed with us today” said McNeil.
You can find a full list of candidates who won and more information about them ​is
available online​.
For more information on programs, initiations and upcoming events, visit the
Conservation Voters of PA​ website. Questions should be directed to Josh McNeil by calling
215-564-3350 or send email to: ​joshua.mcneil@conservationpa.org​.

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What’s Next?
The House returns to Harrisburg November 13 and the Senate November 14 for the same
purpose-- to elect their legislative caucus leaders for the new legislative session starting in
January..
Because of retirements, House Republicans have the most slots to fill, including House
Majority Leader, followed by House Democrats who need to fill their Whip and Appropriations
Committee Chair positions.
The House also has the most new members-- Democrats with 23 and Republicans with
20-- which means most anything could happen in their selection of leaders.
Senate Republicans and Democrats, with fewer retirements, don’t have as many vacant
leadership positions, but again, things happen.
After they adjourn this week, they will not return until January 1 at Noon to start the new
2019-20 legislative session.
Then it will be off to the races-- all bills needing to start over, new committee chairs and
members to name, hearings in the Senate on Gov. Wolf cabinet nominations (because he has a
new terms) and the Governor’s budget proposal.
NewsClips:
AP-Levy: Democrat Tom Wolf Wins 2nd Term As PA Governor
John Baer: What Will Gov. Wolf’s Second Term Look Like?
Meyer Podcast: The Election Is Over, What Lies Ahead For PA?
Thompson: 5 Takeaways From Midterm Election, PA Legislature Division
Esack: 5 Takeaways On PA Governor’s Race
Analysis: PA Sent Midterm Message To President Trump
Murphy: Meet John Fetterman, PA’s New Lt. Governor
Democrats Flip 5 Republican State Senate Seats
PA House, Senate Remain In Republican Control Despite Democratic Gains
AP-Scolforo: Republicans Absorb Losses In House, Senate But Retain Control
AP-Levy: Bob Casey Beats Trump-Backed Barletta In U.S. Senate Race
AP-Levy: Democrats, 4 Of Them Women, Win U.S. House Seats In PA, Delegation Split Evenly
PA Election Results: 4 Big Winners, 2 Big Losers
McKelvey: Big Night For Democratic Women, Incumbents In PA
Democrats Roar In Pennsylvania
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Opponent Wins Chester County House Seat
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

Court Turns Back Challenge To Township Decision Allowing Drilling Based On Storage
Of Drilling Wastewater, Environmental Rights Amendment

On November 8, ​Commonwealth Court reported a


memorandum opinion​ that turns back a challenge to
special exception permits granted by a township for
unconventional natural gas drilling based on concerns
about the storage of drilling wastewater and alleged
violations of the state’s Environmental Rights
Amendment.

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The Court said the objector presented “no credible evidence of harm” and the claims
made are unsupported by the “accepted evidence of record.”
The case involves a challenge to local zoning ordinance decisions in Penn Township,
Westmoreland County that granted 4 special exception applications to Apex Energy PA for
unconventional gas wells in a Rural Resource Zoning District which also lie in the Township’s
Mineral Extraction Overlay District.
Three of the applications were denied initially by the Board, but Apex Energy PA filed
suit in federal court and in a settlement agreement allowed the applications to proceed under a set
of conditions in exchange for the Township agreeing to be bound by certain interpretations of the
zoning ordinance under the state’s Environmental Rights Amendment.
The objector in the case then challenged the special exception decisions in Westmoreland
County Court, which, without taking additional evidence, affirmed the Zoning Hearing Board’s
decisions.
The objector raised three issues on the appeal of the County court ruling--
-- Wastewater Storage:​​ The record lacks substantial evidence that Apex Energy PA’s drilling
permit applications satisfies Section 190-635(D)(1) of the Zoning Ordinance of Penn Township
relating to the storage of “toxic-produced waste.”
Commonwealth Court noted the local Zoning Hearing Board did explicitly determine the
applicant meet the performance standards included in the zoning ordinance on the storage of
drilling wastewater.
The Board also did not determine the proposed drilling operations involved the storage of
toxic liquids.
Commonwealth Court said the objector’s attempt to characterize “wastewater” as a “toxic
liquid” is not supported by the provisions of the zoning ordinance and noted the liquid was brine
as in “water with salt.”
The Court rejected this argument.
-- Environmental Rights:​​ The record lacks substantial evidence Apex Energy PA’s proposal
satisfies Section 190-641(D) of the zoning ordinance relating to the protection of citizens’
environmental rights.
Commonwealth Court quoted a long series of findings by the local Zoning Hearing Board
on the Apex Energy PA drilling applications, including one specific finding in the federal court
settlement of the earlier appeal that a consultant’s report demonstrates the drilling operation “will
not violate citizens’ right to clean air and water as guaranteed” by the Environmental Rights
Amendment.
As a result, the Court rejected this argument by the objector.
-- High Probability Of Adverse Effects:​​ The record contains substantial evidence that shows
Apex Energy PA’s proposal would create a high probability of an adverse, abnormal or
detrimental effect to the public health, safety, and welfare therefore violating the Environmental
Rights Amendment.
Commonwealth Court noted the case before them did not involve a constitutional or
substantive validity challenge like in the ​PA Environmental Defense Foundation​ and ​Robinson
Township​ cases, but rather court review of a local Zoning Hearing Board decisions on special
exemptions.
The Court said the objector presented “no credible evidence of harm” and assertions are
unsupported by the “accepted evidence of record.”

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In addition, the Court said the Zoning Hearing Board attached several detailed conditions
in granting the special exemptions in order to mitigate adverse effects associated with the
drilling.
Click Here​ for a copy of the opinion.
This decision is one of a ​series of decisions recently by Commonwealth Court​ on
challenges to local ordinances regulating drilling operations based on the Environmental Rights
Amendment.
Related Story:
Commonwealth Court Upholds Local Zoning Ordinance Allowing Drilling In All Districts As
Long As They Meet Standards
[Posted: Nov. 9 2018]

Middle Susquehanna RiverKeeper Hosts Nov. 17 A Year In The Life Of The PA River Of
The Year Loyalsock Creek In Williamsport

As the celebration of the ​2018 PA River of the Year--


the Loyalsock Creek​-- winds down, residents of and
visitors to the watershed are invited to gather one last
time to show their Loyalsock Love.
The ​Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Association,
Inc​. invites you to ​A Year in the Life of the
Loyalsock​​ as presented by Keith Williams of
Freshwater Journeys on November 17 at 2:00 p.m. in
the Plunketts Creek Township Volunteer Fire
Department Social Hall, 327 Dunwoody Road,
Williamsport, Lycoming County.
“The Loyalsock gave us a few challenges this year,
with multiple high-water events and even a period of low flow,” explains Williams, author of
Snorkelhead: Adventures in Creek Snorkeling​ and a regular underwater visitor to the watershed.
“I explored the Loyalsock Creek and some of her tributaries throughout 2018, starting in January
when there was ice on her edges and hanging from canyon walls.”
Wetsuits and snorkeling gear won’t be required for this family-friendly adventure,
however, as guests will take an underwater tour from the warm comfort of their seats.
“At times,” adds Williams, “she flowed muddy and visibility was low, but throughout the
year, I was able to capture numerous memorable moments of natural creek history.”
Williams is a natural educator. In addition to authoring his first book on creek and river
snorkeling, Keith Williams has developed river snorkeling-based science curriculum and has
established river snorkeling programs for nonprofit organizations and the U.S. Forest Service.
He has led thousands of people on river snorkeling adventures, including armchair
adventurers like those who attend “A Year in the Life of the Loyalsock” Program.
“We had many partners this year as we celebrated our River of the Year,” said Middle
Susquehanna Riverkeeper Carol Parenzan. “This fabulous fanfare could not have occurred
without the numerous organizations and individuals who came together to plan and implement
almost 20 programs that focused not only on river science but also history, arts, music,
education, recreation, and even economics. Back in March, we started our celebratory season

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with a presentation by Keith Williams on the Susquehanna River watershed, of which the
Loyalsock is a part, so it is only fitting that we close the year with a special showing of his work
specifically highlighting our lovely Loyalsock Creek.”
The program is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.
This project was financed in part by a grant from DCNR’s ​Community Conservation
Partnerships Grant Program​, using Environmental Stewardship (Growing Greener) Funds, under
the administration of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of
Recreation and Conservation and administered by the ​PA Organization of Watersheds and
Rivers​.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper​ website or contact Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Carol
Parenzan at 570-768-6300 or send email to: ​midsusriver@gmail.com​.
2019 PA River Of The Year
Nominations for the 2019 PA River Of The Year are now being accepted until November
9. ​Click Here​ for more information.
2019 PA Trail Of The Year
Nominations for the 2019 PA Trail Of The Year are now being accepted until November
16. ​Click Here​ for more information.
​ hoto:​ E
(P ​ astern Hellbender​.)
Related Stories:
Loyalsock Creek Named 2018 PA River Of The Year In Public Voting
Nominations Now Being Accepted For 2019 River Of The Year
Nominations Now Being Accepted For 2019 PA Trail Of The Year
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

PA Steelhead Assn. Honors 4 Groups For Land Conservation, Waterways Access Work In
Erie County

The ​Pennsylvania Steelhead Association​ recently


honored the ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant​,​ Fish &
Boat Commission, the ​Western Pennsylvania
Conservancy​, and the ​Lake Erie Region
Conservancy​ for their efforts to conserve,
restore, and provide access to some of Erie
County's important lands and waterways.
The awards were presented during the
Association's annual banquet, held on November
3.
"PA Sea Grant works here in the Erie region
and across the state, engaging in a variety of research, outreach, and education programs, said
David Skellie, ​PA Sea Grant’s​ Coastal Land Use & Economic Specialist. “Our efforts in the
Lake Erie Access Improvement Program is a win-win for anglers, landowners, and for land and
water protection efforts. My co-worker Tom Cermak and I are honored to have PA Sea Grant
receive this award acknowledging those efforts and collaborative partnerships."
“At the ​Western Pennsylvania Conservancy​, all of our work enhances the quality of life

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in our region. We have protected hundreds of thousands of acres of land and helped establish
numerous state parks, including Erie Bluffs, to provide our region with clean waters and healthy
forests, wildlife and natural areas,” said Kylie Maland, Western PA Conservancy Watershed
Manager. “Locally, we protected the 92-acre Lower Elk Creek Nature Reserve to conserve the
exceptional wildlife and natural resources that it supports and to enhance recreational access to
one of the most important steelhead fisheries in Pennsylvania.
“Our Watershed Conservation Program compliments this work by coordinating with local
partners to stabilize eroding stream banks and enhance habitat in Elk Creek, while improving
access to the stream from our property,” explained Maland. “We are thankful to the PA
Steelhead Association for the award recognizing this effort to improve these stream resources
and to the other honored partners-- Lake Erie Region Conservancy, PA Sea Grant, and the PA
Fish and Boat Commission-- and especially to the anglers, who help fund the conservation of
important streams through your fishing license stamp purchases.
“We look forward to continuing our collaboration with all of you to be good stewards of
these protected streams and nature areas that will provide enjoyment and value to the community
for generations!” added Maland.
PA Sea Grant staff have worked collaboratively with the other honorees for over 20
years, along with state agencies, the County of Erie, many local municipalities, and most
importantly…property owners.
Through these collaborative efforts, PA Sea Grant has conserved and/or assisted in the
conservation of 45 projects since 2004. These projects total 1,737 acres of permanently
conserved lands, nearly all of which are open for recreational use by the general public.
These conserved areas include 25 properties that establish fishing, farming, forested
riparian and open space conservation easements. Twenty (20) of these easements are fishing
easements through the PFBC’s ​Lake Erie Access Improvement Program​.
Since 2004 when this program was enacted by the state Legislature, PFBC (with PA Sea
Grant’s assistance since 2010), has approved funding for and closed on 18 fee simple (meaning
outright acquisition) projects and 45 public fishing and conservation easements.
These purchases have ensured safe access for anglers to Lake Erie shoreline and 8 local
tributaries where steelhead are found migrating upstream from September through April every
year.
The total amount of stream frontage obtained through PFBC’s acquisitions and easements
is now 25.77 miles. PFBC and PA Sea Grant are currently working with another 20 property
owners whose collective stream frontage is approximately another 13 miles.
Fishing is a vital recreational activity in the Erie region, bringing in more than $10
million annually to the local economy.
PA Sea Grant work with the Fish & Boat Commission through the Lake Erie Access
Improvement Program ensures safe access, permanently conserves land, and importantly
provides compensation for landowners willing to grant stream access.
Visit the ​Pennsylvania Sea Grant​ website for more information on their programs which
operate throughout the state.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events at the ​Western
PA Conservancy​ ​website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy, ​Like
them on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, add them to your ​Circle on Google+​, join them on
Instagram​, visit the ​Conservancy’s YouTube Channel​ or add them to your ​network on Linkedin​.

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Click Here​ to support their work.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

LandStudies President Kelly Gutshall Receives Penn State’s 2018 Arts & Architecture
Alumni Award For Landscape Architecture

Kelly Gutshall, President of Lititz-based


LandStudies​, is the recipient of Penn State
University’s 2018 Arts and Architecture Alumni
Award for Landscape Architecture.
The award is given to one alumni recipient
within each of Penn State’s departments to
recognize career achievements in the arts and design
disciplines.
Kelly received her award during the Alumni
Awards Ceremony in early November, where she
had the opportunity to interact with current Penn
State students. She shared with them her landscape architecture experience through a career prep
seminar and studio time.
Kelly was chosen for this award due to her many achievements in, and contributions to,
the field of landscape architecture.
As a landscape architect, Kelly has championed the firm’s science-based approach to
planning and design. This approach has been applied to thousands of commissions over the past
30 years, all with a common goal of sustainable, quantifiable benefits.
She helped to guide LandStudies as the firm explored and found solutions to some of the
most challenging problems of our generation. This includes regional approaches to stormwater
management, flood mitigation, habitat degradation and groundwater recharge.
It started with LandStudies signature community-based approach to watershed planning
in the early 90s. This led to applying the newly emerging science of legacy sediment to stream
restoration in the 2000.
Next, LandStudies went on to forging public private partnerships through “Economic
Ecology” in the late 2000s. Most recently, the firm is working with the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency to develop a Smart Green Corridor Blueprint that considers energy, water,
transportation, recreation and community in a holistic plan for PA’s watersheds.
Gutshall’s planning prototypes are being replicated throughout the State to assist
communities in meeting their Chesapeake Bay regulatory water quality compliance goals in a
cost-effective manner.
Kelly particularly enjoys collaborating with community leaders to help change
perceptions about the landscape from purely aesthetic, to one of working, functional
environments.
During her 34-year career, she has gained extensive knowledge and experience in
sustainable-site planning, open-space planning, watershed planning, creating and managing
ecologically diverse plant communities, alternative stormwater management and restoration
design.
In 2015, she was recognized for her environmental contributions and named a Watershed

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Champion by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, where she also currently serves on the board.
Deaf from the age of 35, Kelly is active as a mentor with the National Bionic Ear
Association and advocating for the challenges of hearing impaired in the workplace.
For more information, visit the ​LandStudies​ website or contact Laurel Etter Longenecker,
717-627-4440 or send email to: ​laurel@landstudies.com​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for green
infrastructure updates.
LandStudies is certified as a Women’s Business Enterprise (WBE), Minority Business
Enterprise (MBE) and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) based in Lititz, Lancaster
County. ​Follow LandStudies on Twitter​, ​Like them on Facebook​.
NewsClip:
Penn State College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Related Stories:
Chesapeake Bay Watershed Champion: Kelly Gutshall, Landstudies, Inc.
Kelly Gutshall, LandStudies, Named Central Penn Business Journal Woman Of Influence
Feature: Parks To The Rescue On Stormwater, Flooding
Economic Ecology - LandStudies
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
Reducing Flood Damage
The Economic Value Of Green Infrastructure: Calculating A Return On Investments In Parks,
Watershed Restoration, Farmland BMPs, Open Space
Economic Impact Of Natural Resource Conservation In Somerset County
Allegheny Land Trust, Partners Make Urban Greenprint Property Information Tool Available To
Public, Groups
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

PA Horticultural Society Recognizes Winners Of 2018 Gardening & Greening Contest

On November 7, the ​PA Horticultural


Society​ recognized the Blue Ribbon
and the Gardens of Distinction
winners in the ​2018 PHS Gardening
and Greening Contest​.
This year, over 300 gardens across the
tri-state region were entered in the
competition.
The participants were a diverse group of gardeners, including the McKean County Adult
Probation Program in Smethport, Pa., and the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd’s
Shepherd Garden in Wilmington, Del. Gardeners of all ages included students at Thomas
Jefferson Elementary School in Morristown, N.J., and Stewart Middle School in Norristown, Pa.,
as well as residents at the Tel Hai Retirement Community in Honey Brook, Pa.
Geographically, entries came from as far as Washington, Pa., Bear, Del., and Stockton,
N.J.
The entries include colorful flower gardens, bountiful vegetable and community gardens,
combination gardens, school gardens, container gardens, garden blocks, urban farms, and, public
spaces including parks and community centers.

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“The Gardening and Greening Contest brings together such a diverse, talented collection
of individuals and community groups who are passionate about enhancing our world through
horticulture,” said Matt Rader, PHS President. “We are so proud of these gardeners’
accomplishments and hope their participation will inspire their neighbors and fellow community
members to start gardening and enter next year’s contest, one of the many ways PHS engages
people with horticulture and the joys of gardening.”
More than 63 panels of judges visited 313 gardens throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey
and Delaware to view the beautiful, well-designed spaces filled with a variety of
color and texture.
Gardens were judged on maintenance and horticultural practices, as well as the variety,
color, and suitability of plantings. Judges also looked at the design and total visual effect of the
gardens and awarded extra points for imaginative ideas and creativity.
All winners will receive a garden sign and two tickets to the ​2019 PHS Philadelphia
Flower Show​, “Flower Power,” March 2 to 10, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
Click Here ​for a full list of winners.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​PA
Horticultural Society​ website, ​Like PHS on Facebook​, ​Join PHS on Instagram​ and ​Follow on
Twitter​. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from PHS. ​ Click Here​ to become a member.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

DEP Citizens Advisory Council, Environmental Justice Advisory Board Joint Meeting Nov.
13

On November 13, ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ and ​DEP’s


Environmental Justice Advisory Board​ will hold a joint meeting to explore
opportunities to work on issues together.
Members of the Council and Board will hear a presentation on
environmental justice policy updates, a presentation on the ​PA Smart job
training program​ and DEP’s Environmental Education Program.
Also on the agenda is an update on activities by DEP Secretary Patrick
McDonnell and discussion of transition documents the Council is preparing
for Gov. Wolf to highlight environmental issues Council believes should be
addressed in the next 4 years by the Governor and the General Assembly.
DEP also provided Council with its ​written report of activities for November​.
The meeting will be held in ​Room 105 of the Rachel Carson Building starting at 10:00.
A Conference call option for joining the meeting is available: 717-612-4788 or 855-734-4390,
PIN #: 192791.
This is the last meeting of the Council for this year. The next meeting will be held
January 15.
Don Welsh​ serves as Chair of the Council.
For more information and available handouts, visit DEP’s ​DEP Citizens Advisory
Council​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Keith Saladar, Executive Director, by
sending email to: ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or calling 717-787-8171.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

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Using The Law To Solve Climate Change: What Can PA Do? Nov. 28 In Philadelphia 

On November 28 the ​Philadelphia Bar Association​ and


the ​PA Environmental Council​ will host ​A Call To
The Bar: Lawyers For Common Sense On Climate
Change Program​ at the Philadelphia Bar Association
offices, 11th Floor Conference Center, 1101 Market
Street from Noon to 2:15.
On October 8, 2018, the United Nations scientific
panel charged with tracking climate change issued a special report that dominated international
headlines for days.
The report painted a more dire picture of the immediate consequences of climate change
than previously thought and noted that avoiding the damage requires transforming the world
economy at a speed and scale that has "no documented historic precedent."
Without strong action to sharply reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the world is at risk of
catastrophic consequences as early as 2040.
What can we do to protect ourselves and our children from a horrific outcome? Leading
economists and scientists agree on one key component of any solution to climate change; it's
called "Putting a Price on Carbon" to force reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.
This timely program is the fourth program that the Philadelphia Bar Association has
hosted and presented with A Call to the Bar: Lawyers for Common Sense on Climate Change to
serve as a catalyst to the legal community to become more heavily engaged in climate change
awareness, education, and action.
Environmental industry leaders will address:
-- The legal landscape for solutions to climate change
-- The case for carbon pricing policies
-- The authority under Pennsylvania law for carbon pricing
-- A specific proposal for using carbon pricing to make Pennsylvania a leader in fighting climate
change while generating revenues for the Commonwealth
Panelists for this special event include--
-- Professor John C. Dernbach​​, Director, ​Environmental Law and Sustainability Center
Widener University​ Commonwealth School of Law;
-- Jesse Jenkins, Ph.D.​​, Postdoctoral Environmental Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School, ​Harvard
University Center for the Environment​;
-- Robert B. McKinstry, Jr​​., Environmental and Climate Law & Consulting
-- Joseph Otis Minott,​​ Executive Director and Chief Counsel, ​Clean Air Council
-- ​Professors Amy Sinden, James E. Beasley​​, ​Temple University School of Law
-- Davitt B. Woodwell​​, President, ​PA Environmental Council
Click Here​ to register or for more information. CLE credits are available for this
program.
[​Note: ​DEP’s consultant working on the 2018 Update To Pennsylvania’s Climate Action Plan is
scheduled to present is draft plan to the ​Climate Change Advisory Committee​ at its December 4
meeting.]
NewsClips:
WITF SmartTalk Nov. 13: Climate Change And Loss Of Biodiversity

