You are on page 1of 29

Module 6 – Managing Your Practice

6 Lessons

LESSON 1: Financial Management

Opening (5 minutes)

PPT­6 p.1 Welcome to Module 6:  Managing Your Practice

>>Return the graded Module 5 quizzes<<

In Module 5, our focus was on helping you get off to a professional and prosperous start – 
whether you decide to practice as an employee, subcontractor, or small business owner. In this 
module, we’ll take it a step further – how to manage the business you’ve launched. 

PPT­6 p.2 Lesson Objectives (Review objectives with students)

1. Describe the pros and cons of hiring professional bookkeeping or accounting services for 
your business. 
2. Identify four types of financial reports and their purpose. 
3. Describe how to collect on an invoice if your client is slow to pay. 

Financial Management (50 minutes)

Reference text pp. 166­181

Financial management is really about maintaining the financial health of your business – and it 
largely comes down to effective record keeping. 

How does it benefit your business to keep accurate financial records?

Look for:
First and foremost, financial records are a requirement of satisfying federal, state, and local tax 
laws.
Can serve as early warning system to alert you of trends that might need to be corrected.
Can help you to identify which clients are the most profitable.
Can be useful in providing information to potential lenders, buyers of practice and/or investors.
Can be used to help satisfy client requests for payment information.
Critical in helping you to keep track of earnings and if clients owe money.

What are some guiding principles to keep in mind for effective financial management?

Look for:
Keeping financial records

1
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
Back­up
Document retention

>>Referring to pages 166­167, facilitate discussion on tips to keep on top of these 3 areas<<

Debating the Pro and Cons of Using a Bookkeeper. In our earlier discussion about hiring 
professional assistance, you had the chance to talk briefly with your group about which types of 
professional assistance you’re considering. One of the professions you discussed was 
bookkeeping. Let’s take a moment to talk briefly about the pros and cons of hiring a bookkeeper.

>>Referring to Figure 6.2 on page 169, engage learners in a brief 
discussion about the pros and cons of using a bookkeeper<<

Here are some questions to guide the discussion:

Referring to the pros and cons listed in Figure 6.2 on page 169, what do you think are the pros of 
hiring a bookkeeper?
How about the cons, based both on the text and on your own experience?

Types of Financial Accounts/ What are the different types of financial accounts you’ll most 
likely be using?

Look for: Checking account and credit account

What are the benefits and drawbacks to each?

Look for: Checking account is the simplest, safest, and most convenient – but limited to the 
actual amount of funds in your account; credit account allows you to make larger purchases – but 
can get you in trouble if you overextend

>>Ask a student to lead the class in a stretch<<

Creating a Budget. How many of you have a regular practice of creating and maintaining a 
budget for your personal expenses? 

>>Ask for a show of hands<<

What’s the purpose of a budget?

2
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
Look for: Provides a plan for how you will spend, save, and invest the money you anticipate 
receiving – organized by category.

To help us in our discussion about a budget for business expenses, let’s start first with a 
discussion about creating a budget for your personal expenses. What are the categories that you 
might include in a personal budget?

>>Acknowledge responses and record on the left­hand side of
 the board – creating a list going down<<

Now, let’s begin turning this into an actual budget, by creating columns to record what we’re 
going to budget for each month – and then a final column to tally up total expenses within each 
category at the end of the year.

Draw 13 columns across, identifying months of the year along the top and writing “Total Year” at
the top of the last column.

Lead learners in an exercise of estimating monthly costs for a few of the categories, recording the
projected expenses into the appropriate columns. With a category like “Groceries,” for instance,
you could ask learners if they might budget a higher amount during the holiday months.

Year 1 Budgeting. Now, let’s apply this exercise of creating a budget based on the estimates for 
expenses that you’ve already come up with during Module 5.

>>Ask learners to pull out their Researching Costs Notes from Module 5<<

Please convene with your group and using the cost estimates that you already have, design your 
business’ Year 1 Budget. Referring to Figure 6.3, on pages 171­172, create your Year 1 Budget. 
I’ll give you 10 minutes to work on this as a group. Whatever you don’t complete during class 
should be finished for homework.

Allow groups to meet and discuss for 10 minutes. Make yourself available to any groups that 
might need assistance.

