You are on page 1of 29

CONTEMPORARY

TEACHER
LEADERSHIP

ASSESSMENT 1
REPORT

James Hagarty
16137165

This report is designed for Elderslie High School,


PDHPE Department

1
Table of contents
Executive summary …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
Objective …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
Context …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
Goals …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Recommendations …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Comparative table …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Recommendations …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
Reconstructed unit …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
Scope and sequence …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
Concept map …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11
Assessment task …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12
Redesigned unit outline …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14
References …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 22
Appendices …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23

2
Executive Summary
Objective
This report has been designed for the PDHPE faculty at Elderslie High School. The report evaluates
the unit outline for the stage 5, year 9 Physical Activity and Sports Studies (PASS) elective unit: World
games – Korfball, with the aim to provide recommendations regarding how the unit can be
improved, based on relevant evidence based research. The report will focus on utilising the
Understanding by Design (UbD) framework and Game Sense teaching approach in order to correctly
address the learning outcomes and students learning needs within the stage 5 PASS syllabus. As no
scope and sequence, concept map or assessment marking criteria were provided with the original
unit outline, these aspects will also be included into the reconstructed unit of work.

Context
This report has been designed for the PDHPE faculty at Elderslie High School, which is located in
South-West Sydney, NSW. Elderslie High School is a large comprehensive school which is responsible
for approximately 1000 student. Elderslie High School is a co-educational school with an
approximate split of 43% males to 57% females, with both males and females being streamed
together within the PDHPE classes. The diversity of the school is rather limited with only 3% of the
students identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander and 13% of the students recognised as
have a language background other than English. The socioeconomic status of the school is nine
points above the average ICSEA score, consisting of a fairly evenly spread across the four quarters of
earners, with a slight lean towards the bottom middle quarter of earners.

Reference: Statistics and tables above are retrieved from the MySchool Website. Retrieved from:
https://myschool.edu.au/school/41838/profile/2017

3
Goals
- Learning activities adequately address the learning outcomes that have been identified
within the unit outline.
- Students develop a deeper understanding of movement skills and strategies used within
invasion games
- Formative assessment recommendations included within the unit outline in order to provide
teachers and students with adequately ongoing assessment opportunities.
- Increased differentiation within learning activities in order to address the needs of all
students learning abilities.
- Increased student literacy and numeracy opportunities within the provided learning
activities.

Recommendations
The following recommendations have been designed based on relevant evidence based research
associated with improving students learning outcomes and engagement within a PDHPE practical
lesson. The recommendations are based on a co-educational, mixed learning and physical ability
classroom, including students that require additional learning assistance along with those that
require advanced learning opportunities.

- Incorporate Game Sense model activities, which focus on the learning outcomes identified
within the unit outline as opposed to sports specific skills that do not adequately address the
selected learning outcomes.
- Provide students with Game Sense activities which encourage students to critically and
creatively develop solutions to proposed problems or situations .
- Incorporate formative assessment overview within the unit outline.
- Include modifications within learning activities in order to address all students learning
needs.
- Incorporate learning activities which provide students with literacy and numeracy
opportunities

4
Comparative Table
Area of consideration Concerns of the area of Suggested Changes to counteract Research support for the changes
consideration concerns suggested.
Learning activities do not Incorporate activities that incorporate a Light (2013) states that students who are
Understanding by Design adequately address the learning Game Sense teaching approach, which taught focusing on sports specific skill based
outcomes identified within the unit are designed to addressing the learning activities have been found to have limited
outline. outcomes of; movement skills, knowledge regarding game strategies and
strategies, actions and collaboration, movement skills such as when and how to
utilised in order to increase use these skills.
performance and participation. Game Sense activities have been found to
not only increase student engagement, but
also provides students with a greater
understanding regarding how to utilise
movement skills, strategies and skills within a
game like situation (Pearson, Webb, &
Mckeen, 2006).
No formative assessment has been Include formative assessments within
included within the unit outline; the unit outline and the assessment Formative assessments allow teachers to
therefore the teacher has no way overview of the unit outline, which gain an insight into student’s current
to assess how effectively the identifies ways that teachers can assess knowledge and understanding of the learning
students have learnt the content. students learning of outcomes. outcomes addressed in each activity.
Formative assessment will include; Teachers can then adjust students learning
observation, questioning, short answer according to their current knowledge (Dixson
responses and peer assessments. & Worrell, 2016).