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PEC Podcast: Pittsburgh, Philadelphia Leaders In Climate Action
Allegheny Front: How Climate Change Hurts Kids’ Health
Op-Ed: Berks Nature: Saving Our Planet
FERC Chair Blasts Original Clean Power Plan, Praises EPA Replacement Plan In Comments
U.S. Supreme Court Refuses To Block Young People’s Climate Lawsuit Against U.S.
Government
Federal Court 9th Circuit Again Delays Kids’ Climate Change Trial Against Government
Young Activists Can Sue Government Over Climate Change U.S. Supreme Court Says
Op-Ed: It’s Not Rocket Science, Climate Change Was Behind This Summer’s Extreme Weather
Colorado U. Study Investigates Differences In Oil & Gas Natural Gas Methane Emissions
Estimates
More Protection: UN Says Earth’s Ozone Layer Is Healing
[Posted: Nov.9, 2018]

DCNR Week 7: Bright Fall Foliage Remains In Many Parts Of PA

The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Thursday ​Fall Foliage Report​ said despite repetitive rain
and wind events throughout the Commonwealth, nice
color remains in parts of the state.
The most vibrant foliage currently is attributed to the
oak/beech and oak/hickory community peaks evident in
the southern portion of the Pennsylvania Wilds (Elk,
Cameron, Clinton, Lycoming counties) extending
through the spine of the Appalachians through Bald
Eagle, Rothrock, Tuscarora, and Buchanan State forests.
Excellent color also remains on maples, hickories, and
sassafras from Bucks County projecting southwest toward Adams/Franklin County and including
most points south/southeast of this line.
Bright foliage in this region will likely be short-lived, but oak species throughout the
state should present pleasant upper-canopy viewing for at least another week.
Much of the northern half of the state has experienced significant leaf-drop, signifying
the close of fall foliage season.
Click Here​ for this week’s map and all the details! Visit DCNR’s ​Fall Foliage Report
webpage for more information.
Visitors can get suggestions about the best spots to view fall foliage on the ​Penn's Woods
Fall Foliage story map​ and on the ​Pennsylvania Tourism Office​ website.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule/Gov’s Schedule

Here are the Senate and House Calendars for the next voting session day and Committees
scheduling action on bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced--

Bill Calendars
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House (Nov. 13):​​ ​House Bill 1401​ (DiGirolamo-R-Bucks) which amends Title 58 to impose a
sliding scale natural gas severance tax, in addition to the Act 13 drilling impact fee, on natural
gas production (NO money for environmental programs) and includes provisions related to
minimum landowner oil and gas royalties; ​House Bill 1446​ (Quinn-R- Bucks) encouraging
infrastructure for electric and natural gas fueled vehicles; ​House Bill 2105​ (Fritz-R-
Susquehanna) abolishing certain “obsolete” boards and commissions; ​House Bill 2638
(Stephens-R-Montgomery) which would authorize new local authorities to cleanup former
military installations or land having water, sewer or stormwater pollution identified by the
Department of Environmental Protection or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency financed
by tax refunds by businesses and individuals working in the remediation area was amended to
eliminate its application to all properties with pollution to just those involving former military
installations (​Senate Fiscal Note​ and summary) ​ ​House Resolution 284​ (Moul-R-Adams) urging
Congress to repeal the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s MS4 Stormwater Pollution
Prevention Program (​sponsor summary​)​; ​House Resolution 943​ (Tallman-R-Adams) urging the
federal Food And Drug Administration to promptly consider candidates for Lyme disease
vaccinations; ​House Resolution 1112​ (Barrar-R-Delaware) calling on federal government to
recognize the importance of durable, flood-resilient infrastructure (​sponsor summary​). ​<> ​Click
Here​ for full House Bill Calendar.

Senate (Nov. 14): ​Senate Bill 820 ​(Aument-R- Lancaster) providing liability protection for
owners and operators of on-farm agritourism activities (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Bill 930
(Dinniman-D- Chester) sets notification requirements related to pipeline emergencies (​sponsor
summary​); ​Senate Bill 931​ (Dinniman-D-Chester) requires the installation of automatic or
remote controlled safety values in natural gas pipelines in densely populated areas; ​Senate Bill
1199​ (Rafferty-R- Montgomery) providing for a landowners’ bill of rights in cases of eminent
domain, including by private entities like pipeline companies (​sponsor summary​); ​ ​Senate Bill
1270​ (Yudichak-D-Luzerne), (Baker-R-Luzerne) requiring universal lead testing for children
(​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 214​ (Greenleaf-R-Montgomery) urging Pennsylvania
natural gas producers to export gas to European countries in an effort to curtail the monopoly
that Russia has on supply to that region (​sponsor summary​); ​Senate Resolution 373​ (Rafferty-R-
Montgomery) is a concurrent Senate-House resolution to ​establish a Senate-House legislative
Commission to Study Pipeline Construction and Operations and to recommend improvements
for the safe transport of oil, natural gas and other hazardous liquids through pipelines; ​House Bill
86​ (Lawrence-R-Chester) eliminating tailpipe emissions testing for 1992-1995 vehicles in
Pittsburgh and Philadelphia areas (​House Fiscal Note​ and summary); ​House Bill 2154
(Causer-R-Cameron) which would weaken environmental standards for conventional (not Shale)
oil and gas drilling (​Senate Fiscal Note​, ​House Fiscal Note​ and summaries)​. <> ​Click Here​ for
full Senate Bill Calendar.

Committee Meeting Agendas This Week

House:​​ <> ​Click Here​ for full House Committee Schedule.

Senate:​​ <> ​Click Here​ for full Senate Committee Schedule.

13
Bills Pending In Key Committees

Check the ​PA Environmental Council Bill Tracker​ for the status and updates on pending state
legislation and regulations​​ that affect environmental and conservation efforts in Pennsylvania.

Session Schedule

Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House--

Senate ​(Recessed to the Call of the President Pro Tempore)


November 14 (leadership elections)

House​​ ​(On A 12-Hour Call)


November 13 (​Now Voting Day​) (leadership elections)

Governor’s Schedule

Gov. Tom Wolf's work calendar will be posted each Friday and his public schedule for the day
will be posted each morning. ​Click Here​ to view Gov. Wolf’s Weekly Calendar and Public
Appearances.

News From The Capitol

Auditor General DePasquale Releases Audits Of Delaware, Susquehanna River Basin


Commissions: No Duplication Of Effort With DEP

On November 8, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale released separate performance audits of


the ​Susquehanna River​ and ​Delaware River​ basin commissions that emphasize the need for
better accountability and transparency.
“These commissions play an important role in ensuring quality drinking water is
available in the five states that depend on these two rivers,” DePasquale said. “I expect both
panels to operate with the same degree of crystal-clear transparency that we hope to see in our
tap water.”
The commissions are federal-interstate compacts charged with preserving water supply
and quality, managing drought and flood conditions, and preserving water-related recreational
opportunities.
In addition to receiving significant taxpayer support, the fees charged by the
commissions ultimately impact the rates that many Pennsylvanians pay for municipal water and
other services.
Susquehanna River
The audit noted there is no duplication of effort between what SRBC and the Department
of Environmental Protection does with regard to water withdrawals, although there may be some
overlapping legal authority pertaining to water withdrawals and some “appearance” of
duplications.
14
The audit recommended an updated Memorandum of Understanding between the
agencies would clear up this appearance of duplication. In fact, DEP and SRBC have already
started talks to update the MOU.
With respect to fees charged by SRBC for permit reviews, the audit said, “SRBC
management stated that in light of the current lack of funding being provided by signatory
parties, the SRBC may need to consider reducing/eliminating discounts offered to municipal
authorities.
“This could negatively impact Pennsylvania’s public authorities that have dockets with
the SRBC in the form of increased fees.
“Additionally, while SRBC management indicated the reduced contributions have not
affected fees charged to project applicants and docket holders to date, it must balance revenues
with its expenses, which could ultimately result in increased fees.
“With Pennsylvania accounting for over 96 percent of the docket holders, any future
increases in fees will have a negative financial impact on these Pennsylvania organizations.”
The General Assembly has cut funding to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission for
the last several years.
In particular, DePasquale pointed to an audit finding that the Susquehanna River Basin
Commission spent over $1,000 on alcohol for meetings. [​Note: ​No tax money was used to
purchase alcohol, and SRBC has ended the practice.]
“When it comes to publicly-funded entities, there’s really only one pot of money,” he
said. “It’s absurd to think that any public entity would consider buying alcohol to be an
appropriate expenditure.”
DePasquale also panned the SRBC for “extravagant” food expenses, noting of the
SRBC’s total $16,259 food and gratuities expenses related to meetings, the commission could
not provide itemized receipts for $14,072 in food expenses, which included appetizers, filet
mignon, salmon, and Maryland crab cakes, along with side dishes and desserts.
“It really begs the question: what’s going through your head when you decide to use
public funds for such ridiculous meals?” said DePasquale. “Did anyone even consider
brown-bagging their lunch, as so many hardworking Pennsylvanians do every day?”
DePasquale also noted auditors reviewing SRBC spending found $14,048 in questionable
costs associated with rewards and perks for employees, including:
-- Monetary and gift card rewards of $8,031;
-- A staff holiday party expense of $3,074;
-- A staff picnic costing $1,585;
-- A $100 gift card purchase for a wedding gift;
-- Bereavement donations totaling $800; and
-- Flower purchases totaling $458 for Administrative Professionals Day.
“This goes back to my one-pot argument when it comes to spending by agencies that
receive public funds,” DePasquale said. “These panels are not private businesses; they are
governmental bodies that must be accountable for every last penny that they spend.”
Delaware River
The audit made a similar finding with respect to duplication of effort with the Delaware
River Basin Commission as it did for SRBC-- no duplication of effort.
The audit of the Delaware River Basin Commission showed it was unable to provide
itemized receipts for $472 in payments to restaurants.

15
Recommendations
The audits also recommend that both commissions overhaul their longstanding and
out-of-date agreements with the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The SRBC’s
Memorandum of Understanding with DEP is nearly 20 years old; the DRBC’s Administrative
Agreement with DEP is more than 40 years old.
“Not only do the commissions need wholly updated agreements, they also need
additional written operational guidance in coordinating with DEP to preserve our water supply
and quality,” he said.
Both audits show that most signatory parties to the commissions, including Pennsylvania,
are not making agreed-upon financial contributions, with the federal government making no
payments in nearly a decade.
There was one exception: the state of Delaware has met its financial obligations to the
DRBC.
In the 2016-17 fiscal year, Pennsylvania’s support for the SRBC totaled $473,000, an
underpayment of $318,250. Pennsylvania’s funding for the DRBC totaled $434,000, which is
$459,000 less than the agreed-to amount.
The SRBC’s membership includes Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, and the federal
government. The DRBC’s members include Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware,
and the federal government.
The audits, authorized by the 2017 state budget (Act 44 of 2017), covered July 1, 2016 to
June 30, 2017.
Click Here ​for a copy of the Susquehanna River Basin Commission audit report.
Click Here​ for a copy of the Delaware River Basin Commission audit report.
Reaction
The Delaware River Basin Commission released this statement on the audit results--
“The DRBC thanks Auditor General Eugene A. DePasquale and his staff for their
professionalism and attention to detail as they completed their charge,” said DRBC Executive
Director Steve Tambini. “The DRBC generally agrees with the report’s findings and
recommendations, which reinforce what we already knew: that the expenses of the commission
and its officers are reasonable; that while the commission’s work is complementary to that of the
Pa. Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP), further opportunities to work
collaboratively and efficiently should be explored; and that not all commission members are
paying their agreed upon contributions to support DRBC’s budget.”
“Through the commission, the four basin states and the federal government together
advance vital water management objectives for the Delaware River Basin that none of them
could achieve on their own. We are always seeking ways to be more efficient and effective, and
we look forward to working with the commonwealth and our other state and federal partners to
implement the majority of the report’s recommendations,” continued Tambini.
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

News From Around The State

Economic Impact Of Natural Resource Conservation In Somerset County

By: Len Lichvar, District Manager, ​Somerset Conservation District


16
The economic impact of natural resource
conservation is not always easy to determine.
However, verified documentation does exist of its
value and contribution to the local economy and
job sustainability and creation.
At a Somerset County Chamber of Commerce
event in 2014 Western Carolina University
Economist Dr. Steve Morse documented and
determined that if it were not for tourism generated
tax dollars each resident of Somerset County
would pay $564.00 more in state and local taxes.
The data also documents that $184,681.00 is spent on the arts, entertainment and
recreation every day in Somerset County.
The data was derived from the PA Department of Tourism through studies conducted by
Oxford Economics in the Laurel Highlands region of the state.
Tourism dollars in Somerset County are generated from a variety of sources that include
the ​Flight 93 Memorial​, ​Quecreek Mine Rescue site​, proximity to the PA Turnpike and major
resorts.
However, tourism is also generated from the improving natural resources such as land
and water used for recreation now available more than ever before in the county today.
The Somerset Conservation District and organizations that it supports and empowers
such as the ​Stonycreek–Conemaugh River Improvement Project (SCRIP)​, ​Somerset County
Conservancy​, ​Casselman River Watershed Association​, ​Shade Creek Watershed Association​,
Paint Creek Regional Watershed Association​ and many other volunteer and professional
watershed partners work successfully to conserve and enhance those resources every day and
have done so for decades that have garnered state and national acclaim.
Portions of the economic impact of that effort are proven and documented.
As an example, a mile of a trout stocked fishery, according to the PA Fish and Boat
Commission, is worth $73,986.00 a year to the local economy.
A very conservative estimate of 16 miles of restored fishery in the county has largely
been due to the projects of SCRIP and the Somerset Conservation District and the partners it
empowers and supports which totals a value of 1,183,776.00 of economic value each year to
Somerset County.
It should be noted that neither of these organizations receive any Somerset County tax
dollars.
A conservative and older document shows that five miles of restored whitewater rafting,
now available plus more on the Stonycreek River, is valued at $1.2 million of economic value to
the local economy each year.
This impact too is derived directly from the regions improving water quality that has been
the result of the local orchestrated resource conservation efforts.
These documented impacts do not even include the less verified values of the Somerset
District’s technical assistance to the agriculture community that enables farmers to maintain and
improve the economic vitality and conservation values of their businesses.
It also does not include the Erosion and Sedimentation Control Program that minimizes

17
runoff and pollution impacts to the county’s waterways thus sustaining and improving their
ability to support both industrial and recreational use.
Dr. Morse makes the point that “Years ago preserving open space and conserving water
was believed to be a roadblock to economic development. Today, because of the outdoor
adventure tourism market, these resources are now looked on as an economic asset by creating
tax income and sustaining and creating jobs in the region.”
Dr. Morse also believes that, “The potential for growth in the tourism market and its
economic impacts is very possible and likely.”
Because of the on the ground resource conservation projects generated by the District and
its many partners the combined impact of them has been a major contributor in the reduction of
the burden of taxes on the Somerset County taxpayer and no doubt others throughout the region.
Please see the Somerset Conservation District report “​Future AMD Restoration Costs and
Economic Benefits in the Stonycreek River Watershed​” available on the District’s website.
(​Photo:​ ​Oven Run passive mine drainage treatment system​, Somerset County Conservancy.)
Afterword
Since this article was published, the Somerset Conservation District is now involved in a
new project with the multi-county ​Laurel Highlands Conservation Landscape Initiative​ to
complete a return on investment study to document the economic returns from investing in
recreation and natural resource protection and restoration in Fayette, Somerset, Westmoreland
and portions of Bedford and Cambria counties.
The project has retained ​Key-Log Economics​ to conduct the study, which is just in its
beginning stages.

Len Lichvar​ is District Manager for the ​Somerset County Conservation District​. He can be
contacted by calling 814-445-4652.
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Natural Resources
Carbon County Has $800 Million Return On Investment From Natural Resources
Green Infrastructure Offers Triple Benefits, Cost Effective Solutions To Stormwater Pollution,
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Related Stories This Week:
Berks Nature Issues 10 Year Environmental Status Report For Berks County
Allegheny Land Trust, Partners Make Urban Greenprint Property Information Tool Available To
Public, Groups
Act Now
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[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

18
Berks Nature Issues 10 Year Environmental Status Report For Berks County

Berks Nature​ recently issued its 10-year report on


the ​State of the Environment in Berks County​ which
revisits environmental indicators and tracks
recommendations in its ​first report 10 years ago​.
“We launched the first State of the Environment
report a decade ago with the philosophy of “what
gets measured, gets done.” It was the first time
anyone had undertaken a comprehensive analysis of
the state of the environment in Berks County.
“We identified 25 environmental indicators across
five critical categories-- Water, Energy, Air, Waste,
and Land-- and shared the data, assigning a thumbs
up when the data was positive or moving in the right
direction and a thumbs down to indicate areas where
we needed to work harder.
“When we released the initial report, we knew that it
would take years for some of the indicators to show signs of improvement.
“The environmental concerns we identified in the first report were not created overnight.
They grew slowly over multiple decades as a result of poor understanding, neglect, or
indifference.
“We knew that we could not solve all of the challenges overnight or even over a single
decade, but we knew we had to try.
“That first State of the Environment report inspired efforts by a variety of municipalities,
organizations and individuals to improve the local Berks County environment. Groups of people
concerned about poor water quality adopted watersheds and worked to protect them.
“Municipalities recognized the value of coordinated planning and began working together
to tackle environmental and other issues collaboratively. Individuals recognized the importance
of protecting the environmental value of their land and placed it under permanent easement.
In the decade since the first report, there have also been positive shifts at the national and
global levels that have created benefits for us in Berks County.
“Federal clean air standards, for example, encouraged energy companies and
manufacturers to find less-polluting ways to make their products.
“The discovery of vast reserves of less expensive natural gas made it possible to reduce
the amount of coal we burn to generate electricity.
“Automotive companies began making less-polluting, more fuel-efficient vehicles and
new technologies made electric vehicles more reliable and affordable.
“Large companies are making public pledges to address their contributions to climate
change and they are releasing their own corporate sustainability reports that allow shareholders
and others to measure the companies’ environmental performance.
“You can see the benefits of some of these improvements in the updated State of the
Environment data.
“Despite all of these positive steps, the State of the Environment data for Berks County

19
shows that we still have a long way to go. While we have made progress and some of the
indicators are moving in the right direction, there is still work to be done. We’re going to do our
part. Will you?”
Summary Of Indicators
Here are just a few of the status results summarized in the report--
Water
-- Projects are having positive impact on water quality, but 332 miles of stream remain impaired;
-- 36 or 63 water suppliers have water protection plans covering 97 percent of population;
-- 13 municipalities have update sewage plans, but most are more 10 years old or more; and
-- 34 percent of aquatic life monitoring locations rated good.
Energy
-- Vehicle miles traveled per resident has not been reduced;
-- Use of public transit before state average;
-- County relies mainly on fossil fuel for energy, few renewable sources available;
-- Homes are getting more energy efficient, but more could be done; and
-- Berks significantly increased number of LEED green buildings.
Air
-- Number of bad air days decreasing, but traffic congestion challenges air quality;
-- Lead levels in the air have decreased and all of Berks County meets lead standard;
-- Air toxic releases have decreased significantly;
-- Particle pollution levels have decreased; and
-- Traffic congestion and trash burning challenge air quality.
Waste
-- No attempt to reduce the amount of waste county generates;
-- Amount of waste disposed in Berks County increasing after declining for several years;
-- Volume of electronics waste increasing, as is e-waste recycling;
-- Most people continue to participate in special waste collection events; and
-- Recycling percentage has fallen below 30 percent.
Land
--15 percent of land in the county is permanently protected, and increasing;
-- Forested lands make up largest land-cover category;
-- Impervious land-cover makes up 12 percent of the county, but municipalities are addressing
stormwater issues;
-- Multi-municipal cooperation and planning is on the rise; and
-- Outdoor recreation has increased, but more connections and promotions are needed.
The plan also offers 25 tips on how residents can go green and help move the indicators
in the report in a positive direction.
Click Here​ for a copy of the complete report.
Supporting Publications
There are a series of supporting documents Berks Nature produced along with the 10 year
report that provide an even more information about environmental initiatives in the county.
They include--
-- ​State Of The Environment ​(2009)
-- ​State Of The Environment Volume 2: See The Progress, Take The Challenge​ (2009)
-- ​Business Of Nature: The Return On Investment​ In Restoring, Protection Natural Resources In

20
the County;
-- ​Healthy Living In Berks​: Get Outside In Nature, Buy Local Fruits & Veggies; Get Your Well
Water Tested
-- 5​ Year Report Card On The Berks Environment ​(2013)
-- ​Climate Change In Your Backyard
-- ​Stories In Sustainability From Berks County Business Leaders
-- ​Be A Good Neighbor: State Of The Environment 2017
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming events and how you can get
involved, visit the ​Berks Nature​ website. ​Click Here ​to sign up for regular updates from Berks
Nature. ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClip;
Op-Ed: Berks Nature: Saving Our Planet
Related Story:
The Economic Value Of Green Infrastructure: Calculating A Return On Investments In Parks,
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Allegheny Land Trust, Partners Make Urban Greenprint Property Information Tool Available To
Public, Groups
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

Allegheny Land Trust, Partners Make Urban Greenprint Property Information Tool
Available To Public, Groups

The ​Allegheny Land Trust​ and the University of


Pittsburgh's ​Western PA Regional Data Center​ this
week made available to the public and groups in the
City Of Pittsburgh a new interactive ​Urban
Greenprint property information tool​ to help plan and
collaborate on green space projects.
"The tool was developed because the Trust was
getting requests to help community, nonprofit and
local government groups plan green space projects in
the City," said Tom Dougherty, Vice President of
Development and External Affairs for the Trust. "Whether it was developing a local recreation
area, a community garden, protecting areas prone to landslides or natural hazards, building a rain
garden, people needed more information about particular pieces of property."
The Urban Greenprint assembles data layers starting with basic property information on a
property like ownership and tax status.
It adds environmental characteristics, and whether another group or government agency
is interested in the site for redevelopment, whether it is in a designated "food desert" where urban
farming might be encouraged, an area that might be protected for open space or recreation
opportunities or for developing green stormwater infrastructure.

