You are on page 1of 7

Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 21

Virgil: Poetry and Reception

Fall Term 2010: M, W @ 11:00 a.m.­12 noon

Harvard Hall 103

Sections: Th. 2 p.m.­3 p.m, F. 11 a.m.­12 noon

http://my.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?
keyword=myharvard&subkeyword=k72885&tabgroupid=icb.k72885.tabgroup.to
p

Teaching Staff:
Instructor: Richard F. Thomas, Professor of Greek and Latin 
(rthomas@fas.harvard.edu)
Office Hours: M. 2­3 p.m., Th. 3­4 p.m.

TFs: Julia Scarborough (jcscarb@fas.harvard.edu)
Office Hours:
Philip Pratt (pratt@fas.harvard.edu)
Office Hours:

1. Course description

Begins with the Aeneid, paradigmatic epic of the West, from various 
perspectives, involving literary aesthetics and translation theory, how 
poems work, Homeric and other intertextuality, concepts of heroism and 
anti­heroism, individual choice vs. public responsibility, critique of 
empire then, now, and in between. Concurrent attention to Virgil tradition 
in early Christianity, Dante, Milton, Dryden, the Romantics, post­WWI 
Modernists; influence on music, art, and iconography. Subsequent focus 
on the Eclogues and Georgics, their place in the traditions of European 
pastoral and didactic, status as works of Augustan poetry. As with the 
Aeneid we will trace the themes of Virgilian pastoral in the poetry of 
Sidney, Spenser, Milton, the Romantic and Victorian poets, and 20th and 
21st poetry from Eliot to Heaney. Throughout we will focus on the ways 
in which literature, particularly poetry, and art produce an aesthetic 

1
response, how we interpret and explain that response, and how and why 
it matters in our lives. All materials will be in English. The schedule 
consists of two lectures and one section per week. Reading Period will be 
held in reserve for a review session, if required.

2. Prescribed texts (available at the Harvard Coop, but in limited quantities; 
all readily available from amazon.com)
In addition to the Source Book the following texts are required:

Virgil, Aeneid, translated by Stanley Lombardo. Indianapolis: Hackett 2005
The Eclogues of Virgil: A Translation, by David Ferry. New York: Farrar,
Straus and Giroux 1999
The Georgics of Virgil : A translation, by Peter Fallon. Oxford: 
Oxford University Press 2006
David Ross, Virgil. A Reader’s Guide. Malden, MA. Blackwell. 2007

3. Lectures

The assigned readings, scheduled poetry of Virgil and assignments from 
Source Book (SB), should to be done in advance of each class. The 
instructor will be available in the lecture­room from 11:00 a.m. each day to 
answer questions arising from previous classes before the day's lecture 
begins at 11:07 a.m. Questions are encouraged. Attendance is required at 
lectures and sections. If you are unable to attend, please inform TA Julia 
Scarborough (jcscarb@fas.harvard.edu)  in advance of the class.

4. Sections

Punctual attendance is required for all sections. No student may attend a 
section other than the one to which (s)he has been assigned.

Sections will generally involve discussion of Virgil, with some focus on 
the assigned secondary readings (chiefly Ross for the Aeneid), and with 
attention to one reception text at each meeting.

5. Written assignments:

a) Weekly response papers. 250­300 word responses on mainstream 
issues arising from preceding readings and lectures. Questions posted 
Friday, 5:00 p.m., responses to be posted on course website by the 
following Wednesday, 9:30 p.m. 

2
b) Two papers are required for the course:

Paper # 1 (5­6 pages) is due at the beginning of class on Wed., November 
3.

Paper # 2 (9­10 pages) is due for delivery to section TF’s on Friday, 
December 10

The topics for the papers will be prescribed in advance. Please write on 
the topic. A handout will be distributed containing guidelines for 
effective writing and presentation. Please observe these 
recommendations. For the correct use of sources, and other expectations 
concerning the submission of written work, see:
http://webdocs.registrar.fas.harvard.edu/ugrad_handbook/current/chapt
er2/plagiarism.html

6. Exams

The mid­term exam will be written in class on Wednesday, October 13 
You will be expected to identify and discuss specific passages of Virgil 
and other authors that will have been the focus of the lectures and 
sections.

The final exam (3 hours) will comprise brief multiple­choice questions, 
items for identification, and essays. A choice of essay­topics will be given.

7. Grading

Attendance, participation: 10%
Response papers (one grace week): 10%
Mid­term: (in class, Oct. 13 ): 15%
First paper (5­6 pages, due Nov. 3): 10%
Second paper (9­10 pages, due 5 p.m. Dec. 10): 25%
Final Exam: 30%

8. Syllabus

3
W. Sept. 1 Introductory session and aims of the course. Who/what is Virgil? 
Why read Virgil? Why Greece and Rome? What is poetry? What is 
reception? Poetic translation.
SB: # 24

M. Sept. 6 Labor Day. No class. 

W Sept. 8 Virgil’s life and times. Who was Augustus? The historical Virgil. 
Reputation and impact in contemporary and subsequent periods. 
Aesthetics and ideology and why it all matters.
SB: # 1, # 12
Reception: Virgil through two millennia 

M Sept. 13 The Epic Tradition: Epic from Homer to Virgil and beyond. How to 
begin an epic poem? What is epic?
SB: # 8 (pp. 19–20), # 9 (p. 42), # 11 (pp. 68–72), # 22 (pp. 141–42)
Reception: Dante, Canto 1 and Milton, Paradise Lost 1