Most activities involve the teacher Incorporate Game Sense activities Game Sense models of learning focus on
Critical and Creative explaining what to do and provide which promote students participating in students exploring the various potentials
Thinking little opportunities for students to games with little instructions regarding within a game, in order for students to
develop their own strategies or how to best perform the action or develop a deeper understanding of how
actions in order to solve game like strategy, therefore students actively certain movements and skills affect the

5
problems or situations. discover the solutions to their problem outcomes of an action (Stolz & Pill, 2014). Pill
or situation. (2013) states that within a Game Sense
Game Sense games incorporate game approach the teacher acts as a facilitator to
modifications and the teacher asking learning rather than as a direct source,
open ended questions in order to guide utilising various game modifications and
students into the discovery of these open ended questioning in order to guide
solutions. students in the right direction.
Activities provided do not provide Include modifications within activities When students learning needs are not being
Personal and Social any modifications for students with which allow students of all abilities to addressed they are at an increased risk of
Capabilities different learning needs or participate at a level which is suitable to misbehaving or disengaging from the activity
abilities. their abilities. (Light, Curry & Mooney, 2014).
These modifications may include the The use of modification within games can be
time a player can hold the ball for or utilised in order to provide a challenging yet
even the activity itself being changed. achievable goal, for all students regardless of
their ability (Light, Curry & Mooney, 2014).

No literacy opportunities have Students develop a glossary of terms Language plays an important role in sport as
Literacy been included within the unit of relating to korfball and use this specific terminology is utilised in order to
work. language during discussions. Students describe actions or terming specific
translate their practical knowledge into techniques (Jarosz, 2015).
writing through short answer questions.
No numeracy opportunities have Students collect and compare and Llyod, Eather and Riley (2018) state, that
Numeracy been included within the unit of report data regarding peers when physical education is planned
work. performance. Students develop game effectively links to mathematic can be
strategies based on using mathematics incorporated allowing students to experience
of scoring system to determine the and incorporate real-world uses of numeracy
fastest way to achieve a certain score. within a sporting environment.

6
Recommendations
The recommendations that have been outlined within the comparative table will now be discussed
in further detail, explaining the reasoning and research behind these chosen changes. Along with the
changes outlined within the comparative table the reconstructed unit has also included a scope and
sequence, concept map and summative assessment task mark guidelines, as none were provided to
support the unit outline. These supporting articles have been found to lead to better teaching and
learning as they provide structure and guidance to teachers whilst also offering students with a
learning guide and learning goals to work towards (Arafeh, 2016; Jones, Allen, Dunn & Brooker,
2017).

The unit outline has been reconstructed using the Understanding by Design (UbD) framework in
order to develop activities around achieving the learning outcomes rather than including activities
that are common within the sport that do not meet all the learning outcomes, as can be observed
within the original unit outline. Reynolds and Kearns (2017) state, that creating a unit of work using
an UbD framework, not only improves how teachers or instructors develop and teach their content,
but have also been found to increase the learning outcomes of the students or participants
undergoing the created unit of work. The UbD model achieves these teaching and learning
improvements by focusing on three sequenced steps or processes. The first step of identifying the
desired overall learning outcomes has already been address within the original unit outline therefore
the reconstructed unit outline is designed around addressing these specified outcomes.

The second step of the UbD model focuses on developing ways in which to assess the students
learning of these identified outcomes (Yurtseven & Altun, 2017). As the original provided unit outline
has only mentioned one informal assessment throughout the whole unit of work, the reconstructed
unit of work has been developed to include a number of formative assessment tasks throughout
each lesson. Dixson and Worrell (2016) state, that formative assessments are an important tool for
teachers, allowing them to gain an insight into student’s current knowledge and understanding of
the learning outcomes addressed in each activity. This then enables teachers to adjust their teaching
and learning activities based around how successfully the students have learnt the content being
taught. Formative assessment also allows teachers to provide feedback to students regarding areas
of strengths, weaknesses and information regarding how they can improve in these areas of
weakness (Wanner & Palmer, 2018). The reconstructed unit outline has also included assessment as
learning tasks which aim to provide students with a chance to reflect on the identified learning goals,
along with their current position in terms of achieving these goals. This then allows students to
become actively involved in their own learning progress in turn improving their learning outcomes
(Dann, 2014).

