THE PONTIFICAL ACADEMY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

Acta

11

Conceptualization of the Person in Social Sciences
Edited by EDMOND MALINVAUD MARY ANN GLENDON

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The Proceedings of the Eleventh Plenary Session of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences 18-22 NOVEMBER 2005

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VATICAN CITY 2006

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CONCEPTUALIZATION OF THE PERSON IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

Address The Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences Casina Pio IV, 00120 Vatican City Tel: +39 0669881441 Fax: +39 0669885218 E-mail: social.sciences@acdscience.va

THE PONTIFICAL ACADEMY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Acta 11

CONCEPTUALIZATION OF THE PERSON IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
the
PROCEEDINGS

of

the Eleventh Plenary Session of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences 18-22 November 2005

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VATICAN CITY 2006

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The opinions expressed with absolute freedom during the presentation of the papers of this meeting, although published by the Academy, represent only the points of view of the participants and not those of the Academy.

Editors of the Proceedings: Prof. EDMOND MALINVAUD Prof. MARY ANN GLENDON

ISBN 88-86726-18-X

© Copyright 2006 THE PONTIFICAL ACADEMY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES VATICAN CITY

Pope Benedict XVI

The Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, Casina Pio IV

Pope Benedict XVI and the President in the Chapel of Casina Pio IV, 21 Nov. 2005

President Mary Ann Glendon addresses the Holy Father Benedict XVI, 21 Nov. 2005

The Holy Father Benedict XVI addresses the Participants, 21 Nov. 2005

The Holy Father Benedict XVI and the Chancellor H.E. Msgr. Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, 21 Nov. 2005

Some Participants at the Eleventh Plenary Session, 21 Nov. 2005

Professor Margaret Archer presents her paper, 19 Nov. 2005

CONTENTS

Address of the President to the Holy Father ........................................... XVII Address of Benedict XVI to the Members of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences........................................................................................ Report of the President ...........................................................................
XIX XXI

Preface (Edmond Malinvaud)................................................................ XXVI Programme of the Eleventh Plenary Session.......................................... XXVII List of Participants ................................................................................. XXX

SCIENTIFIC PAPERS L’objet de la Session Edmond Malinvaud ............................................................................... PART I – THEOLOGICAL PHILOSOPHICAL BACKGROUND 7 3

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Antropologia Cristiana Angelo Card. Scola................................................................................. Comment: Sur ‘Anthropologie chrétienne’ de Angelo Card. Scola Edmond Malinvaud ........................................................................... Un premier essai d’anthropologie chrétienne: Tertullien Archbishop Roland Minnerath ............................................................. The Anthropology of Karol Wojtyla Has Two Main Features Rocco Buttiglione .................................................................................. Comments: Msgr. Michel Schooyans....................................................................

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CONTENTS

The Human Person Conceptualized by John Paul II as a ‘Bridge Builder’ (Ponti-Fex) Jerzy Zubrzycki .................................................................................. The Classical Notion of the Person in Today’s Philosophical Debate Enrico Berti............................................................................................ Comment: Vittorio Possenti................................................................................. A Reflection on the Eastern Concept of the Human Person – Highlighting Some Elements of Hindu and Taoist Worldviews Mina M. Ramirez .......................................................................................

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PART II – LAW

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

Conceptualization of the Person in American Law Mary Ann Glendon ................................................................................ 103 Comment: The Concept of the Human Person in Anglo-American Law Nicholas McNally............................................................................... 117 Menaces sur la personne Georges Card. Cottier ............................................................................... 122 Die Idee der Menschenwürde als Mitte der modernen Verfassungsstaaten Paul Kirchhof ......................................................................................... 140 Comments: Human Dignity in the Social Doctrine of the Church and the Context of International Law Krzystzof Skubiszewski......................................................................... 162 The Great Human Rights Spectacle: On Politicized Law and Juridified Politics in Europe Janne Matlary .................................................................................... 170 Dal diritto romano al diritto europeo Francesco P. Casavola............................................................................ 189 Comment: Ombretta Fumagalli Carulli .............................................................. 200

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The Human Person in Theravada Buddhism and Islam: Implications for Governance in Southeast Asia Wilfrido V. Villacorta ................................................................................. 209 Die Menschenwürde im öffentlichen Recht und in der politischen Wissenschaft Herbert Schambeck ............................................................................... 235 PART III – SOCIOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY

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Persons and Ultimate Concerns: Who We Are is What We Care About Margaret S. Archer ................................................................................ 261 Comment: Understanding the Human Person as a Relational Subject: An ‘After’Modern Paradigm for the Social Sciences (or: The ‘Economy’ of Human Persons Lies on Their Ultimate Concerns) Pierpaolo Donati ................................................................................ 284 Positioning Theory and Moral Structure of Close Encounters Rom Harré ............................................................................................. 296 Comment: The Concept of the Person as the Gift of Society Margaret S. Archer ............................................................................ 313 What Makes Us Tick? Interest, Passion and Reason Jon Elster................................................................................................ 323 Comment: Paulus Zulu ........................................................................................ 337 Persons: Points of Condensation in a Sea of Living Interactions John Shotter........................................................................................... 340 Comments: Jerzy Zubrzycki .................................................................................. 357 Pedro Morandé .................................................................................. 360

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CONTENTS

PART IV – ECONOMICS The Human Person in Normative Economics Serge-Christophe Kolm ......................................................................... Comment: Christopher Bliss ............................................................................... Conceptualization of Agents in Positive Economic Theories Edmond Malinvaud ............................................................................... Comment: Joseph Stiglitz .................................................................................... 360 414 419 442

Conceptions of Human Beings Implicit in Economics and in the Practice of Economic Policy Juan J. Llach and Ricardo Crespo........................................................ 447 Comments: Hans Tietmeyer .................................................................................. 478 Is Scientism a Threat to the Objectives of the Economy and Economic Policy? José T. Raga........................................................................................ 489

Conclusions Edmond Malinvaud ............................................................................... 498

PRESENTATION

OF THE

NEW BOOK

Presentation of ‘Democracy in Debate: The Contribution of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences’ Mary Ann Glendon ................................................................................ 505 Democracy in Debate Hans Zacher ........................................................................................... 507

WELCOMING ADDRESS TO HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI
MARY ANN GLENDON

Your Holiness, The members of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences are delighted to join our sister Academy of Sciences and its President Dr. Cabibbo in welcoming you. We are deeply honored by your presence among us today. For us social scientists, this gathering in memory of our beloved John Paul II has special meaning. It was he who called our Academy into being eleven years ago. It was he who encouraged us to bring the wisdom of the social sciences to bear on concrete social problems. And it was he who charged us with responsibility to help ensure that ‘social doctrines do not ignore the spiritual nature of human beings...’1 By founding this Academy, your predecessor challenged us to overcome the separations that often stand in the way of effective collaboration among the disciplines concerned with the human person. As we strive to meet that challenge, Holy Father, we are mindful of your own warnings about the encroachments of relativism. For we must admit that the social sciences have contributed more than a little to the progress of relativistic attitudes. Yet reason tells us that common ground among the human sciences must not be found in attitudes that deny the existence of truth. For if there is no truth, there is no sure principle of justly ordering social relations. It thus seems fitting that this week the Academy is reflecting upon a topic that was always close to the heart of John Paul II, and central to Catholic social thought: the concept of the human person. As we do so, we cannot help but recall his passionate insistence that: ‘Man remains

John Paul II, Address to Participants in the Sixth Plenary Session of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences (2000), 1.

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ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE HOLY FATHER

above all a being who seeks the truth and strives to live in that truth, deepening his understanding of it through a dialogue which involves past and future generations’.2 This week we also mark a milestone in our ongoing studies of democracy with the publication of a volume titled, ‘Democracy in Debate: The Contribution of the Pontifical Academy’. On behalf of the director of our democracy project, Professor Hans Zacher, and the entire membership of the Academy, I hope you will do us the honor of accepting the first copy of this book. Holy Father, as our Academy looks to the future, we are eager to have your guidance concerning the ways we may continue to fulfil the missions for which this body was created. The epigraphs that you dedicate today will keep those missions before our eyes. They will remind us that we are part of a living tradition. They will strengthen our resolve to be worthy of those who have gone before us, even as we prepare the way for those who will come after us. As for the bronze likeness that you dedicate today, that kindly face we loved so well will be a constant reminder to all of us to ‘Be not afraid’ to press the frontiers of human knowledge. It will remind us to be not afraid to listen to what modern science has to teach us about ourselves and the world around us. And, above all, it will remind us to be not afraid in the quest for social justice. It only remains for me, Holy Father, on behalf of all our members, to assure you of our heartfelt desire to be of service to you and the Church in the days and years to come.

