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Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Assessment Task 2

Assessment Task Information


Faculty: Modern History
Course: HSC Modern History (stage 6)
Unit: Core Study: Power and Authority in the Modern World 1919–1946
Task Title: The Nazi regime to 1939
Task marks: 25
Weighting: 15% Task No: 2 of 4
Date issued: 2 May 2018 Date for submission: 25 May 2018

Assessment Task Details


Description of Activity:
Students will be required to develop and apply their knowledge and skills to understand
different types of sources and relevant historiographical issues in regard to power and
authority in the contemporary world; specifically referring to the Nazi regime to 1939.
Task instructions:
Multimedia presentation
Students will be required to produce a 5 to 7 minute multimedia presentation (of your
own choosing) (examples include: video, slide show with recorded commentary, vignette
or web page) on one of the following topics:
 Choice 1: The nature of Nazi ideology
 Choice 2: The role of prominent individuals in the Nazi state
 Choice 3: Opposition to the Nazi regime
 Choice 4: The initial consolidation of Nazi power
 Choice 5: The various methods used by the Nazi regime to exercise control (laws
and propaganda)
In your presentation you must address and consider the following:
1) Explain and discuss the impacts and significance this had on the overarching
objective of the Nazi regime.

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

2) Discuss the problems for historians using evidence to make conclusions about this.
3) Refer to a variety of primary resources.
4) Present the information clearly and use appropriate language.

Reflection
The report (structure can be viewed in scaffold area) must be completed and handed in
by period 3, 31 May 2018.

Outcomes to be assessed
Outcome Description
MH12-1 Accounts for the nature of continuity and change in the modern world
MH12-3 Evaluates the role of historical features, individuals, groups and ideas in shaping the past
MH12-5 Assesses the significance of historical features, people, ideas, movements, events and
developments of the modern world
MH12-8 Plans and conducts historical investigations and presents reasoned conclusions, using
relevant evidence from a range of sources
MH12-9 Communicates historical understanding, using historical knowledge, concepts and terms, in
appropriate and well-structured forms

Criteria for assessing learning


Multimedia presentation format
Mark range Criteria
4-5 Presentation appropriate quality for easy viewing. Appropriately and effectively display
information. Highly engaging and inside the time limit.
1-3 Presentation somewhat appropriate quality for viewing. Information displayed in a
simplistic manner. Somewhat engaging and may breach time limit.
0 Non-serious attempt or not submitted on the due date

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Multimedia presentation content


Grade Mark range Criteria
A 17-20 Presentation topic is analysed in significant detail, addressing each of the
four specifically identified components. The analysis will be very structured
Highly and contain high-order terminology. Information spread evenly throughout
Developed the presentation, rather than too much information on one page.
B 13-16 Presentation topic is analysed in significant detail, addressing most aspects
of the four specifically identified components. Most of the analysis will be
Well very structured and contain high-order terminology. Information somewhat
Developed spread evenly throughout the presentation.
C 9-12 Presentation topic is analysed in basic detail, addressing most aspects of the
four specifically identified components. Most of the analysis will be
Developed adequately structured and contain some specific terminology. Information
somewhat spread evenly throughout the presentation.
D 5-8 Presentation topic is analysed in basic detail, addressing a couple of aspects
of the four specifically identified components. Most of the analysis will be
Developing adequately structured and contain some specific terminology. Information
cluttered and somewhat unorganised throughout the presentation.
E 1-4 Presentation topic is analysed in basic detail, addressing a couple of aspects
of some of the four specifically identified components. Some of the analysis
Elementary will be adequately structured and contain some specific terminology.
Information cluttered and somewhat unorganised throughout the
presentation.
0 Non-serious attempt or not submitted on the due date

Reflection
Mark range Criteria
Pass Completes the reflection on time with truthful in depth answers.
Fail Non-serious attempt or not submitted on the due date.

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Sample Scaffold - Reflection


A reflection is a text type in which you are asked to think about a process you have gone through and
express your thoughts on the topic, task or process. Using this scaffold complete the following.

The process I went through to decide on this topic was easy because it is
something I am very passionate about, however, finding relevant
information was difficult because…
Process I started by….
The most challenging part of compiling information for my presentation
was…

To ensure I developed a broad understanding of this issue I looked at a


variety of sources. This included…

Sources The most useful source was…because…

My opinion on this issue is that….

I have come to have this opinion because…

Opinion
Throughout this task, my opinion changed because…

** Don’t forget to include evidence from your sources and discuss why you think each example is
effective in helping you form your opinion.

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Evaluation
Evaluate the importance of assessment and approaches to feedback and assessment design that will
inform your practice in your teaching area. 1500 words

According to the NSW Education Standards Authority (2018), assessment creates the link between
learning, teaching, course content and outcomes. Assessment can be defined as the tool to gather and
interpret tested knowledge or evidence about student progress and learning (ACT Government:
Education and Training, 2011). This in turn, enables teachers to analyse this data and make calculated
decisions about their own pedagogy and students prior, current and future performance outcomes.
With reference to current, scholarly written literature this evaluation will analyse and discuss the
importance of assessment and the many components of assessment including approaches to feedback
and assessment design. Assessment will be discussed in terms of assessment for, as and of learning and
the importance of each in the education setting. The impact of high stakes testing will also be discussed
in terms of student performance.