The third step of the UbD model focuses on planning activities and tasks which can support the
learning of the identified outcomes. As mentioned previously the activities that were included within
the original unit outline do not adequately address all of the learning outcomes that were identified.
A large portion of the original unit focus on the sport specific skills, however Light (2013) states that
students who are taught focusing on sports specific skill-based activities have been found to have
limited knowledge regarding game strategies, tactics and movement skills such as when and how to
use these skills. Demonstrating strategies, actions and movement skills are three of the major

7
outcomes listed within the unit outline, therefore limiting students learning of these skills will not
allow the successful achievement of the learning outcomes. In order to address this, the
reconstructed unit outline has incorporated the use of Game Sense teaching approach. Game Sense
small sided games have been found to effectively teach student’s game-based strategies and
movement skills whilst also allowing them to develop sports specific actions and skills (Light, Curry &
Mooney, 2014). The use of small sided games also increases student participation, which is also
another learning outcome identified within the unit outline Stolz and Pill (2014).

The modifications used within Game Sense games, are designed to guide students towards their own
critical thinking in order to address the problem or idea presented to them. As noted within the
comparative table the original unit focused regularly on direct instructions, explaining to the
students the activity and action which needs to be performed and then the students carrying out
those instructions. Light, Curry and Mooney (2014) state that this form of direct teaching leaves
students with a limited understanding regarding how and when to use specific movements and skills
within an actual game. Therefore, the reconstructed unit outline has incorporated Game Sense game
modifications and open-ended discovery questions within the activities, in order to promote
students creative and critical thinking. Stolz and Pill (2014) state that the Game Sense approach
focuses on students exploring the various potentials within a game, allowing students to develop a
deeper understanding of how certain movements and skills affect the outcomes of a specific action.
Al Mahmud (2013) supports the use of inquiry-based learning in order to provide students with a
deeper understanding of the content being taught, stating that problem solving and research are
two important ways in which students learn to apply content knowledge to specific circumstances.
This deeper understanding during game based activities will provide students with the required
knowledge and ability to successfully achieve the learning outcomes being assessed within a full
game situation.

The modifications within Game Sense activities are also important for addressing students learning
and skill capabilities. When a student struggles to perform a certain skill or action, they risk the
possibility of falling behind the rest of the class in learning. This in turn can lead to students
disengaging from lesson activities and potentially sport altogether due to the formation of negative
opinions toward themselves and their capability to play sport (Light, Curry & Mooney, 2014). Game
Sense approaches include the use of modifications in order to address all students learning needs,
through the changing of rules, equipment, number of players or the specific action being performed
(Stolz & Pill, 2014). Light, Curry and Mooney (2014) state that the modifications used within games
are designed to suit the abilities and needs of the students, in order to encourage all students
regardless of ability to participate and succeed. Therefore the reconstructed unit outline has
implemented the opportunity to modifying games in order to address all students learning abilities
and needs.

The original unit outline also failed to address important general capabilities such as literacy and
numeracy within its activities. The Australian Curriculum recommends the inclusion of general
capabilities such as literacy and numeracy within units of work in order to equip students with the
required skill to live and work in modern Australia. Therefore a range of activities have been
included in order to address certain literacy and numeracy requirement, without limiting the
learning of the specified learning outcomes. Literacy has been included within the unit outline
through the use of sports specific language during discussions and activities, requiring students to

8
create a glossary in order to specify the meaning of the terms being used. Students will also be
provided with opportunities to explain their movements and actions in writing, in order to show an
understanding of the theory behind the practical performance. Jarosz (2015) supports the use of
literacy within sports, stating that language plays an important role in sport, as specific terminology
is utilised in order to describe certain actions and techniques which are important to various sports
or one specific sport.

Numeracy has been included within the unit outline through activities which incorporate the use of
data collection, data comparison and through the use of scoring systems and designing strategies
around using numeracy in order to best solve a certain problem or goal. Llyod, Eather and Riley
(2018) support the inclusion of numeracy within a sports environment, stating, that when physical
education is planned effectively links to mathematic can be incorporated, allowing students to
experience and incorporate real-world uses of numeracy within a sporting environment. Hutto,
Kirchhoff & Abrahamson (2015) furthers these statements, believing that mathematics and sport are
more closely related then most students realise, whilst also finding that when students learn
mathematic through other avenues they gain a greater appreciation for its importance.