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Centesimus Annus, 49.

ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI TO THE MEMBERS OF THE PONTIFICAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES AND THE PONTIFICAL ACADEMY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Monday, 21 November 2005

Distinguished Ladies and Gentlemen, I wish to extend my warm greetings to all those taking part in this important gathering. In a special way I wish to thank Professor Nicola Cabibbo, President of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and Professor Mary Ann Glendon, President of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, for their words of welcome. I am also happy to greet Cardinal Angelo Sodano, Secretary of State, Cardinal Carlo Maria Martini and Cardinal Georges Cottier, who has always been very dedicated to the work of the Pontifical Academies. I am particularly pleased that the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences has chosen ‘the concept of the person in social sciences’ as the subject to be examined this year. The human person is at the heart of the whole social order and consequently at the very centre of your field of study. In the words of Saint Thomas Aquinas, the human person ‘signifies what is most perfect in nature’ (S. Th., I, 29, 3). Human beings are part of nature and, yet, as free subjects who have moral and spiritual values, they transcend nature. This anthropological reality is an integral part of Christian thought, and responds directly to the attempts to abolish the boundary between human sciences and natural sciences, often proposed in contemporary society. Understood correctly, this reality offers a profound answer to the questions posed today concerning the status of the human being. This is a theme which must continue to be part of the dialogue with science. The Church’s teaching is based on the fact that God created man and woman in his own image and likeness and granted them a superior dignity and a shared mission towards the whole of creation (cf. Gen 1 and 2).

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According to God’s design, persons cannot be separated from the physical, psychological or spiritual dimensions of human nature. Even though cultures change over time, to suppress or ignore the nature that they claim to ‘cultivate’ can have serious consequences. Likewise, individuals will only find authentic fulfilment when they accept the genuine elements of nature that constitute them as persons. The concept of person continues to bring about a profound understanding of the unique character and social dimension of every human being. This is especially true in legal and social institutions, where the notion of ‘person’ is fundamental. Sometimes, however, even when this is recognized in international declarations and legal statutes, certain cultures, especially when not deeply touched by the Gospel, remain strongly influenced by group-centred ideologies or by an individualistic and secularist view of society. The social doctrine of the Catholic Church, which places the human person at the heart and source of social order, can offer much to the contemporary consideration of social themes. It is providential that we are discussing the subject of the person as we pay particular honour to my venerable predecessor, Pope John Paul II. In a way, his undisputed contribution to Christian thought can be understood as a profound meditation on the person. He enriched and expanded the concept in his Encyclicals and other writings. These texts represent a patrimony to be received, collected and assimilated with care, particularly by the Pontifical Academies. It is, therefore, with gratitude that I avail myself of this occasion to unveil this sculpture of Pope John Paul II, flanked by two memorial inscriptions. They remind us of the Servant of God’s special interest in the work of your Academies, especially the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, founded by him in 1994. They also point to his enlightened readiness to reach out in a dialogue of salvation to the world of science and culture, a desire which is entrusted in a particular way to the Pontifical Academies. It is my prayer that your activities will continue to produce a fruitful interchange between the Church’s teaching on the human person and the sciences and social sciences which you represent. Upon all present on this significant occasion, I invoke abundant divine blessings.

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT – APRIL 2004 THROUGH DECEMBER 2005
MARY ANN GLENDON

The period from April 2004 through December 2005 was an eventful one in the life of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences. In April 2005, we were deeply saddened by the death of our beloved founder, Pope John Paul II, and on November 21 of that year we were honored by Pope Benedict XVI who made the Casina Pio IV the site of his first official visit to a Vatican department. On that occasion, the Holy Father dedicated a bronze bust and two marble epigraphs commemorating his predecessor’s contributions to the Academy of Sciences and the Academy of Social Sciences. Our Academy marked another milestone on May 3, 2004, when we celebrated our tenth anniversary with a colloquium attended by well-wishers from other departments of the Holy See, several ambassadors to the Holy See, and representatives of sister academies. That happy occasion provided an opportunity to pay a well-deserved tribute to former President Edmond Malinvaud who guided our work during the Academy’s first ten years, as well as to review the Academy’s record of accomplishments in those years. Intergenerational Solidarity and Human Ecology: Plenary Sessions X and XII The first plenary session devoted to the Academy’s Intergenerational Solidarity Project was held from April 28 – May 3, 2004, on the topic ‘Intergenerational Solidarity, Welfare, and Human Ecology’. The meeting, coordinated by Professor Pierpaolo Donati and your President, focused on the problems arising from a new demographic situation that poses challenges to nearly every nation in the world, to varying degrees: the combination of falling birth rates and greater longevity, with the resultant declining ratio of active workers to dependent persons. Although these developments have shaken all the main pillars of each society’s system for dealing with dependency (pensions, social assistance, community services, and the