21
"The idea is to create opportunities for collaboration and to head off conflicts between
groups who may be looking at the same property for different kinds of conservation or
development uses," said Dougherty. "Having the information in one place saves a lot of time and
increases the chances for successful projects, and avoids situations where the left hand doesn’t
know what the right hand is doing."
As an example, a neighborhood group may want to develop a parcel of land in their
community for recreation.
Checking the Urban Greenprint, they could find out if another group is looking to use
open space in the area to develop community gardens or an agency is looking to develop green
projects that store or slow stormwater runoff.
Using that information, the neighborhood group can collaborate with the others interested
in the property and come up with a stronger, more functional project with several different
benefits for their community.
"How we collectively manage our open spaces in the next 5 to 10 years will determine
whether we exacerbate regional issues like flooding, landslides, combined sewer overflow, food
insecurity, blight, and shortages of outdoor recreational places -- or effectively mitigate them for
the improvement of quality of life in the region," said Dougherty. "This tool helps groups
collaborate and maximize their opportunities for community benefits in ways they may not have
thought about before."
The Urban Greenprint project was started about a year ago by the Allegheny Land Trust,
with technical support contributed by the Western PA Regional Data Center and funding by the
Heinz Endowments.
Dougherty said the Trust is open to adding additional data sets from other organizations
who may want to contribute to the efficacy of the tool, and is hoping to expand the data tool
beyond the City of Pittsburgh to cover Allegheny County in the future.
Click Here​ to explore the Urban Greenprint tool. Questions should be directed to Alyson
Fearon at Allegheny Land Trust by calling 412-741-2750 or an email to:
afearon@alleghenylandtrust.org​.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming educational programs and other
events, visit the ​Allegheny Land Trust​ website. ​Click Here​ to read the Trust’s most recent
newsletter. ​Click Here​ to add your email to their mailing list. ​Click Here ​to support their work.
NewsClips:
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Related Story:
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Related Story This Week:
Economic Impact Of Natural Resource Conservation In Somerset County
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Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act

22
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

NFWF, Wildlife Habitat Council Accepting Applications For 2019 Five Star & Urban
Waters Restoration Grants

The ​National Fish and Wildlife Foundation


and the ​Wildlife Habitat Council​ are now
accepting applications for the ​2019 Five Star
and Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program
which will award approximately $1.7 million
in grants nationwide. The deadline for
applications is January 31.
Applicant Webinar
There will be a webinar held on November 15 at 2:00 p.m. for potential applicants. ​Click
Here​ to register.
Background
The grants are being offered in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency, USDA Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, FedEx, Southern Company,
Shell Oil Company and BNSF Railway.
The Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration grant program seeks to develop community
capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial
assistance to diverse local partnerships focused on improving water quality, watersheds and the
species and habitats they support.
Projects include a variety of ecological improvements along with targeted community
outreach, education and stewardship.
Ecological improvements may include one or more of the following: wetland, riparian,
forest and coastal habitat restoration; wildlife conservation, community tree canopy
enhancement, water quality monitoring and green infrastructure best management practices for
managing run-off.
Projects should also increase access to the benefits of nature, reduce the impact of
environmental hazards and engage local communities, particularly underserved communities, in
project planning, outreach and implementation.
This program expects that applicants will represent a mixture of urban and rural
communities. NFWF may use a mix of public and private funding sources to support any grant
made through this program.
Funding from some sponsors have geographic preferences for projects, for example,
FedEx is making $300,000 available for areas like Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, among others.
For all the details, visit the NFWF ​Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program
webpage.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster

23
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

Municipal Stormwater Pollution Reduction Workshop Nov. 27 In Dauphin County

The ​Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay​ will host a


Tale Of Two Townships Stormwater
Management Workshop​ on November 27 at the
Londonderry Township Building, 783 S. Geyers
Church Road in Middletown, Dauphin County
from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
This comprehensive workshop will showcase
financial plans developed for two local townships
as well as additional financing strategies for your
MS4 Stormwater Pollution Reduction Programs.
Also sponsoring the Workshop is the ​Maryland Environmental Finance Center​ and the
Capital Region Council of Governments​.
The cost to attend is $15 per person and includes breakfast and lunch.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Questions should be directed to the
Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay by calling 717-517-8698.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events on the ​Alliance
for the Chesapeake Bay​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Alliance,
Like the ​Alliance on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, add them to your ​Circle on Google+
and visit the Alliance’s ​YouTube Channel​. ​Click Here​ to support the Alliance’s work.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

Penn State Water Insights Seminar Nov. 16 On Resilient Management Of Stormwater In


Urban Landscapes

The ​Penn State Environment and Natural Resources Institute​ will


host a ​Water Insights Seminar​ on November 16 on Sustainable and
Resilient Management of Stormwater In Urban Landscapes.
Dr. Lauren McPhillips​, Assistant Professor of Civil and
Environmental Engineering and Agricultural & Biological
Engineering will discuss work on the function of different
stormwater best management practices.

24
Urbanization is increasing across the United States and the world and we are struggling to
meet the needs of our growing population without compromising environmental integrity.
In recent years there have been increased efforts to develop landscapes using Best
Management Practices or Low Impact Development, with the intention to enhance resilience to
flooding and mitigate degradation to aquatic resources.
Dr. McPhillips will also discuss efforts to understand stormwater management strategies
across several U.S. cities, including comparison of existing structural stormwater BMP strategies
and assessment of potential stormwater retention benefits from vacant lots.
She will also mention some initial efforts to monitor performance of stormwater
management strategies locally.
The Seminar will held from Noon to 1:00 in Room 312 of the Ag and Bio Engineering
Building on Penn State’s main campus in State College and ​is available online via Zoom​.
For more information, and archived copies of past Seminars, visit the ​Water Insights
Seminar Series​ webpage.
NewsClips:
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

Brodhead Chapter Trout Unlimited Volunteers Contributed Over 2,200 Hours Of


Restoration, Education Work In Monroe County

Streams across the Monroe County


are cleaner and healthier thanks to
countless volunteers with ​Brodhead
Chapter Trout Unlimited.
In the past fiscal year-- from October
2017 through September 2018--
volunteers contributed more than
2200 hours of service to the mission
of this national conservation
organization.
With multiple conservation projects protecting, restoring, and repairing rivers, and over
20 education and outreach programs and activities to engage community in conservation that
were held from Blakeslee to Delaware Water Gap and from Skytop to Saylorsburg.
“What’s good for the fish is good for the fisherman,” said Gerry Bortz, longtime member
of the Brodhead Chapter Trout Unlimited which serves Monroe County, PA.
The Brodhead Chapter is a community of people who care deeply about our local rivers
and the trout and other wildlife that need clean, healthy rivers to survive and we’re willing to roll
up our sleeves to ensure those rivers are in better shape for our children and grandchildren.

25
Here in Monroe County, PA, projects and programs that improved rivers, engaged local
communities and educated youth were broad and diverse in their location and impact. They
included:
-- Restored 1000 feet of the Cherry Creek near Stroudsburg, PA
-- Monitored the physical and chemical properties of two streams in Monroe County as part of
the Coldwater Conservation Corps program
-- Installed wild trout signage in Jonas, PA
-- Investigated and monitored for potential impacts from a sewage treatment plant in
Snydersville, PA
-- Participated in to garbage clean-up efforts in Tannersville, PA
-- Organized a clean-up effort after a tractor trailer spilled plastic pellets (nurdles) in
Tannersville, PA
-- Provided financial support for Monroe County Conservation District Programs and advocated
to strengthen their environmental program
-- Provided financial and volunteer support for the Monroe County Youth Field Day
-- Partnered with the Kunkletown, PA Major Paul Syverson Veterans Sanctuary to help veterans
heal and recover from the trauma of combat through therapeutic fly fishing lessons and 10
fishing trips
-- Educated more than 20 students of Pocono Mountain East School District on the importance of
clean water through the ​PA Trout In The Classroom​ (TIC) Program and added a second TIC
Program in the Stroudsburg School District
-- Provided a women’s only fly fishing course in Stroudsburg, PA
-- Taught fly fishing to more than 20 youth campers at the ​Monroe County Conservation Camp
in Marshalls Creek, PA.
-- Organized and implemented a children’s fishing Program for the ​Pocono Chapter of the
National Wild Turkey Federation​ Jakes’ Day in Stroudsburg, PA
-- Advocated to maintain the exceptional value of several streams in Monroe County including
Swiftwater Creek, Tank Creek, Devils Hole, Cranberry Creek, and Tunkhannock Creek
-- Provided volunteer labor for a riparian buffer restoration on the Cherry Creek in coordination
with the ​Monroe County Conservation District​.
-- Provided a fishing opportunity for more than 80 children with a Fishing Contest held in
conjunction with the Knights of Columbus in Stroudsburg, PA
-- Provided 10 public meetings on Conservation and Fishing topics in Bartonsville, PA
-- Held more than a dozen fly fishing and fly tying classes in Bartonsville, Tobyhanna,
Dingmans Ferry, and Stroudsburg, PA
​Plans for Next Year
For 2018 and 2019 the Brodhead Chapter Trout Unlimited already has a busy schedule
planned. In addition to our usual slate of conservation, educational, and youth activities the
chapter is planning the following large scale projects--
-- The Chapter plans to restore 3000 additional linear feet of Cherry Creek in Stroudsburg, PA
-- The Chapter plans to restore an additional 500 linear feet of the Pocono Creek in Tannersville,
PA by partnering with the ​Brodhead Creek Regional Authority​ and the ​Pocono Heritage Land
Trust​, along signage promoting catch and release fishing
-- The Chapter plans to monitor and document the impacts of previous years habitat
improvements on the Cherry Creeks

26
-- The Chapter is looking to add an additional Trout In the Classroom program with a local
school district
-- The Chapter will continue to increase the advocacy efforts in Monroe County
-- The Chapter is going to construct and install used monofilament disposal containers along
publicly accessible trout streams
-- The Chapter plans additional riparian buffer restorations on the Cherry Creek
-- The Chapter plans on improving and providing additional opportunities for veterans
While the Chapter has a busy slate we are always looking for new ideas and new partners
to work with. If you are interested in helping the chapter you are welcome to do the any of the
following:
-- Join the ​Brodhead Chapter Trout Unlimited
-- Volunteer at any of our outreach, education, or conservation efforts
-- Attend our banquet in March
-- Donate, we are always looking for gifts for our March banquet, and cash is always welcome
These projects and so many more were thanks to the members and volunteers of the
chapter and the many of supporters who provide the time, talent and resources to make Monroe
County’s rivers healthier.
For more information on programs, initiatives, upcoming activities and how you can get
involved, visit the ​Brodhead Chapter Trout Unlimited​ website. ​Click Here​ to read recent
newsletters. Questions should be directed to Eric R. Baird, President, by calling 570-396-4677
or sending email to: ​brodheadchapter@gmail.com​.
(​Photo​: Volunteers place Christmas Trees In Cherry Creek to improve habitat, Cherry Creek
after streambank restoration.)
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Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
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From The Field: Raising Eastern Hellbenders In Pennsylvania (Video)
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

Earth Conservancy Seeking Recruits For 2019 Environmental Workforce Training


Program

The Luzerne County-based ​Earth Conservancy​ is


seeking recruits for the ​2019 Environmental Workforce
Training Program​. Three information sessions will be

27
held November 8, 15 and 29.
In 2017, the Earth Conservancy was awarded a $200,000 grant through the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training
Program to implement a new job training program for local unemployed and underemployed
residents in the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton metro area.
The program, through a focus on surveying, emphasizes skills and technology required in
the reclamation and remediation process. More specifically, the courses include--
-- Introduction to Brownfields
-- OSHA 40-Hour HAZWOPER Training
-- AutoCAD, Level I
-- Surveying Field Assistant
-- Basic Land Surveying Techniques
-- GIS for Resource Conservation
-- OSHA 10-Hour Safety Training
-- First Aid/CPR/AED
The EWT Program provides a comprehensive and realistic curriculum to participants
seeking to enter an environmentally-oriented career in the Wyoming Valley. The curriculum,
designed by a team at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, consists of 205 contact hours over the course of
2½ months.
The EWT Program is a $4,289 value, with tuition underwritten through a cooperative
agreement with EPA.
Info Sessions
Three information sessions for prospective participants will be held--
-- November 8:​​ PA CareerLink Luzerne County, 75 North Laurel Street, Hazleton, 10:00 to
11:00 a.m.
-- November 15:​​ PA CareerLink, 135 Franklin Avenue, Scranton, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
-- November 29:​​ PA CareerLink, 32 East Union Street, Wilkes-Barre, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Classes begin February 1, 2019, and are anticipated to conclude in mid-April.
Participants must attend all classes in order to earn certificates and continuing education credits.
Click Here​ for all the details.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the ​Earth
Conservancy​ website.
NewsClips:
Earth Conservancy Head Highlights Nonprofit’s Role In New Economic Development Project
Earth Conservancy Seeking Participants For Free Job Training Program In Luzerne
Coal Culm Banks: 4 Million Tons Of Potential In Luzerne County
Graham Academy To Take Part In EPCAMR GrowBoxxes
Related Story:
Groundbreaking At Hanover 9 Mine Reclamation Site For New Industrial Park In Luzerne
County
Related Stories This Week:
Natural Lands: Be A Force Of Nature, Volunteer Training Sign Up
Sign Ups For York County Master Watershed Steward Program, Info Session Nov. 19
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act

28
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

Sign Ups For York County Master Watershed Steward Program, Info Session Nov. 19

The ​York County Watershed Steward Program​ is now


accepting applications for new members. An
information session for potential new members will be
held on November 19.
The information session will be held at the Penn
State Extension Office, 119 Pleasant Acres Road in York
starting at 6:30.
There is a program fee of $125. Applications are
being accepted now through January. Preregister by
contacting Jodi Sulpizio at 717-840-7408 or by sending
email to: ​jrb143@psu.edu​.
Other Watershed Steward Programs
There are Penn State Extension ​Master Watershed Stewards Programs​ in Allegheny,
Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery,
Northampton, Wyoming and York Counties.
Interested in becoming a Master Watershed Steward in your area? Visit Penn State
Extension’s ​Master Watershed Steward Program​ webpage. Questions should be directed to Erin
Frederick at 610-391-9840 or send email to: ​elf145@psu.edu​.
NewsClips:
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
How Monitoring Local Water Supplies Can Building Community Trust
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Coal Culm Banks: 4 Million Tons Of Potential In Luzerne County
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Brings Back Family Fun Day On The River
From The Field: Raising Eastern Hellbenders In Pennsylvania (Video)
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Related Stories:
York Master Watershed Stewards Plant Rain Gardens, Hold Youth Fishing & Conservation Day
York County Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Oct. 18
York Master Watershed Stewards Rain Barrel Workshop Aug. 8
Master Watershed Stewards In York County Present Outstanding Partner Award
Master Watershed Stewards Helping York County Meet Clean Water Goals
Feature: Meet The Master Watershed Stewards Who Are Saving Streams
Related Stories This Week:
Earth Conservancy Seeking Recruits For 2019 Environmental Workforce Training Program
Natural Lands: Be A Force Of Nature, Volunteer Training Sign Up
Act Now

29
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

CBF: Schools, Organizations Can Now Sign Up For Student, Adult Chesapeake Bay Field
Education Programs

The ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation​ is now accepting


signups from schools and other organizations for
its student and adult ​Chesapeake Bay Field
Education Programs​. The deadline for
applications is November 30.
One and multi-day programs are currently
available under both the Student and Adult Field
Program.
Click Here​ for all the details, including
costs.
For more on Chesapeake Bay-related
issues in Pennsylvania, visit the ​Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA​ webpage. ​Click Here​ to sign
up for Pennsylvania updates (bottom of left column). ​Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Graham Academy To Take Part In EPCAMR GrowBoxxes
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Brings Back Family Fun Day On The River
STEM Education Discovery Day At Wilkes University
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

EPA, Lincoln University Agree To Continue And Expand Partnership

On November 6, the U.S. Environmental


Protection Agency and ​Lincoln University​ in
Philadelphia signed a renewed memorandum
of understanding to work together to enhance
research, teaching, outreach, career
development, and stewardship in the
environmental sciences at Lincoln University.
“EPA has a long history of partnership with
Lincoln University, and we are pleased to
build on that success today,” said EPA
Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio. “The
partnership between EPA and Lincoln
University continues to enhance the education and training of students to prepare them to meet
the environmental challenges of the future. The partnership also strives to ensure that careers in
science are open to every American regardless of race or ethnicity.”

30
“We couldn’t be more excited for the renewal of this partnership with the EPA because it
will provide high-impact and collaborative learning and research opportunities for our students,”
said Lincoln University President Brenda A. Allen. “This agreement demonstrates our
commitment to developing strategic partnerships that enhance the education and professional
development of our students and faculty.”
Building on the success of the original MOU between EPA and Lincoln University
signed in 2002, the new MOU aims to:
-- Support and promote student learning, internships, career development and employment in
environmental sciences and related fields;
-- Enhance Lincoln University faculty and EPA employee professional development in
environmental sciences, and related fields;
-- Support the enhancement of Lincoln University’s environmental sciences curriculum; and
-- Support community development, engagement opportunities for Lincoln University students,
partnerships with regional communities and potential career opportunities with the surrounding
communities on environmental, health, and economic issues.
The MOU is part of EPA's Minority Academic Institutions Program which was created to
increase opportunities for Minority Academic Institutions to participate in federal programs.
EPA works with these schools to increase participation in ways that will strengthen them
by promoting faculty development, increasing institutional capacity, and fully developing the
diverse talent pool that constitutes our nation.
(​Photo:​ Seated- EPA Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio and Lincoln University President
Brenda A. Allen.)
NewsClips:
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Graham Academy To Take Part In EPCAMR GrowBoxxes
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Brings Back Family Fun Day On The River
STEM Education Discovery Day At Wilkes University
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

International Visitors Learn Water Resource Management At Stroud Water Research


Center

The ​Stroud Water Research Center​ in Chester


County recently hosted an ​International Visitor
Leadership Program​ (IVLP) group focusing on
water resource management.
This U.S. Department of State ​Bureau of
Educational and Cultural Affairs​ exchange program
was implemented by ​Citizen Diplomacy
International Philadelphia​, a Global Ties U.S.
Community-Based member.
On September 14 and 21, Stroud Water Research
Center was pleased to once again host delegates

31
with the U.S. Department of State's International Visitor Leadership Program.
This year's program theme was "Water Resource Management," and Stroud Center staff
presented a variety of strategies for assessing, monitoring, and conserving water resources.
The 22 international visitors came from companies and organizations from across the
globe, including
-- Ministry of Energy and Water, Afghanistan
-- Education Above All Foundation, Palestinian Territories
-- Water Commission of Central Asia, Uzbekistan
-- Ministry of Agriculture, Tunisia
-- University of Pecs, Hungary
-- World Wildlife Fund, Romania
-- Office of the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, Canada
-- Moscow State University, Russia
-- Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taiwan
-- Environment and Energy Ministry, Costa Rica
-- National Office for Electricity and Drinking Water, Morocco
-- Cayetano Heredia University, Peru
-- Union of Lake Municipalities, Lebanon
-- Ministry of Water and Irrigation, Jordan
-- Bulawayo City Council, Zimbabwe
-- Intermunicipal Association for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable
Development of Lake Chapala, Mexico
-- World Business Council for Sustainable Development, India
Thanks to Citizen Diplomacy International Philadelphia for facilitating the visit.
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​Stroud Water
Research Center​ website, ​Click Here​ to subscribe to UpStream. ​Click Here​ to subscribe to
Stroud’s Educator newsletter. ​Click Here​ to become a Friend Of Stroud Research, ​Like them on
Facebook​, ​Follow on Twitter​, include them in your ​Circle on Google+​ and visit their ​YouTube
Channel​.
NewsClip:
International Visitors Learn Water Resource Management
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

PASA: Pennsylvania Sustainable Agriculture Conference Feb. 6-9 In Lancaster

The ​PA Association For Sustainable


Agriculture​ will host the ​28th Pennsylvania
Sustainable Agriculture Conference​ at the
Lancaster County Convention Center​,
Lancaster on February 6-9.
Each February, thousands of farmers,
homesteaders, educators, and other food
system professionals gather for four days of

32
intensive learning on more than 120 food and farming topics.
No matter your experience level or agricultural interests, you’ll be able to pack your
schedule with valuable sessions that help hone your craft or advance your career. The
Conference additionally features networking and social events, programming for kids, and an
expansive trade show that includes more than 100 vendors.
People passionate about sustainable agriculture and healthy food systems from more than
30 states and six countries have gathered at our hallmark event since 1992, leaving inspired and
energized for the season to come.
Keynote speakers for the 2019 Conference will include--
-- ​Michael P. Hoffman​: Climate Change & Our Global Food System: A Call To Action
-- ​Leah Lizarondo​: Waste Not: The Moral Disconnect Between Food Waste & Hunger
-- ​Michael Rozyne​: An Unlikely Collaboration: Who Can I Trust?
Click Here​ to register, book rooms and for more information.
More information on programs, initiatives, other upcoming events and education
opportunities is available at the ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture​ website.
NewsClips:
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16
Farmers In Delaware, Philadelphia Counties Can Apply For Natural Disaster Relief Funding
Feature: Penn State Alumna Katie Turner Pursues Passion For Conservation At The Nature
Conservancy-PA As Ag Program Manager
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

Reminder: Deadline For Grants To Help PA Farmers, Processors Get Organic


Certification Is Nov. 16

Pennsylvania farmers and processors seeking


organic certification ​can receive financial
assistance​ through the National Organic
Certification Cost Share Program and the
Agricultural Management Assistance Organic
Certification Cost Program.
The deadline to apply is November 16.
The Department of Agriculture secured
$189,000 in federal funds through NOCCSP and $149,000 through AMA to reimburse farmers
and handling facilities for expenses related to organic certification. Amounts are awarded to
states based on their number of certified organic operations.
“Pennsylvania has grown phenomenally in organic sales, doubling from 2015 to 2016
alone, and we are now second in the nation in organic production,” Agriculture Secretary Russell

33
Redding said. “We are not a leader by accident, but because of public and private investment in
taking a strategic approach to industry growth. These funds support that forward-thinking
innovation by those seeking to grow and sustain their businesses, respond to consumer trends,
and diversify their operations.”
Under the United States Department of Agriculture, the National Organic Program sets
the standards for producers to receive organic certification in livestock, crops, and wild crops.
Cost share programs allow eligible farmers and processors to be reimbursed up to 75
percent or $750, whichever is less, for the cost of obtaining organic certification in each
category.
From 2015 through 2017, Pennsylvania reimbursed 1,258 agriculture operations a total of
$1,068,730 to defray the cost of organic certification.
In September 2018, Gov. Wolf also announced $5 million in grants available to dairy
producers transitioning to organic, as part of the ​PA Dairy Investment Program​.
Applications for the Organic Cost Share program and other programs to support
sustainable farming can be found at the ​PA Grows website​ or call 1-888-PA-GROWS for more
information.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Westmoreland Farmers’ Profits Washed Away By Rains
Related Stories:
PASA: Pennsylvania Sustainable Agriculture Conference Feb. 6-9 In Lancaster
Farmers In Delaware, Philadelphia Counties Can Apply For Natural Disaster Relief Funding
Feature: Penn State Alumna Katie Turner Pursues Passion For Conservation At The Nature
Conservancy-PA As Ag Program Manager
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

Feature: Penn State Alumna Katie Turner Pursues Passion For Conservation At The
Nature Conservancy-PA As Ag Program Manager

By: Kelly Jedrzejewski, ​Penn State News

Katie Turner, a 2013 Penn State graduate in


environmental resource management​, is putting her
love of soil science to good use as the Pennsylvania
agricultural program manager for ​The Nature
Conservancy-PA​, a nonprofit environmental
organization that serves the global community.
Turner said she always has loved nature and knew she
wanted to work in the environmental field.
Although she grew up in a suburban neighborhood in
Camp Hill [Cumberland County], her family taught her
from a young age to appreciate and seek understanding of the natural world.