In conclusion the use of the Korfball reconstructed unit is recommended within the Elderslie High
School PDHPE department, as it utilises recent evidence based research, in order to develop a unit of
work which not only achieves the learning outcomes, but also allows for a deep level of learning
within its activities.

9
Reconstructed Unit
Scope and Sequence

10
Concept map

11
Assessment task

Task: Practical assessment Weighting: 20% Assessment date: 26/06/2018

Outcomes assessed: Task requirements:


3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies that contribute to enjoyable Students will be assessed on their performance during a full sided
participation and skilful performance. game of Korfball.
4.1 works collaboratively with others to enhance participation, Students must be present for this lesson otherwise they will receive a
enjoyment and performance. fail grade
4.3 performs movement skills with increasing proficiency
Marks awarded: Comments:

/ 20

12
Marking criteria

13
Redesigned Unit Outline

Korfball – World Games Stage 5 PASS

Summary Duration
3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies that contribute to enjoyable 5 weeks
participation and skilful performance.
5 x 60 minute lessons
4.1 works collaboratively with others to enhance participation, enjoyment
and performance.

4.3 performs movement skills with increasing proficiency

LS4.1 supports and cooperates with others in a range of activities

LS4.2 recognises steps to achieve personal and group goals

Unit overview Focus


5 Practical lessons over 5 weeks. Theory worksheets for homework. Korfball

Outcomes Assessment overview


3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies that contribute to enjoyable Formative assessment:
participation and skilful performance. - Observation
- Questioning
4.1 works collaboratively with others to enhance participation, enjoyment - Short answer responses
and performance. - Peer assessments

4.3 performs movement skills with increasing proficiency Summative Assessment


Informal assessment: Practical performance
LS4.1 supports and cooperates with others in a range of activities

LS4.2 recognises steps to achieve personal and group goals

14
Students learn about Student learn to Resources, teaching & learning strategies
Basic rules and concepts of Korfball Theory work: Rules and game strategy Read and complete homework task and provide feedback/discuss
worksheets. answers
LESSON 1 –
3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies  Develop a foundation for efficient Maintaining Possession
that contribute to enjoyable participation and enjoyable participation and
and skilful performance. performance in physical activity Discuss aims for the lesson
- Moving into space
- Who to pass the ball to
Discuss terminology used within basketball and invasion games.

WARM UP & STRETCH

4 corners 3 v 1 keep possession activity


Focus on moving into space and who to pass the ball to
Ask class key questions: how do you create space?
When should you pass the ball to a player?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions
Modifications
 Enhance the participation and Make square bigger or smaller
4.1 works collaboratively with others to performance of themselves and Limit time with the ball
enhance participation, enjoyment and others in physical activity and
performance. sport Dribble tag-
Divide class into 2 or 4 teams depending on numbers (and courts
available). One half are attackers and one half are defenders.
Students are to be opposite their goal with the defending team 3
metres from the centreline. Attacking team start with the ball and
aim to tag the defending player by tapping them with the ball
above the knee. If defending team is tagged they are to remain
standing where they were tagged. Attacking players must dribble
the ball when moving with it, pass the ball to players and tag the
opposition to get them out. Give time limits 3-4 minutes before

15
swapping attacking teams.
Key questions: Which player should you pass the ball to?
What should you do in order for the ball to be passed to you?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions
 Develop the personal skills to
participate in physical activity and
sport with confidence and Chasing drill-
4.3 performs movement skills with enjoyment Divide the class into 4 teams, depending on numbers (and available
increasing proficiency courts). Players partner up, with one player watching the other play
the activity, collecting data relating to the student addressing the
lesson objectives. Have teams stand at either end of the court on
the base line and give them numbers corresponding with the team
at the opposite end. Once the teacher bounces the ball in the
middle of the court and calls a number, those two students run into
the court and pick up the ball, The student who picks up the ball
first becomes the attacking team and the other team becomes the
defenders, all players run in and join the game. Once a point is
scored, restart the drill. Give countdowns etc.
Student reports findings from data collection and provides advice
on how to improve performance.
Same team goes out and works on other students
recommendations
Switch students playing and collecting data