>>Call time after 10 minutes and debrief the exercise with the full group<<

>>Check in to see if there are any additional questions<<

Financial Reports. While your budget is your projection of anticipated expenses (based on 
anticipated revenue) – your financial reports are your actual expenses and revenue.

3
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
What are the four basic kinds of financial reports you’re going to want to create?

Look for: ledgers, cash flow statements, income statements, and balance sheets

Referring to Figure of 6.5 on page 174, what’s the difference between each one?

Look for:
Ledger – shows all income and expenses; the basis for all financial statements; kept daily
Balance sheet – shows assets, liabilities and equity; updated quarterly or annually
Income statement – show revenues, expenses, profit; updated monthly and year­to­date
Cash flow statement – shows existing cash on hand, as well as income and expenses; projected on
a monthly basis

Finally, what do you use to request payment?

Look for: submit an invoice – or request for payment

>>Refer learners to Figure 6.10 on page 179 to view sample invoice<<

Wrap Up (5 minutes)

>>Go over homework<<

Finish up your Year 1 Budget.
DUE DATE: Module 6 – Lesson 3

Read pages 181­186. Begin with “Taxes” and stop before “Client Records Management.”
DUE DATE: Next class

>>Invite and answer questions before moving on<<
LESSON 2: Taxes

Opening (5 minutes)

PPT­6 p.3 Lesson Objectives  (Review objectives with students)

1. List the types of taxes for which your business is liable. 
2. Identify at least five deductions that you might be able to claim on your income tax. 

4
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
Taxes (50 minutes)

Reference text pp. 181­186

While I’m not a certified public accountant, and therefore am not qualified to give you specific 
tax advice, we can still have a general discussion about taxes. 

In Module 5, we talked about the three different legal structures for a business. What are these?

Look for: Sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation

Each of these, as you know, has different tax implications.

Let’s back up for a moment, though. Let’s say you’re an employee. What’s involved in filing 
taxes?

Look for: Employer withholds taxes; using the W2 form that you receive from your employer at 
the end of the year, you fill out your tax return; depending upon other income, exemptions, 
deductions, and other credits, you either pay more money or get money back

As you know, it’s more involved when it comes to filing taxes when you are a business owner 
instead of an employee.

Before we get into a deeper discussion about what’s involved, I’m going to share a couple of 
stories of why it’s always a good idea to keep on top of your taxes – especially as a business 
owner.

The first story is about Jim, a massage therapist who decided he would pocket most of his cash 
receipts instead of reporting it all to the government. Jim did fine for a few years. His massage 
therapy business prospered in spite of his unethical business practices. In fact, he did so well, he 
decided to expand into a larger space.

Doing so, however, meant that he needed to borrow money. So, he went to the bank and talked 
with a loan officer.

“We’d love to loan you some money,” the loan officer said after hearing Jim talk about how 
prosperous his business was. “Just bring in your income statement, balance sheet, and record of 
your business checking deposits over the past 2 years, so we can make sure that you can afford to 
repay the loan.”

Well, as it turns out, Jim’s books didn’t reflect his “prosperity,” because he had been hiding some
of his income. On paper he instead looked like a small­time operator. The loan was denied.

5
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Then, there’s the story of Becky, a massage therapist who put paying her estimated tax and end­
of­year taxes at the bottom of her to­do list. Although she was supposed to pay $2,000 per quarter
in estimated taxes, she spent the money on other things.

After a few years of penalties, late filing fees, and extended payment plans, the IRS had had 
enough. One day Becky went to her bank to withdraw $100 from her savings, but her savings 
were no more. The IRS had garnished her account to cover all of her outstanding late taxes, 
penalties and late fees.

Pair Share. Turn to a partner now and share two things: (1) a taxes horror story that you’ve heard
of (or experienced) and (2) a tax or record­keeping tip, such as a way to streamline your record 
keeping, deduct business­related expenses, or even the name of a good accountant that you know 
of.

Allow 3 minutes and then call time. Ask learners to switch. Call time after an additional 3 
minutes.

>>Debrief with the full group<<

Let’s hear about some of the tips that you all came up with.

>>Record all suggestions on the board – and discuss each<<

>>Ask a student to lead the class in a stretch<<

General Guidelines for Taxes. In order to avoid any of these bad situations, let’s talk about what
you need to do instead. 

If you are self­employed, or are an independent contractor, and if you earn more than $400 a year,
what must you do?

