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Revision Guide

MA20219 Analysis 2B

2016-2017

Note: Chapter 3 of the lecture notes is not examinable.


Even though it is indicated below that some things from the lecture notes will not be explicitly
asked as bookwork (since they are not listed below), you are expected to be able to use them
(example: you do not have to explicitly formally state the relation between the derivative and the
Jacobian matrix, but you have to be able to use that relation; as another example: I will not ask
you to provide a counterexample to equality of mixed second partial derivatives, but when given a
function in the exam you should be able to show that it indeed constitutes a counterexample; also,
you should be aware that such a counterexample exists).
When a definition or a statement of a theorem is asked, it is expected that you write this down
as in the lecture notes [possibly in a slightly different but equivalent formulation] with in particular
all conditions clearly formulated.
When a proof is asked for, it is expected that you write down what appears as the proof in the
lecture notes [what is between the word “proof” and the end of proof sign] possibly abbreviated;
however all the key steps must be there and the proof that you give must be coherently written.
If in a proof another result is referenced then: (i) if that result has a name, you should refer to it
by name; (ii) if that result doesn’t have a name, then you can simply write “by a result from the
lectures” rather than giving a reference to a specific numbered result in the lecture notes.

Definitions

• Definition 1.3 (directional derivative)

• Definition 1.12 (differentiable)

• Definition 1.43 (twice differentiable)

• Definition 2.1 (complex differentiable)

• Definition 2.7 (holomorphic)

• Definition 2.32 (star-shaped)

• Definition 2.36 (analytic)

• Definition 2.45 (entire)

• Definition 2.47 (winding number function)

• Definition 2.57 (residue) [note that this was corrected on 2 May]

1
Statement of Theorems

• Theorem 1.25 (chain rule)

• Theorem 1.26 (mean value theorem)

• Corollary 1.30 (mean value inequality)

• Theorem 1.50 (symmetry of second derivative)

• Theorem 1.55 (second order Taylor formula)

• Theorem 1.61 (necessary conditions for minimum/maximum)

• Theorem 1.62 (sufficient conditions for minimum/maximum)

• Theorem 2.5 (Cauchy–Riemann theorem)

• Theorem 2.27 (Fundamental Theorem of complex integration)

• Theorem 2.33 (Cauchy’s Theorem for a star-shaped open set)

• Theorem 2.46 (Liouville’s Theorem)

• Theorem 2.59 (Residue Theorem)

Proofs

• Remark 1.15 (differentiability implies continuity)


[The proof is the part of the first sentence of the remark which follows “since”]

• Proposition 1.16 (relation between derivative and directional derivatives)

• Proposition 1.22 (differentiability and component functions)

• Theorem 1.55 (second order Taylor formula)

• Theorem 1.61 (necessary conditions for minimum/maximum)

• Theorem 1.62 (sufficient conditions for minimum/maximum)

• Theorem 2.5 (Cauchy–Riemann theorem)

• Theorem 2.27 (Fundamental Theorem of complex integration)

• Theorem 2.31 (Cauchy’s Theorem for a triangle)

• Theorem 2.38 (analyticity of a certain integral)

• Theorem 2.46 (Liouville’s Theorem)

• Theorem 2.56 (Cauchy’s Theorem: homology version)

2
Counterexamples

• Remark 1.27 (counterexample to “naive” vector-valued mean value theorem)

Problem sheet questions which may be asked verbatim or a variation on them might be
asked: 1,2,3,6,7,8,9,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,29 and 30 [with 28 given],31,33,34,35,36,38 [with
37 given],39,40,41,42,43,44

There will also be “unseen” questions

Some advise for learning the proofs

• Identify the key ideas in the proof (depending on the complexity of the proof, this may be
1,2,3 or perhaps 4 things).

• Make sure that from these key ideas you can reconstruct an essentially complete proof.

• Learn only these key ideas and trust that on the exam you can reconstruct an essentially
complete proof from these.

The marking of proof questions on the exam will focus on:

• are the key ideas there;

• is the proof coherently written;

• are the details correct.

Partial credit will be given.