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family), there has been relatively little in-depth discussion of the new dilemmas they pose. Public debate, such as it is, has tended to be limited to the economic dimensions of the problems. From the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, however, it is of concern that policy makers are regularly overlooking important medical, psychological, and moral issues. It is to be hoped, therefore, that the Academy’s work in this area can perform a valuable public service, by helping to heighten awareness of the human dimensions of the challenges ahead. It also seems reasonable to hope that our work will stimulate the search for practices and ideals adequate to the new situation. In our conclusions, we pointed out that unless the framework for discussion is broadened soon, the risk of divisive inter-generational competition for resources will be great, and important ethical and human aspects of the coming challenges may well be brushed aside. The most ominous development, of course, is the growing normalization of the extermination of persons who become inconvenient and burdensome to maintain at life’s frail beginnings and endings. The proceedings and conclusions of the Xth Plenary Session have now been published in Acta 10. Among the conclusions of the Xth Plenary Session were several that led to the decision to focus on children and young persons in the XIIth Plenary Session to be held April 28 – May 2, 2006. We noted that the aging society posed new challenges not only for the elderly population, but also for children and child-raising families. We noted, too, that Catholic social thought has been rather silent on the subject of young people. In our final report, we said, ‘A deeper analysis seems to be required of the new circumstances young people face, both in society and within the family’, and that ‘the Church should address them more fully in her teaching’. Accordingly, the second plenary session on Intergenerational Solidarity and Human Ecology will be devoted to the topic, ‘Vanishing Youth? Solidarity with Children and Young People in an Age of Turbulence’. That session, coordinated by Professor Donati, will feature reports on the situation of young people in six regions of the world, followed by comments from a panel of young observers, one from each of the six regions. Conceptualization of the Human Person in the Social Sciences: Plenary Session XI The Academy’s XIth Plenary Session, on ‘Conceptualization of the Human Person in the Social Sciences’ was originally to have been held in the spring of 2005, but was postponed to November 18-22, 2005, due to the

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death of Pope John Paul II. This session, coordinated by Professor Malinvaud, represented a departure from the Academy’s usual programs devoted to studies of concrete social problems in the areas of labor, democracy, globalization and inter-generational relations. There were two main reasons for the decision to devote a special meeting to exploration of issues relating to personhood. In the first place, since a major part of the Academy’s mission is to offer the Church elements that may be useful in the development of her social thought, it was necessary, sooner or later, to gain a deeper understanding of personhood, a concept that is central to, but not systematically developed in, the social teachings. Secondly, it was desirable to look critically at each of the social sciences from the perspective of Catholic social thought and to try to discern the extent to which they are consistent with Christian anthropology. Since the Academy has no special competence in philosophy, the aim was not to produce a full treatment of the subject, but rather to improve our own understanding. To that end, a number of outside experts were invited to give us the benefit of their specialized knowledge. After reviewing the proceedings published in the present edition of the Acta, the Academy will decide whether and how to pursue this exploration so fruitfully begun in 2005. Final Report of the Democracy Project The culmination of the Academy’s Democracy Project was marked at the XIth Plenary Session, first with a presentation to the Holy Father on November 21, 2005 of the first copy of the project’s final report, and later that day with a ceremony in which Professor Hans Zacher, the Director of the Project, and President Glendon formally presented the book to the Church and the public. The report is titled ‘Democracy in Debate: The Contribution of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences’.* Edited and largely written by Professor Zacher, this magisterial report is ‘final’ only in the sense that it summarizes and evaluates the results of the many workshops and conferences the Academy has devoted to democracy studies over the preceding decade. As Professor Zacher noted in his conclusion, ‘Democracy will always remain an unfinished experiment, a work in progress’. It thus seems likely that the Academy, sooner or later, will feel the need to embark on a second phase of democracy studies.