34
Turner regularly visited local farms and the ​Pennsylvania Farm Show​, and her parents
also made sure she was aware of the connection between agricultural stewardship and water
quality in the Chesapeake Bay.
While in high school, Turner attended the Pennsylvania Governor's School for
Agricultural Sciences, now known as the ​Pennsylvania School for Excellence in the Agricultural
Sciences​, a summer residential program at Penn State's University Park campus that provides
rising high school seniors an opportunity to explore the agricultural and natural-resource
sciences.
She said the experience opened her eyes to how agriculture and the environment interact
and helped her find her niche in environmental resource management.
As freshman in Penn State's ​College of Agricultural Sciences​, Turner discovered the field
of soil science and was intrigued.
"Healthy soils are critical for producing healthy crops," she said. "A single teaspoon of
soil contains up to a billion bacteria, fungi and invertebrates that work together to increase
nutrient availability and water-holding capacity. Farmers and gardeners increasingly recognize
the importance of healthy soil. There's still a lot to learn about how healthy soils benefit
humanity."
Turner, who also has a master's degree in plant and soil science from the University of
Delaware, has worked at The Nature Conservancy for about a year.
It is the world's largest conservation organization, working in 72 countries to apply
cutting-edge science to the conservation of land and water for future generations.
As the conservancy's agricultural program manager in Pennsylvania, Turner's work varies
from day to day, which is one of the things she likes most about her job.
"I don't do the same thing every day," she said. "It's a lot of partnership-building, and I
love that I get to interact with so many interesting people. I work with a number of organizations,
including the ​Natural Resources Conservation Service-PA​, ​Penn State Extension​ and various
agribusinesses."
The Conservancy is focused on finding solutions to meet the growing demands of people
and nature including food, clean water and habitat.
In Pennsylvania, Turner hopes to strengthen the organization's relationships with its
agribusiness partners to increase the implementation of practices that make economic sense for
farmers while reducing nutrient and sediment pollution that eventually reaches the Chesapeake
Bay.
"We are working together to help farmers more precisely apply nutrients to feed their
crops so that fewer nutrients leave the farm field," she said.
Turner also works closely with the ​Pennsylvania 4R Alliance​, an organization that
collaborates with farmers to develop science-based systems to improve crop productivity through
more-efficient nutrient use and reduction in losses of nutrients to the environment.
"I'm looking forward to bringing 4R nutrient-management principles to farmers around
the state in hopes they might be widely adopted as standard practice," Turner said. "It is exciting
to use my background and experience in soil science to help make the world a better place."
Turner's adviser in environmental resource management at Penn State, Robert Shannon,
associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, explained that Turner developed
her passion for soil science and environmental issues before she came to Penn State,
participating in the ​Pennsylvania Envirothon​ as a high school student.

35
"When she came to Penn State for Governor's School, we had the opportunity to interact,
and she was convinced that the environmental resource management program perfectly suited
her interests," he said. "Her involvement as a Schreyer Honors College scholar, on the soil
judging team and in studying abroad epitomizes the student engagement that our program
offers."
In addition, students who participate in the Pennsylvania Envirothon and come to Penn
State to major in environmental resource management become eligible for the new ​Robert and
Tammy Shannon Environmental Resource Management Scholarship​.
Turner said her Penn State degree has been beneficial to her career.
"It's given me a lot of credibility in my field," she said. "Employers and other
professionals know that students receive a high-quality education from Penn State and the
College of Agricultural Sciences."
She added, "All my experiences at Penn State really culminated in this position at The
Nature Conservancy. Through my undergraduate research, I met with some of the partners I'm
working with today. Both my research and the connections I made were the keys to helping me
get this position. It's all about networking and making the most of your opportunities."
For more information on programs, initiatives and other special events, visit the ​PA
Chapter of The Nature Conservancy​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for updates from TNC, ​Like
them on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​ and ​Join them on Instagram​. ​Click Here​ to become a
member.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Westmoreland Farmers’ Profits Washed Away By Rains
Related Stories:
PASA: Pennsylvania Sustainable Agriculture Conference Feb. 6-9 In Lancaster
Reminder: Deadline For Grants To Help PA Farmers, Farmers Get Organic Certification Is Nov.
16
Farmers In Delaware, Philadelphia Counties Can Apply For Natural Disaster Relief Funding
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
(Reprinted from ​Penn State News​.)
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

Farmers In Delaware, Philadelphia Counties Can Apply For Natural Disaster Relief
Funding

On November 7, Gov. Tom Wolf notified farmland owners in Philadelphia and Delaware
counties that they are eligible to receive ​disaster relief funding​ from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
“This year was unprecedented and unpredictable, with weather conditions that challenged
farmers across the state,” said Gov. Wolf. “This funding will be crucial to help those producers
protect their investments and recoup some of their losses. I encourage anyone eligible in
Philadelphia or Delaware counties to apply for this valuable federal relief.”
The funding will help with losses caused by disasters that occurred during the 2018 crop

36
year, such as excessive heat and drought. It is the result of a Secretarial disaster declaration and
can include emergency loans from the federal Farm Service Agency.
Eligible farmers can apply for loans for up to eight months after a Secretarial disaster
declaration, and should contact their ​local FSA office​ for assistance.
More information is available by visiting the USDA’s ​Disaster Assistance Programs
webpage, including ​county lists and maps​.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Westmoreland Farmers’ Profits Washed Away By Rains
Related Stories:
PASA: Pennsylvania Sustainable Agriculture Conference Feb. 6-9 In Lancaster
Reminder: Deadline For Grants To Help PA Farmers, Farmers Get Organic Certification Is Nov.
16
Feature: Penn State Alumna Katie Turner Pursues Passion For Conservation At The Nature
Conservancy-PA As Ag Program Manager
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

PA-Section American Water Works Assn/PaWARN: 3rd Annual Security & Risk
Management Symposium Nov. 29 In Monroeville

The ​PA Section of the American Water Works


Association​ and ​PaWARN​ will host the ​3rd Annual
Security and Risk Management Symposium​ on
November 29 at the Doubletree By Hilton Convention
Center, 209 Mall Boulevard in Monroeville, Allegheny
County from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
This symposium addresses: criminal activities,
cyber and physical security threats in our region and
globally, risk management strategies and insight on
critical infrastructure interdependencies, prioritization of
resources, protection of critical infrastructure assets and
GridEX V.
The symposium is intended for members of Critical Infrastructure including the Water &
Wastewater Sector, ASIS, InfraGard, IAEM, ISSA, TRCPA Pennsylvania (PA) Region 13,
Public Sectors (Federal, State and Local) and Private Sectors (Business and Industry), Engineers,
Emergency Management, Utilities, Law Enforcement, Business Continuity/Organizational
Resilience Professionals, VOAD’s and those responsible for protecting our Nation’s Critical
Infrastructure through cyber and physical security initiatives.
The program is offered without cost and includes a continental breakfast, lunch and free
parking.
The Symposium is sponsored by the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security, and the
Pennsylvania Region 13 Task Force, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security–Office of Infrastructure Protection.
Click Here​ to register or for more information.

37
For more information on programs, initiatives and other educational opportunities, visit
the ​PA Section-American Water Works Association​ website.
PaWARN-- the ​PA Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network​-- is an organization of
utilities helping utilities” to: Prepare for the next natural or human-caused emergency; Organize
response according to established requirements; and Share personnel and other resources
statewide, by agreement.
NewsClips:
Auditor General DePasquale Releases Audits Of Susquehanna, Delaware River Basin
Commissions: No Duplication Of Effort With DEP
Meyer: Audit Knocks Susquehanna River Basin Commission Spending
Delaware RiverKeeper Nov. 9 RiverWatch Video Report
Related Story:
PUC To Webcast Nov. 7 PA One Call Underground Utility Damage Prevention Committee
Meeting
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

DEP Invites Comments On Revised Management Of Fill Policy

On November 10, the Department of


Environmental Protection ​published notice in the
PA Bulletin​ inviting comments on proposed
revisions to its Management Of Fill Policy ​(​DEP
ID: 258-2182-773 - existing​).​ Comments are due
January 8.
Among the proposal changes are--
-- Changes procedures for making a fill
determination;
-- Chemical concentration limits;
-- Sample collection and analytical testing requirements; and
-- New procedures for demonstrating when chemical concentrations are the result of background
concentrations.
Comments are due January 8. ​Read the PA Bulletin notice​ on how to submit comments.
Click Here ​for a copy of the proposed guidance [when posted]. Questions should be
directed to Ali Tarquino Morris by calling 717-787-7381 or send email to:
ra-epbenuseall@pa.gov​. When submitting questions by email, place ''Draft Management of Fill
Policy'' in the subject line.
NewsClips:
Slate Belt Residents Decry Proposed Sewage-To-Fertilizer Plant
Penn State Harrisburg Researcher, Students Test New Use For Incinerator Waste
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

Penn State Fans Recycled 114,000 Pounds Of Plastic, Glass & Metal At First 5 Home
Football Games

38
The ​Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority​ Friday
reported Penn State fans recycled 114,000 pounds of plastic
and glass bottles and metal cans at the first 5 home football
games this season.
That’s about a pound of recyclables for each seat in Beaver
Stadium!
Football fans have been encouraged to grab a blue bag for
recycling and a clear bag for trash from bag dispensers are
found in every tailgating field and parking lot.
Blue bags are for recyclables and limited to plastic and glass
bottles and metal cans. Everything else should be placed in
clear trash bags. Full bags should be secured closed and left at each tailgate spot for Physical
Plant crews to collect the morning after each home game.
Clear bags go to the landfill, while the blue bags are delivered to the Centre County
Recycling & Refuse Authority for sorting and recycling.
Fans are asked to leave their tailgate area cleaner than it was found. The fields are
multi-use by students, faculty, staff, visitors, as well as agriculture. It is integral for the safety of
all users that the fields are clean of debris.
“We would like to thank all fans for their efforts in sorting their trash and recycling, and
keeping their tailgate areas clean,” said Amy Schirf, Education Coordinator with the Authority.
For more information on recycling, special waste collections and more, visit the ​Centre
County Recycling and Refuse Authority​ website.
NewsClips:
Rates For Refuse, Recycling Collection To Rise 35% In Nazareth
Op-Ed: Penn Waste Debunks 5 Recycling Myths
Puppets Teach York County Kids The Magic Of Recycling
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
Philly May Pay Homeless To Pick Up Litter
Slate Belt Residents Decry Proposed Sewage-To-Fertilizer Plant
Penn State Harrisburg Researcher, Students Test New Use For Incinerator Waste
Related Stories:
Penn State Fans Recycled 114,000 Pounds Of Plastic, Glass & Metal At First 5 Home Football
Games
New Rachel Carson Building Prescription Drug Take-Back Box Highlights Safe Disposal
Program
Westmoreland County Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event Nov. 17
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

New Rachel Carson Building Prescription Drug Take-Back Box Highlights Safe Disposal
Program

On November 5, the departments of Environmental


Protection, Conservation and Natural Resources, Drug
and Alcohol Programs, and General Services joined

39
representatives of Geisinger unveiled a newly installed ​prescription drug take-back box​ in the
lobby of the Rachel Carson State Office Building in Harrisburg.
The newly installed take-back box is the second of its kind in the State Capitol Complex.
“At a time when the opioid crisis affects each of us, this small act of anonymously
disposing unused medication could very well save a loved one from falling victim to the disease
of substance use disorder,” said DDAP Secretary Jennifer Smith. “We must come together as a
commonwealth for our future Pennsylvanians and proactively make better choices. I encourage
everyone to take advantage of their local take-back boxes and make a positive impact in their
community.”
Since the inception of Pennsylvania’s drug take-back program in 2016, there has been
more than 440,000 pounds of unused, unneeded, and expired prescription medication destroyed
with more than 800 take-back boxes established in all 67 counties throughout the
Commonwealth.
“Improperly disposed prescription drugs can make their way into our rivers and streams,
and it is much better to have unwanted or unneeded drugs safely disposed of through boxes like
this one, rather than tossing them in the trash or flushing them down the toilet,” said DEP
Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Installing this take-back box is more than just helping the
environment, it is also about being a good neighbor and part of the community.”
The prescription take-back box is located just inside the main entrance to the Rachel
Carson State Office Building at 400 Market Street in Harrisburg, PA. The Rachel Carson State
Office Building is home to DEP and DCNR, and is near the Harrisburg Transportation Center,
Harrisburg University, and Strawberry Square in downtown Harrisburg.
“The administration takes the health and well-being of all Pennsylvanians very
seriously,” said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn. “We’re thrilled that this important
resource is located in our building.”
“You can never overstate the value of an effective prescription medication disposal
program,” DGS Secretary Curt Topper noted. “Whether it is keeping our waterways pure or
keeping prescription drugs out of the hands of those who should not have them, DGS and the
Capitol Police are proud to assist in this effort to expand the availability and opportunity for the
proper disposal of prescription drugs.”
Individuals seeking recovery resources for themselves or a loved one can call the toll-free
PA Get Help Now helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357). A live chat option is also available
online or via text message at 717-216-0905 for those seeking help who may not be comfortable
speaking to a helpline operator.
Click Here​ to find a drug take-back location local near you.
NewsClips:
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
Philly May Pay Homeless To Pick Up Litter
Rates For Refuse, Recycling Collection To Rise 35% In Nazareth
Op-Ed: Penn Waste Debunks 5 Recycling Myths
Puppets Teach York County Kids The Magic Of Recycling
Slate Belt Residents Decry Proposed Sewage-To-Fertilizer Plant
Penn State Harrisburg Researcher, Students Test New Use For Incinerator Waste
Related Stories:
Penn State Fans Recycled 114,000 Pounds Of Plastic, Glass & Metal At First 5 Home Football

40
Games
Westmoreland County Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event Nov. 17
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

Westmoreland County Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event Nov. 17

Westmoreland Cleanways and Recycling​ will hold a


Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event​ on November
17 at the Westmoreland Recycling Center, 113 Innovative
Lane in Latrobe from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Residents can bring in Oil Based/Latex Paint, Deck
Stains, Flammable Liquids, Drain Cleaners, Pool Chemicals,
Fertilizers, Antifreeze/Automotive Fluids, Putties, Adhesives,
Glues, Wood/Metal Finishing Products, Water Sealers,
Household Cleaning Agents, Herbicides/ Pesticides for
recycling or for safe disposal.
The cost for disposal is $.85 per pound, weighed on site or $.75 per pound for
Westmoreland Cleanways and Recycling members (current members only; memberships will not
be offered at the event. For membership information, visit the ​Westmoreland Cleanways and
Recycling​ website or call 724-879-4020).
Pre-registration is required to drop off materials for recycling or disposal. Call
866-815-0016 or visit the ​Environmental Coordination Services & Recycling​ website to register
online. [​Note:​​ ECSR is offering recycling events in ​other Pennsylvania locations​ in these
counties: Allegheny, Butler, Erie and another Westmoreland site.]
Click Here​ to learn which Westmoreland County municipalities have the option for
curbside ​Household Hazardous Waste and Electronics Waste​ collection services.
For more information on programs, initiatives, services and other upcoming events, visit
the ​Westmoreland Cleanways and Recycling​ website. ​Click Here​ to read the Fall 2018 By The
Way newsletter with a special feature on Changing Recycling Markets from WCR.
NewsClips:
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
Philly May Pay Homeless To Pick Up Litter
Rates For Refuse, Recycling Collection To Rise 35% In Nazareth
Op-Ed: Penn Waste Debunks 5 Recycling Myths
Puppets Teach York County Kids The Magic Of Recycling
Slate Belt Residents Decry Proposed Sewage-To-Fertilizer Plant
Penn State Harrisburg Researcher, Students Test New Use For Incinerator Waste
Related Stories:
Penn State Fans Recycled 114,000 Pounds Of Plastic, Glass & Metal At First 5 Home Football
Games
New Rachel Carson Building Prescription Drug Take-Back Box Highlights Safe Disposal
Program
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

DEP Holds Dec. 12 Hearing [If Needed] On Delaware County Nonattainment Maintenance

41
Plan For Fine Particulate

On November 10, the Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the PA


Bulletin​ inviting comments on a proposed Maintenance Plan for the Delaware County
nonattaiment Area for fine particulate matter.
DEP will hold a public hearing, if needed, on the plan on December 12 at the DEP
Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street in Norristown, Montgomery County starting at
10:00 a.m.
Persons wishing to present testimony should contact Amanda Rodriguez, P.O. Box 8468,
Harrisburg, PA 17105, call 717-787-9702 or send email to: ​amarodrigu@pa.gov​ to reserve a
time. ​Click Here​ to check if the hearing will be held.
Comments are due December 13. Read the ​entire PA Bulletin Notice​ for more
information.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

DEP Advises Homeowners To Inspect Home Heating Oil Tanks To Prevent Spills, Leaks

On November 5, the Department of Environmental


Protection advised residents to inspect and assess ​home
heating oil tanks​ before the upcoming heating season to
avoid leaks or spills that can be prevented.
Nearly one in five Pennsylvania households uses heating oil
to stay warm in the winter. Owners of home heating oil
tanks should inspect indoor and outdoor tanks for potential
problems.
Leaking heating oil tanks can contaminate drinking water
and soils, diminish indoor air quality, create the potential for
fires and explosions, and subject tank owners to very
expensive cleanups, which may not be covered by
homeowner insurance policies.
With proper tank management, spills and leaks can be avoided. Tank owners who think
their oil tank may have a problem should immediately contact their oil company for help.
DEP encourages home heating oil tank owners to routinely inspect the exterior of the
tank and all attached equipment and follow these tips:
-- For safety reasons, always assume the tank contains at least some oil.
-- Check for signs of rusting on the tank and its structural supports.
-- Examine the tank’s fill line and feed line to the furnace for leaks.
-- Check for signs that the vent line is clogged by debris such as spider or bee nests.
-- Recognize that wet spots or odors near the tank may signal a problem.
-- Never tip over or empty a tank onto the ground.
-- Enlist a professional to perform maintenance or alterations to a heating oil tank system.
Tank owners should make certain that the home address is clearly visible and the tank’s
fill line is clearly marked when heating oil is delivered.
If a tank owner cannot be home when heating oil is delivered, mark the fill pipe with a
red flag or marker and inform the oil company of its location. Residents should ensure that any

42
disconnected fill pipes that remain above the ground are permanently sealed and cannot be
opened.
If a leak or spill occurs, tank owners should do the following:
-- Find the source of the spill or leak and stop or contain the release, using absorbent material
like cat litter, sawdust, peat moss or newspaper to stop the release from spreading.
-- Call the heating oil distributor to remove as much oil from the tank as is necessary to prevent
further release.
-- Immediately notify the municipality and DEP.
-- If heating oil odors are getting into the house, ventilate affected areas, and close off unaffected
areas.
-- Contact environmental professionals to begin the cleanup.
-- Keep detailed, accurate records.
-- Contact the insurance provider.
For more information on home heating oil tanks, visit DEP’s ​Home Heating Oil​ webpage
or call DEP’s Division of Storage Tanks at 717-772-5599.
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