Look for: pay your own federal, state, FICA, Medicare and self­employment tax; file quarterly 
estimated taxes

When do you need to pay your quarterly estimated taxes?

Look for: April, June, September, January – using a 1040­ES form

If you are incorporated, you must also file a corporate tax return. 

6
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

What are the types of taxes you need to pay?

Look for: FICA, self­employment tax, profit & loss, sales tax

What are the forms you will need to fill out – for each of the three legal structures?

>>Write up the checklist below on the board (and referring to page 186 
in the text, define what each form is)<<

Sole Proprietorship Partnership Corporation


Form 1040­ES Form 1040­ES Form 1040­ES
Form 1040 Form 1040 Form 1040
Schedule C Schedule K1 Form 1120
Schedule SE Schedule SE
Form W2 – for any  Form W2 – for any  Form W2 – for any 
employees employees employees
Form 1099­MISC – for Form 1099­MISC – for Form 1099­MISC – for 
any payments >$600 to any payments >$600 to any payments >$600 to 
independent contractors independent contractors independent contractors
Form 2106  Form 2106  Form 2106 

What are the kinds of deductions you can claim?

Look for:
Office and massage­related supplies
Cost to acquire items
Subscriptions
Fees for professional assistance
Credit card fees
Bank account fees
Wages for employees and fees to independent contractors
Home office expenses
Insurance
Telecommunication charges
Computer service chares
License fees
Property tax, sales tax, business tax
Depreciation of fixed assets
Rent/mortgage payments
Utilities for office space

7
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
Linen and/or cleaning service
Uniforms
Gifts to clients
Travel expenses
Meals (limited)
Membership dues
Conference attendance fees
Continuing education fees
Books and resources

Debating the Pro and Cons of Using a Professional Accountant. Another profession that you 
discussed with your group about hiring for professional assistance was accounting. Let’s take a 
moment to talk briefly about the pros and cons of hiring the services of an accountant. While the 
text definitely leaned toward the pros of hiring an accountant, let’s take a moment to examine 
both sides.

Here are some questions to guide the discussion:

What do you think are the pros of hiring an accountant?
How about the cons, based both on the text and on your own experience?

>>Allow discussion to continue for a few minutes<<

Asking the Right Questions. Even if you’re planning to hire a professional accountant, it’s still 
important that you know the basics of taxes so that you can ask the right questions.

When you’re looking to hire an accountant, what are some questions that you should ask?

>>Record suggestions on the board<<

Some examples of questions to include:
Do you have any other massage therapists as clients?
What are your terms?
If I incorporate, how much do you charge for doing my quarterly books?
How should I set up my filing system?
What will I need to send to you and when?
Will I need to pay estimated tax?
How can I avoid being audited?

Role­Play. To practice this, let’s do a quick role­play. I’m going to play the role of the 
accountant. Who would like to volunteer to interview me?

8
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Set up the role­play. Place two chairs in the front of the room. The volunteer will play the 
interviewer and you will play the accountant. The rest of the class will observe.
 
>>Begin the role­play. Let the conversation continue for 5 to 8 minutes<<

>>Applaud the volunteer<<

Debrief the interviewer. Ask how he/she felt during the interview. Debrief with the full class. Are
there any other questions they might have added on? 

Wrap Up (5 minutes)

>>Go over homework<<

Read pages 187­210. Begin with “Client Records Management” and stop before “Time and 
Schedule Management.”
DUE DATE: Next class

>>Invite and answer questions before moving on<<

9
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

LESSON 3: Client Records Management & Insurance


Billing

Opening (5 minutes)

PPT­6 p.4 Lesson Objectives (Review objectives with students)

1. Describe the types of client records you must maintain. 
2. Describe the issues for and against accepting client insurance payments. 

Client Records Management (30 minutes)

Reference text pp. 187­197

In addition to keeping records about your money, you will also need to keep careful records of 
your clients. This begins with the client intake form.

>>Direct learners to Figure 6.16, pages 190­192<<

This is a sample form – which you can use as a template for creating your own client intake forms
for your practice.

What’s the purpose of a client intake form?

Look for:
Minimize malpractice liability
Clarify your professional boundaries
Clarify why client is seeking massage therapy

Key points to cover:
Informed consent agreement
Client release of information agreement
Financial responsibility
Record of client visits

Informed Consent Agreement. Informed consent agreements are basic to ethical standards 
within the profession of massage therapy.