*

H. Zacher ed., Miscellanea 5 (Vatican City, 2005), 320 pp.

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Four Joint Meetings From June 3-5, 2004, the Academy co-sponsored a colloquium on ‘Globalization and International Justice’ with the Mexican Secretariat of External Relations. This colloquium, held in Mexico City and underwritten by the Mexican government, was an experiment in two respects: it was the first time our Academy participated in a meeting outside the Vatican, and it was the first time the Academy co-operated with another group in organizing a meeting. The Academy was represented by Professors Malinvaud, Morandé Court and Sabourin, and our Chancellor H.E. Sánchez Sorondo, all of whom reported that they were impressed by the scholarly quality of the proceedings. In view of the favorable reports from the Mexico City meeting and the need to disseminate awareness of the practical implications of the Academy’s studies, the Council decided to accept the kind invitation from our colleague Professor Betancur, the former President of Columbia, to cosponsor a conference in Bogotà on ‘Globalization and Social Responsibility in a Time of Change: The Ethical Teaching of the Catholic Church’. Representing the Academy at this conference, held on October 6, 2005, were your President, the Chancellor, Professor Betancur, and Bishop Crepaldi. Once again, the experience provided an excellent opportunity to promote the work of the Academy to a wider audience. A third joint meeting was held just prior to our November 2005 Plenary Session, this time in the Casina Pio IV in collaboration with our sister Pontifical Academy of Sciences. The joint working group on ‘Globalization and Education’, held on Nov. 16-17, 2005, brought natural and social scientists together to launch a discussion of an educational project for an increasingly globalized world. The interchange between the two academies was regarded on both sides as so fruitful that hopes were expressed for continued and closer work on this and other projects of mutual interest. Finally, in testimony to the success of the 2004 meeting in Mexico City, the Mexican Secretary for External Affairs issued an invitation to the Academy to co-sponsor a second colloquium on March 27-28, 2006, on the subject of ‘International Migration: The Human Aspects of Globalization’. Representing the Academy on this occasion will be the President, the former President Professor Malinvaud, the Chancellor H.E. Sánchez Sorondo and Professor Raga.
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With the terms of the Academy Council due to expire on October 21, 2004, your President undertook the obligatory statutory consultation with the Members concerning the future composition of the Council (Prot. 0139). The responses indicated that a substantial body of opinion favored a balance among maintaining some continuity, introducing new blood, and achieving wider geographical representation. Accordingly, I proposed to the Holy Father the appointment of Professors Archer, Llach, Raga, Sabourin, Tietmeyer and Archbishop Minnerath, all of whom were appointed in due course to five-year terms. In a special ceremony at the November 2005 Plenary Session, the Academicians expressed their heartfelt gratitude to outgoing Councilors, Ambassador Suchocka, and Professors Schambeck and Zacher, for their extraordinary and dedicated service.
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At the close of the November 2005 Plenary Session, our dear colleague Jerzy Zubrzycki announced his resignation, citing the increasing hardships of travel from Australia. Professor Zubrzycki was one of the original members appointed to the Academy by Pope John Paul II. His resignation was accepted with great regret and with many expressions of appreciation for his exemplary collegiality as well as his outstanding scholarly contributions.
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The membership of the Academy remains at 33, with the Holy Father’s appointment of our newest member, Professor Kuan Hsin-chi, Chairman of the department of Government and Administration in the Chinese University of Hong Kong. We look forward to welcoming Professor Kuan at the 2006 Plenary Session.

PREFACE

The Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences presents here its reflections on ‘Conceptualization of the Human Person in Social Sciences’. The subject, which was prepared during two years, is exceptional because more methodological and philosophical than those examined on previous occasions and than those intended to be tackled in the proximate future. The centrality of the person in Catholic social doctrine gives a good reason for such an exception: we had indeed, some day, to study the extent to which teachings of the social sciences in their diversity were consistent with Christian anthropology. We cannot claim our reflections on this subject to have been brought to completion. But at least some time seems to be required before we can wisely decide about further investigations in the same direction. The eleventh Plenary Session of the Academy had been scheduled for early April 2005, but had to be postponed to November of the same year. Because of various reasons a few among the participants who had prepared written contributions were not able to come at that later period. Their contributions were, however, discussed and are here published. We are thankful for them to have accepted such an arrangement. They are: His Eminence Cardinal Angelo Scola, Professors Jon Elster, Academicians Paul Kirchhof and Pedro Morandé Court. EDMOND MALINVAUD