The term assessment and its origin has been an essential part of education for decades (Madaus &
Kellaghan, 1992). It allows teachers to track and gather vital information needed to improve teaching
pedagogy and student performance in relation to syllabus outcomes of a particular topic. In order to
promote deeper understanding, assessment is used to facilitate closer relationships between teachers
and students in improving progress in learning required outcomes (NSW Education Standards
Authority, 2018). There is an extensive range of literature which discusses the importance of
assessment and whether or not they are being utilised appropriately in schools and other education
bodies. One such piece of literature by Earl (2003), discusses two reasons for implementing and the
outcome of assessment as by having a material recognition for completing a program or course which
can be used to promote further education or become employed. The second reason proposed by Earl
(2003) is that assessment can be used (if used appropriately) to allow students to become their own
educators and recognise their own limitations which will inform them of areas needing improvement.

Similarly, Stiggins (2005, p.1) stated that society has placed pressure or “seen fit to redefine” the role of
assessments and schools to ensure that all students meet a standard and become competent in their

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

learning. According to Stiggins (2005) schools and policy makers are moving from the traditional means
of just ranking students based on their achievement to ensuring that all students meet an appropriate
standard. In order to do this focus has been placed on the type and design of assessment rather than
the outdated strategy of maximising pressure and anxiety levels (this will be discussed later on in the
evaluation). In order to determine whether or not an assessment meets the specific requirements it is
intended to meet, teachers need to look at the design process. The four variations of assessment
include informal, formal, summative and formative. Informal assessments are unlike standardised tools
whereby students are ‘marked’ via learning behaviour, interactions, observations and anecdotal
records (Yorke, 2003). Whereas formal is often more structured in terms of guidelines and
measurements (these assessments may include exams, essays, quizzes and workshops) (Boud, Cohen &
Sampson, 1999). According to Dunn & Mulvenon (2009), summative assessment is the process of
recording and evaluating an achievement or performance made by a student at a particular time (this
can be at the end of the unit, semester, course or year). Formative assessment is based on the
assumption that students take responsibility over their own work which is a constantly occurring
process (National Council of Teachers of English, 2013).

Furthermore, design of assessment has to align with the subject and in accordance with what the
assessment is supposed to assess and the requirements needed for that particular subject. For
example, the document on assessment and reporting in modern history stage 6 by the NSW Education
Standards Authority (2017, p7) states that the historical analysis undertaken in year 12 must allow
students to “focus on an historical question, issue or controversy of interest, and to develop a reasoned
argument, supported by evidence”. Education bodies such as the NSW Education Standards Authority
provide vital information about assessment in regard to its meaning, purpose, design and reporting.

Studies (Rust, 2002) have shown that a combination of all assessments is needed to accurately gain a
student’s result as the individual may differ in their learning styles. For example, one student may excel
under pressure in test conditions while another may score highly in informal assessments such as group
participation. Not only are there different types and designs of assessments but also reasons for
assessment, including; assessment for, as and of learning. In order to clarify student learning and
understanding (commonly known as formative) teacher’s must undertake the process of assessment
for learning (James, 2006). Assessment for leaning may also be used in a way to include all learners
(promote inclusivity), involve teachers and parents, encourages peer and self-assessment. Similarly,

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

assessment as leaning focuses on promoting students in taking responsibility over their own learning
and closely involves both students and teachers to create learning goals (NSW Education Standards
Authority, 2017). Also, commonly known as summative assessment, assessment of learning assists
teachers in gathering student performance and learning achievement at a particular time within the
course so that improvements and goals may be established in lieu of these results (Brown, 2005). The
effectiveness of this is greatly dependent on the quality of feedback.

Design of assessment can easily be compared to feedback of assessment as teachers have the sole
responsibility in making it effective to students. There are numerous standards in the Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers (The Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership, 2011,
p.16) which relates to and identifies the importance of assessment and feedback including “assess
student learning” (standard 5.1), “provide feedback to students on their learning” (5.2) and “report on
student achievement” (5.5). Without appropriate feedback or guidance from teachers, students may
not be able to improve their performances. Bashir, Kabir & Rahman (2016) made it clear that most
teachers find it difficult to provide effective feedback as some students may not respond well to
standardised feedback (such as comments written down on essay) and may need one on one
discussions, so that they can ask their own set of questions. When examining literature there is a
reoccurring theme when discussing the essential components of effective assessment which includes;
the timing, type and the way the feedback is used (Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Lizzio & Wilson, 2008).