PUC Invites Comments On The Consumer Advisory Council Covering Energy,


Telecommunications Utilities

On November 10, the Public Utility Commission ​published notice in the PA Bulletin​ inviting
comments on an ​Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking​ on the PUC’s regulations that address
the ​Consumer Advisory Council​ in an effort to better enable the CAC to more effectively carry
out its mission to advise the PUC on matters related to the protection of consumer interests.
On October 25, the Commissioners voted 4-1 to publish the ANOPR and initiate a public
comment period.
A copy of the ANOPR also will be provided to the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor,
and the chairs of the House Consumer Affairs Committee and the Senate Consumer Protection
and Professional Licensure Committee, who make appointments to the CAC, as well as the
Office of Consumer Advocate, the Office of Small Business Advocate, the PUC’s Bureau of
Investigation and Enforcement, low-income advocates, current members of the Consumer
Advisory Council, the Energy Association of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Telephone
Association, for potential comment from those individuals and organizations.
Created in 1977 and codified in regulations, the CAC is a 12-member advisory committee
intended to act as a source of information for the Commissioners by advising the PUC on matters
relating to the protection of consumer interests.
The PUC seeks comment on ways to improve the CAC’s operational efficiency and
clarify its duties, including addressing the diversity of Council membership; the CAC’s
communications within and outside the PUC; Council members’ appointments and terms; CAC
quorums and official action; ministerial changes to the Council including the frequency of
meetings and Council’s composition; and whether the CAC may be better governed through
Commission Order rather than regulations.
Interested parties may submit written comments on the Commission’s proposal up to 45
days from the date the ANOPR is published in the PA Bulletin (December 25).
Written comments should be submitted to: Public Utility Commission, Attn: Secretary

43
Rosemary Chiavetta, 400 North St., Harrisburg, PA 17120 or through the ​PUC’s eFile System​.
For more information, visit the PUC’s ​Consumer Advisory Council​ webpage.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

PA League Of Women Voters Shale & Public Health Conference In Pittsburgh Nov. 14

The ​PA League of Women Voters​ and ​Pitt's


Graduate School of Public Health​ will host the
2018 Shale and Public Health Conference​ on
November 14 at the University of Pittsburgh
University Club, 123 University Place in
Pittsburgh from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Topics to be covered in the Conference,
include--
-- ​Unconventional Natural Gas Development, Pediatric Asthma and Infant Health​​-- Elaine
Hill, PhD, University of Rochester Medical Center;
-- ​Shale Gas Activity and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Ohio​​-- Nicole Deziel, PhD,
Yale;
-- ​Human Health Impacts of Spreading Oil & Gas Wastewater on Roads​​-- Nathaniel
Warner, PhD, Penn State;
-- ​Research on Shale Development & Childhood Cancer in Pennsylvania​​-- Shaina Stacy,
PhD, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center;
-- ​Public Health Impacts across the Plastics Lifecycle​​; and
-- ​Improving access to health information and treatment​​.
A special break-out session for physicians and health professionals Ned Ketyer, MD
FAAP and Jessa Chabeau, MSW.
Click Here​ to register or for more information. Call 800-61-SHALE for more
information.
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

First Meeting Of PA One Call Underground Utility Damage Prevention Committee Held

On November 7, the Public Utility Commission


webcast the first meeting of the ​PA One Call
Underground Utility Damage Prevention Committee​.
The Committee was created by ​Act 50 of 2017​ and
tasked with the reduction in the number of hits on
underground utilities, including natural gas and other
pipelines, by construction and other activities.
The DPC will meet regularly to review alleged
violations of the Act and make determinations as to the
appropriate response including, but not limited to, the
issuance of warning letters or administrative penalties.
Click Here​ for a list of Committee members.
The next meeting of the Committee will be on December 11. ​Click Here​ for a scheduled

44
of meetings in 2019.
For more information on the program, visit the PUC's ​PA One Call Enforcement
webpage.
(​Photo:​ Backhoe on fire after hitting a natural gas gathering pipeline.)
NewsClips:
Legere: 6,000 Hits To Buried Utility, Pipelines: New Group Hopes To Head Off Dangerous
Mishaps
Hurdle: Sunoco Expects Hybrid Mariner East 2 Pipeline To Start Operating By Year’s End
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Opponent Wins Chester County House Seat
60% Of Pipeline Trainees In Armstrong County Program Got Jobs After 1 Month Course
Keystone XL Pipeline Blocked By Federal Judge
Related Stories:
PUC Prepare Now Campaign Reminds Electric, Natural Gas Utilities To Help Consumers This
Winter
PA-Section American Water Works Assn/PaWARN: 3rd Annual Security & Risk Management
Symposium Nov. 29 In Monroeville
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

PUC Prepare Now Campaign Reminds Electric, Natural Gas Utilities To Help Consumers
This Winter

On November 6, as part of its 16th year of “​Prepare Now​”


education efforts, the Public Utility Commission urged
utilities to help Pennsylvania consumers who may struggle
with the cost of cold-weather energy bills.
The PUC’s 2018 Prepare Now campaign continues to focus
on educating consumers about the availability of
low-income programs; increasing consumer awareness of
ways to reduce winter heating costs; educating consumers on
energy conservation; encouraging consumers to check
electric and natural gas bills and supplier contracts; and informing customers about
PAPowerSwitch.com and ​PAGasSwitch.com​ as resources to shop for energy suppliers and learn
more about efficiency and conservation measures.
A letter signed by the PUC Commissioners​ has been sent to all of Pennsylvania’s electric
and natural gas utility companies under the PUC’s jurisdiction, asking them to join the
Commission in educating consumers about the many winter assistance programs and services
that are available.
The letter also includes specific suggestions for utility companies and emphasizes that
they have more flexibility to make allowances for payment-troubled customers than the PUC
does, under the law.
“Every year, utilities across Pennsylvania spend about $385 million on customer
assistance programs, not counting the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program
(LIHEAP), including payment programs to reduce monthly energy bills; weatherization and
other improvements to cut energy consumption; and hardship programs.
Collectively, these utility programs reach more than 302,000 electric customers and over

45
150,000 natural gas customers across the state,” the Commissioners wrote.
Electric and natural gas customers across the state are helping heat their homes or pay
energy bills through Customer Assistance Programs (CAPs), Low-Income Usage Reduction
Programs (LIURPs) and other services.
Low-income households may also be eligible for ​grants under LIHEAP​, a companion to
the utility-based services.
Consumers interested in more information about these important programs can visit the
PUC’s ​Prepare Now​ webpage, or call the PUC at 1-800-692-7380.
Consumer outreach specialists from the PUC are active across the state, conducting or
participating in workshop events, free seminars, roundtable discussions and community fairs.
During those events, plain language materials and literature designed to educate
consumers about assistance programs and their rights are handed out.
Materials include information on consumer rights in dealing with terminations and
re-connections, available low-income programs and tips on how to ​Prepare Now​ for winter.
For more information on hosting a PUC consumer outreach specialist at a community
event, please call 717-787-5722.
Related Story:
Families Can Apply Now For Low-Income Home Energy Assistance
Related Story This Week:
PUC To Webcast Nov. 7 PA One Call Underground Utility Damage Prevention Committee
Meeting
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC

On November 8, the Public Utility Commission


adopted a ​final policy statement on third-party
electric vehicle (EV) charging stations​ designed
to reduce regulatory uncertainty, provide
greater clarity and consistency among electric
distribution companies (EDCs), and promote
increased investment in EV charging
infrastructure in the state.
The Commission voted 5-0 to approve
the statement, which clarifies that third-party
electric vehicle charging is providing a service
and not considered resale/redistribution under Section 1313 of the Public Utility Code and
directs EDCs to amend their tariffs to address third party EV charging tariff provisions consistent
with the new policy.
“Today, we take a large step toward designing a regulatory landscape which supports
innovative and dynamic pricing for electric vehicle charging,” said ​Chairman Gladys M. Brown
in her statement​. “Technological advancements, including the advent of electric vehicles, are
transforming the electric consumption profiles of customers and the grid as a whole.”
“As such, it is of paramount importance that electric utilities be able to adapt their
infrastructure to support this transformation in an economic manner,” added Brown.

46
Follow Up Filings
Following the policy statement’s publication in the Pennsylvania Bulletin, EDCs should
file amended tariffs with the Commission addressing third party EV charging stations.
After a 30-day public comment period on proposed tariff modifications, the PUC’s
Bureau of Technical Utility Services (TUS) will prepare Orders for Commission approval.
On June 15, 2017, the Commission ​issued a Secretarial Letter​ launching a third-party EV
charging inquiry, underscoring the differing rules and provisions of the resale of utility service
by third-party EV charging stations, all of which may be subject to differing interpretations.
Based on its conclusions from initial comments received in response to the Secretarial
Letter, the Commission proceeded to issue a ​Proposed Policy Statement ​on May 4, 2018
requesting additional public comment on two key issues:
-- Any entity, other than a public utility, owning and operating an EV charging facility that is
open to the public for the sole purpose of recharging an EV battery should not be construed to be
a sale to a residential customer and should therefore not fall under the pricing requirements of
Section 1313; and
-- EDC tariff provisions must exclude these third party EV charging stations from the pricing
requirements of Section 1313 and put forth rules for when and how owners/operators of such
third party EV charging stations are to notify the EDC of a planned EV charging facility
installation and what information the EDC will need in advance.
Click Here​ for a copy of the final policy statement.
NewsClips:
Cusick: PUC Adopts New Policy, Clearing Confusion Over Electric Vehicle Charging
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
Giant Eagle Among Recipients Of Grants Supporting Alternative Fuels
Lancaster Waste Authority, Columbia Company Get Grants For CNG Vehicles
Lehigh/Northampton Transit Mulls Another Round Of CNG Buses
Related Stories:
DEP Awards $2.6 Million In Funding For 16 Clean Energy Vehicle Projects
DEP Awards $610,000 To Support Clean Energy Vehicles At 4 School Districts
West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Holds Funding Workshop Nov. 13 In Westmoreland
County
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

DEP Awards $2.6 Million In Funding For 16 Clean Energy Vehicle Projects

On November 8, the Department of Environmental Protection awarded more than $2.6 million in
grant funding to municipalities and businesses statewide for 16 clean energy vehicle projects that
will help improve air quality and public health statewide.
“As companies and municipalities look to save money in the long run by converting to
less expensive alternative fuels, their good business sense benefits our communities and
environment in Pennsylvania,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Reducing emissions
helps lower the risks of health problems, such as asthma and lung disease, and climate change,
such as flooding.”
The funding, which comes from the Commonwealth’s ​Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
(AFIG) Program​, supports 18 projects to replace older shuttles, school buses, waste-hauling

47
trucks, and other vehicles with cleaner natural gas and electric vehicles, as well as install fueling
stations for such vehicles.
“Promoting the use of alternative fuels helps businesses lower costs while taking
advantage of advances in clean energy vehicle technology,” Department of Community and
Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin said. “It’s important for us to support
businesses looking to switch to alternative vehicle fuels in order to help those businesses thrive
here in Pennsylvania.”
The projects are expected to reduce emissions by more than 2,800 tons and save more
than one million gasoline gallon equivalents annually. Nearly half of the projects are first-time
awardees, and half are part of ongoing efforts to convert to alternative fuels.
Projects funded include--
-- Allegheny County:​​ Giant Eagle, Inc.: $300,000 to purchase 20 compressed natural gas (CNG)
trucks, saving more than 355,000 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Bradford County:​​ Valley Energy, Inc.: $10,950 to purchase two CNG pick-up trucks, saving
1,200 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Butler County:​​ Vogel Disposal Service: $286,163 for the purchase of eight CNG trucks,
saving 56,000 gasoline gallon equivalents per year. Part of the dual-plug station will be open to
the public.
-- Centre County: ​College Township: $7,500 to this first-time applicant for the purchase of an
electric vehicle and $2,077 for a charging station, collectively saving 640 gasoline gallon
equivalents per year. One plug of the dual-plug station will be open to the public.
-- Clarion County:​​ Francis J. Palo, Inc.: $37,500 to purchase five CNG powered pickup trucks,
saving 18,750 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Delaware County:​​ Colonial Airport Parking, Inc.: $66,000 for four propane shuttle buses,
saving more than 18,800 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Lackawanna County:​​ LT Verrastro, Inc.: $142,969 to upgrade their CNG fueling station,
which is also used by County of Lackawanna Transit System, saving 43,500 in gasoline gallon
equivalents per year.
-- Lancaster County:​​ Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority: $80,000 to
purchase two CNG waste transfer trucks, saving more than 17,300 gasoline gallon equivalents
per year.
Gorman Distributors, Inc.: $36,795 to convert three cargo vans to CNG, saving 3,300 gasoline
gallon equivalents per year.
-- Luzerne County:​​ Eastern Freight Systems: $80,000 to purchase two CNG trucks, saving
more than 99,000 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Montgomery County--
-- Suburban Transit Network, Inc.: $300,000 to purchase 14 propane shuttle buses and convert
seven additional vehicles to propane, saving more than 81,000 gasoline gallon equivalents per
year.
-- Waste Management: $300,000 to purchase eight CNG powered vehicles, saving more than
68,500 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Borough of Lansdale: $22,500 to purchase three electric vehicles, saving 126 gasoline gallon
equivalents per year.
-- Philadelphia County:​​ First Transit, Inc.: $300,000 for 23 CNG shuttles and $300,000 for 18
CNG buses, saving more than 340,000 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.

48
-- Washington County--
-- Waste Management: $300,000 to purchase eight CNG vehicles, saving more than 68,500
gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
-- Monark Student Transportation: $76,000 to purchase eight propane school buses, saving more
than 22,800 gasoline gallon equivalents per year.
Other Clean Vehicle Grants/Rebates
Application periods are open for several other clean vehicle, charging station grants or
rebates, including--
-- December 14:​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ (First-Come)
-- December 14: ​DEP ​Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
-- January 25:​​ ​DEP Zero Emission Vehicle, Electric Charging Station Rebates
-- February 9: ​FAST Act Alternative Fuels Corridor Infrastructure Grants
-- March 31​​: ​DEP Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates
Visit DEP’s ​Driving PA Forward ​website for more information on clean vehicle
initiatives.
NewsClips:
Giant Eagle Among Recipients Of Grants Supporting Alternative Fuels
Lancaster Waste Authority, Columbia Company Get Grants For CNG Vehicles
Lehigh/Northampton Transit Mulls Another Round Of CNG Buses
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
Cusick: PUC Adopts New Policy, Clearing Confusion Over Electric Vehicle Charging
Related Stories:
DEP Awards $610,000 To Support Clean Energy Vehicles At 4 School Districts
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Holds Funding Workshop Nov. 13 In Westmoreland
County
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

DEP Awards $610,000 To Support Clean Energy Vehicles At 4 School Districts

On November 9, the Department of Environmental Protection awarded over $610,000 in grant


funding to four school districts for clean energy vehicle projects that will help improve air
quality and public health and save the schools thousands in costs.
“With every school district that moves to alternative fuel vehicles, we incrementally
improve air quality in Pennsylvania for our students and communities,” said DEP Secretary
Patrick McDonnell. “In addition, we save costs, reduce dependence on oil, and help reduce the
greenhouse gases that are driving climate change. Supporting schools’ clean energy efforts is
instrumental in helping protect quality of life in Pennsylvania.”
The funding, which comes from the ​Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants Program​, will
enable the school districts to replace older school buses with 44 propane buses and the
installation of a fast-fill propane fueling system
“In addition to educating Commonwealth students, Pennsylvania’s school districts are
complex business enterprises,” said Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera. “By embracing the
use of clean energy vehicles, school districts can play a part in helping to improve environmental
conditions.”

49
These projects will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 316 tons annually and save
the school districts more than 67,000 gallons of diesel per year--
-- Dauphin County: Derry Township School District:​​ $68,000 to purchase eight propane
school buses, saving 3,998 diesel gallons per year.
-- Delaware County: Haverford Township School District:​​ $68,000 to purchase eight propane
school buses, saving 11,913 diesel gallons per year.
-- McKean County: Bradford Area School District: ​$19,000 for this first-time AFIG recipient
to purchase of two propane school buses, saving 5,028 diesel gallons per year.
-- Montgomery County: North Penn School District:​​ $300,000 for this first-time AFIG
recipient to purchase 10 propane school buses and convert 16 buses to propane, saving 46,419
diesel gallons per year; $155,302 to construct a fast-fill propane fueling station for their fleet.
The ​Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants Program​ supports markets for advanced,
renewable, and alternative energy transportation technologies as a stimulus for opportunities that
better manage Pennsylvania's fuel resources to improve the environment, support economic
development, and enhance quality of life.
Other Clean Vehicle Grants/Rebates
Application periods are open for several other clean vehicle, charging station grants or
rebates, including--
-- December 14:​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ (First-Come)
-- December 14: ​DEP ​Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
-- January 25:​​ ​DEP Zero Emission Vehicle, Electric Charging Station Rebates
-- February 9: ​FAST Act Alternative Fuels Corridor Infrastructure Grants
-- March 31​​: ​DEP Level 2 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Rebates
Visit DEP’s ​Driving PA Forward ​website for more information on clean vehicle
initiatives.
NewsClips:
Giant Eagle Among Recipients Of Grants Supporting Alternative Fuels
Lancaster Waste Authority, Columbia Company Get Grants For CNG Vehicles
Lehigh/Northampton Transit Mulls Another Round Of CNG Buses
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
Cusick: PUC Adopts New Policy, Clearing Confusion Over Electric Vehicle Charging
Related Stories:
DEP Awards $2.6 Million In Funding For 16 Clean Energy Vehicle Projects
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Holds Funding Workshop Nov. 13 In Westmoreland
County
[Posted: Nov. 9 2018]

West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Holds Funding Workshop Nov. 13 In
Westmoreland County

The ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund​ will host


a ​funding workshop​ on November 13 at ​Arnold Palmer’s
Latrobe Country Club​, 346 Arnold Palmer Drive in
Westmoreland County from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.

50
The West Penn Energy Fund is seeking innovative sustainable energy projects to fund
through its latest ​Request for Proposal​. Proposals are due January 16.
Click Here​ to register (seating is limited) or for more information. Questions should be
directed to Joel Morrison, Fund Administrator, by sending email to: ​jlm9@psu.edu​.
Investment Funding
The West Penn Energy Fund seeks to develop a diversified portfolio of sustainable
energy investments. Applications can be submitted at any time throughout the year.
Applicants are required to complete an initial financing request form which provides the
WPPSEF with an overview of the applicant’s project and financial needs.
After an initial review to determine if the project is aligned with the WPPSEF mission
and is of benefit to the West Penn Power ratepayer, the Fund will request additional information
to conduct its technical and financial due diligence.
The Fund works with businesses throughout the application process to determine their
financial needs. The specific terms and conditions of the financial support are determined on a
case-by-case basis.
Click Here​ for more information and to submit an application.
For more information on programs, initiatives and projects already funded, visit the ​West
Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund​ website.
(​Photo: ​Try Again Homes​ solar energy project in Washington County.)
NewsClips:
Christina Simeone: Choices For Pennsylvania’s Energy Future
Re-Imagining Energy: Generation, Storing, Catching Carbon, Built Environment, Pulling It All
Together
Penn State News: Making Wind Farms More Efficient
Union Of Concerned Scientists: Even In A Carbon-Constrained World, FirstEnergy’s Nuclear
Bailout Must Be Rejected
State Ballot Initiative Flops Mask Strong Election For Clean Energy
Clean Energy Ballot Initiatives Fare Better At Local Than State Level
FERC Chair Blasts Original Clean Power Plan, Praises EPA Replacement Plan In Comments
Related Stories:
DEP Awards $2.6 Million In Funding For 16 Clean Energy Vehicle Projects
DEP Awards $610,000 To Support Clean Energy Vehicles At 4 School Districts
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
[Posted: Nov. 7, 2018]

PA Environmental Council’s In Case You Missed It In October Newsletter

The ​In Case You Missed It In October


newsletter from the ​PA Environmental
Council​ is now available featuring stories
on--
-- ​Liberty Bell Trail In Bucks County
Being Relaunched
-- ​Team PEC vs. The Great Allegheny
Passage Trail

51
-- ​Time To Pick PA’s Next River Of The Year
-- Podcast:​​ ​Federal Land & Water Conservation Trust - Expired But Not Extinguished
-- Podcast:​​ ​A Reimagined Future For Johnstown - Vision 2025 Initiative
-- Podcast: ​Industrial heartland Trails Coalition Summit
For more information on programs, initiatives and special events, visit the ​PA
Environmental Council​ website, visit the ​PEC Blog​, follow ​PEC on Twitter​ or ​Like PEC on
Facebook​. Visit PEC’s ​Audio Room​ for the latest podcasts. ​Click Here​ to receive regular
updates from PEC.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

PA Historical & Museum Commission Accepting Nominations For Historical Markers

On November 9, the Historical & Museum Commission


announced it is now ​accepting Historical Marker
nominations​ from individuals, public agencies and private
organizations. The deadline for nomination is December
1.
Since 1914 PHMC’s historical markers have chronicled
the people, places and events that have affected the lives of
Pennsylvanians over the centuries.
The more than 2,500 markers feature a multitude of
noteworthy subjects such as events and people of
environmental significance, Native Americans and settlers,
government and politics, athletes, entertainers, artists,
struggles for freedom and equality, and factories and businesses.
Subjects of 17 markers approved in 2018 include African American sprinter Barney
Ewell, who won a gold and two silver medals in the 1948 Olympics; Isaac and Dinah
Mendenhall, Quaker abolitionists who were active with the Underground Railroad, collaborating
with Thomas Garrett and Harriet Tubman; D. T. Watson Home for Crippled Children, the
facility at which patients were first to receive the Salk polio vaccine; Lois Weber, the first
American woman film director and a pioneer in early filmmaking; the Philadelphia Flower
Show; and the Slinky toy.
One of PHMC’s most visible public history initiatives, the marker program brings
together nominators, PHMC representatives, public officials, and local residents to dedicate and
celebrate the installation of each new marker with a public ceremony.
Applicants are responsible for the costs of marker fabrication and installation. The
approximate cost, including shipping, for the larger roadside marker is $2,060; the smaller
city-type is approximately $1,620. Nominators or sponsoring organizations are asked to carefully
consider these expenses before submitting an application.
Send completed nominations to State Historical Marker Program, Pennsylvania State
Historic Preservation Office, PHMC, 400 North St., Second Floor, Harrisburg, PA 17120-0053.
For more information on the program, visit PHMC’s ​Historical Marker Program​ webpage
or contact Karen Galle, program coordinator, by email to: ​kgalle@pa.gov​ or call 717-705-4266.
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