PROGRAMME

FRIDAY 22 NOVEMBER Mary Ann GLENDON, President of the Academy: Word of Welcome Edmond MALINVAUD, Coordinator of the Meeting: The Subject of the Meeting H.Em. Card. Georges COTTIER (Vatican City): Menaces sur la Personne Comment: H.E. Msgr. Roland MINNERATH H.Em. Card. Angelo SCOLA (Patriarch of Venice): Antropologia Cristiana Comment: Edmond MALINVAUD Jon ELSTER (Columbia University): What Makes Us Tick? Interest, Passion and Reason Comment: Paulus ZULU John SHOTTER (University of New Hampshire): Persons: Points of Condensation in a Sea of Living Interactions Comment: Jerzy ZUBRZYCKI Krzystzof SKUBISZEWSKI (presenter and commentator of Prof. Paul Kirchhof’s paper): The Idea of Human Dignity at the Center of Modern Constitutional States Comment: Janne MATLARY (University of Oslo)

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PROGRAMME

SATURDAY 19 NOVEMBER Romano HARRÉ (Georgetown University): Positioning Theory Comment: Margaret ARCHER Margaret ARCHER: Persons and Ultimate Concerns: Who We Are is Defined by What We Care About Comment: Pierpaolo DONATI Rocco BUTTIGLIONE: The Human Person in the Philosophy of John Paul II Comment: Msgr. Michel SCHOOYANS Mary Ann GLENDON: Concepts of the Person in American Law Comment: Nicholas MCNALLY

SUNDAY 20 NOVEMBER Enrico BERTI (University of Padua): The Classical Notion of the Person in Today’s Philosophical Debate Comment: Vittorio POSSENTI Francesco P. CASAVOLA (University of Naples, President of the Institute of the Italian Encyclopaedia): From Roman Law to European Law Comment: Ombretta FUMAGALLI CARULLI

MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER Serge-Christophe KOLM (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris): The Human Person in Normative Economics Comment: Christopher BLISS (University of Oxford)

PROGRAMME

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VISITS THE

CASINA PIO IV

Edmond MALINVAUD: Conceptualization of Agents in Positive Economics Comment: Joseph STIGLITZ Juan J. LLACH: Conceptions of Human Beings Implicit in Economics and in the Practice of Economic Policies Comment: José T. RAGA Presentation of the new book: Democracy in Debate: The Contribution of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences by President Mary Ann Glendon and Prof. Hans Zacher

TUESDAY 22 NOVEMBER Wilfrido V. VILLACORTA: The Human Person in Theravada Buddhism and Islam: Implications for Governance in Southeast Asia Comment: Mina M. RAMIREZ Herbert SCHAMBECK: Concluding Reflections on the Papers which Dealt with the Human Person in Law and Political Science Edmond MALINVAUD: Personal Reflections on what was Achieved and what might Remain to be Achieved

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Academicians Prof. MARGARET S. ARCHER The University of Warwick Department of Sociology Coventry CV4 7AL, Warwickshire (United Kingdom) Prof. BELISARIO BETANCUR Fundación Santillana para Ibero América Calle 80, N° 9 - 75, Apartado Aereo 3974 Bogotà (Colombia) Prof. ROCCO BUTTIGLIONE Ministro per i Beni e le Attività Culturali Via del Collegio Romano, 27 I-00186 Roma (Italy) Prof. PIERPAOLO DONATI Università di Bologna Facoltà di Scienze Politiche Dipartimento di Sociologia Strada Maggiore, 45 I-40125 Bologna (Italy) Prof. OMBRETTA FUMAGALLI CARULLI Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Facoltà di Giurisprudenza Largo A. Gemelli, 1 I-20123 Milano (Italy) Mailing address: Via Angelo Fumagalli, 10 I-20143 Milano (Italy)

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President Prof. MARY ANN GLENDON Harvard University School of Law Hauser Hall 504 1575 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138 (U.S.A.) Lic. JUAN JOSÉ LLACH Urquiza 875 (B1638BWC) Vicente López Buenos Aires (Argentina) Hon. Justice NICHOLAS J. MCNALLY 468 Dandaro Village, Borrowdale, Harare (Zimbabwe) Former President Prof. EDMOND MALINVAUD Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique 15, boulevard Gabriel Péri F-92245 Malakoff Cedex (France) H.E. Msgr Prof. ROLAND MINNERATH Archêveché 20 rue du Petit-Potet F-21000 Dijon (France) Prof. VITTORIO POSSENTI Dipartimento di Filosofia e Teoria delle Scienze Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Palazzo Nani Mocenigo Dorsoduro 960 I-30213 Venezia (Italy) Mailing address: Via Mozart, 3 I-20052 Monza, Milano (Italy) Prof. JOSÉ T. RAGA Dep.to di Economia Aplicada IV, Facultad de Derecho Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040 Madrid (Spain) Mailing address: Paseo de la Castellana, 153 – 7° 28046 Madrid (Spain)