 Appreciate the enjoyment and Students add at least 3 new words to their glossary based of
challenge of participation in today’s lesson
physical activity and sport
LESSON 2-

Maintaining possession

Discuss aims for lesson

16
-creating space

WARM UP & STRETCH

Manipulation game
In groups of 4, 3 v 1, students get points for tricking their defender
into going the wrong way and receiving the ball.
Key questions: How can trick the defender into going the wrong
way?
What can the player with the ball do to trick the defender?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions using specific
sporting terms
Modifications
Make area bigger or smaller
Defender can only go in one direction

Keep possession game


In teams of 4 students move around a square playing area and
must complete 5 passes in a row without the other team forcing an
error or intercept.
Key questions: How can you break away from your defender?
How can the player with the ball help a player without the ball
break away from their defender?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions
Modifications
Make square bigger or smaller
Change number of players on each team

Maintaining possession review


The teacher provides students with a number of scenarios.

17
Students must then write down the different movements or
strategies which could be used within this situation.
Discuss as a class
Students then perform these actions.

LESSON 3-

Scoring
Discuss aims for the lesson
-moving into a scoring position
-when to go for goals

WARM UP & STRETCH

Hoop ball
In teams of 6, students must pass the ball to a player standing in a
hoop in order to score a point.
Key questions: How can you move into a scoring position?
When should you pass to someone in a scoring position?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions
Modifications
Add or remove hoops
Number of people allowed in hoops

End Zone
In teams of 6, students must pass the ball to a player standing in an
end zone down a specific end for each team.
Key questions: How can you move defender away from the end
zone?
Why would you not pass to someone in the end zone?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions

18
Modifications
Time allowed in end zone
Number of passes before passing into end zone

4v4 half court games


Divide students into 4 or 8 teams (depending on courts available).
Students will play a Round Robin of half court games.
-Everyone in the team must touch the ball before they can shoot.
-3 points for successful attack and shooting a goal
-1 pt for each successful rebound
Students are provided with different scenarios based on points and
must develop strategies using maths in order to best complete
task.
Key questions: How can you put yourself in the best position to get
the rebound?

Students add at least 3 new words to their glossary based of


today’s lesson

LESSON 4 –
Defending

Discuss aims for lesson


- Obtaining possession
- Preventing scoring
WARM UP & STRETCH

Defensive wall
In teams of 6. The defending team has 2 lines that they must stay
on. 3 defenders on each line. The attackers are set up so that there
are 2 players in each of the 3 areas. Defenders must stop the ball
from getting past them.
Key questions: Where should you place yourself to stop your player

19
from getting the ball?
How can you stop your player from breaking away?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Class discussion regarding answers to questions
Modifications
Size of zones
Number of defenders on each line

Small end zone


In teams of 6, students must pass the ball to a player standing in an
end zone which is a small area down each end of the playing area.
Key questions: How can you limit passes into the end zone?
How can you force a player with the ball to make a mistake?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions
Modifications
Size of end zones
Add areas where only a certain number of players can enter

Defending the goal


In teams of 6. Defending team must stop the attacking team from
getting the ball into a scoring position. Attacking team has 4 passes
to get into a scoring position before having to shoot from where
they are.
Key questions: How does defending the scoring area increase your
chance of a missed shot?
How can you positon yourself to get the rebound from a missed
shot?
Students repeat game focusing on solving answers to questions

Students add at least 3 new words to their glossary based of


today’s lesson

20
LESSON 5-
Full game

Discuss aim for lesson


- Utilise all movements and strategies learnt
- Peer review

WARM UP & STRETCH

Full court game of Korfball


Students partner up, with one playing a full game of korfball and
the other collecting data on their partners performance on a table
of movement skills and strategies
Students report data to partner and discuss areas of strength and
weakness and how they can improve
Students continue playing working on partners suggestions
Data collector compares first data to second to see if there is any
improvement.
Students switch roles

Class discussion
As a class the teacher explains the things that students will be
assessed on within the practical performance assessment. Class
discuss the best ways to achieve each learning outcome

21
References
al Mahmud, A. (2013). Constructivism and reflectivism as the logical counterparts in TESOL: Learning
theory versus teaching methodology. Teflin Journal, 24(2), 237.

