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“Time and Place can bring about a change in anyone or anything”.

Varahamihira, a great Indian astrologer said this.

Varahamihira

One of those nine precious gems in the court of Vikramaditya:

Astrologer, astronomer and mathematician, Mihira or Daivajna Mihira, became famous as


Varaha Mihira (499-587 CE).

He was amongst the Navarathnas(nine jewels) in the court of King Vikramaditya


(Chandragupta II - Gupta dynasty)of Ujjain.

Accuracy in predictions:

Mihira was accurate in his astrological predictions and predicted that King Vikramditya’s 18
year old son would be killed by a Varaha or a wild boar. He had also predicted the time as
5pm in the evening. Upon hearing these predictions from Mihira, King Vikramaditya gave
orders to construct a special and secure palace for the royal prince.

After the construction , as many as 10,000 troops were on high alert to meet any eventuality
within and outside the palace area. Not even a rat was allowed to sneak in. Such was the
security.

On the fateful day, Mihira was told to rethink of his predictions. People started doubting
Mihira’s ability of foretelling. But he was firm in his words. Prince was seen happily playing
with other children on the seventh floor of the palace where he used to be like a person
under house arrest. But when the fateful time came, he went upstairs and to the open
terrace. Meanwhile everyone thought Mihira would soon lose his recognition as astrologer.
Mihira told the King that the prince had died and was lying in a pool of blood.

Everyone rushed to the terrace when the time was 6pm, only to see the prince lying in a pool
of blood. No one knew why the boy went there to play. Prince was disfigured by the iron
hooves of the artificial metal boar, the Royal Emblem attached to the flag staff. King honored
and gave him the title Varahamihira for his accuracy in astrology.

Brihat Jataka of Varahamihira Book Description


Birhat Jatak from time immemorial has been considered as the standard textbook on
Astrology. The English translation of Varahamihira`s Brihat Jataka is a monumental
work in completing which the difficulties in translating a beautiful, technical and
suggestive work in sanskrit had to surmounted by hard labour, profound research
and want of adequate expressions.

It is not mere a translation work; the ripe experience of Mr. Rao for over 60 years in
the field of Astrology and his sound judgment on doubtful points have substantiated
its value further.

Brihat Jataka of Varaha Mihira
by Var Hamihira

1,203


The Brihat Jataka of Varaha Mihira
by Varhamihira

1,259


The Brihat Jataka of...
by N Chidambaram Aiyar

1,447

Book Your Pooja


Poojas Introduction
Our knowledge of Varahamihira is very limited indeed. According to one of his works, he was
educated in Kapitthaka. However, far from settling the question this only gives rise to discussions
of possible interpretations of where this place was. Dhavale discusses this problem. We do not
know whether he was born in Kapitthaka, wherever that may be, although we have given this as
the most likely guess. We do know, however, that he worked at Ujjain which had been an
important centre for mathematics since around 400 AD. The school of mathematics at Ujjain was
increased in importance due to Varahamihira working there and it continued for a long period to
be one of the two leading mathematical centres in India, in particular having Brahmagupta as its
next major figure. The most famous work by Varahamihira is the Pancasiddhantika (The Five
Astronomical Canons) dated 575 AD. This work is important in itself and also in giving us
information about older Indian texts which are now lost. The work is a treatise on mathematical
astronomy and it summarises five earlier astronomical treatises, namely the Surya, Romaka,
Paulisa, Vasistha and Paitamaha siddhantas. Shukla states in The Pancasiddhantika of
Varahamihira is one of the most important sources for the history of Hindu astronomy before the

The Great Compilation) discusses topics such as [1]:- Descriptions of heavenly bodies, their
movements and conjunctions, meteorological phenomena, indications of the omens these
movements, conjunctions and phenomena represent, what action to take and operations to
accomplish, sign to look for in humans, animals, precious stones, etc. Varahamihira made some
important mathematical discoveries. Among these are certain trigonometric formulas which
translated into our present day notation correspond to
sin x = cos(p/2 - x),
sin2x + cos2x = 1, and
Another important contribution to trigonometry was his sine tables where he improved those of
Aryabhata I giving more accurate values. It should be emphasised that accuracy was very
important for these Indian mathematicians since they were computing sine tables for applications
to astronomy and astrology. This motivated much of the improved accuracy they achieved by
developing new
interpolation methods. The Jaina school of mathematics investigated rules for computing the
number of ways in which r objects can be selected from n
objects over the course of many hundreds of years. They gave rules to compute the binomial
coefficients nCr which amount to
nCr= n(n-1)(n-Another important contribution to trigonometry was his sine tables where he
improved those of Aryabhata I giving more accurate values. It should be emphasised that
accuracy was very important for these Indian mathematicians since they were computing sine
tables for applications to astronomy and astrology. This motivated much of the improved
accuracy they achieved by developing new
interpolation methods. The Jaina school of mathematics investigated rules for computing the
number of ways in which r objects can be selected from n
objects over the course of many hundreds of years. They gave rules to compute the binomial
coefficients nCr which amount to
nCr= n(n-1)(n-2)...(n-r+1)/r! 2)...(n-r+1)/r!