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JACKLYN E.

PARIÑAS- MST ENGLISH

Strategic interlink between industry and academe is a viable strategy to


address the challenges that most educational institutions are facing today.
Incorporating industry training and increasing the participation of industry
practitioners in academe work have proven to be very beneficial at increasing
efficiency, effectiveness and capacity building of the academe. HEI’s have
relative success at collaborating with industries in terms of curriculum
development. On the job consultancy (OJT) and consultancy are considered
determinants of the levels of engagement and must be explored by HEI’s to
achieve significant collaboration between the academic and the industry.

UNIVERSITY INDUSTRY COLLABORATION

WHAT IS UNIVERSITY INDUSTRY COLLABORATION?


It refers to any type of cooperation between universities and companies in
order to jointly develop services or improve existing services.

The collaboration between universities and the industry is increasingly


perceived as a vehicle to enhance innovation through knowledge exchange.

Strategic interlink between industry and academe is a viable strategy to


address the challenges that most educational institutions are facing today.
THREE TARGET AREAS FOR COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE
UNIVERSITY AND INDUSTRY
Collaboration for:
 knowledge development and growth - university participation in the
knowledge and innovation system
 better education- dialogue between universities and the surrounding
society on the content and scope of degree courses and external contacts
by students during their education
 democratic development- the work of universities on communicating
research for public education
In order for universities to secure access to economic resources for
research, increasingly strict demands will be placed on the benefit of this
research for commercial or other societal development in the short and long
term.
The universities nee to develop the capability of using the research
knowledge for new products or services.
To address the mismatch between industry needs and the quality of
graduates, there should be industry road maps, more one-to-one partnerships
between schools and companies, and the development of students’ general
competencies.
The focus should be on honing student’s competencies, including the
capacity to make ethical decisions, leadership, problem solving and basic
cognitive skills.
An internship was a way of developing human resources (HR). On-the-job
training of about six months would give the intern enough time to learn about
the industry and allow companies to decide if he/she should be hired. But, the
courses included internships should not as a strategy but to comply with
requirements. Studies show that students from schools in the provinces,
especially those in generic courses, found it hard to meet requirements.
Indeed, industry and the academe should be more involved in internships
and CHED should give local industry-academe partnerships more flexibility to
design courses relevant to their communities.