52
DCNR Invests In Recreation Improvement Projects In Clinton, Lancaster, Mercer,
Philadelphia, Westmoreland Counties

The Department of Conservation and Natural


Resources announced investments in recreation
projects in Clinton, Lancaster, Mercer,
Philadelphia and Westmoreland counties.
Clinton County
On November 5, DCNR and local
officials announced grant funding for the design
and engineering for the rehabilitation of a former
railroad bridge for use as a multi-use trail in
Clinton County.
A total investment of $84,700 in the
project will support the engineering and design
of the bridge rehabilitation over the West Branch of the Susquehanna River on the Clinton
County Rail Trail in Lock Haven.
“To meet a goal of providing a trail within 15 minutes of every Pennsylvanian we are
working throughout the state to close major trail gaps,” Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said. “We are happy to assist the county with support
for the design phase to help close this trail gap, and connect the Clinton County Rail Trail to the
Pine Creek Rail Trail.”
The state investment will allow the county to conduct field inspections, engineering
design, utility coordination, and construction planning for the pedestrian and bike bridge across
the West Branch to eventually connect Lock Haven to Jersey Shore.
The bridge rehabilitation when completed will create never-before-seen views of the
Susquehanna River.
Trail systems draw regional visitors, get people outdoors, promote healthy exercise, and
connect public spaces.
In Pennsylvania, outdoor recreation generates $29.1 billion in consumer spending, $1.9
billion in state and local tax revenue, $8.6 billion in wages and salaries, and sustains 251,000
direct Pennsylvania jobs.
Lancaster County
On November 7, DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn announced the investment of
$500,000 in the renovation of ​Lititz Springs Pool Complex​ in Lancaster County.
The project includes replacing the aging structural and mechanical components of the
55-year-old facility, and making it ADA compliant.
“Local parks are cherished public spaces and provide experiences that strengthen our
sense of community,” Dunn said. “We are happy to assist the Lititz Borough by investing in its
pool, which is an important part of the community and residents’ well-being as a source for
summer outdoor recreation.”
The Lititz Springs Pool draws about 17,000 visitors annually. It serves multiple
municipalities in Northcentral Lancaster County, drawing multiple generations of users and
offers a wide variety of programs, events and recreational swimming opportunities.
The 3-acre pool complex is centrally located in Lititz Borough. It is part of the 100-acre

53
recreational corridor that includes the Warwick School District campus, athletic fields, and Lititz
Springs Park.
The source of funding for the DCNR grant is the ​Keystone Fund​, which is currently
celebrating 25 years of supporting thousands of community improvements in Pennsylvania.
Through its grant program, DCNR has provided financial and technical assistance
support for local park and recreation improvement projects in all 67 of Pennsylvania’s counties.
Mercer County
On November 8, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources announced a
$106,000 grant to support the construction of six asphalt, outdoor pickleball courts with fencing
at ​Buhl Park in Hermitage​ in Mercer County.
“Local parks and recreation facilities improve the everyday lives of people of all places,
ages, and backgrounds, while serving as a primary venue for recreation for Pennsylvanians,”
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said.
“We are happy to assist the Buhl Park Corp. by investing in these new pickleball courts to help
meet the needs of families and residents by providing opportunities for exercise and fun.”
The 300-acre Buhl Park currently offers a lake, fitness trail, disc golf course, outdoor
nature classroom, and a number of other amenities.
The park was established by industrialist Frank H. Buhl and his wife in the early 1900s to
rectify the Shenango Valley’s lack of recreational and cultural institutions.
Philadelphia County
On November 8, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy
Adams Dunn visited Canal View Park, Manayunk, to announce the investment of $1.9 million in
7 local park and trail projects in Philadelphia, including the ​Schuylkill River Trail​.
“Philadelphia understands the value of its parks, trails, and green spaces throughout the
city. Recreation takes many forms in this city, from this wonderful “spine” we are standing on
that connects neighborhoods, to the pockets of green spaces throughout the city that provide
walkable access to recreation,” Dunn said. “We are proud to be a partner with the city in helping
them reach their recreation and conservation goals and providing a better quality of life for their
residents.”
The ​Manayunk Towpath​ project will receive a $300,000 grant for lighting, landscaping,
stormwater management, and other site improvements to enhance the connection between the
historic towpath and Manayunk neighborhoods to focus on the area’s economic and cultural
heritage, energize local businesses, and to build heritage-based tourism.
The six additional grants awarded by the administration to the Philadelphia Department
of Parks and Recreation include:
-- Century Park​​, a large plaza-type park area in the museum district, $300,000 for work to
include construction of pedestrian walkways, plaza, fountain and parking area; installation of
lighting and utilities; ADA access, landscaping, project sign, and other related improvements
-- East Fairmount Park Smith Memorial Playground​​, a park designed especially for the city’s
younger children (10 and younger), $250,000 for work to include construction of pedestrian
walkways, nature play area, and a parking area
-- Russo Park​​, a traditional neighborhood park in Northeast Philadelphia, $250,000 for work to
include construction of pedestrian walkways and basketball courts; installation of fitness station
equipment with required safety surfacing; ADA access, landscaping, project sign, and other
related site improvements

54
-- Schuylkill River Trail Christian to Crescent segment​​, $500,000 for construction a new
0.4-mile section of the Schuylkill River Trail at Grays Ferry, with an exciting new cable-stay
boardwalk design
-- Schuylkill River Trail River Wall,​​ $200,000 to make structural improvements to the river
wall along the Schuylkill River Trail on Kelly Drive, near the viewing stands for rowing events
-- Schuylkill River Trail Wissahickon Gateway acquisition​​, $100,000 toward the acquisition
of approximately 0.13 acres in Philadelphia to improve trail access and safety at a busy trail
junction that coincides with a busy SEPTA transportation center. This acquisition will help to
close a Top Ten Trail Gap.
"We are fortunate to have the ongoing and generous support of the Pennsylvania
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources," said ​Philadelphia Parks & Recreation
Commissioner Kathryn Ott Lovell. "Their support enables us to transform public spaces
throughout the city, connect neighbors and neighborhoods, and elevate the quality of recreational
opportunities available to Philadelphians."
The investments are supported by the ​Keystone Fund​, which is currently celebrating 25
years of supporting thousands of community improvements in Pennsylvania.
Through its grant program, DCNR has provided financial and technical assistance
support for local park and recreation improvement projects in all 67 of Pennsylvania’s counties.
Westmoreland County
On November 9, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources announced the
award of a $500,000 grant to extend the Loyalhanna Trail between ​Keystone State Park​ and the
Borough of New Alexandria, Westmoreland County.
The investment will provide almost four miles of a new bike and pedestrian trail to
support the community’s connection to good health.
“Trails provide a close-to-home connection to nature and recreation that is always free or
affordable,” Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn
said. “We are happy to provide this grant to create the Loyalhanna Trail, which will connect
Keystone State Park to nearby communities.”
The project will co-locate the trail in the same corridor as new sewer lines to be installed
in Derry and Salem townships, and New Alexandria Borough. Trailheads will be located at Grey
Wing Park in New Alexandria and at Keystone State Park.
This section is part of a proposed longer trail along the Loyalhanna Creek.
The source of funding is the ​Keystone Fund​, which is currently celebrating 25 years of
supporting thousands of community improvements in Pennsylvania.
DCNR Grant Workshops
To learn more about other available grant opportunities to support trail and recreation
projects, attend one of the upcoming workshops on DCNR’s Community Conservation Grant
Program. ​Click Here​ for more.
A new grant round is opening soon.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​,​ ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the​ ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog, ​Click Here​ for upcoming events,​ ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo:​ DCNR Deputy Secretary Lauren Imgrund.)
NewsClips:

55
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Pittsburgh River Towns Unite To Create Triboro EcoDistrict
Danger From Firing Range Keeps New Delaware River Trail Closed In Philadelphia
Kummer: Philly Introduces E-Bikes To It’s Indego Bike Share Program
Nov. 9 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Crable: Muddy Run Recreation Park In Lancaster, A Park For All Seasons
Scranton Wants To Pass On Pocket Park
Editorial: Pocket Park Not A Good Option For Downtown Scranton Property
Heritage Trail Meeting Thursday In Westmoreland County
Hundreds Show Up To Clean East End Ball Field In Altoona
Williamsport Bathhouse, Park Renovation Seen As Recreational Opportunity
Raystown Lake Boating Survey Forms To Be Issued
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

DCNR Invites Public To Nov. 15 Information Session On Beltzville State Park In Carbon
County

On November 9, the Department of Conservation and


Natural Resources’ Bureau of State Parks announced a
public meeting will be held on November 15 for park
visitors and residents living near ​Beltzville State Park​ in
Carbon County to discuss the operation of the park on
high-visitation days.
The informational meeting will be held from 4:00 to 8:00
p.m. at the Towamensing Fire Company, 105 Firehouse Rd,
Palmerton, PA.
It is being offered by the joint stakeholder group formed to investigate and address crowd
and parking concerns, and study possible corrective measures.
Representatives from Pennsylvania State University and Toole Recreation Planning will
be on hand to provide an update on progress and future steps in their study of local community
and visitor experiences at the 3,002-acre Beltzville State Park.
Attendees are invited to visit and ask questions of the stakeholder group which includes
bureau operational, resource, and planning specialists, and representatives of Beltzville State
Park, the Game Commission, Fish and Boat Commission, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, ​PA
Parks and Forest Foundation​, and ​Friends of Beltzville State Park​,
Local state lawmakers Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne/Carbon) and Rep. Doyle Hefley
(R-Carbon) will also be represented to help address community questions or concerns.
Beltzville State Park’s land and lake are owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for
flood control, and managed for recreation by DCNR and the Game Commission.
Beltzville is recognized as an outstanding water resource, with the capacity to
accommodate unlimited horsepower motorboats.
The park, which includes the 949-acre Beltzville Lake, draws boaters, swimmers, and
picnickers during the peak summer season of Memorial Day through Labor Day.
Other attractions include Pohopoco Creek, an excellent trout stream that feeds the lake;

56
more than 500 feet of sand swimming beach, and many picnic areas.
Visit DCNR’s ​Beltzville State Park​ webpage for more information on the park.
For more information on state parks and forests and recreation in Pennsylvania, visit
DCNR’s website​,​ ​Click Here​ to sign up for the Resource newsletter, Visit the​ ​Good Natured
DCNR Blog, ​Click Here​ for upcoming events,​ ​Click Here​ to hook up with DCNR on other
social media-- Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr.
(​Photo:​ Beltzville State Park lake.)
NewsClips:
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Pittsburgh River Towns Unite To Create Triboro EcoDistrict
Danger From Firing Range Keeps New Delaware River Trail Closed In Philadelphia
Kummer: Philly Introduces E-Bikes To It’s Indego Bike Share Program
Nov. 9 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Crable: Muddy Run Recreation Park In Lancaster, A Park For All Seasons
Scranton Wants To Pass On Pocket Park
Editorial: Pocket Park Not A Good Option For Downtown Scranton Property
Heritage Trail Meeting Thursday In Westmoreland County
Hundreds Show Up To Clean East End Ball Field In Altoona
Williamsport Bathhouse, Park Renovation Seen As Recreational Opportunity
Raystown Lake Boating Survey Forms To Be Issued
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
Related Story:
DCNR Stakeholder Process To Help Evaluate Visitor Experience At Beltzville State Park,
Carbon County
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

STEM Competition Challenges High School Students To Combat Spotted Lanternfly

High school students from four southeastern


Pennsylvania counties will put their computer
science skills on display November 9 as they
compete in the Spotted Lanternfly Hackathon, a
STEM-related initiative that invites students in
grades 9-12 to design an app to easily track, detect,
identify and access information about the invasive
species.
Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive insect that has the
potential to have a multi-billion-dollar economic impact on several important industries--
including grapes, apples, hops and hardwoods-- and early detection is vital for the protection of
Pennsylvania’s businesses and agriculture.
“Students learn best when they can apply the skills they learn in class to real-world
applicable experiences,” said Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera. “By engaging them to
help address the Department of Agriculture’s challenge, they can contribute their skills to
improve conditions for Commonwealth agencies.”
The competition will include students from school districts in Bucks, Chester, Delaware

57
and Montgomery counties.
It is being hosted by the PA SEED STEM Ecosystem in partnership with the departments
of Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources, and Education and represents a celebration
of National STEM Day held on November 8.
“The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has teamed up with the federal
government and colleges and universities to combat this invasive insect through research and
education, and we are happy to have Pennsylvania’s high school students join the fight,” said
Secretary of Agriculture Russell Redding. “These students are using technology, innovation, and
the critical skills learned in STEM programs to solve a real problem that threatens real
commodities, has a real impact on our economy, and impedes the quality of life in real
communities.”
Students will compete in regional competitions at the counties’ intermediate units on
November 9, with one winner being selected from each county. The four winners will
demonstrate their apps during the 2019 ​Pennsylvania Farm Show​ from January 5-12.
Data collected from the apps will be connected to state databases to help agencies stop
the spread of the insect. Ideally, the goal is to have the apps available on the Apple App Store
and Google Play.
“DCNR is proud to partner in this innovative education program that pits some of our
brightest students against a very formidable insect foe,” said DCNR Secretary Cindy Adams
Dunn. “Pennsylvania’s trees are under attack - by not just this species, but the ​gypsy moth​,
emerald ash borer​, ​hemlock woolly adelgid​. Sadly, the list goes on and on. We need these young,
sharp minds of today concentrating on how to best safeguard tree health of the future.”
Find out more about Spotted Lanternfly, visit ​Agriculture’s Lanternfly​ webpage, ​USDA’s
website​ and ​Penn State Extension​.
(​Photo​: Penn State Extension: ​Spotted Lanternfly: What To Look For.​ )
NewsClips:
WITF SmartTalk Nov. 13: Climate Change And Loss Of Biodiversity
Stop Biodiversity Loss Or We Could Face Our Own Extinction UN Study Warns
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Tree Talk The Focus Of Short Course For State Prison Inmates
AP: Bodies Found In Burnt Cars As California Fire Incinerates Town
Mass Devastation As Fire Destroys At Least l,000 Structures In Northern California Town Of
Paradise
Fast-Growing Northern California Wildfire Forces Evacuations
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

Foundation For Sustainable Forests, City Of Erie Announce Sustainable Forest


Management Initiative

By: Annie Socci, ​Foundation For Sustainable Forests

The ​Foundation for Sustainable Forests​ is excited


to announce a new partnership with the City of
Erie called the Sustainable Forest Management
Initiative.

58
Launched at a press conference alongside Erie Mayor Joseph Schember and city Arborist
Sarah Galloway on November 1, the initiative aims to develop a long-term sustainable
management plan for the city’s 150+ acres of urban forests.
As Sarah Galloway described in the press conference, “Our forests face many threats,
such as invasive species and climate change. These impacts are affecting forests even when they
are left untouched.”
The goal of this partnership is to develop a plan that protects and promotes native plant
diversity through invasive species management, improves habitat diversity and quality for birds
and other wildlife, and educates the public on the role of sustainable forestry in maintaining
healthy forests.
It is the City’s hope that this plan will ensure the long-term health and vigor of its urban
forests, while continuing to provide the surrounding community with benefits such as clean air
and water, and overall wellness gained from time spent in the woods.
Ms. Galloway is also hopeful that this initiative will provide a template for neighboring
municipalities who would similarly like to see their wooded parks managed sustainably over
time.
As a nonprofit organization, the Foundation for Sustainable Forests is uniquely
positioned to work with the city. Although primarily a land trust, a significant part of the FSF’s
mission is dedicated to promoting sustainable forest practices for the benefit of both people and
the land.
Erie’s Sustainable Forest Management Initiative will showcase approaches to fostering
diverse, resilient forests, and broaden its impact on the landscape beyond the lands it currently
manages and protects.
In addition to advising the city in the development of their plan and doing work on the
ground, the FSF will also be able to assist the city in seeking grant funds for invasive species
control and outreach efforts.
As the project begins, we will be meeting with neighborhood groups surrounding these
wooded parks, as well as seeking input from Erie area groups such as the ​Erie Bird Observatory
and ​I Am a Planet Kid​, and the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Bureau of
Forestry.
Mayor Schember included in his announcement the potential plan to cut and remove dead
and dying trees from the parks, such as dying ash trees affected by the emerald ash boring beetle.
Any trees that are removed will be determined by the needs of the forest, and net
proceeds generated from any tree removal will be reinvested back into the parks, for example to
help control the spread of invasive species such as multiflora rose and ornamental vines that
spread from neighboring yards.
The FSF looks forward to working with the City of Erie on this visionary initiative. All
too often, humans have many negative impacts on the surrounding natural landscape, and we
look forward to highlighting ways that people can positively influence wooded ecosystems,
including our urban forests.
Click Here​ for a video of the press conference ​(Facebook)​.
To learn more, contact Annie Socci by sending email to: ​amsocci@forestsandpeople.org
or call 814-694-5830.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Foundation
For Sustainable Forests​ website. ​Click Here​ to support their work.

59
(​Photo:​ Back row (from left) G
​ uy Dunkle,​ FSF Forest Manager and Board Member; E ​ rie
Mayor Joe Schember;​ Erie Director of Public Works ​Dave Mulvihill.​ Front Row (from left)
Annie Socci,​ FSF Executive Director; ​Sarah Galloway​, Erie Arborist and Sustainability
Coordinator; J​ ane Woods,​ FSF Board Member.)
NewsClips:
Erie Launches Program To Preserve Urban Forests
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Tree Talk The Focus Of Short Course For State Prison Inmates
AP: Bodies Found In Burnt Cars As California Fire Incinerates Town
Mass Devastation As Fire Destroys At Least l,000 Structures In Northern California Town Of
Paradise
Fast-Growing Northern California Wildfire Forces Evacuations
Related Story:
Western PA Conservancy Adds 35 Acres Of Forest To Casselman River Conservation Area,
Somerset County
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

Western PA Conservancy Adds 35 Acres Of Forest To Casselman River Conservation


Area, Somerset County

On October 31, the ​Western Pennsylvania


Conservancy​ announced an additional mile of
forested frontage along the Casselman River
across from the ​Great Allegheny Passage Trail ​in
Somerset County is now protected and open to the
public.
This newly protected 35-acre property is located
in Lower Turkeyfoot Township, approximately
three miles east of Confluence, Pa., on the
Casselman River, a tributary of the Youghiogheny
River.
This property is now open for hiking, birding,
wildlife watching and other forms of low-impact
recreation.
It is one of six Conservancy-owned properties protected in recent years to help safeguard
scenic views and wildlife along the GAP Trail. These properties comprise the Conservancy’s
644-acre Casselman River Conservation Area.
This property protects several rare plant species found within this section of the
Casselman River floodplain, where dense vegetation, forests and wetlands play an important role
in filtering and storing water while providing important, high-quality habitat for wildlife.
Accompanying these ecological protections are the scenic and public recreation benefits
this property provides to improve river access for anglers and paddlers. It is in proximity to four
canoe/kayak access points along the river operated by Conservancy partners, the ​Casselman
River Watershed Association​ and the Fish and Boat Commission.
Two of these access locations, Fort Hill and Harnedsville, were created by grants from

60
the Conservancy’s Canoe Access Development Fund. Experienced paddlers will pass through
this and other Conservancy-protected lands during a 5.5-mile trip that features mostly fast,
flowing water and open rapids between those two access points.
“This property was identified by many local stakeholders as a key protection priority
because of its high visibility from the GAP Trail and extensive frontage along the Casselman
River,” said Tom Saunders, president and CEO of the Conservancy. “With the generosity of our
funding partners, we’re pleased to continue protecting natural areas and wildlife habitats along
the Casselman River, and also to provide protection of the scenic views along the GAP trail.”
The purchase of this property was made possible by Charles and Sandra Romesburg of
Logan, Utah.
Charles grew up in the area and graduated from Uniontown High School. Shortly after
earning a PhD at the University of Pittsburgh, he and Sandra moved to Utah, where Charles
served as a professor at Utah State University until his recent retirement.
Although the Romesburgs have not lived in this area for many years, they have continued
to support the Conservancy since becoming members in 1970. Charles attributes their ongoing
involvement to his fond memories of exploring the Conservancy’s ​Bear Run Nature Reserve​ and
other natural areas in the Laurel Highlands throughout his childhood.
They want to ensure that the wildlife in the region will continue to thrive in future
generations.
Additional grant funding was provided by the Katherine Mabis McKenna Foundation and
the PA Department of Environmental Protection.
Before exploring the property, visitors are encouraged to first contact the Conservancy
for parking and access information at 412-586-2318 or send email to: ​azadnik@paconserve.org​.
More information is available on programs, initiatives and special events at the ​Western
PA Conservancy​ ​website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from the Conservancy, ​Like
them on Facebook​, ​Follow them on Twitter​, add them to your ​Circle on Google+​, join them on
Instagram​, visit the ​Conservancy’s YouTube Channel​ or add them to your ​network on Linkedin​.
Click Here​ to support their work.
NewsClips:
Erie Launches Program To Preserve Urban Forests
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Tree Talk The Focus Of Short Course For State Prison Inmates
AP: Bodies Found In Burnt Cars As California Fire Incinerates Town
Mass Devastation As Fire Destroys At Least l,000 Structures In Northern California Town Of
Paradise
Fast-Growing Northern California Wildfire Forces Evacuations
Related Story:
Foundation For Sustainable Forests, City Of Erie Announce Sustainable Forest Management
Initiative
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