How does this serve the client?

10
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
Look for: Protects the client’s right to have professional services, credentials, and products 
explained; supports their responsibility to respect the business practices of the professional and to 
actively participate in the healing process

How does this serve the massage therapist?

Look for: Protects their right to know information about the client to determine whether or not 
massage therapy is the correct therapeutic service; supports their responsibility to inform client of
benefits, limitations, contraindications, possible outcomes of work

>>Refer learners to Figure 6.17 on page 193 to view sample
 informed consent form (simplified)<<

SOAP Notes. What does SOAP stand for?

Look for: Subjective, Objective, Assessment and the Plan

SOAP notes were developed by Dr. Lawrence L. Weed in the 1970s and have become widely 
used in health care. SOAP notes provide a consistent, objective method of recording a massage 
client’s needs, the work provided in each session, and the client’s progress.

Why should a massage therapist bother with SOAP notes?

Answer: If the client is healthy and is seeking massage just for relaxation, your SOAP notes do 
not need to be as thorough. However, if a third­party insurer is paying for the massage therapy, or
if the client was referred to you by a licensed health­care provider, SOAP notes are necessary. 

In either case, it’s always a good idea to keep good records – using a system that is widely 
known. Another benefit of using SOAP notes, in fact, is that they help to bridge the gap between 
the field of massage therapy and the health­care community. If you speak their language, health­
care professionals are more likely to respect you. We’ll touch again on the importance of using 
the same language in Module 8 when we discuss forming professional relationships with allied 
industries.

Let’s break down each of the letters in SOAP.

Who is the actor in the “Subjective” step?

Answer: The client. This is where we record the client’s subjective complaints and functional 
goals, including symptoms and affected activities.

11
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
When does this step occur? Before the massage, during the massage, or after the massage?
Answer: Before the massage begins.

Who can give me an example of a client’s subjective complaint?

>>Acknowledge answers and correct any, if need be<<

Who is the actor in the “Objective” step?
Answer: The massage therapist’s objective findings and recommended plan.

When does this step occur?
Answer: Primarily it occurs before and during. It includes observations before the massage – or it
could occur during the massage, through palpation or range­of­motion testing.

Who is the actor in the “Assessment” step?
Answer: Both. The massage therapist is actually recording the client’s subjective change, such as
“My shoulder doesn’t hurt anymore.” Plus the massage therapist records his/her own assessment 
of objective changes.

When does this step occur?
Answer: After the particular area has been massaged or after the massage itself.

Who is the actor in the “Plan” step?
Answer: Primarily the massage therapist. The massage therapist generates both a plan for future 
care; as well as the client’s self­care plan (although the latter is dependent upon the client to 
actually execute the self­care plan).

>>Refer learners to Figure 6.19 on page 196 to view sample SOAP chart<<

>>Ask a student to lead the class in a stretch<<

Client Insurance Billing and Reimbursement (20 minutes)

Reference text pp. 197­210

Debating the Pro and Cons of Seeking Insurance Reimbursement

>>Referring to Figure 6.21 on page 198, engage learners in a brief discussion 
about the pros and cons of seeking insurance reimbursement<<

12
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Here are some questions to guide the discussion:

Referring to the pros and cons listed in Figure 6.21 on page 198, what do you think are the pros 
of seeking reimbursement?
How about the cons, based both on the text and on your own experience?

What would be your inclination as a business owner – to seek reimbursement or not?

>>Create a quick human graph – with those inclined to seek reimbursement 
on one side of the room and those disinclined to on the other side<<

Now, please convene with your group and decide whether or not the business that you are 
creating will or will not seek reimbursement.

>>Give groups a few minutes to discuss and then elicit a quick discussion<<

If your group has decided to seek insurance reimbursement, please stand – and then have a seat.

If your group has decided to not seek insurance reimbursement, please stand – and then have a 
seat.

Regardless of whether or not you decide to pursue insurance reimbursement, it’s important to 
know the terminology.

>>Review insurance reimbursement terminology, outlined in 
“Spotlight on Business” on page 203<<

What does each of these mean?
Assignment of benefits
Initial evaluation/reevaluation form
Payment agreement
Prescription
Release of records

>>Define each as a group<<

Learning how to work within the medical and health insurance system can be cumbersome, but 
let’s take a quick look at what a typical health insurance claim looks like.