Arafeh, S. (2016). Curriculum mapping in higher education: a case study and proposed content scope
and sequence mapping tool. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 40(5), 585-611.

Dann, R. (2014). Assessment as learning: blurring the boundaries of assessment and learning for
theory, policy and practice. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 21(2), 149-
166.

Dixson, D. D., & Worrell, F. C. (2016). Formative and summative assessment in the classroom. Theory
into practice, 55(2), 153-159.

Hutto, D. D., Kirchhoff, M. D., & Abrahamson, D. (2015). The enactive roots of STEM: Rethinking
educational design in mathematics. Educational Psychology Review, 27(3), 371-389.

Jarosz, B. (2015). About specialized language in sports commentary (on the example of coverages of
volleyball matches. Socjolingwistyka, 29, 269-282.

Jones, L., Allen, B., Dunn, P., & Brooker, L. (2017). Demystifying the rubric: a five-step pedagogy to
improve student understanding and utilisation of marking criteria. Higher Education
Research & Development, 36(1), 129-142.

Light, R. L. (2013). Positive pedagogy for physical education and sport: game sense as an example. In
Contemporary developments in games teaching (pp. 41-54). Routledge.

Light, R., Curry, C., & Mooney, A. (2014). Game Sense as a model for delivering quality teaching in
physical education. Asia-Pacific journal of health, sport and physical education, 5(1), 67-81.

Lloyd, A., Eather, N., & Riley, N. (2018). Physical Education and Numeracy. In Numeracy in Authentic
Contexts (pp. 341-372). Springer, Singapore.

Reynolds, H. L., & Kearns, K. D. (2017). A planning tool for incorporating backward design, active
learning, and authentic assessment in the college classroom. College Teaching, 65(1), 17-27.

Stolz, S., & Pill, S. (2014). Teaching games and sport for understanding: Exploring and reconsidering
its relevance in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 20(1), 36-71.

Wanner, T., & Palmer, E. (2018). Formative self-and peer assessment for improved student learning:
the crucial factors of design, teacher participation and feedback. Assessment & Evaluation In
Higher Education, 43(4), 1-16. doi:10.1080/02602938.2018.1427698

Yurtseven, N., & Altun, S. (2017). Understanding by Design (UbD) in EFL Teaching: Teachers'
Professional Development and Students' Achievement. Educational Sciences: Theory and
Practice, 17(2), 437-461.

22
Appendices
No Scope and sequence was provided

No Concept map was provided

No Assessment task was provided

No Marking criteria was provided

Original unit outline has been attached

23
Korfball - World Games Stage 5 PASS

Summary Duration
1.1 discuss factors that limit and enhance the capacity to move and perform 5 weeks

3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies that contribute to enjoyable 5 x 60 minute lessons
participation and skilful performance.

4.1 works collaboratively with others to enhance participation, enjoyment


and performance.

4.3 performs movement skills with increasing proficiency

LS4.1 supports and cooperates with others in a range of activities

LS4.2 recognises steps to achieve personal and group goals

Unit overview Focus


5 Practical lessons over 5 weeks. Theory worksheets for homework. Korfball

Outcomes Assessment overview


3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies that contribute to enjoyable Summative Assessment
participation and skilful performance. Informal assessment: Practical performance

4.1 works collaboratively with others to enhance participation, enjoyment


and performance.

4.3 performs movement skills with increasing proficiency

LS4.1 supports and cooperates with others in a range of activities

LS4.2 recognises steps to achieve personal and group goals

24
Students learn about Student learn to Resources, teaching & learning strategies
Basic rules and concepts of Korfball Theory work: Rules and game strategy Read and complete homework task and provide
worksheets. feedback/discuss answers
LESSON 1 –
3.1 demonstrates actions and strategies that  Develop a foundation for efficient and Dribbling
contribute to enjoyable participation and skilful enjoyable participation and performance WARM UP & STRETCH
performance. in physical activity
Dribble relay-
Divide class into groups of 4-6 depending on
numbers. Have half the team on one end of the
court and the other half on the other end. Starting
from one end each team must dribble the ball to
their group down the other end then pass the ball
to the next player on their team who then dribble
the ball back to the starting end. Continue this
until all students are back to where they started.