Not only is it essential to give students feedback but also feed forward, which is looking into the future
and discussing with student the steps they have to make in order to improve. This process can be
facilitated by “involving additional experiences that help students clarify their understanding and can
involve the teacher in questioning, prompting, and cueing learners” (Fisher & Frey, 2009, P29).
Differentiation involves the creation of fair and flexible components in teaching, learning and is vital
when considering assessment (NSW Education Standards Authority, 2018). Differentiation occurs so
that students of varying ability can meet the standards required by the assessment. This means devising
assessments which are negotiated, promote strengths (instead of only exposing weaknesses and
limitations), allowing appropriate time, less demand for high level language proficiency and allowing
choice (such as allowing choice in presenting their work) (The Higher Education Academy, 2014).

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

The impact of high-stakes testing on students is becoming more of an issue in education and
assessment in today’s education. According to Kleinert, Kennedy & Kearn (1999) high stakes testing is
being used to pressure students into becoming motivated and take exams more seriously. In actual
fact, however, this is creating quite an opposite result as Lagenfeld, Thurlow & Scott (1997) revealed. If
students become too pressured or restricted in time limit they are more likely to perform worse than if
they were in a relaxed positive learning environment. Phillips (1994) found that there are many types of
assessments (such as NAPLAN and HSC) which have high-stake rewards or punishments placed on
them. These may include amount of income, publicity and sanctions. Therefore, it is important for
teachers to place as little pressure on students as they can so that students can achieve their best
performance.

In order to become a proficient teacher, one must first understand the many intricacies involved in
assessment. This includes the importance, design and appropriate feedback while taking into
consideration inclusiveness and differentiation in planning and implementing assessment. There are
numerous pieces of literature and distinguished educating bodies (NSW Education Standards Authority
and Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership) which guide teachers in the process of
implementing effective assessment throughout all schooling levels.

References
ACT Government: Education and Training. (2011). Teachers’ guide to assessment. Retrieved from
https://www.education.act.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/297182/Teachers_Guide_to_Asse
ssment_Web.pdf

Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. (2011). Australian professional standards for
teachers. Retrieved from https://www.aitsl.edu.au/docs/default-source/apst-
resources/australian_professional_standard_for_teachers_final.pdf

Bashir, M.A., Kabir, R., & Rahman, K. (2016). The value and effectiveness of feedback in improving
students’ learning and professionalizing teaching in higher education. Journal of Education and
Practice. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1105282.pdf

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Boud, D., Cohen, R., & Sampson, J. (1999). Peer learning and assessment. Assessment & evaluation in
higher education, 24(4), 413-426.

Brown, S. (2005). Assessment for learning. Learning and teaching in higher education, (1), 81-89.

Dunn, K. E., & Mulvenon, S. W. (2009). A critical review of research on formative assessment: The
limited scientific evidence of the impact of formative assessment in education. Practical
Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 14(7), 1-11.

Earl, L. (2003). Assessment as learning: Using classroom assessment to maximize student learning.
Corwin Press, INC

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2009) Feed up, feed back and feed forward. Educational Leadership, 67(3), 20-25.

Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of Educational Research, 77 (1), pp.
81-112.

Higher Education Academy. (2014). Assessment and feedback. Retrieved from


https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/resources/assessment_and_feedback.pdf

James, M. (2006). Assessment, teaching and theories of learning. Assessment and learning, 47, 60.

Kleinert, H.L., Kennedy, S., & Kearn, J.F. (1999). The impact of alternate assessments: A statewide
teacher survey. The Journal of Special Education, 33, 93-102.

Lagenfeld, K., Thurlow, M.L., & Scott, D. (1997). High stakes testing for students: Unanswered questions
and implications for students with disabilities. Minneapolis, MN: National Center on Educational
Outcomes.

Lizzio, A., & Wilson, K. (2008). Feedback on assessment: students’ perceptions of quality and
effectiveness. Assessment & evaluation in higher education, 33(3), 263-275.

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)
Nathan Gardiner 18037454

Madaus, G. F., & Kellaghan, T. (1992). Curriculum evaluation and assessment. Handbook of research on
curriculum, 119-154.

National Council of Teachers of English. (2013). Formative assessment that truly informs instruction.
Retrieved from http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Positions/formative-
assessment_single.pdf

NSW Education Standards Authority. (2017). Assessment and reporting in modern history stage 6.
Retrieved from https://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/assets/global/files/assessment-and-reporting-in-
modern-history-stage-6.pdf

NSW Education Standards Authority. (2018). Assessment in stage 6. Retrieved from


http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/11-12/Understanding-the-
curriculum/assessment

Phillips, S.E. (1994). High stakes testing accommodations: Validity versus disabled rights. Applied
Measurement in Education, 7, 93-120.

Rust, C. (2002). The impact of assessment on student learning: How can the research literature
practically help to inform the development of departmental assessment strategies and learner-
centred assessment practices?. Active learning in higher education, 3(2), 145-158.

Stiggins, R. (2005). From formative assessment to assessment for learning: A path to success in
standards-based schools. Phi Delta Kappan, 87(4), 324-328.

Yorke, M. (2003). Formative assessment in higher education: Moves towards theory and the
enhancement of pedagogic practice. Higher education, 45(4), 477-501.

Stage 6 school-based assessment task - Year 12 (500 words) Evaluation (1500 words)