13
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
>>Refer learners to Figure 6.23 on page 204 to view sample health insurance claim form<<

Remember that as a massage therapist, you are going to need to have professional liability 
insurance. What’s the standard in massage therapy?

>>Look for: $2 million per occurrence, with $6 million aggregate<<

There are a number of types of insurance coverage we should be familiar with as massage 
therapists, since these sometimes may be used to cover massage therapy services. What are these?

Look for:
Auto & personal injury
Workers’ compensation
Health insurance
Self­insured employer plans
Discount plans

>>Referring to pages 199­202, review each of these types of insurance<<

Any questions on any of these forms or types of insurance before we wrap up for the day?

>>Respond to questions or comments<<

Wrap Up (5 minutes)

>>Go over homework<<

Read pages 210­214. Begin with “Time and Schedule Management” and stop before “Human 
Resources Management.”
DUE DATE: Next class

>>Invite and answer questions before moving on<<

14
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

LESSON 4: Time & Schedule Management

Opening (5 minutes)

PPT­6 p.5 Lesson Objectives (Review learning objectives)

1. Identify effective time management tips.
2. Identify strategies for effective management of the work environment. 

Time Management (30 minutes)

Reference text pp. 210­211

Pair Share. Turn to a partner and share tips on how you manage your time, both personally and 
professionally. Each of you will get 2 minutes.

>>Call time after 2 minutes<<

>>Call for partners to switch and then call time after an additional 2 minutes<<

Now, based on your Pair Share discussion, I’d like the two of you together to draw up a list of 
suggested tips to manage time – both at home and at work. Just write these out on a regular piece 
of paper.

>>Allow 4 minutes for partners to create lists of tips.  After 4 minutes, ask for a sharing of
ideas with the full group.<<

>>Record tips on the board<<

Add on the following (if they are not already on the list):
Weekly activities list
ABC ranking
Scheduling
A­level tasks
B­and C­level tasks
Reevaluation

Training people on how to manage their time better is a multi­million dollar business. It largely 
comes down to creating systems that will work for you. This often involves a trial­and­error 
process. Once you find tricks that work for you, discipline yourself to follow these.

15
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Radical Time Management. Let’s do an activity to address this topic further. When it comes to 
time management, the usual way is to say to yourself, “First I’ll schedule all my work obligations.
Then, if (and only if) there’s time left over, I’ll squeeze in 10 minutes of fun.”

>>Set up the individual writing exercise<<

>>Ask everyone to get out a sheet of blank paper and pen<<

Here’s what I’d like you to. On your piece of paper, make 2 columns – the left one should be 
wide, and the right one should be narrow, just wide enough to put a number in it.

In the left column, write down all your current time commitments, including sleep. Every activity
that takes up some of your time. Imagine if someone were watching you from another planet – 
what would they see you doing?

In the right column, next to it, estimate how much time per week you currently spend on that 
commitment. It doesn’t matter in what order you write them. For instance, you might write:
“Wash, fold, and put away laundry – 1½ hours”
“Enter finances into Quicken – ½ hour”
“Work – 43 hours”
“Talk to mom – ½ hour”
“Sleep 7 hours/night – 49 hours”
“Shower and shave – 4 hours”
“Help Megan with her homework – 2 hours”

Draw a line at the bottom of your list when you’ve finished writing down every current 
commitment you can think of. Below the line, write down the things you wish you had time for 
but are currently not doing. Remember, the times are per week. Some of these activities may 
include personal self­care activities – that we discussed in Module 4. Effective time management,
as we touched on in Module 4, is one of the best tools to take care of ourselves – since it opens up
more time to engage in the kinds of activities that truly nourish us.

Perhaps you might write:
“Paint the kitchen – 6 hours”
“Do tai chi 15 minutes/day – 1½ hours”
“Write in my journal for 15 minutes/day – 1½ hours”

>>Direct learners to begin. Call time after 5 minutes<<

>>Distribute Radical Time Management Worksheet<<

16
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
HO 6­1
Now, here’s the radical part. Make out a schedule for the next week of your life.