Morris Arboretum: Designing Native And Ecological Plant Communities Workshop Nov.
28

The ​Morris Arboretum​ is hosting a ​Designing

61
Native and Ecological Plant Communities Workshop​ on November 28 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. at 100 E. Northwestern Avenue in Philadelphia.
The Workshop will translate the ecological principles of wild plant communities into
planting design tools that will help you create better planting.
Functional and ecological plantings, such as rain gardens and meadows, are increasing in
popularity, but simultaneously face severe challenges. They often fail to wow the public, offer a
low level of ecological function, and simply don’t survive on low-budget maintenance.
Examples of failed projects are plentiful and hurt the image of the native plant
movement. These issues won’t be solved if we continue to compare planting design to painting
on canvas and perceive plants as individual objects in space.
It is time for a new approach—a plant-community-based method that has evolved in the
world of ecological science. This interactive workshop will introduce you to the science behind
stable and lasting plant combinations.
You will learn the skill of creating plant communities in four hands-on design exercises
and practice this technique in a hypothetical planting project at the end of the workshop.
5 CEUs for ISA certified arborists and LACES credits for landscape architects are
available for this Workshop. The cost is $180.
Click Here​ to register and for more information. Questions should be directed to
215-247-5777, ext. 125.
For information on other professional courses at the School of Arboriculture at Morris
Arboretum, visit the ​School Of Arboriculture​ webpage.
The ​30th Annual American Landscape Symposium - Ecology-Based Landscape Design:
What Comes Next?​ will be held January 10-11 at the Science Center Auditorium, Montgomery
County Community College, Blue Bell.
For more information on programs, initiatives and other upcoming events, visit the
Morris Arboretum​ website.
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native plants,
including--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- Brandywine Conservancy: ​Forested Riparian Buffer Planting Guide
-- Audubon PA: ​Bird Habitat Recognition Program
-- National Audubon: ​Native Plants Database
-- ​Xerces Society For Invertebrate Conservation
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
You can also check with ​land trusts​, ​watershed groups​, ​PA Audubon​ and ​Trout Unlimited

62
Chapters, ​county conservation district​ or other groups near you to see how they can help.
NewsClips:
WITF SmartTalk Nov. 13: Climate Change And Loss Of Biodiversity
Stop Biodiversity Loss Or We Could Face Our Own Extinction UN Study Warns
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Related Story This Week:
Ernst Conservation Seeds: Presentations Available From Eastern Native Grass Symposium In
Erie
[Posted: Nov. 6, 2018]

Ernst Conservation Seeds: Presentations Available From Eastern Native Grass Symposium
In Erie

Most of the presentations from the ​11th Eastern


Native Grass Symposium​ in Erie are now available
online, according to ​Ernst Conservation Seeds
based in Crawford County. The presentations
include--
-- ​Multi-Acre Solar Arrays That Benefit
Pollinators, Soil And Water
-- ​Grazing Native Warm-Season Perennials To
Meet Production, Conservation Goals
-- ​Converting A Former Superfund Site To Native Grasslands And Meadows
-- ​The Native Plant Palette: Sustainable Design For The Environment & Your Business
-- ​Vegetated Bank and Shoreline Stabilization Utilizing Native Plants
-- ​Introduction To Pollinators & Native Habitat Establishments
Click Here​ for a list of available presentations.
Native Plant Resources
There are lots of resources available to help property owners landscape with native plants,
including--
-- ​DCNR Landscaping With Native Plants
-- Game Commission: ​Common Beneficial Plants Found In Wildlife Habitat
-- U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: ​Native Plants For Wildlife Habitat And Conservation
Landscaping
-- ​Chesapeake Bay Sustainable Landscape Professional Directory
-- Brandywine Conservancy: ​Forested Riparian Buffer Planting Guide
-- Audubon PA: ​Bird Habitat Recognition Program
-- National Audubon: ​Native Plants Database
-- ​Xerces Society For Invertebrate Conservation
-- ​Gardening For Butterflies: Penn State Extension
-- ​Planting For Pollinators: Penn State Extension
-- ​Center For Pollinator Research, Penn State

63
-- ​Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan ​- Learn Why Pollinators Are At Risk In PA
-- ​Ernst Seeds - Pollinator Habitat Restoration
-- ​Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
You can also check with ​land trusts​, ​watershed groups​, ​PA Audubon​ and ​Trout Unlimited
Chapters, ​county conservation district​ or other groups near you to see how they can help.
NewsClips:
WITF SmartTalk Nov. 13: Climate Change And Loss Of Biodiversity
Stop Biodiversity Loss Or We Could Face Our Own Extinction UN Study Warns
Related Stories:
Senate Hearing: Non-Native, Invasive Plant Species Ecologically Castrating The Landscape, But
There Is A Solution
Manada Conservancy Offers Native Plant Landscape Design Service
Related Story This Week:
Morris Arboretum: Designing Native And Ecological Plant Communities Workshop Nov. 28
[Posted: Nov. 9, 2018]

Natural Lands: Be A Force Of Nature, Volunteer Training Sign Up

Delaware County-based ​Natural Lands


is now accepting applications for its
Force Of Nature Volunteer Program
training covering a variety of land
management, habitat restoration, native
plant gardening, event support, outreach
and ambassadorship topics. The
deadline for applications is November
30.
Force Of Nature volunteers receive
extensive training and leadership opportunities, and commit to serving 20 hours per year.
Class of 2019 training will be held Saturdays, 1:00-5:00 pm, February 16, March 2,
March 16, March 23, and April 13. Volunteers must attend at least 4 of the 5 sessions, including
the first one, to graduate from the program. Graduation is April 27.
Click Here​ for all the details. Questions should be direct to: Debbie Beer by sending
email to: ​dbeer@natlands.org​ or calling 610-353-5587 x266.
Of course there is no need to wait until Force of Nature training to volunteer with Natural
Lands! Come out and join one of their upcoming volunteer opportunities.
For more information on programs, initiatives and upcoming events, visit the ​Natural
Lands​ website. ​Click Here​ to sign up for regular updates from Natural Lands and ​Like them on
Facebook​. ​Click Here​ to support their activities.
NewsClips:
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Land Conservation In Action: Bear Creek, Luzerne County
Kennett Township Officials Continue To Acquire Huge Parcels Of Open Space In Chester
County
Another 400 Acres In The Works For Cherry Valley Wildlife Refuge In Northampton

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Natural Lands President Molly Morrison Will Retire, But Remain On Chester County Planning
Commission
Related Stories:
Earth Conservancy Seeking Recruits For 2019 Environmental Workforce Training Program
Sign Ups For York County Master Watershed Steward Program, Info Session Nov. 19
Act Now
How Good Is The Water Quality In Streams In Your Community? Take A Look, Then Act
[Posted: Nov. 5, 2018]

In Memoriam: Dr. Eli Drannon Buskirk, Founder Of Paxton Creek Watershed &
Education Association

Dr. Eli Drannon Buskirk, 74, founder of the ​Paxton Creek Watershed
and Education Association​ in Dauphin County, passed away on October
14 at his home in Crescent City, California.
Buskirk founded the Paxton Creek group in 2001 because of his
passion for educating people about water quality issues.
In Harrisburg he taught Urban and Regional Planning at Penn
State's Harrisburg Campus, worked as an environmental consultant on
projects throughout Asia and Africa, and designed and taught an
environmental studies curriculum at Harrisburg Area Community
College.
He was serving as a volunteer lighthouse keeper at the time of
his passing.
There will be a remembrance of Buskirk on November 25 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the
Olewine Nature Center​ at Wildwood Park in Harrisburg.
Memorial contributions in his memory may be made to ​The Paxton Creek Watershed &
Education Association​, PO Box 61674, Harrisburg, PA 17106 or ​The Manada Conservancy​, PO
Box 25, Hummelstown, PA 17036.
Click Here​ to read his obituary. ​Click Here​ to read a history of the Paxton Creek
Watershed & Education Association and its accomplishments.
[Posted: Nov. 8, 2018]

Environmental NewsClips - All Topics

Here are NewsClips from around the state on all environmental topics, including General
Environment, Budget, Marcellus Shale, Watershed Protection and much more.

The latest environmental NewsClips and news is available at the ​PA Environment Digest Daily
Blog​, ​Twitter Feed​ and ​add ​PaEnviroDigest Google+​ to your Circle.

Politics
AP-Levy: Democrat Tom Wolf Wins 2nd Term As PA Governor
John Baer: What Will Gov. Wolf’s Second Term Look Like?
Meyer Podcast: The Election Is Over, What Lies Ahead For PA?
65
Thompson: 5 Takeaways From Midterm Election, PA Legislature Division
Esack: 5 Takeaways On PA Governor’s Race
Analysis: PA Sent Midterm Message To President Trump
Murphy: Meet John Fetterman, PA’s New Lt. Governor
Democrats Flip 5 Republican State Senate Seats
PA House, Senate Remain In Republican Control Despite Democratic Gains
AP-Scolforo: Republicans Absorb Losses In House, Senate But Retain Control
AP-Levy: Bob Casey Beats Trump-Backed Barletta In U.S. Senate Race
AP-Levy: Democrats, 4 Of Them Women, Win U.S. House Seats In PA, Delegation Split Evenly
PA Election Results: 4 Big Winners, 2 Big Losers
McKelvey: Big Night For Democratic Women, Incumbents In PA
Democrats Roar In Pennsylvania
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Opponent Wins Chester County House Seat
Air
Colorado U. Study Investigates Differences In Oil & Gas Natural Gas Methane Emissions
Estimates
Alternative Fuels
Giant Eagle Among Recipients Of Grants Supporting Alternative Fuels
Lancaster Waste Authority, Columbia Company Get Grants For CNG Vehicles
Lehigh/Northampton Transit Mulls Another Round Of CNG Buses
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
Cusick: PUC Adopts New Policy, Clearing Confusion Over Electric Vehicle Charging
Awards & Recognition
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Penn State Behrend Alumnus Honored For Long Career In Mayfly Research
Biodiversity/Invasive Species
WITF SmartTalk Nov. 13: Climate Change And Loss Of Biodiversity
Stop Biodiversity Loss Or We Could Face Our Own Extinction UN Study Warns
Budget
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Chesapeake Bay
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
From The Field: Raising Eastern Hellbenders In Pennsylvania (Video)
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the free Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to support the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Citizen Action
Natural Lands: Be A Force Of Nature, Volunteer Training
Climate

66
WITF SmartTalk Nov. 13: Climate Change And Loss Of Biodiversity
PEC Podcast: Pittsburgh, Philadelphia Leaders In Climate Action
Allegheny Front: How Climate Change Hurts Kids’ Health
Op-Ed: Berks Nature: Saving Our Planet
FERC Chair Blasts Original Clean Power Plan, Praises EPA Replacement Plan In Comments
U.S. Supreme Court Refuses To Block Young People’s Climate Lawsuit Against U.S.
Government
Federal Court 9th Circuit Again Delays Kids’ Climate Change Trial Against Government
Young Activists Can Sue Government Over Climate Change U.S. Supreme Court Says
Op-Ed: It’s Not Rocket Science, Climate Change Was Behind This Summer’s Extreme Weather
Colorado U. Study Investigates Differences In Oil & Gas Natural Gas Methane Emissions
Estimates
More Protection: UN Says Earth’s Ozone Layer Is Healing
Coal Mining
Union Of Concerned Scientists: Even In A Carbon-Constrained World, FirstEnergy’s Nuclear
Bailout Must Be Rejected
PJM Aims For Middle In Defense Of Capacity Market Plan At FERC
Op-Ed: PJM CEO: Powering A Resilient Grid Through Competitive Markets
Delaware River
Auditor General DePasquale Releases Audits Of Susquehanna, Delaware River Basin
Commissions: No Duplication Of Effort With DEP
Meyer: Audit Knocks Susquehanna River Basin Commission Spending
Delaware RiverKeeper Nov. 9 RiverWatch Video Report
Drinking Water
How Monitoring Local Water Supplies Can Building Community Trust
High Lead Levels In Braddock Water Supply Linked To Private Supply Lines
$2 Million Downtown Philly Water Main Repairs Will Continue Into February
8 Months After Water System’s Critical Failure, Mountaintop Residents Face Challenges
Survey: Fear Of Schuylkill Punch: Lower Income Residents Spend More On Water
Boil Water Advisory Issues For Jackson Twp., Luzerne County
Boil Water Advisory Lifted In Jackson Twp. Luzerne County
Maykuth: Aqua Water Strikes Again, Acquiring Another Montco Sewer System
Economic Development
Earth Conservancy Head Highlights Nonprofit’s Role In New Economic Development Project
Earth Conservancy Seeking Participants For Free Job Training Program In Luzerne
60% Of Pipeline Trainees In Armstrong County Program Got Jobs After 1 Month Course
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Pittsburgh River Towns Unite To Create Triboro EcoDistrict
Editorial: Study Underscores Natural Gas Is An Energy Powerhouse
Tree Talk The Focus Of Short Course For State Prison Inmates
Education
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Graham Academy To Take Part In EPCAMR GrowBoxxes
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Brings Back Family Fun Day On The River
STEM Education Discovery Day At Wilkes University

67
Emergency Response
Salem, Westmoreland County Recognized For Storm Preparedness
Energy
Christina Simeone: Choices For Pennsylvania’s Energy Future
Re-Imagining Energy: Generation, Storing, Catching Carbon, Built Environment, Pulling It All
Together
Penn State News: Making Wind Farms More Efficient
PA Utilities Push Back On Act 58 Prescriptive Ratemaking Regulation By PUC
Final Policy Statement On 3rd Party Electric Vehicle Charging Adopted By PUC
Cusick: PUC Adopts New Policy, Clearing Confusion Over Electric Vehicle Charging
Editorial: Plan For Hydroelectric Plant On Allegheny Deserves Consideration
Coal Culm Banks: 4 Million Tons Of Potential In Luzerne County
PPL’s Residential Price To Drop To 6-Year Low On Dec. 1
This Is Only A Test; PPL Exercise In Security Today In Allentown
8 Cars Caught On Fire After Utility Pole Crash Dropped Live Wires In Uptown Harrisburg
Union Of Concerned Scientists: Even In A Carbon-Constrained World, FirstEnergy’s Nuclear
Bailout Must Be Rejected
PJM Aims For Middle In Defense Of Capacity Market Plan At FERC
Op-Ed: PJM CEO: Powering A Resilient Grid Through Competitive Markets
FERC Chair Blasts Original Clean Power Plan, Praises EPA Replacement Plan In Comments
State Ballot Initiative Flops Mask Strong Election For Clean Energy
Clean Energy Ballot Initiatives Fare Better At Local Than State Level
Farming
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Westmoreland Farmers’ Profits Washed Away By Rains
Flooding
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Salem, Westmoreland County Recognized For Storm Preparedness
Pumps In Place For Sewer Line Relocation Related To Solomon Creek Flood Wall Project
AP: Straight Line Winds Blamed For Storm Damage In PA
Lehigh Valley Cleaning Up After Torrential Rains, High Winds
Floodwater Closes Emmaus High School Monday
Community Pitches In As Flood Repairs Continue At Emmaus High School
Flood-Damaged Emmaus High School To Remain Closed
Flooded Emmaus High Likely To Operate On Delay Monday
Flooded Roads, Structure Collapse Reported In Central PA
Forests
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Tree Talk The Focus Of Short Course For State Prison Inmates
Forests - Wildfires
AP: Bodies Found In Burnt Cars As California Fire Incinerates Town
Mass Devastation As Fire Destroys At Least l,000 Structures In Northern California Town Of
Paradise
Fast-Growing Northern California Wildfire Forces Evacuations

68
Green Infrastructure
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Health - Environment
Allegheny Front: How Climate Change Hurts Kids’ Health
Land Conservation
Lancaster Farmland Trust Celebrates 30th Anniversary, Hands Out Annual Awards
Land Conservation In Action: Bear Creek, Luzerne County
Kennett Township Officials Continue To Acquire Huge Parcels Of Open Space In Chester
County
Another 400 Acres In The Works For Cherry Valley Wildlife Refuge In Northampton
Natural Lands President Molly Morrison Will Retire, But Remain On Chester County Planning
Commission
Littering/Illegal Dumping
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
Philly May Pay Homeless To Pick Up Litter
Mine Reclamation
Earth Conservancy Head Highlights Nonprofit’s Role In New Economic Development Project
Earth Conservancy Seeking Participants For Free Job Training Program In Luzerne
Coal Culm Banks: 4 Million Tons Of Potential In Luzerne County
Swoyersville Residents Learn More About Culm Bank Removal From DEP
Graham Academy To Take Part In EPCAMR GrowBoxxes
Oil & Gas
Natural Gas Power Plant Assessed At $42.2M In Luzerne County
Editorial: Study Underscores Natural Gas Is An Energy Powerhouse
Giant Eagle Among Recipients Of Grants Supporting Alternative Fuels
Lancaster Waste Authority, Columbia Company Get Grants For CNG Vehicles
Lehigh/Northampton Transit Mulls Another Round Of CNG Buses
Litvak: Sniffing For Oil, Pittsburgh Energy Firm Heading Into Kentucky
AP: Empty Mansion Under Renovation In Philly Suburb Leveled By Gas Explosion
Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed Over Natural Gas Explosion That Leveled House In Lancaster
Colorado U. Study Investigates Differences In Oil & Gas Natural Gas Methane Emissions
Estimates
AP: Oklahoma Earthquake Prompts Shutdown Of Drilling Waste Disposal Well
Pipelines
Legere: 6,000 Hits To Buried Utility, Pipelines: New Group Hopes To Head Off Dangerous
Mishaps
Hurdle: Sunoco Expects Hybrid Mariner East 2 Pipeline To Start Operating By Year’s End
Phillips: Mariner East 2 Pipeline Opponent Wins Chester County House Seat
60% Of Pipeline Trainees In Armstrong County Program Got Jobs After 1 Month Course
Keystone XL Pipeline Blocked By Federal Judge
Radiation Protection

69
Union Of Concerned Scientists: Even In A Carbon-Constrained World, FirstEnergy’s Nuclear
Bailout Must Be Rejected
PJM Aims For Middle In Defense Of Capacity Market Plan At FERC
Op-Ed: PJM CEO: Powering A Resilient Grid Through Competitive Markets
Recreation
Teen Girl Scout Earns Silver Award With Trail Project In Lackawanna County
Pittsburgh River Towns Unite To Create Triboro EcoDistrict
Danger From Firing Range Keeps New Delaware River Trail Closed In Philadelphia
Kummer: Philly Introduces E-Bikes To It’s Indego Bike Share Program
Nov. 9 Take Five Fridays With Pam, PA Parks & Forests Foundation
Crable: Muddy Run Recreation Park In Lancaster, A Park For All Seasons
Scranton Wants To Pass On Pocket Park
Editorial: Pocket Park Not A Good Option For Downtown Scranton Property
Heritage Trail Meeting Thursday In Westmoreland County
Hundreds Show Up To Clean East End Ball Field In Altoona
Williamsport Bathhouse, Park Renovation Seen As Recreational Opportunity
Raystown Lake Boating Survey Forms To Be Issued
More Than 100 Junk Tires Dumped At Swatara State Park
Recycling/Waste
Rates For Refuse, Recycling Collection To Rise 35% In Nazareth
Op-Ed: Penn Waste Debunks 5 Recycling Myths
Puppets Teach York County Kids The Magic Of Recycling
Slate Belt Residents Decry Proposed Sewage-To-Fertilizer Plant
Penn State Harrisburg Researcher, Students Test New Use For Incinerator Waste
Renewable Energy
Christina Simeone: Choices For Pennsylvania’s Energy Future
Re-Imagining Energy: Generation, Storing, Catching Carbon, Built Environment, Pulling It All
Together
Penn State News: Making Wind Farms More Efficient
Union Of Concerned Scientists: Even In A Carbon-Constrained World, FirstEnergy’s Nuclear
Bailout Must Be Rejected
State Ballot Initiative Flops Mask Strong Election For Clean Energy
Clean Energy Ballot Initiatives Fare Better At Local Than State Level
FERC Chair Blasts Original Clean Power Plan, Praises EPA Replacement Plan In Comments
Stormwater
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
Susquehanna River
Auditor General DePasquale Releases Audits Of Susquehanna, Delaware River Basin
Commissions: No Duplication Of Effort With DEP
Meyer: Audit Knocks Susquehanna River Basin Commission Spending
McKelvey: SRBC Cited For Alcohol Spending, Overlapping Projects
Sustainability
Op-Ed: Berks Nature: Saving Our Planet
Wastewater Facilities
Maykuth: Aqua Water Strikes Again, Acquiring Another Montco Sewer System

70
Slate Belt Residents Decry Proposed Sewage-To-Fertilizer Plant
Watershed Protection
Penn State’s College Of Arts & Architecture Honors Kelly Gutshall Of LandStudies
Pittsburgh: Stormwater Greening Is Good For Business
How Monitoring Local Water Supplies Can Building Community Trust
Penn State: Go West For Animal Agriculture In PA To Help Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
Greencastle Residents React To Stormwater Costs
Why York County Is Considering A Regional Stormwater Authority
Solanco Students Plant Trees On Day Of Service In Lancaster
Coal Culm Banks: 4 Million Tons Of Potential In Luzerne County
Lackawanna Heritage Valley Brings Back Family Fun Day On The River
From The Field: Raising Eastern Hellbenders In Pennsylvania (Video)
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal
Click Here​ to subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal
Follow Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Twitter
Like Chesapeake Bay Journal​ On Facebook
Wildlife
Crable: Saturday’s Eagle Day At Conowingo Dam Seeing Eagles Almost A Sure Thing
Snow Bunting, American Tree Sparrows Arrive In Erie
National Aviary’s Wings & Wildlife Art Show In Pittsburgh Showcases Beauty Of Natural
World
From The Field: Raising Eastern Hellbenders In Pennsylvania (Video)
Penn State Behrend Alumnus Honored For Long Career In Mayfly Research
Market Is Huge For Exotic Animals, Laws Only Loosely Protect Them
Game Commission Charges Man Whose Wolf Hybrid Mauled 2-Year Old
Frye: Look For Clues When Field Judging Black Bears
Crable: Hunters Can Now Take Game Commission Mobile App With Them
Expert: Droppings, Crow Roosts Not Healthy
Volunteers Go After Pesky Crows In Williamsport
West Nile/Zika Virus
Dept. Of Health Confirms 6th Death From West Nile Virus, This Time In Dauphin County

Click Here For This Week's Allegheny Front Radio Program

Public Participation Opportunities/Calendar Of Events

This section lists House and Senate Committee meetings, DEP and other public hearings and
meetings and other interesting environmental events.
NEW​ means new from last week. Go to the ​online Calendar​ webpage for updates.