W Sept. 15 Aeneid 1 Storm, Shipwreck and Carthage. The Aeneid under way in  
medias res. What sort of a hero is Aeneas? What sort of gods are 
Virgil’s gods? Why Carthage matters. Dryden's Translation
SB: # 8 (pp. 24–25), # 9 (pp. 43–46)
Reception: Dryden’s Aeneis

M. Sept. 20 Aeneid 2 The Fall of Troy. What sort of a hero is Aeneas? Laocoon 
in literature and sculpture.  Death of a King.
SB: # 29
Reception: John Denham’s Fall of Troy and 17th century Royalist translation; 
Laocoon group: Winkelmann to Lessing (the competition between 
text and image)

W. Sept. 22 Aeneid 3­4 Aeneas’ Odyssey and back to Dido. Homer’s Cyclops 
and Alexandrian poetry (Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes)
SB: # 8 (pp. 47–51)
Reception: Dante, Inferno TBA

M. Sept. 27 Aeneid 4 The Tragedy of Dido. Causation and Responsibility. 
Reading with different points of view.  The Conflation of genres.
SB: # 10 (pp. 72–75), # 13

4
Reception: Dante, Inferno, Chaucer, House of Fame, Dryden’s translation, 
Purcell, Dido and Aeneas

W. Sept. 29 Aeneid 5­6 Funeral Games and the loss of Palinurus. Rewriting the 
Iliad. Erasing the past.
SB: # 7 (pp. 32–36), # 8 (pp. 52–53)
Reception: Selections from Dante

M. Oct. 4 Aeneid 6 Journey to the Underworld. Engaging the Homeric heroes. 
The Ghost of Dido. Roman History and the play with time
SB: #14
Reception: T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, and Bob Dylan

W. Oct. 6 Aeneid 7 Italy and War. Disruption of the pastoral world. 
Catalogue of Roman heroes
SB: # 19
Reception: Carlo Levi, Christ stopped at Eboli

M. Oct. 11 Columbus Day. No class.

W Oct. 13 Midterm 

M. Oct. 18 Aeneid 8 Aeneas and Augustus. Giant­killing. Mythic past, 
narrative present, and  historical future: patterns of time in the 
Aeneid.
SB: # 7 (pp. 21–23), # 11
Reception: W.H. Auden, Secondary Epic

W. Oct. 20 Aeneid 9 Heroism, the loss of beauty, and the clash of civilizations. 
The Aesthetics of brutality.
SB: SB Suppl. Wilfred Owen, Brian Turner
Reception: Wifred Owen, Brian Turner and other war poets

M.  Oct. 25 Aeneid 10 The Realities of War. Heroism and brutality
SB: SB Suppl. Parry "Tewo Voices"
Reception: Parry, "Two Voices"; Stanley Kubrick, Full Metal Jacket

W. Oct.. 27 Aeneid 11 Burying our sons. Camilla, and the loss of pastoral.
SB: # 20
Reception: Robert Lowell, Falling Asleep over the Aeneid

5
M. Nov. 1 Aeneid 12 Heroism and Empire. Closural strategies: How to 
end/not to end an epic.
SB: # 7 (pp. 27–31, 37–40), # 22 (pp. 143–44), # 25, # 27
Reception: Maffeo Vegio, Milton, Paradise Lost 12.

W. Nov. 3 Eclogue 1, 6 Introduction to the Eclogues. What is pastoral? Virgilian 
literary aesthetics in the context of Greek and Roman literature.
SB: # 5

M. Nov. 8 Eclogues 1, 9 War, Possession and Dispossession
SB: # 27, # 23, 
Reception: Arcadian traditions, William Barnes, Eclogues of Miklós 
Radnóti

W. Nov. 10 Eclogues 2, 10 The play with Genres: Pastoral and Elegy
SB: # 21 (pp. 137–140)
Reception: Milton, Lycidas.

M. Nov. 15 Eclogues 3, 5, 7, 8 Shepherds’ songs
SB: # 15, SB supp. Spenser
Reception: Flyting traditions from Spenser to Robert Frost, The  
Mountain, 8 Mile

W. Nov. 17 Eclogues 4 Golden Age, Utopia and the Messiah
SB: # 6, # 17
Reception: From the Christian Fathers to Seamus Heaney, Bann  
Valley Eclogue

M. Nov. 22 Georgics 1 Introduction to the Georgics. Songs of the Earth
SB: (supplementary materials on course site)
Reception: Thomson’s Seasons and 18th­Century English Georgics

W. Nov. 24 Georgics 2 Green poetry: Italy, deforestation, the environment, and 
poetry of deception
SB: # 21
Reception: Marvell, The Mower against Gardens, Upon Appleton House 
William Pember Reeves, Passing of the Forest

M. Nov. 29  Georgics 3 Love, Plague and the Failure of agriculture
SB: #16, # 18, SB Suppl. Crabbe

6
Reception: Crabbe, Kavanagh and Heaney: Irish anti­pastoral, 
potato famine, and the Troubles.

W. Dec. 1 Georgics 4 Bees, Orpheus, Poetry, Loss and Redemption before 
Christ. 
Reception: Aeneid 6, Ovid, Metamorphoses, Dante, Selections

Related Interests