1. Schedule sleep first. How much does your body need in order for you to feel vital, rested, and
happy? Fill it in.

2. Next, schedule the fun stuff – however, you define the fun stuff. While some people consider 
painting the kitchen a chore, others consider it a delight. You decide. If you want to do an 
hour of tai chi on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings, block out a 1­hour band on 
those days for that. If you want to go to a movie on Saturday night, block out time for that.

3. Next, schedule the activities that give your life meaning – however you define that. Maybe 
it’s volunteer work at a hospice, walking your dog, hanging out with your significant other, or
helping Megan with her homework.

4. Next, schedule the life maintenance items that are unavoidable – grocery shopping, getting a 
haircut, doing dishes, paying your bills, going to the doctor, buying stamps.

Give learners 5 to 10 minutes to fill out the schedule in class. Explain that they will turn in their 
Radical Time Management Worksheet at the beginning of next class – and will have a chance to 
talk further about it.

>>Call time after 5 to 10 minutes, depending upon how much time they seem to need<<

How much time is left in your week? Count up the hours.

>>Give learners a chance to count<<

How many hours do you have open in your schedule?

>>Ask learners to call out the number of hours>>

That’s how much time you have available to devote to your massage business.

Do you see any benefits to adopting this approach to managing your schedule?

>>Acknowledge all responses<<

Just as we discussed in Module 4, when we take time to engage in activities that nourish us and 
when we intentionally schedule these, then we become more effective when we are working. 

17
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
You’ll exude vitality instead of fatigue, and a keen ability to listen to your massage clients instead
of distractedness.

Do you think that this way of doing a schedule is realistic?

>>Acknowledge all answers<<

Personal Reflections. Let’s take a few minutes to reflect on this activity – and the concept of 
time management – in our journals. Use the following questions to guide your writing:

Again, what matters to you most in life?
How are you going to manage your time effectively so that you can continue to engage in 
activities that matter to you?
Especially given the time pressures you’ll face upon entering a new career, how are you going to 
manage your time?

>>Give learners a few minutes to write and then bring journal writing to a close<<

>>Elicit any comments afterwards<<

>>Ask a student to lead the class in a stretch<<

Appointment Schedules (10 minutes)

Reference text pp. 211­212

How many of you use some kind of scheduling system or device?

>>Acknowledge all answers<<

As a massage therapist, you’re going to not only keep a schedule of your own life – but you’re 
also going to need to keep a record of client appointments. What are different systems that you 
can use?

Answers could include: paper calendar, online calendar, appointment book

What’s important is that you keep track – and stay on top of your appointment schedule.

What are some tips to make scheduling easier?

18
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
Look for: Offer only two options, i.e., “Morning or afternoon?”; keep space in appointment book
to mark changes; use different colored pencils

Most often, the scheduling will take place over the phone. What are some tips to handling phone 
calls?

Look for:
Use voicemail.
Smile when leaving outgoing message – and listen to it before saving it.
Return calls within 24 hours.
Use an answering service.
Use software to allow clients to book online.
Mute ringer during appointments.
Hire a receptionist during busy hours.

The Automated Office (10 minutes)

Reference text pp. 212­214

What are some software packages that you know of that are specifically tailored to massage 
therapy businesses?

Look for: 
Customer Pro­File Massage Management Software 
Cassowary Massage Office Management Software
EasyTabs, For Independent Massage Therapists 
ManEdger Management Systems (Canada)
Massage Manager
Massage Office Professional

What are the common features of each of these?

Look for:
Client manager
Calendar scheduler
Expenses
Gift certificate
Supplier management
Reports
Mailing labels

19
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Now, taking a look at the “Real Touch” story on page 213, discuss with your group the level of 
automation you’re shooting for in the business you’re developing. As a group, read over the story 
– and then discuss what you think is best for your business. I’ll give you 5 minutes to discuss – 
and remember to take notes (and date it)!

Wrap Up (5 minutes)

>>Go over homework<<

Finish up your Radical Time Management Worksheet. 
DUE DATE: Next class

If your group has decided to go the automated route – or is even considering it, tonight, you’ll 
need to research the different software packages available. Look into pricing, available features 
and convenience. Be ready to present on what you found for the next class.
DUE DATE: Next class

Read pages 214­222. Begin with “Human Resources Management” and read through the end of 
the chapter.
DUE DATE: Next class

>>Invite and answer questions before moving on<<

20
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

21
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Lesson 5: HR Management, Being and Employee

Opening (10 minutes)

Pair Share. Let’s take a couple of minutes to share both the Radical Time Management schedule 
that you designed – along with your experience in trying it out between last class and this one. 
You’ll each get 2 minutes to share.