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LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Prof. MINA MAGPANTAY RAMIREZ Asian Social Institute Graduate School of Social Transformative Praxis 1518 Leon Guinto Street Malate, Manila 1004 (Philippines) Prof. RENÉ RÉMOND Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques 27, rue Saint Guillaume F-75337 Paris Cedex 07 (France) Prof. KEVIN RYAN 20 Crafts Road Chestnut Hill Massachusetts, MA 024678 (U.S.A.) H.E. Msgr MARCELO SÁNCHEZ SORONDO Chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and Social Sciences Casina Pio IV V-00120 Vatican City Prof. Dr. HERBERT SCHAMBECK University of Linz Institute for Public Law and Political Sciences Juridicum A/4th floor, A-4040 Linz-Auhof (Austria) Mailing address: Hofzeile 21 A-1190 Vienna (Austria) Rev. Msgr Prof. MICHEL SCHOOYANS Voie du Roman Pays, 31-101 B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium) Prof. KRZYSZTOF SKUBISZEWSKI Iran-United States Claims Tribunal, Parkweg 13 NL-2585 JH Den Haag (The Netherlands)

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Prof. JOSEPH STIGLITZ Columbia University – Graduate School of Business 3022 Broadway, 814 Uris Hall New York, NY 10027 (U.S.A.) H.E. Ambassador HANNA SUCHOCKA Embassy of Poland to the Holy See Via dei Delfini, 16, int. 3 I-00186 Roma (Italy) Prof. WILFRIDO V. VILLACORTA The ASEAN Secretariat 70 A Jl. Sisingamangaraja Jakarta 12110 (Indonesia) Prof. BEDRICH VYMETALÍK ˇ ˇ Advocate Office Lískovecká 2089 738 01 Frydek-Mistek (Czech Republic) Prof. HANS F. ZACHER Max Planck Institut für Auslandisches und Internationales Sozialrecht Amalienstrasse 33, D-80799 Munich (Germany) Prof. JERZY B. ZUBRZYCKI 68 Schlich Street, Yarralumla ACT 2600 Canberra (Australia) Prof. PAULUS ZULU Director, Maurice Webb Race Relations Unit University of KwaZulu-Natal King George V Avenue 4041 Durban, Natal (South Africa)

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LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Foundation for the Promotion of the Social Sciences Dr.Dr. HERBERT BATLINER Aeulestrasse 74 FL-9490 Vaduz (Principality of Liechtenstein) Dr. MARTIN STRIMITZER Präsident des Bundesrates i.R. Kirchstrasse 49 A-6091 Götzens, Tirol (Austria)

Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace H.E. Msgr GIAMPAOLO CREPALDI Secretary of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace Palazzo S. Calisto V-00120 Vatican City

Outside Experts Prof. ENRICO BERTI Università degli Studi di Padova Dipartimento di Filosofia Piazza Capitaniato, 7 I-35139 Padova (Italy) Prof. CHRISTOPHER BLISS University of Oxford – Nuffleld College Oxford OX1 1NF (United Kingdom) Prof. FRANCESCO PAOLO CASAVOLA, Presidente Presidenza dell’Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana Piazza dell’Enciclopedia Italiana 4 I-00186 Roma (Italy) H.E. Cardinal GEORGES M.M. COTTIER Pro-Teologo della Casa Pontificia Palazzo Apostolico V-00120 Vatican City

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

XXXV

Prof. ROMANO HARRÉ Georgetown University Department of Psychology 306 White-Gravenor Hall 3700 O Street, N.W. Box 571001 Washington, D.C. 20057 (U.S.A.) Prof. SERGE-CHRISTOPHE KOLM 20 rue Henri Heine F-75016 Paris (France) Prof. JANNE HAALAND MATLARY University of Oslo Department of Political Science Moltke Moes vei 31 Box 1097 Blindern NO-0317 Oslo (Norway) Prof. JOHN SHOTTER 90 Moncrieff Street Peckham London SE15 5HL (United Kingdom)

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