Dribble tag-
Divide class into 2 or 4 teams depending on
numbers (and courts available). One half are
 Enhance the participation and attackers and one half are defenders. Students
4.1 works collaboratively with others to enhance performance of themselves and others in are to be opposite their goal with the defending
participation, enjoyment and performance. physical activity and sport team 3 metres from the centreline. Attacking
team start with the ball and aim to tag the
defending player by tapping them with the ball
above the knee. If defending team is tagged they
are to remain standing where they were tagged.
Attacking players are only able to take three steps
with the ball, pass the ball to players and dribble
to get the opposition out. Give time limits 3-4
minutes before swapping attacking teams.

25
Chasing drill-
Divide the class into 2 or 4 teams, depending on
numbers (and available courts). Have teams stand
at either end of the court on the base line and
 Develop the personal skills to participate give them numbers corresponding with the team
in physical activity and sport with at the opposite end. Once the teacher bounces
confidence and enjoyment the ball in the middle of the court and calls a
4.3 performs movement skills with increasing number, those two students run into the court
proficiency and pick up the ball, The student who picks up the
ball first becomes the attacking team and the
other team becomes the defenders, all players
run in and join the game. Once a point is scored,
restart the drill. Give countdowns etc.

LESSON 2-

Throwing/catching

WARM UP & STRETCH

Remind students of the most effective passes in


Korfball & why they are effective. Bounce pass,
 Appreciate the enjoyment and challenge chest pass & overhead passes.
of participation in physical activity and
sport Square Passing drill-
Students work in groups of 3 with one ball per
group in a square outlined by 4 cones. Students
must pass up the line of the square to a player
moving to the free cone.

Passing on the move-


Divide students into each corner and at halfway

26
along the sidelines. One player in the corner starts
with the ball, runs halfway along the end line or
halfway line and passes to the next player on the
move, who receives a pass approximately half
way between the lines. They stop and pass to the
next player on the move. Have players stop when
passing the ball to ensure better passes.

3 man weave-
Divide players into 3 lines along the end line.
Middle line starts with the ball and then passes to
either side. Players follow their pass and take over
the empty line. Keep players wide for smooth
passes.

LESSON 3-
Attacking

WARM UP & STRETCH

4v4 half court games


Divide students into 4 or 8 teams (depending on
courts available). Students will play a Round Robin
of half court games.
-Everyone in the team must touch the ball before
they can shoot.
-1 pt for touching back board
-3 points for successful attack and shooting a goal
-1 pt for defenders if they intercept and score.

LESSON 4 –

27
Defending

WARM UP & STRETCH

Partner tag-
Student are to pair up and spread out on the
court, on teachers whistle students are to try to
softly slap their partner behind the knee, counting
who gets the most slaps.
Modify: Tapping shoulders, stepping on toes.
Remind students to stay low and quick on their
feet watching where their player goes and to
match it to avoid being tagged.

Rotation drill-
Divide students into 2 or 4 even teams (depending
on courts available). Have both teams line up on
the end line on either side of the hoop. One team
are the attackers and one team are the defenders.
The first person in the attacking line dribble the
ball out to the half way lien and return to attempt
to take a shot at goal. Once the attacker reaches
the halfway line, the first defender comes out and
attempts to stop the person from scoring. Once
possession has changed attacker passes to the
next player in the line and the drill repeats. To
modify, one attacking player dribbles to half way,
and the next in line comes out to help score a
point. Same for defenders, ultimately becoming,
2v2.

LESSON 5-

28
Shooting

WARM UP & STRETCH

Attack vs Defence shots


Divide students into 2 or 4 groups (depending on
courts available). Have students line up in two
lines behind the free throw line. Left side
(attackers) take turns at shooting and the right
line (defenders) take turns at defending and
getting the rebound. If the left side (attackers)
miss the shot, the right side (defenders) become
the shooting side and vice versa. Continue until all
students have had a turn.
Modify: increase shooting distance and from
different angles of the hoop. Can also include a
run up and steps can be taken to practice
dribbling.

3 v 2 continuous defensive transition


‘fastest with the mostest’
Remind students they can take 3 steps on the go
when they have possession of the ball. Aim is to
get players into attack quickly. Divide students
into teams of 3, two teams start at each end.
Always return to the same end. Attack- one shot
only, then quickly back to defend. Two defenders
only.

29