Direct learners to share thoughts with a partner. Call time after 2 minutes.
Switch. Call time after an additional 2 minutes.

>>Encourage any sharing out afterwards<<

PPT­6 p.6 Lesson Objectives (Review objectives with students)

1. Identify legal considerations that affect you if you have employees. 
2. Describe how your massage practice is like your own business even if you are not self­
employed.

Human Resources Management (20 minutes)

Reference text pp. 214­218

Establishing Employee Policies

HO 6­2 Convene with your group and using the Employee Policy Setting Worksheet, decide what the 
employee policies will be for your business.

>>Distribute Employee Policy Setting Worksheet – one per group<<

Allow groups to discuss for 5 minutes. Ask for a report out from each group.

I won’t be collecting these as homework. However, remember to (1) incorporate what you came 
up with in your business plan and (2) include this actual worksheet in the appendix to your 
group’s business plan. 

>>Ask a student to lead the class in a stretch<<

Being an Employee (10 minutes)

Reference text pp. 219­221

22
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

Even if you decide to be an employee as opposed to a business owner or independent contractor, 
you are still going to need to develop a similar skill set. 

What are some of the skills that are required, even as an employee?

Look for: managing client relationships, goal setting, abiding by laws and regulations

Whether you work for yourself – or someone else – you’re going to need to create a business plan
to follow. You already touched on a number of these when you filled out your Individual Career 
and Practice Planning Worksheet – and you are continuing to address all of these areas in 
working with your group in designing your business plan. But, let’s review each, briefly.

Review: 
Goals and objectives
Laws and regulations
Business structure
Services and products
Pricing and marketing
Physical space
Business policies and procedures
Hiring
Financial

Wrap Up (20 minutes)

HO 6­3 Insights From the Experts. As a way of wrapping up both today’s class – and in approaching 
the end of Module 6, let’s hear some words of wisdom from experts in the field. 

Allow learners to stay with their group.
Distribute one “quote slip” to each group.
Remind learners to assign roles, as always.

After the facilitator in your group reads the quote aloud, I’d like each group to engage in a 
discussion, addressing the following questions:

What are the main points? 
What do you think about their perspective? 
Do you agree? Why or why not?
Is there anything you would add on?
What are insights you gained by reading and discussing this quote?

23
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

As a group, take 3 minutes to discuss your quote – and then please be ready to share both the 
quote and 1 insight you gained by discussing the quote.

>>Go over homework<<

Review Chapter Six, in preparation for Chapter Quiz.
DUE DATE: Next class

>>Invite and answer questions before moving on<<

24
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

LESSON 6: Summary & Application

Opening (10 minutes)

Automated Office Software System Report Outs. Now, let’s hear a quick report out from each 
group about which system you decided to go with – giving us a quick overview as to why you 
selected this particular system.

>>Elicit a quick report from each group<<

PPT­6 p.7 Lesson Objectives (Review objectives with students)

1. Review key points in Module 6.
2. Demonstrate acquired knowledge with short quiz.
3. Apply knowledge by working on elements of Final Project.

Chapter Review (15 minutes)

>>Direct learners to the review questions at the end of Chapter 6, page 222<<

>>Lead a discussion on each of the questions. Possible answers are given below<<

Reference text p. 222

The chapter review questions provide an opportunity to refresh learners’ memories about their 
textbook reading. 

1. What basic financial business records and statements are relevant to the management of
a massage therapy practice?
­ Business records: budgets, ledgers, invoices, mileage log.
­ Financial statements: balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement.
­ Tax returns.

2. How could you handle collecting a bill from a client who is overdue in paying you?
­ Consider your options – and whether or not you’re better off financially to spend the time
with another client.
­ If the bill is large – contact a collection agency.
­ Wait to reschedule client until bill is paid in full.