November 10--​​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association​. ​Water Wiser Kids Search For Stories Of The
Forest Program​. ​Nothstein Preserve​, Paradise Township, Monroe County. 8:00 to 9:30 a.m.

November 10--​​ ​Trout Unlimited. PennFuture. Clean Water Advocacy Workshop​. ​Wildwood
Park​, 100 Wildwood Way, Harrisburg, Dauphin County. 9:30 to 3:30.
71
November 13-- ​CANCELED​. ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Next scheduled meeting is
December 18. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

November 13-- ​Agenda Posted.​ ​ ​DEP Citizens Advisory Council​ joint meeting with ​DEP’s
Environmental Justice Advisory Board​. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. Contact:
Keith Saladar, Executive Director, ​ksalador@pa.gov​ or call 717-787-8171. [​Note: ​The last
meeting of 2018] Conference call option for joining the meeting is available: 717-612-4788 or
855-734-4390, PIN #: 192791. ​(f​ ormal notice)​

November 13--​​ DCNR Public Meeting On Forest District Plans: ​Pinchot State Forest District​.
District Office, 1841 Abington Road, North Abington Township, Lackawanna County. 6:00 to
8:00. ​Click Here​ for more.

November 13--​​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Trinity Point
Church of God, 180 W. Trinity Drive, Clarion, Clarion County. 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here​ for
more.

November 13--​​ ​NEW​. ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Funding Workshop​. ​Arnold
Palmer’s Latrobe Country Club​, 346 Arnold Palmer Drive, Latrobe, Westmoreland County. 8:30
to 10:30.

November 14--​​ ​CANCELED​. ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting.


Rescheduled to November 29. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

November 14--​​ ​Chesapeake Bay Local Government Advisory Committee/DEP Local Officials
Roundtable Discussion​. Schuylkill County Extension Office (Lower Level), Agricultural Center,
1202 Ag Center Drive, Pottsville. 4:30 to 6:00.

November 14--​​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission​ holds a hearing to take comments on a series
of 25 water withdrawal requests. ​Washington Crossing Historic Park Visitor Center​, 1112 River
Road, Washington Crossing, PA. 1:30. ​ Click Here​ for an agenda and how to comment. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

November 14--​​ ​PA Resources Council​. ​Vermicomposting Workshop​. South Park Buffalo Inn,
Allegheny County. 6:30 to 8:00.

November 14--​​ ​PRPS, DCNR Community Conservation Grants Workshop​. Collier township
Community Center, 5 Lobaugh Street, Oakdale, Allegheny County . 9:00 to Noon. ​Click Here
for more.

November 14--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA League Of Women Voters Shale & Public Health Conference​.
University of Pittsburgh University Club, 123 University Place, Pittsburgh. 9:00 to 5:00.

72
November 15-- ​ ​Agenda Posted​. ​DEP Radiation Protection Advisory Committee​ meeting.
Room 105 Rachel Carson. 9:00. DEP Contact: Joseph Melnic 717-783-9730 or send email to:
jmelnic@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice​)

November 15--​​ ​DEP Webinar On How To Apply For Environmental Education Grants​. Noon
to 1:00.

November 15--​​ ​NEW​. ​National Fish & Wildlife Foundation Webinar On How To Apply For
2019 Five Star And Urban Waters Restoration Grants​. 2:00. ​Click Here​ to register.

November 15--​​ ​Chesapeake Bay Local Government Advisory Committee/DEP Local Officials
Roundtable Discussion​. Northumberland County Conservation District, 441 Plum Creek Road,
Sunbury. 4:30 to 6:00.

November 15--​​ ​America Recycles Day​.

November 15--​​ ​NEW.​ ​DCNR Public Information Meeting On Beltzvlle State Park​.
Towamensing Fire Company, 105 Firehouse Rd, Palmerton, Carbon County. 4:00 to 8:00.

November 15--​​ ​Penn State Extension Agricultural Production & Shale Gas Development
Webinar​. 1:00 to 2:00.

November 15-16--​​ ​PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture​, Penn State. ​Northeast Cover
Crops Council Conference​. ​Ramada Hotel and Conference Center, State College.

November 16--​​ ​Chesapeake Bay Local Government Advisory Committee/DEP Local Officials
Roundtable Discussion​. Derry Township Municipal Complex, 600 Clearwater Road, Hershey,
Dauphin County. Noon to 1:30.

November 16--​​ ​PA State Assn. Of Township Supervisors​.​ PA Stormwater Conference​ [Eastern].
Montgomery County.

November 16--​​ ​Trout Unlimited Webinar On Ecological Impacts Of Delaware River Basin
Natural Gas Pipelines & New Interactive Map Tool​. Noon to 1:00.

November 16--​​ ​NEW​. ​Penn State Water Insights Seminar On Sustainable And Resilient
Management Of Stormwater In Urban Landscapes​. Room 312, Ag and Bio Engineering
Building, Penn State University, State College. ​Available online via Zoom​. Noon to 1:00.

November 17--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Day​. ​Wallenpaupack Environmental


Learning Center​, Hawley, Wayne County.

November 17--​​ ​NEW​. ​Westmoreland Cleanways & Recycling Household Hazardous Waste
Collection Event​. ​Westmoreland Recycling Center, 113 Innovative Lane, Latrobe. 9:00 to 1:00.
Pre-Registration Required.

73
November 17--​​ ​NEW​. ​Middle Susquehanna RiverKeeper A Year In The Life Of The Loyalsock
Creek​. ​Plunketts Creek Township Volunteer Fire Department Social Hall, 327 Dunwoody Road,
Williamsport, Lycoming County. 2:00.

November 18--​​ ​Brodhead Watershed Association. Leavitt Branch Dry Dam Walk-And-Talk
Tour​. Monroe County. 10:00.

November 20--​​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 of the Rachel Carson Building. 9:00 a.m. to Noon. ​Click Here​ to pre-register to join the
meeting by webcast. Participants will also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 643 952
548.

November 20--​​ ​South Mountain Partnership Trails Workshop - Building Strong Community
Connections​. ​Shippensburg University​, Cumberland County. 8:30 to 5:00.

November 26--​​ ​DEP Hearing On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Pipeline Compressor Station In
Jefferson Township, Mercer County​. ​DEP’s Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in
Meadville, Crawford County. 10:00.

November 27--​​ ​NEW​. ​Municipal Stormwater Pollution Reduction Workshop​. Londonderry


Township Building, 783 S. Geyers Church Road, Middletown, Dauphin County. 9:00 to 2:00

November 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Senate Democratic Policy Committee​ Hearing On Addressing
Climate Change In Pennsylvania By Controlling Carbon Emissions. IBEW Local #5, 5 Hot
Metal Street, Suite 100, Pittsburgh. 10:00.

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On Karns City Refining RACT II Air Quality Plan,
Butler County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford
County. 9:00

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On Lord Corporation RACT II Air Quality Plan,
Crawford County​. ​DEP Northwest Regional Office, 230 Chestnut Street in Meadville, Crawford
County. 10:00

November 28--​​ ​DEP Hearing On Bruce Mansfield Power Plant, Little Blue Run Waste
Impoundment NPDES Discharge Permit​. South Side Area School District Middle/High School
Auditorium, 4949 PA State Route 151, Hookstown, Beaver County. 6:00. ​(O​ ct. 27 PA Bulletin
page 6927)​

November 28--​​ ​NEW​. ​Morris Arboretum Designing Native And Ecological Plant Communities
Workshop​. ​Morris Arboretum​, 100 E. Northwestern Avenue, Philadelphia. 9:00 to 3:30.

November 29--​​ ​DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 9:30. DEP Contact: Diane Wilson, 717-787-3730, ​diawilson@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

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November 29--​​ ​Stroud Water Research Center Water’s Edge Gala - Freshwater Excellence
Award Celebration​. ​Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library​, Winterthur, Delaware.

November 29-- ​Academy Of Natural Sciences of Drexel University​. ​Delaware Watershed


Research Conference​. Academy Offices in Philadelphia.

November 29--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Section-American Water Works Assn./PaWARN 3rd Annual Security
& Risk Management Symposium​. ​Doubletree By Hilton Convention Center, 209 Mall
Boulevard, Monroeville, Allegheny County. 7:30 to 4:00.

November 30--​​ ​Gov. Wolf’s PFAS Action Team Public Meeting​. LTBA.

December 1--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Volunteer Training Day​. ​Inn At
Lackawaxen​, 188 Scenic Drive, Lackawaxen, Wayne County. 9:00 to 1:00.

December 4-​​- ​DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Lindsay Byron, 717-772-8951, ​lbyron@pa.gov​. ​(​formal notice)​

December 4--​​ ​DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety​ meeting. DEP Ebensburg Office, 286 Industrial
Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. DEP Contact: Margaret Scheloske, 724-404-3143,
mscheloske@pa.gov​.

December 4--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For East Penn
Manufacturing, Berks County​. DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave,
Harrisburg. 10:00.

December 4--​​ ​DEP Hearing On New Adelphia Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor Station, Bucks
County​. ​West Rockhill Township Municipal Building, 1028 Ridge Road, Sellersville, Bucks
County. 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

December 4--​​ ​DEP Hearing On New Adelphia Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor Station,
Delaware County​. ​Lower Chichester Township Municipal Building, 1410 Market Street,
Linwood, Montgomery County. 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

December 5-- ​DEP Storage Tank Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. ​DEP Contact: Kris Shiffer 717-772-5809 or send email to: ​kshiffer@pa.gov​.
(​formal notice)​

December 5-​​- ​DEP Laboratory Accreditation Advisory Committee​ meeting. DEP Laboratory
Building, 2575 Interstate Dr. Harrisburg. 9:00. DEP Contact: Aaren Alger, 717-346-8212 or
send email to: ​aaalger@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)

December 6--​​ ​DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Michael Maddigan, 717-772-3609, ​mmaddigan@pa.gov​.

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December 6--​​ ​Susquehanna River Basin Commission​ business meeting on proposed water
withdrawal permits and other actions (​Click Here​ for agenda). Location To Be Announced..
SRBC Contact: Ava Stoops, 717-238-0423. ​(f​ ormal notice)​ C​ lick Here​ for more.

December 6-- ​Westminster College Student Symposium On The Environment​. ​Westminster


College​, ​McKelvey Campus Center, New Wilmington, Lawrence County. 5:30 to 9:00.

December 6--​​ ​10,000 Friends Of Pennsylvania Commonwealth Awards Dinner​. ​ArtsQuest​,


Bethlehem.

December 7--​​ ​Penn State Extension Understanding Dairy Business For Conservation
Professionals Workshop​. ​Lancaster Farm and Home Center​, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster.
10:00 to 2:00

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Monroe Energy
Facility, Delaware County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown.
10:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Exelon Croydon
Power Plant, Bucks County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown.
2:00.

December 11--​​ ​DEP Hearing [If Needed] On RACT II Air Quality Plan For Arcelormittal Plate
Company, Montgomery County​. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street,
Norristown. 8:00 a.m.

December 12--​​ ​DEP State Board for Certification of Water and Wastewater Systems Operators
meeting. 10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Edgar
Chescattie, 717-772-2814, ​eshescattie@pa.gov​.

December 12--​​ ​DEP Solid Waste Advisory Committee​ & Recycling Fund Advisory Committee
meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Laura Henry, 717-772-5713,
lahenry@pa.gov​.

December 12--​​ ​NEW​. ​DEP Holds Dec. 12 Hearing [If Needed] On Delaware County
Nonattainment Maintenance Plan For Fine Particulate​. ​DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East
Main Street in Norristown, Montgomery County. 10:00.

December 12--​​ ​DCNR State Forest District Management Plan Meetings​ - ​Bald Eagle State
Forest​, District Office, 18865 Old Turnpike Road, Millmont, Union County. 6:00 to 8:00.

December 12--​​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission​ business meeting. ​Washington Crossing
Historic Park Visitor Center​, 1112 River Road, Washington Crossing, PA.10:30. ​ Click Here​ for
an agenda. ​(​formal notice​)

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December 13--​​ ​DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel
Carson Building. 9:15. DEP Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436 or send email to:
kdalal@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal notice​)
-- Draft regulations setting methane emission limits for oil and gas operations

December 17--​​ ​PA Chesapeake Bay Watershed Planning Steering Committee​ meeting. Room
105 Rachel Carson Building. 1:00. ​Click Here​ to register to join the meeting by webinar.
Participants also need to call in 1-650-479-3208, PASSCODE 644 895 237.

December 18-- ​Environmental Quality Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.
9:00. DEP Contact: Laura Edinger, 717-772-3277, ​ledinger@pa.gov​.

January 12--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00,​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 26--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. Noon to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

January 27-30--​​ ​Partnership For The Delaware Estuary​. ​2019 Delaware Estuary Science &
Environmental Summit​. Cape May, NJ.

February 2--​​ ​Delaware Highlands Conservancy Eagle Watch Bus Tour​. 10:00 to 1:00.​ ​Click
Here​ for more.

February 6-9--​​ ​NEW​. ​PA Association For Sustainable Agriculture​. ​Pennsylvania Sustainable
Agriculture Conference​. ​Lancaster County Convention Center​, Lancaster.

February 12-13--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​.


Dauphin County Agriculture & Natural Resources Center​, 1451 Peters Mountain Road, Dauphin,
Dauphin County.​ ​Click Here to register​.

March 2--​​ ​PA Wilds.​ ​Retailers, Producers, Public 3rd Annual PA Wilds Buyer’s Market​.
Gemmell Student Complex Multi-Purpose Room​, Clarion University.

March 9--​​ ​2019 Watershed Congress Along The Schuylkill River​. Montgomery County
Community College​ ​campus in Pottstown​.

March 21-- ​DEP Oil and Gas Technical Advisory Board​ meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson
Building. 10:00. DEP Contact: Todd Wallace, 717-783-9438, ​twallace@pa.gov​. ​(f​ ormal
notice)​

March 27-28--​​ ​Advanced Watershed Educator Workshops For Non-Formal Educators​. ​Jennings
Environmental Education Center​, 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock, Butler County.​ ​Click
Here to register​.

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April 7-9--​​ ​CMU Mascaro Center For Sustainable Innovation. 2019 Engineering Sustainability
Conference​. ​David L. Lawrence Convention Center​, Pittsburgh.

April 29 to May 2--​​ ​Center for Watershed Protection​. ​2019 National Watershed and Stormwater
Conference​. South Carolina.

May 8-10--​​ ​PA Assn. Of Environmental Professionals​. ​2019 Annual Conference - Growth
Through Collaboration​. State College.

May 16-18--​​ ​PA Land Trust Association​. ​Land Conservation Conference​. Monroe County.

July 24-26-- ​Professional Recyclers Of PA​. ​Annual Recycling & Organics Conference​.
Harrisburg.

Related Tools ----------------

Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

Click Here​ for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages.

Visit ​DEP Connects​ for opportunities to interact with DEP staff at field offices.

Click Here​ to sign up for DEP News a biweekly newsletter from the Department.

DEP Facebook Page​ ​DEP Twitter Feed​ ​DEP YouTube Channel

DEP Calendar of Events​ ​DCNR Calendar of Events

Senate Committee Schedule​ ​House Committee Schedule

You can watch the ​Senate Floor Session​ and ​House Floor Session​ live online.

Grants & Awards

This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other
recognition programs. ​NEW​ means new from last week.

November 15--​​ ​Delaware River Basin Commission Fall Photo Contest


November 16--​​ ​WPC Western PA Canoe, Kayak Access Project Grants
November 16--​​ ​NEW​. ​Organic Farm/Processor Certification Grants
November 16--​​ ​DCNR 2019 PA Trail Of The Year
November 16-- ​PA Housing Finance Agency RFP For Housing Proposals
November 20--​​ ​PA Visitors Bureau Scenic Beauty Photo Contest In 5 Counties
December 1--​​ ​NEW.​ ​PHMC Historical Marker Nominations
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December 1-- ​USDA Rural Community Water Infrastructure Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
December 14--​​ ​DEP Alternative Fuels Incentive Grants
December 14--​​ ​FEMA/PEMA Pre-Disaster & Flood Mitigation Grants
December 15--​​ ​Coldwater Heritage Partnership Grants
December 17--​​ ​Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence
December 17--​​ ​PA Parks & Forests Foundation 2019 Awards
December 21--​​ ​ORSANCO Ohio River Sweep Student Poster Contest
December 31--​​ ​DEP County Act 101 Waste Planning, HHW, Education Grants
January 11-- ​PennDOT Green Light-Go Program, LED Light Upgrades
January 11-​​- ​DEP Environmental Education Grants
January 16--​​ ​NEW​. ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund Project Funding
January 18--​​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Lifetime Achievement Award
January 25--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
January 31--​​ ​NEW​. ​NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grants
February 8--​​ ​DEP FAST Act Alternative Fuels Corridor Infrastructure Grants
February 11--​​ ​PA Land Trust Assn. Government Leadership Award
March 1--​​ ​NEW.​ ​West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Investment Funding​ ​(Rolling Deadline)
March 31--​​ ​DEP Level 2 Electric Charging Station Rebates​ ​(First-Come)
July 15--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
December 16--​​ ​DEP Grants/Rebates Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
March 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
March 22--​​ ​DEP Act 101 Recycling Implementation Grants
June 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
September 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants
December 1--​​ ​Western PA Trail Volunteer Fund Grants

-- Visit the ​DEP Grant, Loan and Rebate Programs​ webpage for more ideas on how to get
financial assistance for environmental projects.

-- Visit the DCNR ​Apply for Grants​ webpage for a listing of financial assistance available from
DCNR.

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits

Here are highlights of actions taken by agencies on environmental regulations, technical


guidance and permits.

Regulations -----------------------

On November 10, the Environmental Quality ​published notice in the PA Bulletin​ of a proposed
rulemaking-omitted providing for the electronic submission of Air Quality General Plan
Approval and General Operating Permit applications. The regulation is effective upon
publication in this PA Bulletin.
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On November 10, the Public Utility Commission ​published notice in the PA Bulletin​ inviting
comments on an ​Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking​ on the PUC’s regulations that address
the ​Consumer Advisory Council​ in an effort to better enable the CAC to more effectively carry
out its mission to advise the PUC on matters related to the protection of consumer interests.
Comments are due December 25.

Pennsylvania Bulletin - November 10, 2018

Technical Guidance -------------------

On November 10, the Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the PA


Bulletin​ inviting comments on proposed revisions to its Management Of Fill Policy ​(DEP ID:
258-2182-773)​. Comments are due January 8.

Permits ------------

On November 10, the Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the PA


Bulletin​ inviting comments on a proposed Maintenance Plan for the Delaware County
nonattaiment Area for fine particulate matter. Public hearing, if needed, December 12.
Comments due December 13.

On November 10, the Department of Environmental Protection ​published notice in the PA


Bulletin​ inviting comments on a federal consistency determination under the Coastal Zone
Management Act for maintenance dredging at Fort Mifflin Terminal by Sunoco in Tinicum
Township, Delaware County. Comments are due November 26.

On November 10, the Fish and Boat Commission published notices in the PA Bulletin
announcing additions and changes to the lists of ​Class A Wild Trout Waters​ and ​Wild Trout
Streams​ and the opportunity to comment on ​proposed additions to Wild Trout Streams​ and
proposed additions to Class A Wild Trout Waters​.

Note:​​ The Department of Environmental Protection published 49 pages of public notices related
to proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the November 10 PA Bulletin -
pages 7127 to 7176​.

Related Tools ----------------------

The Department of Environmental Protection published 49 pages of public notices related to


proposed and final permit and approval/ disapproval actions in the November 10 PA Bulletin -
pages 7127 to 7176​.

Sign Up For DEP’s eNotice:​​ Did you know DEP can send you email notices of permit
applications submitted in your community? Notice of new technical guidance documents and
regulations? All through its eNotice system. ​Click Here​ to sign up.
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Visit DEP’s ​Public Participation Center​ for public participation opportunities.

DEP Proposals Out For Public Review


Other Proposals Open For Public Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Other Proposals​ - DEP webpage
Other Proposals Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage

DEP Regulations In Process


Proposed Regulations Open For Comment​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods​ - DEP webpage
Recently Finalized Regulations​ - DEP webpage
DEP Regulatory Update​ - DEP webpage
August 4, 2018 DEP Regulatory Agenda - ​PA Bulletin, Page 4733

DEP Technical Guidance In Process


Draft Technical Guidance Documents​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines​ - DEP webpage
Submit Comments on Proposals Through ​DEP’s eComment System
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized​ - DEP webpage
Copies of Final Technical Guidance​ - DEP webpage
DEP Non-Regulatory/Technical Guidance Documents Agenda (July 2018)​- DEP webpage

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Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or
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PA Environment Digest​​ is a publication of ​PA Environment News LLC​​ and is edited by


David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. He can
be contacted by sending email to: ​PaEnviroDigest@gmail.com​.

Did you know you can search back issues of ​PA Environment Digest​​ since May 28, 2004 on
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