3. What types of taxes does your business have to pay and when are they due?

25
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
­ FICA
­ Self­employment tax
­ Profit & loss
­ Sales tax
­ Quarterly taxes – due April, June, September, January

4. What are five business­related tax deductions you might be able to claim on your 
income tax return?
­ Office and massage­related supplies
­ Cost to acquire items
­ Subscriptions
­ Fees for professional assistance
­ Credit card fees
­ Bank account fees
­ Wages for employees and fees to independent contractors
­ Home office expenses
­ Insurance
­ Telecommunication charges
­ Computer service chares
­ License fees
­ Property tax, sales tax, business tax
­ Depreciation of fixed assets
­ Rent/mortgage payments
­ Utilities for office space
­ Linen and/or cleaning service
­ Uniforms
­ Gifts to clients
­ Travel expenses
­ Meals (limited)
­ Membership dues
­ Conference attendance fees
­ Continuing education fees
­ Books and resources

5. Name three advantages to hiring a professional accountant to assist you with financial 
and tax management.
­ Help you set up a financial record­keeping system.
­ Highlight areas of financial vulnerability so you can take corrective action before it’s too 
late.
­ Prevent your business from paying higher taxes than necessary.
­ Reduce your chances of being audited.
­ Free your time so you can spend it on giving massages.

26
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons

6. What client records are necessary to your massage practice?
­ Client intake form
­ Client informed consent agreement
­ SOAP notes
­ Client telephone log
­ Client visits and billing record

7. What communications strategies are appropriate for networking effectively and 
building relationships with other health care professionals in the care of shared clients?
­ Send letters of introduction.
­ Follow up with professionals.
­ Provide education about massage therapy licensure, training and experience, efficacy of 
massage.
­ Explain how you measure the success of your work. 

8. What are the pros and cons of accepting client insurance reimbursement?
Pros:
­ Provides access to potentially large client base.
­ Medically prescribed massage may be billed at higher rate.
­ More people could receive massage therapy, and more often.
­ May be required if you’re working in a hospital or clinic.
­ Increases access to those who wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford.
­ Opportunity to increase your knowledge base, especially if working with chronically ill 
or injured clients.

Cons:
­ Have to learn to work within medical system.
­ Thorough documentation required.
­ Requirements that need to be met, such as timeliness.
­ Type of care you provide may be dictated by insurance company or referring physician.
­ Denials, delays, adjustments and reductions often occur.
­ Can be daunting working with chronically ill or injured clients.

9. What factors should you consider when choosing the best method for clients to make 
appointments?
­ Depends upon complexity of your business.
­ Depends upon preference of clients.
­ Depends upon whether you have employees who are scheduling appointments.

10. What legal considerations affect your business if you have employees?
­ State and federal health laws

27
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
­ FICA taxes
­ Overtime pay
­ Federal/state unemployment taxes
­ Workers’ compensation insurance

11. How is managing a business you own similar to managing your massage practice as an 
employee of another company?
­ Still use many of the same skills, such as: managing client relationships, goal setting, 
abiding by laws and regulations.

Is there anything else that we discussed in this module that you’d like to review before we begin 
the quiz?

>>Respond to questions by facilitating a discussion,
encouraging learners to help each other in responding to these questions<<

Quiz 6  Quiz (10 minutes)

>>Distribute quiz. Give learners 5 minutes to complete<<

Collect quiz and explain that you will return them at the start of Module 7.

>>Ask a student to lead the class in a stretch<<

Application (25 minutes)

I am now going to give you time to meet with your group to continue working on your business 
plan. Having completed Modules 5 and 6, you have enough information and expertise to begin 
addressing the following additional sections of your group’s business plan:
“Organization and Management” 
“Financial Management”

Here’s a reminder of what each of these areas should cover: 

Organization and Management. This section should include the following:
Description of how your company is organized;
Description of the legal structure of the business; 
Identification and overview of required licenses and permits;
Brief bios of all key players in the company (everyone in your group).

28
Module 6 – Managing Your Practice
6 Lessons
After reviewing this section the reader should know how the company is organized, its legal 
structure, the roles that everyone plays in the company and an understanding of the flow of 
operations. 

Financial Management. This section should include the following:
Estimate of start­up costs, including one­time, annual and monthly expenses;
Projected revenue (one year forward)
After reviewing this section the reader should know your company’s financial projections.

Wrap Up (5 minutes)

>>Go over homework<<

Bring in magazines that have lots of great images. They don’t have to be related to massage 
therapy.
DUE DATE: Next class

Read pages 223­233. Begin with Chapter Overview and Objectives and stop before 
“Advertising.”
DUE DATE: Next class

>>Invite and answer questions before moving on<<

29